35 Burst results for "Grant"

Rep. Maxine Waters Resorts to Racism Excuse Against 'Evil' GOP

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:36 min | 2 d ago

Rep. Maxine Waters Resorts to Racism Excuse Against 'Evil' GOP

"She was talking with Jonathan K part on MSNBC. Want you to hear what she had to say. The American people are going to be able to distinguish between us and them. And in the final analysis, we're going to win. We're going to beat them. We don't take anything for granted. We know that they're evil. We know that they lie. We know that they don't give a dawn about facts. And so we've got to overcome that with the truth. They're evil. I mean, that's a strong word of evil. Oh, worse than that. Worse than that. Evo. When you see the kind of attacks that you have talked about already, that's constantly being made by them. That's evil. And I want you to know, I'm under attack also. They tried to send to me. And of course, we beat them back with our slight majority that we have. And even, you know, Marjorie Taylor Greene, I believe, has something up to expel me from the Congress of the United States. Can you imagine people with this kind of attitude? And these kinds of actions. And this kind of racism that they just play all the time. Talking about expelling me or anybody else from Congress when, in fact, they shouldn't even be there. Yeah. I love that racism. You know, they want to expel you because you're black, right? Maxine? What is worse than evil, I wonder? What's worse than evil? I don't even know what worse than evil would be. I guess maybe just a Democrat.

Jonathan K Msnbc Marjorie Taylor Greene Congress United States Maxine
Why Kyle Rittenhouse Should've Never Gone to Trial

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:27 min | 2 d ago

Why Kyle Rittenhouse Should've Never Gone to Trial

"Where my brain goes with this stuff, it's sort of like saying Supreme Court declares one plus one equals two. And everybody cheers. And there's a side of me that says, why are we cheering? Like we know one plus one equals two. The only horror is that we needed to hear what the Supreme Court said on it as though they didn't themselves know that one plus one equals two. At that point right now. Roger Kimball wrote a brilliant column about this. Kyle rittenhouse, that should case never have gone to trial. We had high definition video of leftist thugs chasing them through the streets yelling, kill him, kill him, kill him. We had video of someone clubbing him with a skateboard. We had video of someone pointing a gun at him. When he shot those three psychotics, one of whom was a pedophile. It was obviously self defense. He was even this. This is like my brain explodes. You say one of whom was a pedophile. Okay, a child rapist. Now, if you're following the news, many people already know this. But I think it bears repeating since we've not addressed this issue. Talking about things that are so confusing. In other words, it's not an issue of Kyle rittenhouse is chased by some people or whatever. The people chasing him are the sort of characters that anybody would say are super bad people. Not anybody Eric, not anybody, the mainstream media were to say calling them heroes. A Democrat legislator saying, they were a group of heroes. They were antiracist activists and Kyle rittenhouse cross state lines illegally with an AR-15 attack. Assault weapon and killed them. None of which is true. They will have no we know, don't take for granted or the old maybe your listeners don't know this because you're the only person saying it. If they read MS MSN, if they watch NBC, if they watch CNN, they don't know any of this. They think he was a white nationalist who carried a gun across state lines and murdered people. None of which is true. He didn't carry a gun across state lines. He shot himself defense. He wasn't a white nationalist. They were white communist thugs trying to murder him trying to burn down a used car dealership of some small businessman.

Kyle Rittenhouse Supreme Court Roger Kimball Eric NBC CNN
Biden vaccine rule for health workers blocked in 10 states

AP News Radio

01:01 min | 2 d ago

Biden vaccine rule for health workers blocked in 10 states

"A a week week before before the the deadline deadline for for mandatory mandatory vaccines vaccines of of federal federal judges judges blocked blocked the the bike bike did did ministration ministration from from requiring requiring millions millions of of health health care care workers workers to to get get coded coded shots shots ten ten state state to to challenge challenge the the president's president's healthcare healthcare worker worker vaccine vaccine mandate mandate affecting affecting millions millions of of workers workers in in seventy seventy six six thousand thousand facilities facilities like like nursing nursing homes homes and and home home care care agencies agencies that that receive receive funding funding from from Medicare Medicare or or Medicaid Medicaid the the ten ten states states led led mostly mostly by by Republicans Republicans were were granted granted a a preliminary preliminary injunction injunction by by a a federal federal judge judge in in St St Louis Louis who who said said the the centers centers for for Medicare Medicare and and Medicaid Medicaid had had no no clear clear authority authority from from Congress Congress to to enact enact a a vaccine vaccine mandate mandate and and was was overstepping overstepping its its power power Missouri's Missouri's Attorney Attorney General General spearheaded spearheaded the the lawsuit lawsuit and and accuses accuses the the administration administration of of using using the the corona corona virus virus as as a a tool tool for for control control over over people people another another Cordy Cordy placed placed a a freeze freeze on on another another administration administration rule rule that that would would require require businesses businesses with with more more than than a a hundred hundred workers workers to to either either mandate mandate vaccines vaccines or or conduct conduct weekly weekly testing testing I'm I'm Jackie Jackie Quinn Quinn

St St Louis Louis Centers Centers For For Medica Congress Administration Administration Missouri Medicare Cordy Cordy Jackie Jackie Quinn Quinn
The Left Only Wants You to Talk About Vaccine and Mask Mandates

The Dan Bongino Show

01:15 min | 2 d ago

The Left Only Wants You to Talk About Vaccine and Mask Mandates

"It's not overly complicated They want big government small individuals That's why you're only allowed to talk about two things according to left with the coronavirus You're only allowed to talk about vaccine mandates because it empowers them to tell you what to do and mask mandates because it empowers them and tells you what to do The fact that the vaccines are not working like they told us they would work The fact that masks haven't worked at all he's totally irrelevant That's why arguing the data with them is ridiculous Well forget the left I give you the data for you for the benefit of you in your own family I don't give you the data on masks and vaccines because I think I'm gonna convince a leftist These people aren't interested in the truth They're interested in advancing the power football down to the big government end zone and away from the individual liberty end zone Period full stop By the way breaking news Federal district court grants an injunction halting Joe Biden's vaccine mandate for Medicare and Medicaid certified providers and suppliers in several states including Missouri Iowa and New Hampshire That's an election with just broke that So this vaccine mandate is not doing well in the courts because Joe Biden has no authority to do it through osha and he knows that It is a workaround There are no workarounds in the constitution ladies and gentlemen That's the point of a constitution It's not meant to be a

Federal District Court Joe Biden Football Medicare New Hampshire Missouri Iowa Osha
Ingratitude Leads to Tragedy

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:31 min | Last week

Ingratitude Leads to Tragedy

"Dare I say Thanksgiving is a threat to the left? The ethos of it is, of course it is. Now I'm not saying that every leftist is going to boycott Thanksgiving tomorrow. I'm sure they're going to enjoy pie in Turkey. But do you think that the discussion amongst a true leftist tomorrow? It's going to be one of wonder and adoration and respect and appreciation or one about complaining, one about forming coalitions to change things. Now, trust me, I'm not saying that we don't have to fix anything in this nation. What I am saying, though, is that the awe and wonder of the citizen led checked and balanced, independent judiciary consent to the governed system that we live in. Granted from God, not by government is one that every person should be in awe and wonder of tomorrow. And of course, thankful for family, thankful for getting through the last couple of years. Every bad idea. That is currently being discussed on the international stage. Every bad idea that killed over a 100 million people was rooted in ingratitude. Do you think Joseph Stalin was a thankful man? Do you think Mao Zedong was a thankful man? Do you think Benito Mussolini was a thankful man? In gratitude, leads to tragedy.

Turkey Joseph Stalin Mao Zedong Benito Mussolini
Energy Secretary Doesn't Know How Much Energy Americans Need

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:36 min | Last week

Energy Secretary Doesn't Know How Much Energy Americans Need

"Biden authorized the President Biden authorized the use of the strategic oil reserve yesterday to combat U.S. gasoline prices. It's a fade. It's a fake. Three 50 million barrels of oil sounds like a lot. The strategic oil reserve is for dire national security emergencies. Donald Trump filled it up to the brim, and President Biden had taken up 50 million barrels to make a gesture. It may have a little tiny impact on three days of gas. Three days of gas prices. That's what it is. No other nations are Tapping into their oil reserves and a collective effort to bring it down, not going to work. The kind of amount of oil we consume in the world is one of those pieces of data that nobody really knows. It's so astonishing, high. Except maybe the secretary of the energy, right? The energy will know. How much oil we can. Let's go to her number two energy secretary Jennifer grant on The White House press yesterday. How much oil do we consume? Do you know how many barrels of oil does the U.S. consume per day? I don't have that number in front of me. Some suggest it's about 18 million, which would suggest your releasing less than three days worth of supply from the petroleum reserve. Why is that enough? It isn't enough. Not knowing, by the way, not knowing how many barrels of oil, the United States consumes every day. Why in the world would we believe the secretary grant on those? And if Rick Perry had done that, remember Rick couldn't remember the three agencies when he himself was on painkillers. She'd be if it had been him. He'd be roasted with the turkeys by

Biden Strategic Oil Reserve President Biden Jennifer Grant Donald Trump U.S. Petroleum Reserve White House Rick Perry Rick
Herro leads Heat past Pistons 100-92 with 4th-quarter rally

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last week

Herro leads Heat past Pistons 100-92 with 4th-quarter rally

"Tyler hero had thirty one points and eight rebounds in the heats one hundred ninety two comeback win over the pistons Miami trail by nine before opening the fourth quarter on a twenty seven six Ron heroes back to back three pointers cut the deficit to seventy seven seventy four Jimmy Butler and bam Adebayo each provided fifteen points nine boards in the heats fifth win in six games Kyle Lowry added fifteen points eight assists and six boards for Miami Detroit led fifty three forty seven at halftime before finishing one and four on its five game homestand Jeremy grant had twenty one points and seven boards for the pistons I'm the ferry

Pistons Miami Ron Heroes Jimmy Butler Bam Adebayo Tyler Kyle Lowry Jeremy Grant Detroit Miami Pistons
What's Actually in the House-Passed Build Back Better Bill?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:14 min | Last week

What's Actually in the House-Passed Build Back Better Bill?

"So what is in this bill? This is according to breitbart dot com. They do a wonderful job. House passes behemoth build back better act. Funds, Biden's banking surveillance apparatus, the bill would spend $500 million to hire new Department of Justice tax division surveillance agents to bring civil and criminal cases against Americans if we're not rating enough homes right now. It removes any prohibition regarding Uyghur Muslims in China, Democrats have removed the provision of the previous draft that would have prohibited any funding, provided by title and science spacer technology award a contract subcontract grant or loan to an entity involved with using the forced labor of Uighur Muslims. How about tax pork for trial lawyers? This provision modifies current law expensing rules to allow plaintiff's attorneys to deduct out of pocket litigation costs in the year they are incurred. How about number 6? This is a fun one. The build back better act would add language, creating a tax credit for wages paid to journalists. That's what we need. We need more New York Times reporters. The bill would add $500 million. $500 million. That's the annual operating budget of Pittsburgh every single year to give you an idea. The whole city. For schools of medicine, prioritizing funding, based on racial demographics, and requiring faculty to be hired and students be recruited based on prioritizing racial and demographic characteristics. How about left wing divisive race baiting? This bill with add back language that continues the race baiting attempts. As Americans is oppressive claiming all minorities are denied a full opportunity to participate in the American way of life that's a direct quote out of the bill. That all minorities are denied a full opportunity from participating in American life. There's $2.5 billion for tree equity. It'd be a $2.5 billion slush fund that would send taxpayer dollars to radical environmental groups to plant trees and advance tree equity. The bill asks for hundreds of millions of dollars to promote funding for racism and discrimination training curriculum, funding for healthcare risk training to promote the lips climate agenda and refers to pregnant women as

Department Of Justice Tax Divi Biden China New York Times Pittsburgh
Rep. Jim Jordan: Republicans Have to Win the Next Midterm to Turn Country Around

Mark Levin

01:56 min | Last week

Rep. Jim Jordan: Republicans Have to Win the Next Midterm to Turn Country Around

"It's obviously this is a kamikaze party because they feel they're going to lose in 2022 I don't talk that way because I want our people to come out and fight like we're behind I don't take anything for granted what these people do That's the right answer Yeah And so they're like a kamikaze party They think okay we've got two years We control the government Let's get everything in We have It's like ObamaCare So we'll lose a cycle will lose two cycles but we're setting in place for enshrining forever our agenda Here's my concern This is supposed to be a republic So the Democrats it's 50 50 in the Senate And by the quirk of the constitution they have the vice presidents who can break a tie They want today effectively by three or four votes And so they can fundamentally alter our economic system our immigration system our governing system Fundamentally altered Here's my question to you That's not what a republic is supposed to be about in one election We can't win every election Congressman So every election where they're in a majority they're going to be able to turn this country inside out That's what they're up to When we win it back we're going to have to turn it right side up We're going to have to put things back in the property And yes we will We have to We have to And look I think it's growing I mean I think mom's a dad showing up at school board meetings What happened in Virginia What happened in the rittenhouse case where again if that wasn't self defense I don't know what is Where the due process the system our court system it worked and freedom mattered and that stand up for the second all those things So I think it's going to come back in the right direction and Republicans Now again I'm like you I don't take anything for granted and we got to work hard to make sure we win next year but when we do I think we're going to stop everything that we can and then we're going to reelect Donald Trump as president in 24 and get a chance to put the country back on

Senate Rittenhouse Virginia Donald Trump
CRFB, Rep. Jim Banks Break Down the Consequences of Democrats $5T Bill

Mark Levin

01:37 min | Last week

CRFB, Rep. Jim Banks Break Down the Consequences of Democrats $5T Bill

"The committee for a responsible federal budget found that the legislation cost as much as 4.91 trillion over ten years That's 5 trillion Congressman Jim banks who is very solid chairman of the Republican study committee's catalog many of the most radical policy So in addition to massive spending which will leave the further mass of inflation It's not the oil companies creating inflation ladies in general They couldn't do it if they wanted to It's the American Marxist Innovation killing socialist price controls the bill would institute government price setting of prescription drugs which are shown to be likely to lead the significantly decreased private investment in new cures page one 9 7 7 Funds Biden's banking surveillance apparatus The bill would spend half a $1 billion to hire new Department of Justice tax division agents to bring civil and criminal cases against Americans like you page 8 78 Remember was funding prohibition regarding Uyghur Muslims in China Democrats have removed a provision in the previous draft of the reconciliation bill Page one zero 8 two which prohibited any funding provided by the title on science based technology to award a contract subcontract grant alone to an entity involved with using the forced labor of the Uyghur Muslims and Xi Jiang province in China This would remove the protections Preventing taxpayer dollars from going to entities using Uyghur Muslim slaves in China

Congressman Jim Banks American Marxist Innovation Bill Would Institute Governmen Republican Study Committee Department Of Justice Tax Divi Biden China Xi Jiang
United Airlines Pilot Placed on Unpaid Leave After Being Granted Exemption From Vaccine Mandate

The Charlie Kirk Show

03:12 min | Last week

United Airlines Pilot Placed on Unpaid Leave After Being Granted Exemption From Vaccine Mandate

"I am going to be joined in this segment by captain sherry walker and captain Dave Morgan of airline employees for health freedom. They happen to be United Airlines pilots, and they are pretty good at what they do. 7 87 international 7 67, these guys are experts. They keep us safe. They make the skies friendly. They get us from point a to point B and now they are going to tell us their story about their experience with these vax mandates that have been spreading across the country. There is news today that osha has now at least temporarily sidelined this plan of vax mandates, pending circuit court, judgments that have fully put a stop to it, at least for the time being. So we're going to keep monitoring that. Dave Morgan, thank you so much for joining us, captain sherry walker. Thank you so much for joining us. Tell us a little bit about what you guys have been going through the floor is yours. I've got some tape, by the way, that we can play at some point in the segment of the CEO of United. I know you're not speaking on behalf of United here, but I do have, I think it's partner to what we're discussing. So I do want to get to that, but tell us what you've been going through. Tell us a little bit about your background. Are you guys getting paid right now? I went on unpaid leave a week ago on Friday. I'm a pilot for United Airlines. I was hired in continental airlines in 1998, so I've been here 23 and a half years. We've spent many years out in the island of Guam for Micronesia and three years ago, just before the pandemic, we moved from Guam to the great state of Arizona, and I'm on a fly 7 87 out of San Francisco. Pandemic came down the pipe and we pressed on. We are the front lines that we're willing to do whatever it took. What we are team of many, many people, and I'm just representing I'm a voice representing thousands who I wish also could have this opportunity to speak. But we work through this thing. And with a really can do cooperative spirit of let's get through this because I was also a pilot during 9 11. I remember that vividly. We worked through that. And then suddenly, on the back side of this, here comes this vaccine mandate. And those of us who pressed on and made the wheels turn airplanes fly, the people who were able to fly for point a to we were there to get them there. And all of a sudden, Scott Kirby says, we're not safe anymore. You're done. So as of last Friday, I've been placed on unpaid leave, and they've basically cut my cord. I have no insurance, no benefits. I can't retire. I have no access to anything. They have shut me down and to make it worse. I can't pass travel. I can't even jump seat on other airline jump seats. So I'm scrambling right now to see what I'm going to do with insurance. I have three boys, 12, 16 and

Captain Sherry Walker Captain Dave Morgan Airline Employees For Health F United Airlines Dave Morgan Guam Osha Circuit Court Micronesia Pandemic United Scott Kirby Arizona San Francisco
Judge exonerates two men convicted in 1965 killing of Malcolm X

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | Last week

Judge exonerates two men convicted in 1965 killing of Malcolm X

"The charges have been dismissed against two of the men found guilty in the slaying of civil rights leader Malcolm X. in a New York courtroom Manhattan district attorney Cyrus Vance junior declared that Mohammad Aziz and Khalil Islam did not get a fair trial in nineteen sixty six because evidence that would've cleared them was deliberately withheld orders on the record J. Edgar Hoover himself the FBI Wilson this is not to tell police or prosecutors have anymore in fact FBI informant the judge granted the request conditionally vacated Mohammad Aziz who was paroled with his co defendant in the eighties hopes the criminal justice system that unfairly put him in jail makes restitution the same system that responsible for this travesty of justice all of the responsibilities he cites racism behind his prosecution and conviction for the

Mohammad Aziz Malcolm X. Cyrus Vance Khalil Islam FBI J. Edgar Hoover Manhattan New York Wilson
Julius Jones' family begs for clemency as execution nears

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last week

Julius Jones' family begs for clemency as execution nears

"Hours before he was slated to die convicted killer Julius Jones has been granted clemency in Oklahoma Oklahoma governor Kevin Stitt used his authority to spare the life of Julius Jones just hours before his scheduled execution there's been a public outcry over doubts about Jones is guilty in the slaying of a businessman more than twenty years ago during a car jacking the governor commuted the death sentence to life imprisonment without parole Jones says he was framed by the actual killer who had been a high school friend Oklahoma's Attorney General says he respects the governor's decision to grant clemency but he's convinced Jones is guilty the case was featured in a twenty eighteen documentary the last defense produced by actress viola Davis I'm

Julius Jones Kevin Stitt Oklahoma Jones Viola Davis
US, China ease restrictions on journalists

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 weeks ago

US, China ease restrictions on journalists

"China and the US have agreed to ease restrictions on each other's journalists amid a slight easing of tensions between the two sides the announcement in the official China daily newspaper says the agreement was reached ahead of Tuesday's virtual summit between Chinese leader xi Ching paying I'm president Joe Biden limits on media workers the fuel tensions between the two countries for more than a year under the agreement the U. S. will issue one year multiple entry visas to Chinese Janice the report says China will reciprocate by granting equal treatment once the US policies take effect on

Xi Ching China Daily China Joe Biden United States U. Janice
Pfizer agrees to let other companies make its COVID-19 pill

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 weeks ago

Pfizer agrees to let other companies make its COVID-19 pill

"Drugmaker Pfizer has signed a deal with a U. N. backed group to allow other manufacturers to make its experimental pelvic nineteen pale the move could help make the treatment available to more than half of the world's population in a statement FISA says it would grant a license for the anti viral paled to the medicines patent pool the agreement that's generic drug companies make the build the use in ninety five countries but excludes some large manufacturers with manufacturing capacity already health officials say the fact that the deal was struck before physis pill has been authorized anywhere could help end the pandemic more quickly I'm Charles the last month

Pfizer Fisa Charles
Let the Tone-Deaf Democrats Dig Their Own Graves

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:01 min | 2 weeks ago

Let the Tone-Deaf Democrats Dig Their Own Graves

"A moment. I want to speak to the idea that 2022 is going to be a landslide. Don't take anything for granted. A lot could happen between now and then. A lot could happen between now and 2022, but I like her chances. I like what the Democrats are doing to themselves. I like what leftist media folks like Jen Rubin are doing to themselves. There is a tone deafness to them the likes of which I've never seen in my life. I mean, do you know there are actually trying to say that 4.4 million workers quitting in the month of September is a good sign. They're actually saying that inflation is okay because we can all afford it. The desperate, they're afraid they're in denial, and they're not listening to the American people. And from a political standpoint, I'm fine

Jen Rubin
Fox's Brian Kilmeade Discusses His New Book 'The President and the Freedom Fighter'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:34 min | 2 weeks ago

Fox's Brian Kilmeade Discusses His New Book 'The President and the Freedom Fighter'

"I'm talking to Brian kill me, you may know him from fox and friends, but he's written a lot of books. This one is called the president and the freedom fighter Abraham Lincoln Frederick Douglass in their battle to save America's soul. America soul could use a little saving right now. But we're not going to talk about that. What made you want to write a book combining these two figures? Well, I was looking for the last time I was here. You kind enough to interview me about Sam Houston, the Alamo Avengers. So I try to find an angle not plowed and the Alamo is, but San jacinto isn't 9 months later he ends up taking him out as San jacinto beating Santa Anna in 17 minutes because Texans know it, but the rest of the world. So I go, what's next? The Mexican war, I didn't think had enough. My opinion, I'm sure there's a lot there with Lee in the quartermaster grant and the fact that these generals fought on the same side and then years later, they'd be trying to kill each other and a lot of them successfully. I said, all right, the Civil War. What could I do that's not plowed ground from Ken burns a series to the remarkable book, David blight wrote about Frederick Douglas Scott? I think the book of the year, 5 years ago. And then what about Lincoln? I literally you and I gave the same situation. We get books about linking to our desks all the time, and they're all great. I'm waiting for nobody who's written been written about more. It's like maybe three people like who've written about Napoleon Jesus, Lincoln. I mean, I don't know how many books have been written about Lincoln. So yeah, what do you do for a fresh angle on the Civil War? So what I wanted to do is also I didn't mind tackling race, but I wanted to do it through quotes, not opinion. And racist never left the news, Black Lives Matter is raging at the time. And then you have you have a situation where as late as Condoleezza and rice Condoleezza Rice on the view, having to defend herself growing up in a Jim Crow south who knew all about racism, but grew up as his conservatives says, don't ever let it be an excuse. So I said, what have I talk about their parallel lives to the degree in which they read a lot of the same books? Did they overcame incredible obstacles? Nothing like Frederick Douglass. I get it. The guy was enslaved until he was in his 20 years old, two tries, got out in the second time within 7 years has a biography. It's a bestseller, and then starts a world tour and becomes famous in Scotland, Ireland, Germany, and England. This guy was a slave ten years before, but decides to come back to America because his 4 million enslaved 350,000 slave owners and he sees potential in this guy Lincoln and the Republican Party that we're finally ready to do

Abraham Lincoln Frederick Doug San Jacinto Alamo Avengers David Blight Frederick Douglas Scott Lincoln America Santa Anna Sam Houston Napoleon Jesus Texans Ken Burns FOX Brian Rice Condoleezza Rice LEE Condoleezza Jim Crow Frederick Douglass Scotland
The Media Wants You to Believe Kyle Rittenhouse Shot Black People

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:58 min | 2 weeks ago

The Media Wants You to Believe Kyle Rittenhouse Shot Black People

"Jennifer horn, are you there? I am here happy birthday to the marines and happy Wednesday to you, said. Happy happy Wednesday to you as well. I don't know. You work incredibly hard, hardest working lady on radio as you also keep. What's his face grant stinchfield under control every morning is you're hosting the morning answer on a.m. 5 98, 8 70 the answer. However, I don't know what you do after this show as have you been keeping a beady eye on the Kyle rittenhouse trial? Is this insane? What a couple of twists that we've seen over the last couple of days. And you know what? What really struck me said is that we heard about this obviously after Jacob Blake and Kenosha and 2020, that was the year where we heard about this. And the media convicted him on day one. They made fun of Ricky Schroder and all the people who stood up for Kyle rittenhouse that they were just a bunch of white supremacy. Even the president himself, Biden called him a white supremacist. Do you know what really struck me? And I'm almost embarrassed to admit this because you know I keep up with the news like crazy. Yes. As I was kind of going through as this trial got underway, what was the last week? Probably. I was just going through and just refreshing everything in my mind. And I looked at the victims and the victims were all white. Now, hang on hang on. You don't forget don't forget. White wife beat us and child rapists. Don't forget. Yeah, yeah. And you know, I pride myself on staying afloat on most of the stuff. Especially these big stories I really try to stay up to date. In my mind, he shot at black people, he didn't shoot at white people. He shot a black people. This is why the media convicted him and said he was a white supremacist because he went in with an AR-15 to go hunting for black people. That was the impression that the news media gave us. That was what was in people's minds. I still think people believe that he shot three black people. And he

Kyle Rittenhouse Jennifer Horn Grant Stinchfield Jacob Blake Ricky Schroder Marines Kenosha Biden White
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:43 min | 3 weeks ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"A lot of square foot of housing because you are not going to find the same house in New York. Your carry progression in your job and even the sense that you are the reason doing this particular job as opposed to something else. That reminds me of some research that Terry Mitchell and his colleagues did on what they called job embeddedness, which is the idea that if we want to predict people's turnover over time, we need to pay attention to their fit with the organization is their alignment between their values and their interests and their skills and what they do and where they belong. We need to look at their links to people and we need to look at what they would have to sacrifice to walk away. And one of the things they found in the research was that you had to look at fit links and sacrifice in a community, not just in a job to determine whether people would really walk away. And it sounds like you've arrived at a very similar set of conclusions in from a very different perspective. Because we are looking at the same data. And presumably as an open mind as we can. So back on the point of dignity, the desire to be respected. Also, the meaning that you spoke about the motivation to make a difference. When I was doing my doctoral dissertation, I had done some experiments with university of fundraising callers. And I found that just randomly assigning them to meet one scholarship recipient who had benefited from their work was enough to substantially increase the number of calls they made. The minutes they spent on the phone ultimately, the money that they raised. And one of the first questions that I got, I think it must have been in my first job talk was, well, but how does showing people the meaning of their work and seeing who they help? How does that compare against a financial incentive? And I thought it was such a complicated question to answer because I don't know what dose of meaning is equivalent to a $100 reward..

Terry Mitchell university of fundraising New York
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:45 min | 3 weeks ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Of sort of going out of their well established field, my call for my girl and a theory for object and decided that they were going to teach development, which they were making up as they went along. And they were making up with us. And it was about, I don't know 5 or 6 of us students in the room and it's also exhilarating to see a field being created in front of your eyes and with your own inputs. And yeah, it was a bit people sorry was insane in the sense that they were like, you're a good student. You know, you could just get a great job if only you did a normal field. And I said, well, that's not. I didn't come here to get a great job. I can be able to study development economics. And it was not even question for me because I knew why I was there and I was going to do it regardless. So if we fast forward, I don't know, a couple decades. You wrote a book about radically rethinking poverty. And I think it's a wonderful summary of so much of the research you've done. But it's also a perfect fit for the show, because this show is about rethinking assumptions that we take for granted. So I'd love just for starters if you could talk a little bit about what common assumptions about poverty are overturned by your work. So I think depending on the flavor of the month, there are any number of wrong assumptions about poverty. And what's interesting is that they are very strongly held at a moment in time, and then they are kind of next year it's another one. So the one when I grew up and that I grew up poisoned. In fact, I grew up believing when I was naively thinking I was going to save the.

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:58 min | 3 weeks ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Wow, okay, there's so many things I already want to follow up on there. The first one is you said it's dangerous to follow the career advice of your or pursue the career interests of your 8 year old self. So I had a similar experience with my, I guess, my early exposure to economics. When I was a sophomore in college, I was declared a joint major between psychology and economics. And I knew I wanted to understand human behavior and I thought the two worlds would be great to try to marry. And then I showed up in my first economics class and the professor wrote on the board that quality of life was a function of consumption and savings. That is the dumbest equation I've ever seen. My happiness has very little to do with how much I consume and how much I save. Do economists understand at all. What people care about and what drives the quality of our lives. And I'm wondering if I gave up on economics too soon, do you think I should have I should have rethought my distaste for those equations? Yeah, I think you should have, but I understand why you didn't. And I think many, many years, students have exactly the same experience, I had the same experience and I had given up. It's only because I needed to make a little bit of money in Russia and because I thought it would be a way of being closer to what was happening that I got back in the proximity of economists. Many people stopped because that's what they're exposed to or maybe if they go to a second lesson and there's stuff learning that countries worse is related to their GDP or some such. And then I'm like, we don't rightly conclude that it's not for them. And I think that's an error of it's not even an error of the economics profession. It's an hour of the way because I'm taught because if you look at what economies do, it's so varied and it's so diverse and there are still people who write down those equations, but there are many people who do other things like the behavioral economics you would perhaps have done if you had continued in the field. But you have to have completed and survived two years of disparate to get to it. And most people don't. And that's why now, this year, for example, at MIT, I teach two classes that targeted to freshmen. I want to get them right out of high school before they done any economics..

Russia MIT
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

01:58 min | Last month

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Going to be one of the most <Speech_Female> critical things that you <Speech_Female> do going forward. <Speech_Music_Female> Thank you. You're <Laughter> awesome. Thank you. <Laughter> Thank you. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Next time <Speech_Music_Male> I'm taken for granted. <Speech_Music_Male> Nobel laureate <Speech_Male> Esther duflo <Speech_Male> joins me <Speech_Music_Male> to talk about how to fight <Speech_Music_Male> poverty with <Speech_Music_Male> data, and <Speech_Music_Male> how to motivate people. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> You wrote at <Speech_Music_Male> one point that <Speech_Male> economists <SpeakerChange> are <Speech_Male> like plumbers. <Speech_Female> When parameters <Speech_Music_Female> are really helpful, <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> my father kept <Speech_Music_Female> saying that the best <Speech_Music_Female> for me to marry <Speech_Music_Female> would be a doctor <Speech_Music_Female> or a plumber because you <Speech_Music_Female> always need these people <Speech_Music_Female> near you. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> Finally, <Speech_Music_Female> I found neither.

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

08:07 min | Last month

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Us about some of the biases you faced and how you dealt with them. Well, you know, again, the time that I came into the corporate world, there were no women in consulting maybe two women in BCG Chicago, which is where I was. And the only other senior woman was in Boston and I'd never met her. So there were no senior women in BCG Chicago. And going over to client organizations, I don't believe I ever saw a woman in a client organization. So you enter rooms and there will be 50 people in the boardroom or a conference room and you'll be the only woman. And half of it was my problem at him, because I walked into these meetings always and said to myself, I'm sure they're all thinking, what is she doing in this room? You know, she's so different comes from an emerging market, woman and on top of that, what is she going to contribute to us? So right off the bat, I dug a hole for myself. And I said, I've got to dig out of this hole. Because I've got to prove to them that I have a right to be at this table. And so I would over prepare, I would have every number of my fingertips. I mean, I was like a walking computer, which didn't exist then. I was there at the laptop. I was in. I was in those days none of those existed, remember. So I would prepare and I'd earn a seat at the table. And as you mentioned, like clothes are pretty interesting. And so they look at me saying who is this person that you brought into the room? To advise CEOs of big companies and consulting. And so I had to get them to overcome all of those negative screens and view me as just a brain sitting behind a table. And after the first couple of meetings, they would always turn to me first. And so I think I benefited from the fact that people are willing to look past the superficial stuff and get to the crux of the matter, which again I'd say only in America. And I was a beneficiary of all of that. So the fact that I was the only woman in most cases, I probably experienced less bias than many people experienced today. Because people actually wanted me to succeed to say it's a novelty. Let's see how we can have a succeed. Wow. So this idea that you were going to prove yourself, and you had something to prove. I think you're preaching to the choir here. Our own samarina Muhammad, I think sitting right there. Has done some brilliant research on underdogs and how when people underestimate you or when people doubt you, if they're not credible, that fires you up. Yeah. And it leads you to say, you know what? I'm gonna show you. Where it's much harder is when the people above you are credible, where they've accomplished a lot where they're very senior. And they're questioning you. And who are you going to trust? Your own confidence that you can do it, or this very senior person who thinks you can't. How did you deal with being an underdog or being underestimated in those situations? End of the day, I can only rely on my competence, my knowledge. So like I said, I was over prepared. Let me tell you how I prepared. If this was the assignment I was given, I always levitated and define my assignment with that much bigger, because I wanted to understand every linkage between what I was given to how it was going to impact the enterprise as a whole. So I always zoomed into my assignment and zoomed out to see how the impact is going to measure the cross. So whenever anybody talked about something, I said just a minute. It's not going to help the company because if I took what I was doing, what personally and personally was doing, the combination that I'm suggesting is way better than the combination, you are looking at. But maybe I'm missing something. You know, in my youth, I'd say, I'm writing you're wrong. I do black and white and in your face. I was taught how to communicate in a more gentle way. So I'd say things like, you know, maybe I'm not understanding what you're doing, although in my head, I'm going you're wrong. Telling me, can you help me understand what I'm missing? And then at the meeting they say you're wrong, I'm the boss forget it. But a day or two later they'd come back and say, I think you were right. And they called me the dog with the bone because if I decided that I was right, I'd come back and reconceptualize it 5 different ways. I wouldn't give up, because at the end of the day, if I had done all the work and I thought my solution was right for the company. And I felt others had not done the kind of work. It behooved me to keep coming back to the issue to lead the showed me compelling analysis to disprove me, or accept what I said. So my CEOs would always call me. She's a dog with the bone, don't argue, because she's not going to give up if she believes she's right. I think you need that kind of conviction something you do. What if you're wrong, though? If they have better facts to prove that I'm wrong, I'm willing to completely accept it. Because remember, the goal is not personal showcasing. The goal is what's right for the company. But you've got to match me with facts and figures. Don't just say, my gut tells me this. Gut works, but cut works when it's backed up with some facts and figures. Ideally formed after the facts and figures. Ideally formed after the fact, but I tell you many senior leaders are president of the past. So their gut comes from what they've been doing all the time in the past. And if the world is changing, the situation is changing, you've got to change. And then they don't know how to change. So they always rely on my gut tells me this is what you got to do. Then you start to have doubt saying, oh, you're a prisoner of your path. Let me see how I can help you. So then you take over PepsiCo. And you have this bold, massive vision, to reinvent the business, essentially, and say, we don't want to just give people sugar water. We don't want to contribute to an epidemic of obesity or poor health. We actually want to make people healthier. Was that a challenge to get people on board with that vision or had the world changed enough that people were starting to come around? Can I just agree with that characterization at all? So please correct. I mean, let me reframe your question to say that the portfolio was made for a time when that's what people ate and drank. I came and saying consumer tastes are changing. I want to take what I call a fun for you portfolio and make it better for you and good for you also. So that the consumer had infinite choice. They could eat and drink whatever they wanted. And all that I wanted to make sure was the better for you and the good for your choices were not more expensive, tasted bad or not available. So they all had to be ubiquitously available, affordably priced and high quality. That's all I wanted to make sure. You know, I had to do that because that's where the consumer was going. And again, when I became CEO, we did a piece of work on mega trends. What are the big mega trends that will impact PepsiCo over the next decade or two? And then future back, if you work on it and say, what do I need to do today to cater to these trends? Because it takes a while to get the R and D and all of the disciplines in place. The product launches the innovation. So that megatrends work was my true north. And once I got the boat to bind to the mega trends, it was very easy for me to devise the strategies and the plans to address the mega trends. So it was relatively easy. And now just selling it to the rest of the people in the company. And the question is, what words to use? This is where I think using the words that speak to people's heart is more important than speaking to their minds. And so performance of purpose was born. And how do you continue to deliver performance? Because PepsiCo is a performance machine. But due to the way to ensure human sustainability, environmental sustainability and talent sustainable. And that was purpose, nourish, replenish, cherish. So when you put all of them together, you spoke to the employees and we got.

samarina Muhammad Chicago Boston PepsiCo America obesity
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

07:54 min | Last month

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Questionable anyway. So you've got to know when to rethink the paradigm that you're operating in. Well, I'm a fan of rethinking in many ways. But this seems like this seems like blasphemy. How could you say we're okay with being number two in a market? What CEO does that? Well, why are you looking at just one brand? That's the first problem with the way you look at the beverage business. But 25 years ago, the market is to be 80% sodas and 20% all of the beverages. Today, it's about 40% sodas and 60% other beverages. If you get locked into comparing bran cook versus brand Pepsi, it's like, you know, yesterday's business when the market is going away from you and going into the future businesses. So you've got to look at the overall beverage business to the overall beverage business. And just for your information, Pepsi has looked a nice tea, number one, Gatorade, number one, Starbucks Frappuccino, number one, aquafina, doing pretty well. So you've got a really go with the times. You know, the best example is people say that the red beverage is timeless, the blue beverage is timely. I'd rather be timely than timeless. Interesting. So we have some MBA students in the audience. I am often critical of that choice of pass particularly if they did an undergrad business agree. Wondering, who needs 6 years of business education? Then I agree with you. Okay. 100%. Either you do an undergraduate in business and do your post graduating something completely different or you're doing undergraduate and something which has hint of science and then do your MBA. I honestly believe that you're right. 6 years is too much. Okay, but but you two see value in an MBA if you didn't study business as an undergrad. I don't know the MBA of today. Hesitating. Let me tell you why, because I think the NBA education needs to be read on recast. The MBA degree that I got versus the MBA degree that exists today. I think it needs to come a long way. So let me rewind hit play and come forward. When I went to the Yale school of management and did a masters in public and private management. It was way ahead of its time. Because what Yale was teaching way back in 1978 was that companies are rooted in society. They have a duty of care to every society and community their part of. So we have to think of all stakeholders and think of the impact of every company on every constituency deals with before it sets a strategy of financial objectives. Some years later, Yale went to an MBA because that was considered the only way to get in the rankings, which I have a real problem with. But then although what does fantastic in the rankings I've got to tell you? We don't care officially. Thank you. But then if you fast forward now, this whole ESG stakeholder theory purpose has brought us full circle back to Yale's original goal of linking companies into societies. So I think you should never have walked away from masters in public and private management. And when I went to school, one third of the cases were nonprofit. One third was government political only one third was corporate cases. So it was a great experience for starting about the Metropolitan Museum and when it was going through bankruptcy how to recover. Those were fantastic cases which sort of made you understand. The other thing to Adam that bothers me is in business schools. We teach people not to be siloed in companies. How you should break down silos. But I think business schools in universities are extremely siloed. So I think we have to rethink in business schools. How we rewrite the education. So it's more practicing what we are supposed to be teaching. I think that's a valid critique. And I would love to see us take steps in that direction. I think we've taken some. We have a lot more work to do. Okay, so in my dozen years at Wharton, the proposal I've been most excited about that's gotten zero attraction is to eliminate the two year MBA, and only offer a one and a three year. The one would be for a career accelerator. So we're going to go right back to their same industry. The three would be for career switchers to have time to do two internships and actually learn what they want to do moving forward. Support or reject. I would give them the book called rethink and have them read it. I think that's what's badly needed. You know what? You never have any status in your own backyard, right? Actually, the association of MBA deans or the debate that discussion. The last time I spoke to them, I think it was a New Orleans. I told them they had to rethink the entire MBA. Time has come and some of them turned the other way others said, it's a great idea. Maybe now the one year could be a remote though. It could be? Yeah. And the way technology is progressing could become a reality, which means no more buildings. All right. Well, then whose names will go on? That's gonna work. That's right. And I don't know how we fund this whole enterprise then, but that is a problem you could solve for us. One of the things that I think you were remarkable at both during your consulting career and as you moved into management roles, was recruiting people to mentor you. People who often were very busy who didn't need more mentees. How did you do it? How did you get people to say, yes, I want to invest in Indra? I don't think I've ever asked somebody to be my mentor. People sort of pick me. And I think what I've learned over the years is mentors pick you, you don't pick them. And the reason they pick you is because they see something in you that attracts them to you. And they think that if they were to mentor you support you and accelerate your progress, they will also look good downstream. Every one of the people that has served as memento supporter promoter whatever, even I will say, I had a part in her development. You know, I helped her move through these years of her life. And so I think you have to be careful about going to some stranger and saying, will it be my mentor, which a lot of people ask me to do? I can't do it. The second is that if you are a mentee, support to whatever you are, you owe a duty of care to your mentor. So if your mentor is giving you advice, don't just listen to the one year and let it go out the other year. Process it. And if you're not going to take the advice, go back to the mentor and say, look, you gave me this advice on this issue. Let me tell you why it didn't take it. Let me tell you, perhaps be that I went down. And let me tell you why I did that. So you have to give respect to the mentor. If you want to maintain the relationship. It's very important. This is such invaluable advice on both fronts. I can not tell you how many students I've had come into my office for career advice. And then they do the exact opposite of what I recommended. And I hear about it 6 months later. I don't care whether you followed my advice. I want to learn from what your analysis was. That's exactly. I also want to be able to say, now I told you so. Instead of waiting until you take the job and then call me a year later and say, I never should have gone to that company oops. You know, people forget that this mentor mentee relationship is actually two way responsible relationship. Cherish it. Well, and on the first point, I think one of the things that's so powerful here is we hear frequently from our students, I feel like it's an imbalanced relationship. I have nothing to give back to my mentor. What you're saying here is excelling. Succeeding is what you give back because then you're a mentor, get some credit for your success and also gets to see you go off and check. If you do a good job, that should be, you know, psychic pleasure for your mental, because it doesn't matter if you're working for that person. If you're doing a great job somewhere else, they look at you fondly and say, you know, I had to say in her doing so well in that job because I trained her to think this way or approach things this way. So they take great pleasure in your progress wherever you are, wherever they are. Yeah. So you had a lot of support of people surrounding you. You also had some people who did not necessarily see your potential. Talk to.

Pepsi Yale Metropolitan Museum Yale school of management association of MBA Starbucks MBA NBA Wharton Adam New Orleans
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

02:54 min | Last month

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Such a hard time coming around to rethinking this idea of the ideal worker? The biggest gap I think is all discussions of the future of work, talk about robotics, technology, disruption from that. It does not talk about family, doesn't talk about women, young family builders, who are all central to this idea of the future of work. If you don't have enough women in the workforce, you're not going to have jobs filled. Because a lot of the care jobs are going to be remain unfilled, especially when we have 10,000 people reaching the age of 65 every day in our country. So we better worry about women coming into paid work. Women are getting college degrees at ten points higher than men. They've got a whole point of GPA more than the men in stem disciplines. 70% of high school valedictorians are women. Today in a knowledge economy, the country is going to succeed by having the best and the brightest come to work. So we have to give women the choice to come into paid work. We've got a grease as kids for them. Instead, what do we do? We put barriers up to them and say, you know, if you have a kid that's your problem. That's why they're delaying having kids. So I come back and I say the day we include families and women and young family builders in our discussions on future of work. I think everybody's sensibilities will improve. I think so too. I think one of the I guess one of the roadblocks that I'm seeing organizations run into is take an experiment that Nick bloom did at the C trip call center in China where people who are randomly assigned to work from home or 13 and a half percent more productive, but they were half as likely to get promoted because they didn't have face time with senior leaders. And I know that a lot of leaders are starting to worry about this disparity where if people do have flexibility if you're hybrid or you're fully remote, they're still going to be people probably men, probably people without families at home, who end up with more of that FaceTime and they're going to be advantaged unfairly. How do we solve that? I think we are in the most tricky part of that discussion right now. How is hybrid work going to work? Should you give people the choice to decide how to deploy the hybrid days? Or do you mandate for groups of people to come in certain days and others not to come in other days? The only way is going to happen is if office footprints themselves change. So that you basically say, we are going to say coming only for two days, three days and not going to come in. It's going to help the climate is going to reduce our office footprint, whatever. The commercial real estate guys in our life what I'm saying. But the reason I'm saying this is because that's the only way you're going to avoid the men going into the office and the women's staying home. And working flexibly and having trouble balancing all of the priorities. So this idea of rethinking is something that I've been spending a lot of time on lately. And not surprisingly, frustrated that a lot of leaders are afraid of being accused of flip flopping..

Nick bloom C trip call center China
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

03:52 min | Last month

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"I want to tell you about a new podcast from Ted. It's called am I normal with Mona chalabi? Mona's a star data journalist, and in every episode, she investigates a new question like how many close friendships do you need? And can you actually trust your dentist? But since studies and spreadsheets don't tell the whole story, she's talking to experts, strangers, even her mom, to fill in the gaps. Ultimately, it's a show that asks does normal even exist? Follow am I normal with Mona chalabi wherever you're listening? Thanks to the Hartford for sponsoring this episode. Hey work lifers. It's Adam crane. Welcome back to taking for granted. My podcast with the Ted audio collective. I'm an organizational psychologist, and this series is about rethinking assumptions. We often take for granted about how we work, lead and live. Today's guest is one of time's most influential people. Sprinter Alison Felix. In Tokyo at age 35, she won her tenth and 11th Olympic medals, becoming the most decorated track and field athlete in American history. And the most decorated woman ever in the sport. She's now meddled in 5 straight Olympic Games. It was an especially triumphant moment since he came in the aftermath of challenging Nike's lack of pregnancy protections for athletes. When Allison was expecting in 2018, they tried to cut her pay by 70%. When she asked them to guarantee her salary, if her performance suffered due to childbirth, they refused. After she spoke out publicly and walked away, they finally changed their policy. Since then, Allison has founded her own footwear and lifestyle brand. With her brother west. I'm an adviser to say sh and I was thrilled to see Allison when gold and bronze in her own shoes. I can't think of a better role model when it comes to achieving excellence sustaining success and bouncing forward after disappointment..

Mona chalabi Adam crane Alison Felix Mona Ted Hartford Olympic medals Allison Tokyo Olympic Games Nike
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

01:53 min | 5 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"I wanted to write about it john. This is ben such a delight and talking to you is every bit as exciting and enjoyable and eye opening as i hoped it would be. Well thank you so much autumn. It's really great to be with you and have a chance to talk with you. I'm a big fan of your work. So this really cool. Taken for granted as part of the ted audio collective show is hosted by me. Adam grant and is produced by ted with transmitter media. Our team includes colin. Helms gretta cohn. Dan donald joanne luna grace rubinstein. Shell quint ben. Ben chang an nfl. This episode was produced by constanza. Show is mixed by rick. Quan original music by hans sale sue and alison lately breath old. I feel like about every third sentence. You're right. I think either which i wrote that. Or oh my god. He's been living in my head. I feel this way. That is my favorite thing about books. Actually is those moments when it feels like the writer knows something about you that you've never told anyone and you get to co. Mingle these deep really abstract hard to fathom experiences and feelings with a writer. That's what i love about reading. So if if my book could be that for you. I'm super grateful. One more thing you know. I love data. And we'd love your help and gathering some data about work life. Let us know what you think at survey nerds dot com slash. Worklife will appreciate your feedback on strikes to build on and weaknesses to overcome that survey nerds dot com slash worklife. Thank you ex..

john alison rick colin Dan donald joanne luna grace r hans sale Helms gretta cohn Shell One more thing Ben chang Adam grant third sentence ted audio collective Mingle ted constanza sue
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

04:46 min | 5 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Look so just on a personal level. That's my experience of it. Is that once you get to a really high skill level. There's so much wealth involved precisely because everyone is really skilled. Exactly that's exactly how michael explains that he his his data among other places came from baseball he said. Look if everybody's bad than the few people who are good are gonna stand out a lot but if everybody's good it's almost impossible to know whether the pitcher the batter is gonna win on that given exchange and it sounds like you see writing as as a similarly high talent endeavour right now. Yeah i think so. I mean i'd have to. I'd have to think more of it to be sure that i that i believe that but i think okay another related topic that i wanted to ask you about you in two different sections of the book. You said things that surprised me at one point. You said you need advice. You feel like you need to have a vice in your life. I think that might be dr pepper. Yeah and then the other is you said you. You always wished for a nemesis with both of these hot. What most people don't go looking for vices and nemeses. They're stuck with them and they're trying to escape them. Well i think with with the vice. I think i don't know where it comes from. But when i was in my teens and twenties i smoke cigarettes compulsively and for me like the pleasure of cigarettes was in the kind of compulsive cycle of it. The build up of the need and desire and then like the pleasure of giving in to that need and desire became a really kinda vicious cycle for me. And so i i've managed to pull mostly out of that but i do. I do still drink diet dr pepper. Which feels a little bit like a vice to me as far as the nemesis. You don't you don't wanna nemesis. Feel like everybody. Everybody wants a nemesis. It's like. I remember when i was younger. My writing career a few of my writing friends. We'd have writers that they felt like a real deep kind of a rivalry. With and i would always think that was kind of cool and sort of wish that i had a writer who i felt this weird. Mix of admiration and jealousy toward But i never really did. And i never really felt. Like i had a nemesis until relatively recently when i began gardening and developed a deep deep nemesis ical to coin a term relationship with this groundhog. That lives underneath my hoes. Shed in fact adam just this morning..

michael both this morning two different sections one point twenties teens people adam
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:19 min | 5 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"A kind of safety or security a sense of deep sense of home that i may don't feel now because circumstances have changed. I'm in a different place in my life. And that's what i was thinking about. I was thinking about how there's always there's always a past that you can't get back to that part. At least part of you wants to return to right. Like i would love to have a conversation with people. I love who've who've died. Or i would love to be able to. I would love to be able to go back and spend one day in the apartment that sarah and i shared in in new york when we were in our twenties. Now i am happier in almost every way now than i was then but i still do sometimes feel a longing for for an old an old self so that that speaks to what i found so interesting about it after i stopped rejecting the idea it it seemed like you were defining a new type of nostalgia or at least one that i never thought about before because normally when i thought about nostalgia. It was longing for an experience or a moment that was passed. Its person i've lost or It's a place. I was in a group that i was part of. That's moved on and you wanted to go back. it sounded like identity nostalgia. You wanted to recover a version of you. And as i thought about it more i realize yeah there are parts of my pass selves that i miss The just the the sheer wonder of being curious about what career i might pursue a little bit even though that was mostly an anxiety provoking but but i think there is a weird phenomenon where once we've gone through something it feels different so everything feels survivable after you survive it and i think that's a lot of why i allow myself sometimes to think about those those past versions of myself fondly. Well my favorite review that you did in the whole book was cut..

new york sarah one day twenties one
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

04:44 min | 5 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"In my life. When i was experiencing a lot of burnout but also didn't understand one that i was experiencing burnout and to why i was experiencing it and understanding that it. It isn't just about how much work you're doing was really important for me understanding that if i have a sense of daily progress in a sense of small winds work becomes much easier and more fun and then when i have a sense of orientation and purpose work doesn't feel so overwhelming to me and so that that was probably the biggest thing that i that i use all the time when i start to feel that way i can tell myself okay. Well what are some small wins or. Are you venturing away from a feeling of purpose in your work and maybe that's why you're feeling burnt out. I think of course there are lots of other causes vern out lots of other treatments for it that we're discussing that episode but that's that's what resonated really deeply with me and it. It was kind of like a magic pill overstated or anything. Well as a native midwesterner indianapolis flavor of this review. It's very kind and warm. But i also imagine there are some ideas. You've disagreed with a challenge. A little bit. Is there anything that that jumped out at. You where you said. Now you got this wrong. Or i have a different take on this one of the things i really like about. The podcast is that you make room for uncertainty and celebrate the wisdom of to change your mind. But i think i haven't even radic more radical approach to uncertainty than you do to be uncertain about everything all the time no matter what i only there are moments where you have a measure of certainty that i feel like. I'm not sure. I'm not totally sure that matcher i one hundred percent sure. That's true as i would be but you have your much higher tolerance for ambiguity than i do..

indianapolis one hundred percent one ideas
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

04:03 min | 6 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"It looks more like oh well you know. Here's our slate and should we choose from these. So there are basic ways of getting there. And i'd focus obviously in this conversation in corporate america but when it comes to people in my ted talk i said invite people in your life. Who don't look like you don't think like you who don't act like you and who don't come from where you come from and i tell people you could make a conscious decision to do that. You could actually go. And in your workforce invite people that you don't normally see or know to lunch and not in some creepy weird way but in a way of just trying to foster knowledge and information. And then i asked the person who has invited to stay open minded and give people the benefit of the doubt would if we lived in a world where there was all benefit and no doubt that we could actually create a scenario where we understand. People are going to ask questions that are difficult. And they're going to put their foot in their mouth but they're well intentioned or they're trying to learn or no more in their imprecise and awkward in the exchange as opposed to you being annoyed by it gave a talk at to a group of students at princeton wants. And they're like we're tired of people asking us. Do we get sunburn. And how do we wash our hair when braids and all that stuff. And i was like listen easier than picking cotton field if that is the worst of your job right now. I think our ancestors had a harder harder road here so if part of your responsibility to educate people about what it is like to be us because we know so much more about them than they know about us. I think you're up to it. I love that one of my big regrets in my career to date. Is that when. I have seen moments like that. Sometimes i haven't spoken up. What advice can you offer enclosing to make sure that..

america one princeton
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:41 min | 6 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Welcome back to taken for granted and more of my conversation with mellody hobson. Let's talk about then when somebody recognizes the weakness like that and says. I need to be more considerate but then doesn't make the change. You've said that some people don't change until they're in pain. what set about. I learned that from nancy. Parrots men at At allen and company she was on the board of princeton with me and she said her mother was a psychologist and her mother said that to our people. Don't change unless they're in pain and it just stuck with me. I thought about the times that i had been in pain that i had changed. And it's unfortunate that that's what does it to you. You see that in smokers who smoking after getting cancer run ins with the law. Whatever it might be plenty of examples of that were changed comes from feelings of great fear or pain. The pandemic is a perfect example of that. We had to pit in a major major way and you saw companies really not just survived but thrived. We asked a lot of people in this pandemic in terms of change and modifying behavior and it was something that i know didn't come easy for certain people but the adoption was necessary. So this was People change when they're in pain. Yeah i think one of the reasons. People don't adapt is they're holding onto the past. And i know george has some advice for you and others on that about what jet is doing. Don't do get is don't hold on. That is a very important concept that george had to teach me in a very sad moment where it lost the individual that worked at the firm and i was just so sad and it was a young woman who had gone on to start her own business and she was a superstar so great. I poured my heart into our and i thought she'd be running area out one day when she left. I literally i was like choking back tears. And george looked at me and he said i don't hold on. That's why they have no attachments. And your master and it was like within a minute. I process that and then i thought of staying and that silent if you love someone new set them free and i was like i have to set her free and it was really one of the most profound concepts for me that you can't hold onto people you.

mellody hobson george one At allen nancy one of the most profound conce one day a minute
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:06 min | 6 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"You're one of my role models when it comes to feedback and you have had incredible experiences of receiving difficult feedback and then learning to benefit from it. And i wonder if you could share how. You've learned to take tough feedback. Well we have this really great coach at aerial and one of the things that he told me was. That feedback was not a right. You're not entitled to it so whenever you get it. It's a gift and you treat it that way. And that was something. I really took part. And he also told me that you should be willing to receive feedback from anyone and it shouldn't be dependent upon if you like the person or don't like them respect them. Don't respect them. they may have a point. That really makes a lot of sense in something for you to think about. Thirdly if someone calls you a horse's ass the first time you might say okay the second time you might say. I'm going to think about it. The third time they call you. Horses asked by a saddle get feedback. That is repetitive. See what it is that people are seeing in you that you need to work on so with all that in mind one of my mentors is bill bradley. The former us senator and hall of fame basketball player one day. He sat with me and he said you know melody. If you're not careful you could be a ball hog. You could really step over a lot of people and it has the potential. Do not be good. And i remember sitting there and telling myself don't cry. I was certainly second guessing myself and thinking. Why is he saying this to me. It didn't feel very good. But i also thought to myself at the time if i cry. He won't ever give feedback again because who wants to sit and have to put someone back together after they've given them feedback and then want to do it again. So i just remember sitting and really quieting myself emotionally. So that i could receive what he said and then i left thinking about ways to solve for some of the things that he had mentioned melody. It's an amazing story and it raises some questions for me. The first one is it doesn't seem like calling someone. a ball hog is a gift. Did not bother you. Sure it bothered me. But this idea that i could hijack a conversation and he said it with your enthusiasm and your charisma you could dominate and dominating you can silence other people so one of the ways that i actually went about it was. I tried to engage with people by asking them questions about themselves. I from the person who picks me up in the lobby for meeting to wherever i am. It takes the attention off of me and people like to talk about themselves. I also ended up learning a ton of things about people. It's a tool that. I use to not be a ball hog. There's so much that can be learned from this. I think also though i would go to bill bradley and say there might be a more effective way to deliver that message. Maybe if you're a little bit.

bill bradley second time first time third time first one one Thirdly things one day
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

03:07 min | 6 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"I've only worked at one company. The average american has eleven jobs in their lifetime. But it makes complete and total sense if you grew up as me that you would cling to permanency and security. I'm the youngest of six kids. My mother was a single mom. She worked really really hard but we often were in tough situations of getting addicted or getting our lights turned off or phone. Disconnected or car repossessed. Sometimes they didn't know where we're going to live. It was just a terrible way to live as a result of that. I just had this great sense of financial insecurity. I ended up having an obsession with school. Which was the center of calm and security for me in a world. That was not common not secure and i could control outcomes at school so i became this crazy student then. I went to princeton and in all of those settings. I was just an observer. I saw the life that i want it. I romanticized the friends that i had on the lives that they had in the two parent households and all of these things and it did. Give me this aspiration for financial security at some point. I felt like i had won the birth lottery. In every way anybody who knows anything about your childhood would suggest that that is not the first narrative come to mind. The reason i say one the birth lottery is not. Because i didn't work extraordinarily hard and still do and not because i didn't pay my dues and consult with really smart people to help me and tough moments but let's just start with dna. I got a brain from those two people that put me in good stead in school. That's that's a fluke. You don't know what you're going to get when you know. Meet billy smart kids. I'm like thank your parents for that. Dna the first thing that put you in a good place so then the had the dna. A lot of people don't necessarily use it to their advantage. I was fortunate that i made the right decisions at the right time. That chose aerial. I'm not saying that everything wouldn't've worked out. But i'm just saying that i took these non traditional paths big wall street firms and i went to this little firm and chicago because i could sit next to work with this guy that i thought was really smart and that understood me and that would foster mitalent and allow me to grow so that. That's why i say. I won the lottery then i was born in america. That's a real thing. If you could be born anywhere in the world to be born in america even with all of the things that are wrong in america which is a lot. It's still has a a leg up on a lot of other places in terms of creating the the opportunity for success. I'm adam grant and this is taken for granted by podcast with its head audio collected. I'm an organizational psychologist. My job is to think again about how we work lead..

america six kids eleven jobs two people two parent one company chicago adam single mom one first narrative first thing american princeton
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:20 min | 6 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"So i was gonna say i was going to say. In some cases it's easier to think about working on my own emotional intelligence and the application of the skills that i know. I used elsewhere than it is to say okay. We've got to teach a kid who doesn't necessarily have a fully developed. Prefrontal cortex yet to interact differently. But i wanna. I wanna react to this labor idea. It's so interesting. I i find skills when i hear a skill i immediately think. Ooh that's something. I can study and practice and master and i'm excited about it when i hear labor. My association is that's a task that somebody else's forcing me to do. That's why i don't have a bus. I just find the idea of thinking about this skills. As opposed to the labor a little bit more autonomy supportive which is ironically what. You're critiquing about the way that corporations manage emotional intelligence. The other thing that i think about here is when i hear emotional intelligence i see it as a little bit liberating. We live in a society that judges people heavily on their intelligence and mostly does that in terms of their mathematical and verbal skills right so we have too many kids who grow up in america and other parts of the world to hold. They're not smart. And i think by calling it an intelligence. It legitimates the fact that okay. You might not be a math whiz. You might not be the person who will write the next shakespeare play or the next maya angelou poem but you have a very important set of cognitive capacities that really matter in the world. Do you want to rob people if that way so i think there are two questions there the first days i mean. I think you're right that there is a reason you don't want to think about it as labor because then you don't have to see it as the employee employer relationship anymore because when i'm talking about labor i'm not talking really about an activity that someone is doing but i'm talking about kind of position that somebody occupies and a political and economic position that someone has to occupy and the kind of work that they have to do because of it and so yes of course talking about it as intelligence focuses or centers and idea of autonomy. But i'm saying that that is in part a false idea of autonomy but then to your second question it's also not a false idea of autonomy right. I think one of the reasons emotional intelligence or personality are as popular as they are is precisely because of what you say that they do give people a sense of self right. They give people a language or vocabulary by which they can understand themselves as having a certain set of capacities and now they have an idiom and terms to use in order to describe that and it can be incredibly grounding. And the same way. That i told you that i want to think about the interrelation between people and the structures that they occupy. I think this here. To as an example where we can think on the one hand about ideology and on the other hand about something quite utopian in that idea that there may be people who are simply more emotionally adept than others that this might be an overall good to the world and that we might be able to learn something from people who have this capacity about religion nationality more generally. And and so i again. Just don't wanna let go of this ability to think about to think about this concept or to come at this concept from from both sides. I love that that mic drop. If we were live in a room with an audience right now. People would be cheering just crush..

america two questions second question both sides one first days shakespeare too many kids angelou one of the reasons maya