26 Burst results for "Grange"

NASA Has Completed Work on the James Webb Space Telescope

John Batchelor

01:15 min | Last month

NASA Has Completed Work on the James Webb Space Telescope

"Do we have left? We got about a minute. Okay. James Webb Telescope has passed its final checks The Hubble replacement, the Hubble replacement, and it's going to soon be shipped through the Panama Canal down to Karura. I'd like you wanna Karoo. Excuse me is it's huge, Is it? Is it fillets? Massive. Oh, I haven't seen it with the mirrors unfurled. I've seen it with the mirrors folded up, but it is Massive. It's going to have a about a 21 Ft Wide Mirror, which is three times almost three times the diameter of the Hubble. And it will be working in infrared, so you can see much further because it can see through Hubble's mostly visible and ultraviolet wavelengths. So an infrared you can see past all the dust and the junk that's out in the deeper parts of the universe. And really start looking back at the very edge of the beginning of time, which is very promising, and it's gonna be parked what they call Earth Sun l two or the Grange to which is a stable point out beyond, uh, Earth's orbit, so it'll be in the Earth's shadow all the time. So between that and the natural cooling, it's got and the artificial quickly and Scott's got sunshades that could pop up hopefully Um, you'll be able to start really answering some of these very basic questions about the beginning of the universe. So exciting, so exciting.

Karura James Webb Panama Canal Scott
"grange" Discussed on Short Storiess Podcast

Short Storiess Podcast

04:30 min | 5 months ago

"grange" Discussed on Short Storiess Podcast

"On the last stroke of twelve the cupboard door in the next room and there is no need to ask me how i knew it. I couldn't of course see it. But i could hear or sense in some way the sound of it i could feel my hair all of it rising upon my head. I was aware that there was a presence. In the adjoining room will not say a person. A living soul but a presence. Anyone who has been in the next room do a presence will know. Just how i felt. I could hear a sound as of someone groping on the floor and the faint rattle as of coins. My hair was now perpendicular my reader. Can it or not but it was then at this very moment from somewhere below in the building there came the sound of a prolonged and piercing. Cry a cry is of a seoul passing in agony. My reader may censure me or not but right at this moment i decided to beat it whether i should have remain to see what was happening is a question i will not discuss. My one idea was to get out and to get out quickly. The window of the tower room was some twenty five feet above the ground. I sprang out through the casement in leap and landed on the grass below. I jumped over the shrubbery and one bound and cleared the moat in one jump. I went down the avenue and about six strides and ran five miles along the road through the fens in three minutes. This at least is inaccurate description of my sensations. It may have taken longer. I never stopped till i found myself on the threshold of the bugum comes in little bug beating on the door for the landlord. I return to bug him. Grange on the next day in the bright sunlight of a frosty november morning in a seven cylinder motorcar with six local constables and a position it makes all the difference we carried revolvers spades pickaxes shotguns and a ouija board. What we found cleared up forever the mystery of the grange we discovered horrid the butler lying on the dining room floor quite dead. The physician said that he had died from heart failure. There was evidence from the mark's soviet shoes in the dust that he had come in the night to the tower room on the table he had placed a paper which contain a full confession of his having murdered. Jeremy bugum fifty years before.

five miles Jeremy bugum six local constables twenty five feet three minutes november morning one jump fifty years before seven cylinder about six strides twelve one one idea next day
"grange" Discussed on Short Storiess Podcast

Short Storiess Podcast

05:55 min | 5 months ago

"grange" Discussed on Short Storiess Podcast

"Somewhat. Cynically is there any particular season or day when you're grain just supposed to be special league terrible sir. Jeremy looked at me strangely. Why d- rats that he said. Have you heard the story of the grange. Never heard of the place in my life. I answer cheerily till you mentioned it to night my dear fellow. I hadn't the remotest idea you still own property. In england that grains is shut. Up said sir jeremy and has been for twenty years but i keep a man there ho rod. He was butler and my father's time. and before. if you care to go. I'll write him that you're coming and since you're taking your own fate in your hands. The fifteenth of november is the day at that moment. Lady bug them and clara and the other girls came trooping out on the veranda and the whole thing passed. Clean out of my mind. Nor did i think of it again until i was back in london. Then by one of those strange coincidences or premonitions. Call it what you will. It suddenly occurred to me one morning that it was the fifteenth of november. Whether sir jeremy had written to herod's or not. I do not know but nonetheless. Nightfall found me as i have described knocking at the door above. Gum grange the sound of the knocker head. Scarcely ceased to echo when i heard the shuffling of feet within and the sound of chains and bolts being withdrawn. The door open a man stood before me holding a lighted candle which he shaded with his and his faded black close once. Apparently a butler's dress is white hair advanced staged left me no doubt that he was horrid of whom sir. Jeremy had spoken without a word. He motioned me to come. In and still without speech he helped me to remove my wet outer garments and then beckoned me into a great room. Evidently the dining room. Of the grange. I have not in any degree in nervous. Man by temperament remarked. Before and yet there was something in the fastness of the wainscott at room. White had only by a single candle in the silence of the empty house and still more in the appearance of my speechless attendant..

london Jeremy england twenty years jeremy clara fifteenth of november a single candle one morning one
You Cant Outrun Your Fork

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

11:53 min | 1 year ago

You Cant Outrun Your Fork

"And today. We are going to cite you with a show about gluten called. You can't outrun your work. Dr Louis came up with that. Catchy Title I think he stole it. Perhaps from someone else but We liked it so extra. That's right but so we're GONNA talk to you about foods that might cause you to want more of the same and some very exciting testing information that we have been waiting very long time for Where it would be convenient for you and great reports and ways for you to determine gluten or wheat sensitivity so to day Dr Louis Would you explain to us about gluten and why it such a big problem? And why would someone be intolerant to it and you know what does it? 'cause what's the big deal with gluten gluten free so big deal right? I think it is a big deal. some of the research says is one out of one hundred or two out of hundred. That has gluten intolerance ILIAC disease. You know if you have that kind of Gi Issues go see your Gi doctor. So you're in tarnished Get the test made. Although we're going to tell you about tasks that you can do with us that I found to be. Oh my God blow you into new reality of knowledge and understanding again. I'M GONNA go down too much rabbit. Trails You know when I read this thing in interior. Was you know everybody should follow Tara? She really good health coach and she rat some pretty intelligent newsletters. Just like brandy does for Janet May You know I think anyone that puts beans chiles kind of a heathen might not love the Lord. But it's not just about beans beans can have issues too but mostly we don't talk about. Grind grain is not good and some of the myths. 'cause I I really think Janice going to get into more detail than me but and I hear this all the time but I'm eating whole wheat bread because I'm getting whole grains well usually Whole wheat break usually doesn't contain very much of the whole grind because the number one ingredient he's usually called wheat flour There's nips but I love my oatmeal. It's like well. I two or three bowls boat meal per year and I think it's the most nutritious thing you can eat breakfast. I personally think that's very very not true. And I think it's better than a breakfast. You know of sugary cereal but OATMEAL has a pretty high glycemic load. And so I don't think that's a good thing because it generally means when you have a high glycemic stuff. It usually means that you're going to spend the rest of the day over eating because you're hungry because of glycemic index Well you know I think we need to back up a little bit here and tell people why we got so involved with gluten you know before we we tell people. Don't eat gluten you know. It's not good but at the same time we didn't have a personal experience with it or where we could relate to own my goodness. That's what's causing it. If it's many of you have been listening to us for years. Thank you so much or someone that's new. You know the personal history there with why we found this out is because Dr Lewis was experiencing severe stomach pains to the point. He thought he was going to die. I mean I was bitterly I. I was giving him everything that I knew to give him. And you know we know all about nutrition for those of you that don't like me Janice WanNa keep me alive so ninette and happy but he I would give him so many things and it was like nothing was making it right and it got so bad. He tried to take out extra life insurance because he was sure he wasn't going to make it. And you know how God works. He sends people longer path. When it's just your bleakest darkest hour and shows you something you would not have listened to previously and incomes a Representative or actually. We had a a one of our bottom representatives. Tell us about this country. This company called vibrant labs and they did A lot of blood work with just a little bit of blood and we were very excited about it because we thought well you know. We don't really know what we need to have run. We've got a pretty good deal going with our lab companies. Now you guys get great pricing on the labs we you know. I don't know how this is going to help us. And she said but they'll do a gluten test on you and wheat sensitivity and food sensitivity testing and and maybe Dr Lisk and find out what's wrong so when we did the testing at that time it was a blood draw and it had to be a person that came to your office or they came to your house and they drew the blood and then it was sent off Which we did and Dr. Louis came back that he was not only gluten intolerant but he was borderline Celia disease. Which is what that turns into if it's uncontrolled so you know telling someone to quit eating gluten and then seeing it on a on a report where it's glaring at you telling you this is the result of you. Eating gluten is two different things which made us want to start offering this test. So Dr Lewis Stop Gluten. He thought well that's the issue. I'll stop it. He did and immediately. He started feeling better and I thought so. I did the test mine. Wasn't that bad. It wasn't great turns out that anybody who lives in the United States has it to some degree because of the Chemical crawls and the increase in gluten in the grange compared to what it was a few decades ago right and so we both more so than I will make sure he does not eat gluten in a meal and I cannot tell you the difference in how you feel with your digestive system. You know if you're suffering from you know things like bloating and brain fog and and you eat something that you just feel like it. Just you can't. You're not gonNA ever process it. It's probably because you have some sort of an allergy to it But belly pain diarrhoea. Muscle pain anxiety. Headaches nausea confusion numbness. They're all signs of it. And frankly with the lab testing the way it was at the time. And I know many of you and I'm sweating explaining this many of you've been asking us when you're GonNa get this going because we really want to do this We couldn't count on having a person that would draw the blood all the time everywhere because we are able to to draw lab across the United States. It's not always convenient place for someone to get drawn so vibrant look really just came out with The ability to have it as a finger prick test in your home so the way it works is we've said everything up on our website. It's under Specialty panels tab at the top and it explains to you. What all is in this test? And these tests that we've seen before because Dr has looked at them many times from different companies there about three thousand dollars to run what we're running for six hundred dollars and the fact that it can be a finger prick test in your home so you're secure. You don't have to go to a lab which a lot of people are scared of now and it doesn't take that much blood to do. All of this is just. We're just so excited to be bringing it to you But they have what? You're what you'll get for that six hundred dollars as a wheat. Zumur panel a leaky gut panel and a food sensitivity profile panel of ninety. Six foods Where'd you fill out the Hell Star Bay? If you've not done our health survey it'll ask you it. It includes Wheat Gluten and electons. And then you'll be able to pick two more primary foods that you eat the most of and those are added but it it detects wieght and gluten related disorders it aids in this specific recognition of antibodies to wheat peptides including gluten and non gluten components along with intestinal permeability. It allows detection of protein. Antibodies associated with wheat and gluten sensitivities. Were information to reduce monitor and manage the inflammatory effects of those sensitivities. So you'll be able to tail and it. It gives it to you in beautiful reports. It tells you what you may be missing nutritionally not specifically our products but just in general which Dr Lewis will turn around and come up with products that are ours to correlate to these tests. So that you'll know which things you need. So Dr Lewis. Can you explain to us? How Leaky Gut. Why why would we test for that so much? You know what? What is it? We're trying to see with leaky gut. Well the Gluten Causes Zanjan Zanjan opens up the gaps and then the leaky gut can absorb poorly digested food. Proteins back to our microbes and it gets things in your blood stains bloodstream. You don't really want It's just a bad thing. A you know anybody. Listen to enough my podcast. Now that I get in different moods well. I'm in a different mood today. You know you know my main thing I want to say. Today's it's you know we. We named this thing. It's hard to run your Fort It's also hard to lose weight when you have overactive knife and fork so folks you've gotta take responsibility Lake Innis is very very very common number. We'll get into maybe a little bit of detail but you know I looked up. Some research and it said leaking can be reduced by Herbs Courson Journal and Pharmacology And we have had trouble keeping our courson slash Brahma Lane in stock although we have in stock now because there was plenty of research that says corser tend to really really good for things that are Respiratory illnesses you. Draw your own conclusion there but It's really good because it has not just the Carson but rude and Brahma Lane. Pat Pain Pancreatic and which includes lap as protease and analyze. Because you need the enzymes and it's really really good. My Barranca have always always been a my weak area and I've been talking to in the morning to at night and you know it also lowers inflammation because that shows in your c reactive protein. Her chance heart attack and stroke and I've been taking it home I got. I feel better than I felt in years but given up. The gluten was good thing so think about the gut leak in this can be reduced by taking a course. It's not just about lowering your c reactive protein. It's about all kinds of other things. I'd say get away from grains I have plenty of stuff here depend on how much you WanNa get into but You have to you know. Had One patient says well. I did a test and I learned to get off of whatever food was bothering her. The number one is weight Number two is milk like if you have colitis or IBS and again if you WANNA really

Dr Lewis Dr. Louis Food Sensitivity Janice Wan Herbs Courson Journal And Phar United States Headaches Dr Lisk Zanjan Zanjan Tara Representative Pat Pain Janet Barranca Brahma Lane Bloating IBS Carson Corser
"grange" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"grange" Discussed on KCRW

"News I'm David Grange and I'm no well king good morning more than a hundred years ago an influenza pandemic swept across the world a new work of audio art posted online tries to bring voices from nineteen eighteen to life here's NPR's neda Ulaby the voices are not real their computerized the richness paper stories from nineteen eighteen when the so called Spanish flu ravaged the planet these stories still feel timely a man with a cold can easily throw it twelve feet by sneeze therefore he must be kept at a distance sneezing and coughing on screen by a handkerchief should be regarded as a missile the word this is called radio influenza it was created by artist Jordan basement I wanted it to sound like some broadcast from a dystopian future so what we hear our artificial voices that are manipulated to sounds kind of real there is a danger of panic if you create an unreasoning a culture of fear then you create anxiety hatred hostility basement started this project two years ago to coincide with the hundredth anniversary of the flu pandemic that killed more than fifty million people worldwide on the radio influence a website there's an audio entry for each day of that year April twenty third reading a fragment of news from that day sometimes verbatim sometimes cobbled together from various stories here's a headline from a hundred and two years ago today after influenza rabies just like today reported was fraught sometimes even sensational in these dispatches from the pastor filled with their ERISA quizlet to fake news the flu is blamed on German U. boats on jazz on immigrants and non Jews Jews says a medical man enjoy immunity from influenza while Jordan basement was doing his research he says he was not prepared for the extreme behavior caused by the influenza scare so much so that I had to stop putting that stuff in there because it was unbelievable what people actually did to one another because they were so on well and they couldn't stand it any longer the psychological impact of having influenza and what that did to people how depressed it made people have suicidal would make people how homicidal and meet people the tragic death of Mr J. Hann builder and undertaker of Mason took place on Monday when he was found with his throat cut the deceased had suffered recently from influenza even stories of scientific optimism or a little heartbreaking like this one from June twenty eighth nineteen eighteen a new method of preparing vaccines is described in the lawn sits by captain David Thompson and captain David lease which the writers think may result in the complete mastery of infectious diseases or discount that's the thing that I find the most confusing and also the most human artist Jordan basement we haven't learned from history you know we don't do it in our personal lives and in our collective lives these things take away from examining hundreds of news stories from nineteen eighteen is simple the only way that we're gonna survive this thing is if we share what we have in this if we pool our resources if we pull our information if we trust one another and to recognize that we are creative and we are powerful and that we do have opportunities to behave differently we need each other now more than ever sometimes art works as a consolation radio influenza says Jordan baseman is a warning not at liberty NPR news in nineteen seventy this song hit the top ten why can I touch you was a hit for twenty year old Ronnie Dyson but outside of one big role on Broadway he never scored another hit song mark Anthony Neal says we're missing out Neil is the author of what the music said black popular music and black public culture he chose Ronnie Dyson for our series one hit wonders second best songs why can't I touch you you know it doesn't sound like it is going to sound weird it doesn't sound like a black record no it sounds like a real kind of mainstream pop song you know something to Glen Campbell might have sang his forte really was to show to he got signed if need seventeen to appear in the musical hair and in fact he sings a query as well and they're able to translate that kind of moment to stardom into a.

David Grange
North Korea is testing ballistic missiles again

Hugh Hewitt

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

North Korea is testing ballistic missiles again

"Kim Jong hoon help to his old tricks north Korean fighter jets fired rockets into the sea wall Grange units launched a number of cruise missiles into CD's of exercises across the country the BBC's Laura bicker in Seoul says US missile splashed down in the sea of

BBC Laura Bicker Seoul Kim Jong Sea Wall Grange United States
How Long Does It Stay on Surfaces? How Long Can We Rely On Amazon Delivery?

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

15:59 min | 1 year ago

How Long Does It Stay on Surfaces? How Long Can We Rely On Amazon Delivery?

"From the weekend. Our young ace symptomatic cases the key to spreading the virus. Should we rethink the conventional wisdom around facemasks? How long can the virus stay on surfaces? And how long can we rely on Amazon delivery? As of last night known cases of Corona virus in the United States exceeded thirty five hundred spread across forty nine states prompting the mass cancellation of and the reordering of American public life the CDC is recommending halting gatherings of fifty people or more throughout the US for the next eight weeks if implemented fully that means all sporting events all concerts all conferences. All parades all weddings. Almost everything done for eight weeks. Bars and restaurants are closed in New York City beginning tomorrow. Tuesday at nine. Am takeout and delivery orders? Only New York City schools have closed. Ohio has suggested schools might remain closed in that state for the remainder of the academic year but Ohio Massachusetts and Illinois have gone the France route as well. All bars and restaurants are shutting down statewide quote. Delay means more people will die Ohio governor. Mike DeWine said these states are the first states to take the steps toward Italy toward a complete shutdown of public activities except for food medicine and other essentials it is unlikely they will be the last the CEO of universal music group Lucian Grange. Perhaps the most powerful man in the music business has been hospitalized after testing positive for Cova nineteen apple CEO. Tim Cook and Apple Services. Chief Ed Eq- attended granges sixtieth birthday party. Two weeks ago in shocking news. But I guess we can't be shocked anymore by anything as it's all probably going to close down. Mgm Is Shutting the following Las Vegas Properties beginning March Seventeenth Aria Bellagio excalibur. Look zoar Mandalay Bay. Mgm Grand Mirage New York New York Park Mgm and Videira. So that's basically the entire Vegas Strip. Other companies closing stores or reducing hours Nike Worby Parker all birds urban outfitters Apple Patagonia and Glossy Walmart is partially shutting down twenty four hour locations which will operate six. Am until eleven pm until further notice starbucks is moving to what it is calling to go only model. You can still walk up an order at the starbucks counter or via drive thru or delivery. But you can't stay and sit in the cafe or Patio Areas French luxury company. Lvmh said figuring it's cosmetics division to only produce mass quantities of Hydro Alcoholic Gel in order to give it to French health authorities. More people have now died from the corona virus outside of China than have died inside China since the disease. I emerged airline Cathay. Pacific is adding flights from US cities and London to Hong Kong because since the disease seems to be relatively under control in Hong Kong at the moment some people are seeing Hong Kong as a safe haven and are rushing to travel there a mere seven weeks ago. Hong Kong had implemented travel restrictions because of its proximity to mainland China. Italy reported three hundred sixty eight deaths in a single day yesterday. A twenty five percent increase making this the deadliest twenty four hour period thus far worse than the deadliest day in Wuhan's outbreak. Italy has reported two hundred deaths for each of the last three days. Italy only had its first. Colonel Related Death three weeks ago now. More than eighteen hundred people have died because of overloaded hospitals. The fatality rate and Lamberti is nine percent in the rest of Italy. The fatality rate is five point one percent Spanish health authorities reported two thousand New Corona virus cases in twenty four hours on Sunday bringing the total in the country of Spain to eight thousand cases with two hundred eighty eight deaths as the number of people who have died of the virus more than doubled in twenty four hours as the Spanish death. Toll was up from one hundred thirty six a day earlier. That is an increase of almost one hundred percent. Spain is clearly on. The Italian trajectory is France. Next it certainly seems to be going that way quoting the New York Times. France announced the closing of all non indispensable businesses including restaurants bars and movie theaters after a sharp uptick in corona virus cases. The number of French cases past five thousand four hundred twenty on Sunday with one hundred and twenty seven deaths on Saturday. Three hundred corona virus patients were in critical condition half of them under sixty years of age on Sunday. Francis Transportation Minister said the country would begin reducing plane train and bus services between cities and quote. I'd like to end the segment with some potentially good news from Italy Adrenal Aguzzi. A professor of neuro pathology and Switzerland just north of the troubled Italian region of Lombardy tweeted a chart this weekend that showed that even with the surge in deaths in Italy over the last few days the death rate is deviating ever so slightly from exponential growth. It's early days. But the lockdown might be beginning to work linked to the chart. I'm referencing in the show. Notes and Chen He wa. The European Bureau chief for China Daily tweeted this quote. Just read that Chinese medical team sent to Italy to fight Kovic nineteen comprises mostly experienced doctors from Sichuan Sichuan folks still remember how an Italian rescue team during the devastating. Two Thousand Eight Wenchuan earthquake saved many lives. The world needs more of US helping each other and quote. There has been a lot of justified. I think hand-wringing about the scenes of people going to bars and restaurants even to Disney world. This weekend seemingly unworried about anything that is going on. This is obviously a problem for one. Big reason potential transmission from people who might not know they already have the disease indeed. There is increasing evidence that it is young people people without symptoms that might be the key driver of the spread of Corona Virus. Even more so than we realized quoting. Cnn New Studies in several countries and a large corona virus outbreak in Massachusetts Bring into question reassuring assertions by US officials about the way the novel virus spreads it appears that a Massachusetts Corona virus cluster. With at least eighty two cases was started by people who are not yet showing symptoms and more than a half dozen studies have shown that people without symptoms are causing substantial amounts of infection several experts interviewed by CNN. Said while it's unclear. Exactly what percentage of the transmission in the outbreak is fueled by people who are obviously sick versus those who have no symptoms or very mild symptoms? It is becoming clear that transmission by people who are as symptomatic or mildly symptomatic is responsible for more transmission than previously thought and quote. Indeed scientists seem to be coming to the conclusion that this is what makes corona virus so insidious it can spread far before it even sickens both mergers and SARS tend to be only spread by symptomatic people. But if you get cova did you might have spread it to fifty other people before you even know it. Add to that what we've previously discussed about how scientists suspect that you're more contagious earlier. On in the disease in a study of twenty four passengers who had just flown from Israel seven tested positive for corona virus of which four had no symptoms and the viral load of specimens from a symptomatic patients was higher than from the three patients. Who had symptoms thus the global move toward social distancing? Stay home stay out of large crowds status small crowds. There's a link to chart in the show notes that shows the difference between two towns in Italy. The two are Bergamo and loyalty. Loyalty actually had the first cove in nineteen case reported before Bergamo reported. Its first but Loki. Shut down their town February. Twenty Third Burgum. Oh waited until almost a week later by March thirteenth lucky only had around a thousand cases of corona virus and those case numbers seem to be leveling out while Burgum oh has seen case numbers shoot up to two thousand five hundred and young people. I'm talking to you. Data from South Korea where they test everyone they can is suggesting that. Thirty percent of the carriers in that country where aged twenty to twenty nine. If that's not enough to convince you let me point you to an actual animation. It is literally just balls. Dancing around and environment randomly representing infections over time. Look at what happens to the infection curve when only a quarter of a population continues to circulate and three quarters of a population practice social distancing. The infection rate is significantly slowed and with extensive distancing with seven eighths of a population staying home. The infection curve is stopped almost in its tracks. These are powerful animations but they are only animations only simulations made to educate on a concept. The concept is however. This is joke. If you can stay home let me quote. The last paragraph from the story accompanying the simulation quote in one crucial respect. These simulations are nothing like reality. Unlike simulations cove nineteen can kill though. The fatality rate is not precisely known. It is clear that the elderly members of our community are most at risk from dying from covered. One thousand nine hundred quote if you want this to be more realistic. A scientist was quoted after seeing a preview of the story some of the DOTS should disappear and quote link to the simulation is of course in the show. Notes questions are being raised as to whether or not more of US should be wearing face masks. Even if we're not showing signs of corona virus infection authorities in China already mandate the wearing of masks in all public places whether or not people are sick or healthy quoting from ink stone since late January Chinese authorities and major cities have enforced rules on wearing face masks in public spaces including detaining. Those who tried to use public transport without a mask and quote in South Korea and Japan is also required. That mask be worn by healthy people in crowded places but in much of the rest of the world including here in the US. It's advised that only people displaying symptoms should wear masks as just mentioned the possibility that corona virus can be spread by a symptomatic. People is causing some to argue for more widespread use of masks quoting again from ink stone. A symptomatic transmission has been reported in multiple countries in which a spreader is responsible for sickening others without knowing it in January at cluster. Thirteen infections was believed to have started with a British man who contracted the virus during a trip to Singapore and spread it to others on a skiing trip in the French Alps and back home in the United Kingdom all the while showing no signs of infection himself quote researchers writing in the Lancet suggested that in light of this current national advice may need updating to deal specifically with Ron Virus quoting from the peace. If everyone puts on a mask in public spaces it would help to remove stigmatization that has hitherto discouraged masking of symptomatic patients in many places. Furthermore transmission from asymmetric infected individuals has been documented for Kobe. Nineteen and viral load is particularly high at early disease. Stage masking as a public health intervention would probably intercept the transmission link and prevent these apparently healthy infectious sources and quote. All of that said as of right now. The advice remains to only wear a mask if you are displaying symptoms helping to conserve the mask as a resource masks are in short supply and are needed for medical practitioners. Who them more than the rest of us. In order to safely treat people not get sick themselves and thus stay on the job. A new study has revealed the length of time that Kobe nineteen can remain viable on common surfaces. The study so new that it is yet to be. Peer reviewed found that Corona virus was most stable on plastic and stainless steel with viable virus being detected up to seventy two hours on those surfaces after application it can also remain viable for up to twenty four hours on cardboard and up to four hours on copper. The researchers noted that these decay timings were similar to those found with the two thousand and two two thousand. Three SARS virus suggesting that quote differences in the epidemiology of these viruses likely arise from other factors including high viral loads in the upper respiratory tract and the potential for individuals infected with cove nineteen to shed and transmit the virus while a symptom matic and quote. There are presently two hundred and seventy four surface disinfectants approved by the EPA for use against Kovic Nineteen Link to the list is in the show notes at this point with store shelves increasingly bear. I'm sure a lot of us are continuing to rely on delivery especially Amazon prime delivery to keep ourselves stocked up with everything we need so that we can shelter in place. Avoid going out to stores as much as possible and just generally socially distance well an article and vices motherboard talking about the broader strains to workers in the sorting facilities and also the people who have to deliver our stuff makes the point that maybe our delivery systems are endangered as well quote. Motherboards spoke to Amazon Logistics Labor experts. Who say it's only a matter of time? Before Amazon's prime signature two day delivery promise serious delays mistakes and widespread shortages due to increased demands from consumers also pressure on workers to meet rising production quotas restrictions on trade and the possibility of fulfillment centers being. Shut DOWN AS CORONA VIRUS SPREADS. Amazon's warehouse workers. Say they're already seeing increased workloads while fewer of their colleagues are showing up to work. According Labor organizers already Amazon's white collar workers have been asked to work from home. But that's obviously not an option for warehouse fulfillment workers and delivery drivers quote. It seems really likely that. Amazon's prime delivery system will falter Daniel flaming president of Economic Roundtable and an author of the two thousand nineteen report on Amazon's economic impact on southern California told motherboard. One day deliveries may not be made within one day if the workers who do show up to warehouses are more stress given bigger routes and are possibly less experienced incorrect deliveries will be made. The last mile segment of the delivery is very labor intensive and quote flaming ads. That were likely to see a close parallel of what happens in Amazon warehouses. During the holiday rush increase delays mistakes and bottlenecks. It would seem to me. Most likely that we'll see a drop in reliability and timeliness and quote but more than that the fear here is the same with the health system basically if too many people involved in the Amazon delivery chain are even temporarily sidelined by the disease at the same time. It's possible that even Amazon delivery could go down to say nothing of the potential disruption to the supply chain I e if even Amazon can't source enough goods to

Italy Amazon United States Ohio France China Spain New York City South Korea Scientist Starbucks MGM Hong Kong Bergamo Walmart Lvmh New York Times Ron Virus Tim Cook
Inside the 24 hours that shut down the sports world

The Big Story

08:52 min | 1 year ago

Inside the 24 hours that shut down the sports world

"Michael Grange is senior writer at sports net he covers the NBA or at least did before was suspended. Hi Michael Jordan. I'm doing all right. We're just trying to keep up as I talk to you and I'm sure you've seen it the. Nhl HAS JUST SUSPENDED. Its season as well. It's just remarkable How the pace of these things. It's almost kind of a symbol or an apt emblem for the problem. That that's Kinda confronting everybody is is you look at how this this issue affected the sports world and it was you know just to the pace of three or four days space three or four days? It was kind of incremental. You know people were paying. There's a little bit more urgency around it and then you know everything's just kinda come on like a tidal wave and You know that's roughly I think How the kind of manifest itself through populations is You know it's sort of a little bit of a creep a little bit of concern and then all of a sudden. It's too late and things kind of spiraled and Guy Can't really recall anything. Released a sports where the things and news and developments have come so quickly and rapidly and suddenly described the scene at the NBA game that forced the suspension of the season because that seemed to really be the tipping point. Four all of this very interesting. I mean The Oklahoma City Thunder were hosting the Utah Jazz. There was some concern that there is sort of like the Star Center for the Jazz. You know was ill. He'd been kind of exhibiting signs of I think he'd been tested for strep throat was exhibiting signs of being unwell and he was given a task for Kobe nineteen I believe the day of the game and he so he never went to the arena was home but had turned out the team's hotel but had that test been negative that he simply had a kind of a more common kind of flew his expectation plan was to play the game and the So the two teams are floor. The music is playing. Crowd is in the building. You know the the tip is approaching and right around the time when the ball would've been going up and and all of that you know one of the The team medical officials for the Oklahoma City centre kind of came running out of out of the back of the building onto a data. Deficient gathered to coaches and my understanding. Is that the player tested positive for covert nineteen. You know those are responsible came very quickly. After that it was determined they would have to at least have to postpone that game. It takes them a while to figure out how to relay that information to the crowd they did and you know within the hour almost of that decision the NBA realized that had to suspend operations for the possible. What had the discussion around this virus and the MBA or even to this virus and sports In the bigger picture being leading up to that what kind of measures I were being taken. What were people considering? Because I got the sense that this escalated very quickly you says correctly you know the NBA has gotten a lot of credit for being very proactive and a little bit ahead of the charge as a release the other North American sports. I don't know if she claimed. In this instance you know we saw how rapidly this escalated in parts of Asia and Europe and is of last week you know the the first kind of acknowledgement of the virus by the NBA was You know kind of an internal memo that was never made public but kind of out saying no players Daffy be conscious of Of you know sort of shaking hands and kind of dropping slapping hands you know. Go with a bunch of bumps fist-bump when your own or don't feel obligated to sign autographs. So he's doing about the players. I mean themselves from you. Know actions with the public The next stage of that but it wasn't taken seriously and I certainly saw players can figure doing that and The only really making a big deal of it. Which goes I think the way while people were kind of looking at it as recently as a week ago. I believe it was on Tuesday that you know the lead and and in conjunction with the other Major North American sports panel putting New Measures. About how the media would interact with players. You know they're out to keep a certain distance between players during interviews and that there wouldn't be no more scrums I'd access everything would be kind of a press conference type setting and again. That was all seen as a preventative. Measure to keep the players distanced. So that's Tuesday on things by this time we're really escalating. Really think was sort of you know where where a lot of news is really coming out and the pictures getting more grim and so on as of Wednesday afternoon the Board of Governors of the leaks representatives from each of the franchise are kind of represented. The owners of each of the franchises themselves were on conference calls in hand and trying to come up with a plan and at that point the plan. Wise try to keep playing games but maybe one to limit fans or maybe role you also game is supposed to be in Boston. Concerns about it out. Great maybe the game can be played in Boston and Detroit. It'LL BE BOSTON DETROIT. Sorta thing road game until Home Game. So you know again. It's sort of like half measures but when newly found out a player was positive then they their hands were forced because if he kind of you know the NBA is such a small community and says his travelling circus tall man. You know they they are kind of bounce around the continent gone and you. Do you know somebody on twitter. She did an exercise like this. And show that if you only need to go back is about five or six days and you see all the players that go bare played against and then all the players. Those players played against any almost entirely covered within a five day span. Certainly ten days so at that point you know it. Writing was on the wall that they you know they couldn't simply couldn't continue because you don't know who else is in fact good and it's turned out one other player it's been infected with the jazz and all the teams that have been a better played the jazz including the Toronto Raptors in the past ten to fourteen days are now kind of are now being tested so tell me what that means for the raptors in particular because they played the jazz and what it means for sports in Canada well as it relates to the raptors. I mean you know it's just a kind of a complete one eight You know they played in Utah Monday night and I was sort of the end of the longest folks up to the season and you know the raptors were to form their short handed goals. Whatever reason not to win the game getting there on the road and played the four or fatigue and all the rest of it and You know their usual kind of plucky courageous thing and won the game and and came home on the on a red eye. Charter came after the game. So theraflu red eye type flight landing in Toronto early Tuesday morning and I'll be right and they weren't scheduled to play again until this coming Saturday. So they had a few days off which is right there in the NBA schedule that you got consecutive days off and You know a couple of the coach. Nick nurse had had his own into this charity scheduled to the hotel to in our other player charity events and all that went off without a hitch around nine thirty pm ever getting -CATIONS and The of what's going on and by you know by midnight a number of players are good number of the players had contested at a Toronto Hospital. The all the traveling party with the Raptors so broadcasters medical personnel seems security personnel You know there's a party for fifty people They all were required. They've been tested. My understanding most have today and so they're just waiting for the results of that. I think my understanding is should take twenty four hours from the time the test and you know and that'll dictate next move. Seventy this in the media term advised to Not only quarantine but isolate. So you know. It's sort of isolate themselves within else but the expectation is you know about your community or your home you know and just kind of hope for the best regarding the outcome of these tests. But it's you know it's a it's a massive development as it relates to the

NBA Raptors Michael Jordan NHL Boston Strep Throat Toronto Raptors Michael Grange Oklahoma City Oklahoma Writer Nick Nurse Twitter Utah Jazz Toronto Star Center Detroit Board Of Governors Kobe
"grange" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"grange" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"She had to come to ever since the bay area which is busy and bustling difficult Jim the Goshen first time she had traveled outside of that small town and state Fisher house she said it just became this other Fisher house family standard trucker under their wing turns out she was getting ready to have a baby and they gave baby shower for her the Fisher house residents and staff they made sure she had everything she needed there was she actually had had the baby while still hospitalized the staff just absolutely celebrate the family members it was really wonderful home away from home not just physically the motion the kind of support she had was extraordinary most of our patients had to stay a long time and without question a patient is going to do better when they have love more than people over there close matter how compassionate staff to have their family members there was just essential Asians who were able to have that you could see a difference in terms of how it impacts courage family member Grange is extraordinarily helpful at a call progress we would have people are right prior to being complete it was very challenging to find adequate housing close with their when she's your house was completed it was a game changer in terms of families being able to be constantly on the with their it was a game changer for the patient and also and if you're wondering if volunteering sharing the talents are giving gifts to the Fisher house foundation makes a difference Scott sums it up here for us better when they are and in the type of care that we are providing was crucial to have them present it's an all possible this is much more challenging than Sam of course yes on on we were located story.

Grange Scott Sam Jim Goshen Fisher Fisher house Fisher house foundation
"grange" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"grange" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Process the Grange park Illinois this is Tim I'm glad you called her a great have you with us hello hello rush thank you very much for taking my call and merry Christmas thank you Sir same to you this whole impeachment thing I'm ninety percent sure will go well for all of us and the president but with the never trump prison there like Mr Romney I think if they have the opportunity to get rid of the guy if it gets that far they're gonna take it because they don't care about what we think what we want and it's nice to see all these folks given shift our time and I hope that translates into votes next year but I I am just concerned or leery that if it gets that far they're going to take the opportunity because it's creeped along all the way you know yes where how what far how far do you make it work if it gets to a trial if it's not dismiss right away I believe that the never Trumper folks like Romney who I don't trust at all and the reason I am skeptical is because they kind of hose this over before with the McCain sent a bomber Kerr and we're paying like for us we're paying over thirty thousand dollars a year for my wife and myself for health insurance and we were so looking forward to obamacare getting repealed and we were let down big time and so I just I'm skeptical and maybe you can make me feel a little bit better here well look your right to be skeptical and you don't need any evidence other than what Romney and his buddies and sad they hate the guy Romney he wanted to run for the Senate in hopes of helping get rid the trump and in another stepping stone back to maybe Republican presidential nomination sometime down the road they never Trumper is the Republican slash conservative never drummers are at one with the Democrats in their hatred for an opposition to Donald Trump and in some instances are leading the movement no you're you're you're dead on right to be suspicious about rom eight couple of stories here I alluded to one of them at the beginning of the program as a teaser this is a start Carter story headline disgruntled the Reagan and bush Iraq officials pay for anti trump and in Times Square a large electronic Billboard asking what is trump hiding appeared in Times Square in New York City yesterday the Billboard says if the president did nothing wrong what does he have to hide if I tell the truth what is he afraid of the Billboard shows trump with fingers to his mouth as well as for current former officials with duct tape over their mouths Mike Pompeii John Bolton Mick Mulvaney and Rudy Giuliani members of the media portrayed the Biltmore does work on an anti trump Republican group without disclosing who they are well here's what I our bill Kristol Christine Todd Whitman Linda Chavez Bob English and many others so bill Kristol Christine Todd Whitman Linda Chavez bobbing listeners have purchased a Billboard in Times Square asking what's trump hiding if you did nothing wrong what does he have to hide one story George Conway attorney and husband of kellyanne Conway will lead a new group of anti trump critics aimed at forging trumps reelection by the way the never traverse the job they're panicking because the Democrats a failed crystal and his buddies Jonah Goldberg and Steve Hayes all these other guys they're gearing up now even more so because the Democrats have failed to make their impeachment case of these guys are getting in gear and they have created a super pac it's called the Lincoln project touting itself as a formal step forward for never droppers it'll begin operations with one million dollars in funding commitments the group said that it aims to raise millions more to spend on ad campaigns targeting battle ground state voters with a simple message defeat trump and trump ism at the ballot box the principles of this group our Steve Schmidt who ran McCain's campaign and savage to Sarah Palin former Ohio governor John K. second visor John weaver former New Hampshire Republican chairwoman Jennifer horn veteran Republican operatives Rick Wilson and kellyanne Conway is husband these are the never transfers running the super pac call the Lincoln project designed to get battleground voters to oppose.

Grange park Illinois Tim
Ethane And The Plastics Boom

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:27 min | 2 years ago

Ethane And The Plastics Boom

"Natural gas is mostly used for heating homes or fuelling power plants but it has another key ingredient. You may not have. I've heard of ethene building block of plastics. President trump attention to it a few months ago when he visited the site of a chemical plant. Shell is building in Pennsylvania. This plant like a number of others being built in the US will convert some of the region's ethene into plastic. Trump trump told workers. This was bringing the country. Big Economic Benefits American manufacturing. And we are reclaiming our noble heritage as a nation of builders again but they're so much natural gas and pain that chemical plants in the US can't use use it all turns out this has been a lucky break for the European Chemical Company. Any US in twenty eleven. Its own supplies of pain. From the North Sea were running and low says Warrenville Chomsky an economist with the US Energy Information Administration in yours looked at the United States where ethics supply was growing in where especially in the region that no place to go and the recognize opportunity. Any US commissioned a fleet of ships the first ever to carry ethene by I see to move shale gas from a port near Philadelphia to plants in the UK in Norway. Any US officials did not agree to an interview for this story. But but here's CEO. Jim ratcliffe in a company video. I think for some of these assets in Europe. It's the only way they can survive if we can bring some of the. US Economics Lacrosse to your to the US has quickly become the world's leading exporter of ethene feeding growing plastics industries in India and China and those exports. It's are expected to keep growing back in two thousand sixteen. It was big news when usurping arrived in Scotland site. It is the first delivery for any office of Shale shale gas into the UK. It's arriving at grains mouth lead to this morning and just grain mouth is home to Scotland's biggest petrochemical plant and refinery. You can see some of the flares ears than their operating silent tears across and some of the Mandy cooling towers wretchedly onsite. Kevin Ross is president of the Scottish Plastics and rubber cessation and runs a local plastics testing company. He says American shale gas has allowed any us to restart one of its production units. The plant is now now running at full capacity. That's not just good for the thirteen hundred people who work there but for the suppliers and contractors like him which big at the nearby lab where his company tests plastic materials. He shows me what looks like a glossy plastic pipe. Almost certainly because it's made of it either nuclear nuclear pharmaceutical our military homosexual. Because it's so expensive it's height is a pipe report. Steroids is a very high performance by any US. Got Hundreds of millions of dollars in loan guarantees from the UK to retrofit the GRANGEMOUTH plant for American shale gas. But it's also pushed for its own local supply it wants the UK to allow fracking. The controversial technology that breaks up rock doc deep underground to get oil and natural gas and that plan was met with intense opposition Philip Norman with friends of the Earth. Scotland opposed fracking. Because of what he'd heard about it from communities in the US and Australia people were telling us of gas leaks who tell those like children. The headaches talks that Kellerman over the pushback has resulted in an ironic. Twist to this story in Twenty Fifteen Scotland put in place a moratorium Graham on fracking and the UK government recently did the same. So fracking is illegal in Britain. Even though it's still legal to import shale gas produced by fracking in the US S.. Leasing Claire is a railroad engineer at the Grange Mouth Petrochemical Plant. He has mixed feelings about this. I think it's good idea. The final began gas from somewhere near anything turnpike about it is Scotland said No. We don't Franken here so decided to go to Americans gays gas. He'd rather the UK get a local supply but for now he says America's boom in gas and ethene is helping him keep his job for N._p._R.. News I'm Reid Frazier in Grangemouth

United States UK Scotland Trump Trump Grangemouth Kevin Ross President Trump Grange Mouth Petrochemical Pla Shell Pennsylvania Jim Ratcliffe North Sea European Chemical Company Europe Mandy Cooling Towers Graham Franken Scottish Plastics
Man Behind the Camera

Bon Appetit Foodcast

11:40 min | 2 years ago

Man Behind the Camera

"All right so this is your second time with the pot getting our concern Osama veteran okay known at the table. No crunchy snacks crunchy snacks. No no shaking of the coffee ice loud. There are months where like weeks will go by. We're I'm like how am I literally. Don't know where your I will not have seen you for two weeks. Yeah that is basically the story of my life. Sometimes I don't even know where I am. I'll wake up hotel. Mike Oh yeah no. I'm in Appleton Wisconsin. Oh No oh now I'm in San Antonio Texas. Yeah I mean we talk about a few issues in your job in general but in our travel issue that came on May so you you shot almost the entire feature will yeah does may two thousand nineteen you were in Beirut with Andy Burgundy tracked and then you I'm just flip through the pages then you were in Taipei with Suli and also burgundy and Andy any wanted to tag on everything so that was a big photo portfolio of yours your shot in Allison Rome in spring break menu story that was just in New York yeah that was here in the building the buildings that was as basic recipe story and then you shot photos for our red sauce America package which brought you. Where did you go for this one? Oh man that was a lot. I think that was six cities L. A. L. A. Philly New Orleans. Oh my God. Where did I go? I mean you literally can't remember yeah I it was like four to five cities. I guess my first question is I think a lot of fans of yours. WanNa know like how do you end up as a staff dog for at a food magazine like whenever someone asked me about this is I'm the worst possible personnel asked because it's purely luck and circumstance stance and my only goal and still the only like hey just don't get fired and spend closing up on your six and I still get asked to come back every day and there were definitely moments early on we're Alex pollick grocer artificial photo department critic Blake. I'M GONNA kill Lau a huge mistake so you start off as an intern turn years ago yeah. That's my freshman year of college. I just wanted to do something with my life and not just go home for the summer to California and you know Oh bummer and my parents house so I wanted to find an internship and I've always had a fascination with the magazine world apply too much internships. Nobody got got back to me in like a week. Before summer started. I saw a posting for esquire magazine to be a fashion closet intern. Oh and I was like that sounds cool. That sounds way out of my reach. I am hugely under qualified for that but I'M GONNA shoot my shot and Michael Steph. who was the fashion assistant at the time got back to me? He's like when can you come in based on what oh it. Did you have background. It was the most underqualified letter ever. It was basically hey. Here's my resume. I was a lifeguard in high school. I was a high school tutor and I intern at the State House in Massachusetts in politics nothing related to magazines but I really love menswear and here's like my favorite menswear blogs and here's my favorite brands brand's. I like fashion. I can work hard and he got back to me. Can I just say that. I am a lot of times when I talked to young people who are just out of college in their writing you you know letters to inquire about a job and they read like they're written by a law firm. I'm always like learning be yourself. Be passionate sort of expose yourself so to speak but that's what's GonNa grab some somebody's attention one hundred. I think the way I showed her. The letter wasn't like the formerly hi my name's dogs home. Hey My name's Alex. I'm really excited about this. I know him not meant for this Gig but I will do whatever it takes gap and so forth and they took a chance on me and that kind of was my segue into the New York City magazine publishing world and it turns out having square on your resume. Just opens opens up a lot of doors but it was great. It was just my eighteen years old. I didn't get paid but I got to see how magazines work I've got to be on fashion shoots Justin Timberlake Lake and Ryan Gosling and wow poll like hold fourteen thousand dollar jackets and look it Nick Sullivan whose whose the editor in chief at the time Grainger David David David grange just like talk shop and like this is amazing. This is legendary and that made me really WANNA stick with it yeah very recall okay so internship at esquire. How then does that lead you to be a so after that? I was convinced that I wanted to stay in publishing. Look fashion. menswear ended up at Nylon guys Juku for a little bit complex four pins so I was very very much in that circuit as an intern just doing minimal intern work but after a couple of years I was just like this is not really what's my angle here. I don't WANNA be stylus. I don't WanNa be a fashion writer. The idea of being a photographer and fashion was just you know. I didn't even sit down. That's not going to happen so after this is my third yes approaching my third year of college. I A Internet a bunch of or apply uh-huh bunch of other internships again. Nobody got back to me. Despite actually this I'm being off and having a lot of magazines in Monroe oster I applied to like yeah a a couple of mags won't be noted but they're they're. They're okay. They just get back. I mean I saw a posting for bone apetite photo internship and I was like I know nothing nothing about food. I like pictures. I took photo classes in high school and college. So how active a photographer were you at this point. It's like I'm not active. I don't know I took a lot of fissures in high school. I had my own flicker account. I you were you were you were definitely interested. We're sitting at least and I took pictures of the school paper and stuff like that. I I was a you know an avid hobbyist as major so do you did you come in an interview like what God you the job ultimately so I went in again. It's always like a last minute. Call in showed up from Boston and I met with Jake. Ramoser are former photo assistant and he he gave me a talk. Hey so turn yeah. It looks like you've worked a lot of magazines. you have zero photo experience and you have zero food experience so you're pretty underqualified but honestly the only person here that's interviewed. That's worked at large publications so we're GonNa go with you. So that was basically it was it was Bazeley. Hey you're you've worked at reputable places so we'll hire yeah. I do think that's interesting interesting career wise like over the years. I've worked at James Beard Foundation in Time Out New York and the food's severe than G. Q. Got more fashion thing that came back to food. I was a sports writer in college like it is you can move around and I think one thing that editors employers look for is that you do have experience in in a particular field and that you know how to get stuff done that you know under you understand what the industry requires but within that sort of industry you can shoot food. You can shoot you know people. You can do all these things. You don't have to be in one lane. One hundred percent I think at the time I was taking some classes and I was also I was studying NPR print journalism at the time and I remember talking about that with Jake and he was like Oh. This is a plus because you kind of understand writing thing and photography on some level so we'll run with this so he didn't internship summer internship a year or so later. We ended up hiring you as a foot assistant no so I did this summer internship and I was like this is way better than working fashion. Everyone's so much nicer yeah yeah. It was a great time and I was like in order for me to WANNA stay in this world I can see I need to shift from fashion to food media so then I went back to Boston awesome for my senior year and as as I left Alex pollock the photodetectors times like hey we love your great. Just reach out when you're when you're graduating we can like. Maybe you keep you keep you happy. Come back so I would always send emails and I say hey just graduated like three months three or four months. I would love to come talk about a photo editor assistant role. Did you in the interim year. Were you working on shooting things. Decrease your portfolio to share with Alex to say hey I just want. I've been shooting a lot. Take a look at my stuff. Yes so thankfully because of my time I she went over to Boston magazine for my senior of college and I ended up being digital intern which basically means I was just doing every anything and everything for the website correct the king yeah yeah I remember being so proud and like twenty years old on my I've got years of intern experience. I haven't been paid for any of them but you we know I've seen some stuff like that really was my my pride enjoy worked a lot of places and they harden managed digital intern and they also gave me bill do photo take pictures and do have my own bylines socially once a lot of times when you get your foot in the door somewhere are the the brand or the magazine wherever they need people to do stuff go. You can go okay but we'll trust you. There's something trustworthy about you. Then people are all right. Go give this a shot. You'd have a DVD will keep doing it. I must really thankful that it was a web internship versus print because obviously no one's GonNa give any Interna print byline whereas it's much lower risk to teachers hey make something for lab and if it's really good we'll Polish and if not we won't publish in no one will ever or care about low budget so it was just gave me a lot more freedom and they knew that I worked at the food magazine before okay so you know how to take pictures of food. You were photo intern turn. I'm like yeah I guess I mean I. I saw Marcus Nelson. Do you like an overhead shot of something by a window so I can do that. How hard can it be yeah so I mean I I? I did it and they would. It was really cool. I mean they sent me there. Okay so we'll just have you do restaurants so they would send me like once a week in shoot for four restaurants a week and just shoot it for their website so who was giving you guidance about photos style at that point what kind of shots they wanted from the restaurants. It's nobody else really. They just assumed you knew what you were doing. The funny thing is I applied to Boston magazine to be a photo inter. I WANNA continue that path that track of being working for requirements it's but they they didn't want but then the digital department got back to me. I didn't really have communication with the magazine so it was just kind of me and our digital editor who just send me. I was like Oh this. Let's get this close enough to bone advocate and some overhead shots off light and like keep doing this and I would just bike around Boston Jason and go to a bunch of restaurants that are digital restaurant editor Chris Hughes covered and yeah it was it was really good training. It's really good training. I looking back it was really great just being able to go in and practice and shoot restaurants for relatively low risk and have that be an internship set eh great base so then I shot all these restaurants and as shooting what's in all this stuff to Alex pollick. I'm like hey portfolio.

Intern Boston Boston Magazine Food Magazine Mike Oh Alex Editor Esquire Magazine San Antonio Texas Writer Andy Burgundy Jake Osama Appleton Wisconsin New York California New York City Magazine Alex Pollick Beirut James Beard Foundation
"grange" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"grange" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"One you always wanna remain in contact with your emergency managers to report damages but also you want to start preparing yourself and become more resilient flood. Insurance difference is one avenue but we talked earlier during the break about if something would happen whether it be flooding or anything always have a point contact preferably outside of the state where you can email or excuse me where you can text and let people know you're okay and we're the rest of the family is yes because that way you're not taking up any additional space. You know bites of information go through his text much better than they do on phones and those phone phone lines need to be remaining open to the first responders okay so <hes> i digress there. I'm sorry well the north and this is important really because i want to go to that's really the day of the flood you're talking about. You're texting now whether it's be aflutter fire anything yeah yeah but he but he even even before this event hits. I mean let let's say i'm gonna roll the clock back. It was a sunday. I remember because i is working as a reporter that day <hes> and <hes> <hes> when tropical storm irene hit vermont on august twenty eighth two thousand and eleven and and i'm sitting in my office in montpellier and one of the questions i had which i think eventually answered in the affirmative affirmative. My my car is parked outside. The office at our office at the time was run on the banks of the ski river along stonecutters way so i <hes> i was sitting there and debating. Should i move my car. You know because if the water comes up over over the over the bank of the river of i'm probably even want to run from the office myself and i going to want you know one of my car. <hes> not being inundated when i exit the exit the door of the building <hes> so i actually did move my car up to the parallel street that slightly higher elevation as speak on berry street in my peeler and is cut through there and i figured if i needed to it just run for run up the hill essentially <hes> through somebody's backyard in and over to bury st and get my car there <hes> and so you've the but i mean those kinds of planning issues there <hes> what what should be what should people be thinking in general about as they eh as they here. There's a risk of flooding and they know that their neighborhood might be prone while he should be always listening to your radio station especially the local and weather alerts which we also have fema the fema app you can download in it allow. You five alerts for different areas if you travel. Maybe you work in one city and you know you live in another. You can put in different alerts or different zip codes but once.

fema montpellier reporter vermont
"grange" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"grange" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Within six weeks but there is a thirty day waiting period for flood insurance so if you purchase that today it's not going into effect for thirty days so you don't want to wait until the the last minute till you see one of those storms coming up. You know the coastline to see oh. You think it's going to peter out before it hits us or will it hit us. You know hard core so oh it's another avenue but businesses you mentioned businesses businesses can purchase flood insurance for the structure and their contents. It's <hes> renters can find out from their landlords if the property is in a flood zone and if they have flood insurance but they can get it for their contents so they could go ahead hadn't do that and then of course homeowners can get it for contents and structure so no none of us really knows what's going to happen tomorrow. You know as far as the weather. Everybody can predict predict what mother nature has her own mindset and she doesn't let us know about all. I think i'm gonna throw some nice tornadoes over here and heavy rains down here right now. We have an idea but she can change your mind so yeah that that that is true. I mean people are essentially playing the odds <hes>. It sounds like you're limited. If you have this thirty day waiting period i and you suddenly see the prediction is for nasty hurricane to be hitting being the north american mainland in the next week or so <hes> it's too late too late then if you're thinking about getting a flood insurance to guard against flooding from matt storm but let's go back to irene for a minute say you live closer to where you got impacted directly from the remnants of hurricane irene and and you got a grant from fema understand that you had flood insurance purchased for you. That would have been good for three years. You would have received a letter also saying that after that time period that gives you a breathing space to get back on your feet and recoup some money then it's up to you and you were expected to maintain that flood insurance. If you did not that means you could and that's only could be found ineligible for any future federal assistance because we've given and you assistance you know we've we purchased the flood insurance for you for three years and we want you to learn from that. That's the whole purpose of you know. All of all all of the grant fema basically represents your neighbors from across the country who recognize when an event happens in a community.

fema hurricane irene irene peter three years thirty day thirty days six weeks
"grange" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"grange" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"There's the waist then get distributed where the impact occurs is. It distributed during flight. I don't know the answers to this. That's a big big issue. You know when you're talking about nuclear waste right flying all over the world yeah yeah that is <hes> who knew that i i didn't. I did not until just the last couple of days that i'm reading a little bit about this know that we're talking about. Nuclear nuclear powered missiles now that is kind of a scary technological yeah say yeah and and have you know this is. This is the kind of thing we i mean. It seems like nothing's really changed then in russian last thirty years or so because when you you think about back the journal will which i think was nineteen eighty six <hes> the the first response to it was basically minimizing cover up nothing to see here folks yeah see the same thing going on here isn't there oh absolutely i mean <hes> everything old is new again in in that sense that hasn't changed even during the gorbachev years you know the russians were a little bit more open about things but when it came to the military and secret stuff like that even when gorbachev was the president of the soviet union <hes> it wasn't as if it was the west the opening of the west issues alright well tomsk materia syria. Thank you so much for joining me this morning. It's always good talking with you and your perspective. We will love talking again soon. I want to switch gears back to conversation. We were having having in the last segment with monica callan from the grange hall cultural center here in waterbury. We talked a little bit about the history of the local grange hall here in waterbury that now is this cultural center and i it it prompted one call from <hes> someone who said we needed to look more deeply into the grange and <hes> and then we got another call during the break from jackie folsom of the vermont farm bureau who said she would like to address the questions about about the grange itself and <hes> louis. She's on the line with us right now. Good morning jackie hey dave. How are you doing today doing well. How are you. I'm good. Would you wanna tell us about the grange well i. I am not a member and i was really hoping for one of them to call in but i wanted to clarify the fact that it seemed that the woman who was talking about them thought that they he had kind of gone by the wayside and i do want to let you know that the grange does have a really strong legislative advocacy president presence at the state house and they have a a day where they go in and they take over room chen and they visit with the legislators and i believe the person that is following legislative issues for them as jenny nelson who who is pretty well known around the community. We vermont farm bureau a couple years ago. We got wind of something that <hes> the railroads were trying to do about throwing growing up <hes> <hes> loads that go railroads and driveways go over to private property and they wanted the owners of the private property to take over maintenance so the right of ways and the railroad tracks and i did get a hold of grains because i as you had in the previous conversation the grain was founded on issues with the railroads and we went in there and advocated <hes> together as a group and we got the railroads attention and we got veterans attention and we kind of backed off a little bit so i did wanna let folks know that they still are out there and they still go to the state house. They have a legislative handbook and policies that they develop and <hes> we do work with them on occasion. So you know down the line. Maybe it'd be something they do have a really rich history and it's kind of interesting to hear <hes> what they're up to and maybe you would want to do a show with somebody from the grange and somebody from farm bureau or just from the grange but i think people need to know that they are still active. <hes> their numbers are down..

grange hall cultural center grange hall jackie folsom waterbury gorbachev president vermont farm bureau vermont farm monica callan soviet union jenny nelson tomsk chen syria thirty years
"grange" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"grange" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Up. If you look at a map it would be in the far north west of russia in in the arctic circle relatively they close to finland <hes> not an abortive but close to finland is big as you some idea where it's it's been described the city as russia's version of los alamos because the nuclear clear development and secret loopier testing in in such a so what's happened. Is this from what i can figure out from what i've been told running out of reports. The russians have made advancements in developing a missile powered by nuclear energy. Not a nuclear earlier warhead. You know just to be clear but a nuclear powered missile much like we have nuclear powered submarines and aircraft carriers the advantages are it can go faster farther farther and better maneuverability has all these advantages of the big leap and missile technology. There was an explosion last thursday somewhere in the process of the developing or the fuel mode for this missile or in the missile itself when it was test launched that's very it's unclear to me and to and many others what happened when and how but it was a severe enough nuclear explosion that at least five scientists died relatively quickly from the blast and the radiation to others have died since russia tried to cover it up but scientists around the world where he would pick up his leap in radiation action from the area and so they knew something happened and finally russia somewhat admitted what happened. This is a little echoes of gerald. Isn't it yeah <hes>. That's the immediate you know comparison being made. It's unclear a if it's as bad as noble in a sense of what kind of degree of radiation has been omitted. <hes> clearly was i said significant enough to kill five engineers relatively soon russia's secrecy abounds and so it's gonna take a long time to sign it out but people in finland they neighboring nations have to be concerned about what what kind of radiation in the air and there's another part about this. It's troubling u._s. Is according to president trump but we're developing the same kind of weapon. One of the drawbacks to it is when a new missiles powered by nuclear energy is this would be nuclear waste is generated process and and what happens waste in the missile okay so when that missile strike something for example..

russia finland los alamos president gerald
"grange" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"grange" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"It's not quite up there yet. We're yeah because we got <hes> i. I'm i'm working with the <hes>. I'm working on my website with my web. Guy okay folks. Hey let's let's get a caller on the show here jim for berries unlike good morning jim hi hi good morning. I just want to commend you on your organization's. After restoring old buildings it's great to see i like this. Put back into the you know useful purpose and and and certainly as you know an asset to the community. I wanna make a suggestion though <hes> if you're going to invoke the grains name i think you should become a little more <hes> knowledgeable about the history of it <hes> i. I left the radio on because it was about rain. I i recall background interest <hes> but <hes> agriculture is it's intrinsic to the <hes> it's up the core of history in grange was integral to <hes> <hes> to agriculture all around the country and and and <hes> you sound like you have an appreciation for it and and certainly you wanted to do right by it but there's a rich history there air of why the vermont <hes> farms declined <hes>. It's not <hes> just the blame on the federal government. <hes> you know i think even even the people themselves i think probably disagree and what what the answer to that is. Your answer should not offend anyone going to just blame it on changes in federal government that support big <hes> it. It just doesn't go there. I mean there's a whole history of the whole hurt by out. An regulations regulations were huge part of it when they put in <hes> <hes> they require them to put cement flaws in the stables in the sixties that knocked out a whole bunch of people balked tearing the bulk tank from the real complicated and and and and rich history in the in agriculture and of course <hes> and in the decline of agriculture that we've seen in recent decades i would i i gather. You're you're telling us jim that's that's exactly true and and the thing is i think you could use the grain connection as this is an extension from a community activity jiminy onto a different community activities need to history jim. I got out of the end of this segment. I thank you very much for calling in this morning. You raise a good point. Wait <hes>. There's a lot a lot more behind behind what we're talking about here. Sometimes jim i'd love to talk to you further on that so contact the grange hall cultural centre and ask for monica <music>. Hey we're about the top of the hour monica callen thanks so much for coming in alaska cultural center folks and we will be back with more than eight gram show just a yeah. I wish i had a dollar for every compliment. I get about our selection upstairs at the warren store. The season's collection boasts country casual clothing for men.

grange hall cultural centre alaska warren store monica vermont eight gram
"grange" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"grange" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"To see that happen to mom and in the process of looking for a place that was sustainable with the we tried all sorts of different buildings and and <hes> the grange people <hes> <hes> came to me <hes> came to us and said hey <hes> we are are in a place where we need to dissolve organization. Would you take over the building and make it a public. Keep it up in public use and we were like oh my gosh. We didn't even think about this. Yes this is perfect. This is wonderful and to be able to <hes> revitalize this building that i drove by several times a day growing up and in my lifetime i'm thrilled to have that happen and it gives us a place to do what we wanna do and it gives other people a place for for them to do what they wanna do too because there's not a lot of spaces like that in waterbury. That's really interesting and i'm trying to figure out i mean the grange. The national grange still is yeah going organization from what i can gather them and i've just been looking online a little bit find out about green and and you know they're they're out there lobbying for better rural broadband dan service so we know that something going on in these modern times realize related to grange. I haven't had a chance to reach out to them and get a lot of details on that. But what what why is it that the local chapter here in waterbury faded away to the point where they decided they needed to dissolve well. I can only tell you what i what what i understand not being grainger myself on. There's whole a whole bunch of things things that happened. <hes> events that happened that led up to that one of the biggest ones was in the nineteen eighties the legislation that the national legislation change to support the big firms the mega farms in this country to produce food and and so all the smaller farms sorta went by the wayside and they it was it was it was a struggle and at the same time <hes> if you know if my recollection of the <hes> the records the the local grains records that i <hes> have have seen <hes> there were some. I'm really charismatic. Leaders that <hes> unfortunately at the same time got sick or <hes> or died or and so the leadership <hes> was not where it was and everybody was struggling to save their farm at the same time and you know it was just a conflict of of you know a perfect rick storm to really make it difficult for them to continue and so when they came to us there were three people <hes> who were diligently working <hes> in the grain keeping things going and doing events and one of them had a heart attack and that was sort of the end of it because it was just it was too much for three people take three people in their later years to take on so long comes. Your group is then is completely separated distinct from the greens. You're just calling the green cultural center because it's in the old grange hall well and we want to honor the community work that they did and what we don't. We want to make sure that that's not forgotten in fact <hes> on october fourth. We're going to have a naming ceremony and naming <hes> the the the new kitchen that we've put in mechanical room to the people who <hes> we saw doing so much work for so many years..

waterbury old grange hall
"grange" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"grange" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Country. We're able to organize and have that kind of power in washington d._c. So the legislation was changed and they were able to get the proper price for their crops and for things that they brought brought to the <hes> to the market so sort of a almost fraternal organization of farmers essentially was the main germ for the things starting out yeah it was because that was that was the <hes> model that was working at that time <hes> you know is a very <hes> sort of male dominated <hes> <hes> sort of <hes> societal <hes> structure <hes> there was also a sorority <hes> it in waterbury center the re beckons were this sorority of that group and they all got together all the time and boy. Did they have fun. I hear stories about you know <unk> having dances every week or every you know several times a month <hes> upstairs and they were a little while they were having a good time. You grew up in waterbury. Is that right. I grew up in my center and what got you interested in doing in in leading this project well oh gosh well i. I drove by it every day i live. I live two miles away. I'd have to pass it through waterbury center and and you know as a kid i saw things happening there <hes> in the seventy s <hes> and then as in the eighties it just sort of died out what a lot of the activity so it was always a one it was i was always wondering what happened in that building mom and then when i was doing programming oh gosh <hes> nearly twenty years ago we we my husband and i who we create theater and so we went to the grange hall and said hey what's can we rent this out so we did programming there for quite a few years but we could only do so much because we realized that the lights that we wanna plug into theater would probably burn the place waist down where we were worried about that and so <hes> at one point we asked them if they wanted you know if we could rewire the place in have have time designated time to do the theater but they had other things going on so i think what we did was plant a seed at that time <hes> <hes> and then when tropical storm irene came into waterbury and my husband's office was destroyed and everything sort of flipped on its head it and i had been trying. I think it was three three or four times. Before tropical storm irene i had tried to generate a an arts arts center effort in waterbury. 'cause it was something that i missed as a kid. We had great support at the high school but <hes> that was that was thirteen miles away way so that was that was a lot especially in the seventies with oil embargo and driving. Was you know you only you only burn gas when you need it two so it was it was hard to get together and so it was something that i wanted and so when tropical storm irene came in. I was like wait. Maybe maybe maybe people are talking about new ideas. Maybe this is the time and so i i became a fema project champion and got a lot of information about <hes> the town and what their desires were and who was interested in that and who you know who <hes> who wanted to come on board and who wanted to.

waterbury waterbury center washington fema grange hall twenty years
"grange" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"grange" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Of course a lot of folks i think remember doc severinsen the tonight show orchestra and so on and so anyway that little diversionary music history for you i want but the grandchild cultural center is also fascinating dating me because it it seems as though you do a wide range of things not just musical events <hes> was what does the overall purpose of this organization. Would you say monica callan well. The the overall purpose is to get people together to get people to know who their neighbors are do it with <hes> in a context of sharing your talent sharing being <hes> sharing fun activities <hes> exploring our tagline is create connect and celebrate <hes> <music> so anything that fits into that is really what it's all about and it's about the community. It's a place for the community to come and share what they do and um and have some fun dylan it yeah. It seems like a nifty thing now now. <hes> is this housed in a in a place that was great hall for a long time before and now sort of getting getting a revitalization. Tell us about that well so in the eighteen fifties. Nobody's really sure what year it was but it may eighteen fifties the the bell in the bell tower says eighteen sixty three <hes> and that came later but <hes> in the eighteen fifties it was built <hes> to be a baptist church coach and over time <hes> they they every winter they would sort of closed shops and move over to the waterbury center church on route one hundred so they were only feeding one stove and after a while i think what happened was they were like well. We like you guys. Why are we maintaining two buildings buildings and so they the <hes> at the same time that <hes> they were going through that process the grange hall or the <hes> the grange range organization number two thirty seven in waterbury center was growing and it outgrew the living rooms and the kitchens chins and all the other places they were meeting and so the <hes> they bought the church and they put a floor halfway up the sanctuary and created a basically a dance hall and a meeting space and then downstairs <hes> they eventually put a kitchen and <hes> so they had two floors to to work work <hes> and and to to gather so <hes> the grange hall organization was very active of course in agriculture culture because that's where their <hes> their activities based. It's a <hes> <hes> a national group <hes> i hope i can. I hope i'm speaking properly about that's because it's so close dear to so many people <hes> <hes> in this community anyway who are still around <hes> but it's <hes> you know it was it was formed to actually create <hes> a network of lobbying interests across the country because when the railroads is came through they were not giving the farmers <hes> <hes> a fair deal on their on their <hes> crops in they're the things that they brought to the railroad to send out and so <hes> it was a really powerful lobbying force. It was amazing that all these small farms all over the country. We're able to organize and have that kind of power in washington d._c. So the legislation was changed and they were able to get the proper price.

grange hall waterbury center monica callan bell tower washington dylan
"grange" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"grange" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Now back to the dave ramsey show in your program where this tuesday morning august the thirteenth two thousand nineteen really appreciate all you listeners out there staying with us. We've got an interesting segment coming up right now. Monica callan is my next guest. She is head of the grange hall cultural center in waterbury and <hes> i. This is an institution solution that <hes> is getting off the ground. I guess it's still fairly early in its in its revitalized career. Although grange halls have a long and distinguished career career throughout american history really as a place where communities together and i want to learn a little bit about that from monica callan to i hope and <hes> monica monica good morning thank you for joining the program completely and <hes> so <hes> you <hes>. Let's let's start out with sort of current events here and i i was reminded about. I want to get somebody from the grange hall cultural centre on to talk about the overall program there and i was reminded of that because last week popping into my email mel was a news release from you talking about it an upcoming dance at the grange hall cultural cultural center. It looks like a swing dance. Tell us about that. It's <hes> <hes> swing dance at the dance at the grange hall <hes> it's with the green mountain swing band. It's a seventeen piece live big band <hes> uh-huh so they're gonna fill the stage and about real life trombone trumpet saxophone. I'll all the bells and whistles. No synthesizers incisors folks. That's going to be really shocking. No this is an old time band or an old. <hes> you know for old fashioned fun time <music>. There's going to be a vermont swings which is an organization here in in <hes> burlington <hes> but they're kind of all over the stay the kind of people from all over the state but <hes> they're gonna come down and do a free dance class <hes> to brush up and to give you the basics at six thirty thirty and then at seven thirty. The music is going to start upstairs. This is all on august twenty fourth which i gather would be a week from this coming saturday right and <hes> so get get your dancing shoes out folks and get ready to <hes> and so what i'm thinking what are we talking about benny goodman and glenn miller kinda music or yeah okay. There's <hes> they'll probably throw in a couple of other things to other familiar <hes> pieces but yeah the <hes> it's a fundraiser for the <hes> grange hold cultural center a renovation fund and the scholarship program for the green mountain swing band give <hes> they give scholarships out to kids at school to continue ah studies with music well. I have to confess one of the reasons. It's released caught. My eye was i'm a i'm an old trombone player from way back and so when i saw this <hes> this thing about a real big band coming to the scene said <hes> while that that sort of warms the cockles a little bit and and <hes> you know i just i mean i do think that there there is a lot to be said for and i wanna put it in a plug for for listeners out there. If you check out some of the big bands they seem to be a second flowering of the big band era almost sta in the one thousand nine hundred seventies. There was some great groups back then the toshiko akiyoshi. Lew toboggan big band is my personal favourite can say that so she he also was a is a japanese pianist <hes> and and <hes> she <hes> was one of the leaders of this ban along with great great tenor sax player luther back in and they they just they did some really great stuff <hes> bill watterson manhattan wildlife refuge so there's a lot of it's not just the forties people think glen miller and woody herman and benny goodman and all those guys who were terrific by the way but there was a definitely a later a later version is i don't know whether this group will get into any of the later stuff that that came out of course a lot of folks i think remember doc severinsen the tonight show orchestra and so on and so anyway that little diversionary music history for you.

Monica callan grange hall grange hall cultural cultural grange hall cultural centre grange hall cultural center dave ramsey benny goodman glenn miller waterbury mel manhattan woody herman
"grange" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"grange" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"I mean it's just the dumbest thing i've ever heard when we've got all kinds of other delivery services probably ten times better so we're going to launch a nuclear attack against russia or something you'd probably what do it from aircraft carriers closer to russia's at the eddie or what the thing that they probably views would be intercontinental ballistic missiles submarine missiles okay they would use it wouldn't it wouldn't fly planes aww burlington and sending them yeah they wouldn't. They wouldn't even fly beef baotou over there. Yeah i mean it's just doesn't make logical sense when i can't believe people. Can i think that burlington is going to attack the soviet union with an f thirty five and it's going to be at least three four five thousand miles away. Yeah i mean it's an interesting perspective you offer their friend and that's why i appreciate the callers out there. Who will maybe maybe thinking about things <hes> i mean. Can you imagine being a commander and say. I want a single pilot. I i get your point. I think i think he i think he made your point. I'm gonna move on but i appreciate the call. Thank you very much. <hes> i think it's worth noting that the department of defense and they're sort of nuclear preparedness reports which they put together on annual basis have have included that thirty five is an important part of that <hes> as an important part of this sort of nuclear the u._s. nuclear fleet <hes> whether that's f thirty five's based in vermont or graf thirty five's based in europe you know is difficult to say at this point but <hes> sort of for those who are linking the two there is the department of defense itself has said that thirty five's will need to be nuclear capable and we'll be part of the u._s. nuclear arsenal there well. There's an interesting counter. I mean i guess spreads fred's issue. Here is that the distance of burlington from burlington to <hes> some are some of the i guess <hes> more likely targets here <hes>. It's so far that you probably would not make this flight do you do you have any sense of <hes>. I mean what's your thought on that particular point their talent. Yeah i mean one of the more interesting things that happened happened during the debate that played out in the legislature a few months ago is that you know a pilot who was based in burlington talked about having flown <hes> nuclear testing runs during his time in burlington acton saying that there were nuclear weapons stored here in the seventies. I believe <hes> so obviously very different. Technology was available then available now and <hes> there's probably much stronger air inter ballistic missile capabilities and that sort of thing but the idea that nuclear weapons would be stored in vermont for foreign wars. Is you know not remote at all. What's what's that a source told me that they were <hes> there. Were nuclear weapons occasionally trucked from the plattsburgh airbase then existent down to down to the portsmouth naval air station station right down eighty nine through vermont on flatbed trucks through burlington montpellier etc so <hes> the stuff as wouldn't be brand at new who i guess is <hes> one thing to think about <hes> and the truth is a matter. Is that whatever whatever happens. We won't know about it for until thirty years after the fact so you in the military has a huge amount of discretion <hes> to sort of keep things confidential and secret so you know what does or doesn't play out <hes> you you know we all know more discretion than transparency. That's for sure hey calling mine. <hes> i wanna thank you very much for coming in this morning. Colin is the managing editor reiki digger. The end always a great guest on the show great thanks. Hey we're gonna take a brief break for some c._b._s. News at the bottom of the hour returning couple minutes with more the dave ramsey bruce lee with us. I wish i had a dollar for every compliment. I get about our selection upstairs at the warren store. The season's collection boasts country casual clothing for men and women dresses for summer weddings.

burlington vermont burlington acton russia soviet union dave ramsey bruce lee commander europe warren store fred portsmouth naval air station Colin plattsburgh airbase montpellier thirty years
New Orleans TV anchor dies in plane crash

Joe Pags

00:17 sec | 2 years ago

New Orleans TV anchor dies in plane crash

"The airplane that crashed into a house north of New York City in the town of la Grange bill state police captain Paul to court his briefing reporters as the plane caught fire three occupants on at to survive that one is confirm deceased the house also had three people in it one is missing to survive one with life threatening injuries the cause of the crash is under investigation the pilot of a small plane killed in a deadly crash near New Orleans lakefront airport yesterday radio the control tower shortly after takeoff about unspecified problems and sought clearance to return as with federal safety investigators say today also killed in the crash Nancy Parker a long time to Orleans TV journalist a man's arrested in Daytona beach Florida accused of being fascinated with shootings

New York City Nancy Parker La Grange Captain Paul New Orleans Orleans Daytona Beach Florida
"grange" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"grange" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Wall Street and if you miss a show please catch the podcast go to Wall Street M. dot com slash podcast Hey a special Joe Walsh show tonight were actually on the road we are in la Grange park and specifically we are at Memorial Park in la Grange park that's at five hundred north with Grange road if you want to come out I'm doing the show live out here it's so good to be out of the studio it's so good to be away from misty my producer and Josh my board guy and everybody back in the studio it's so good to be out with people and it's great because this is in national night out in with Eric out here he's out here with me and my love of the Jewish rye to lean is out here with me as well this is national night out a nation wide event everybody it happens the first Tuesday every single August local communities get together with their local law enforcement and you know what they have fun they they have some camaraderie they celebrate with each other because here's the problem here's the deal too often we all are having negative negative interactions with our men and women in blue time to have some positive and that's the whole point in national night out again I am in la Grange park if you want to come out and see me the address is five hundred north lagrange road it's Memorial Park I'm sitting right here beautiful night sitting right here in Memorial Park in la Grange park a suburb of Chicago five hundred north range road there's gonna be food there's going to be music man we got a we got a cover band coming up in about an hour call the evil burritos how about that I've never heard of the evil breeders can't wait for that but sergeant Matt Fellers in his whole team here in la Grange park I haven't really sat up something pretty impressive for kids and adults to interact with local law enforcement and no matter where.

la Grange park Memorial Park producer Eric Chicago Joe Walsh Josh Matt Fellers
North Korea says missile test a "warning" to South Korea

BBC World Service

04:02 min | 2 years ago

North Korea says missile test a "warning" to South Korea

"Let's talk to the South Korea based analyst Robert Kelly he's liable muse stay what we know about the type of missiles that have been developed and when that tested on Thursday wrote we're still we're still learning stuff can government doesn't share information very readily about this it's a short range that's probably the most important thing politically because the sort of informal gentleman's agreement the US president has with Kim Jong un is mostly about long range stuff that could strike the United States in one of the issue the trump of course is that he's not so great with American allies so short range which Japan South Korea and range but you know trump the sort of mixed on his opinion about allies so as long as the north Koreans only doing sort of smaller stuff like this the of the larger process with the US can continue the military exercises that this is a battle the ones that are held between the US and South Korea that's a regular thing has been going on for years yes it is which is one of the reasons why it's a little bit surprised that the north Koreans are doing this but on the other hand I mean they have a wage now they have an opening on this they managed to get some stuff out of the Americans in the past most obviously all these nice photo ops with American president help legitimize North Korea as like a real country not some weird or William cul de sac and that's a really valuable writing so now the north Koreans want to continue to push to get concessions would just start writing in the north Koreans were like the exercises to stop it would reduce south current readiness sort produce inter operability so they can get it that's great and that that reliance on the relationship pool that is our president trump anyway to have the relationship with North Korea deemed a success that's that bargaining chip yeah that's right and that's where I think serve is a concern out there in the annals community which is that the president has sort of talked up this notion as a friendship with Kim Jong on it this is sort of important it almost seems like on itself the president and you know a lot of people think with an election coming up next year complexion and a one the perception of all winter victory on North Korea even if he doesn't have so he might be willing to bend on north Korean demands in order to maintain the fiction are they useful look for affection or whatever of of of progress in North Korea I'm I'm what's the reaction to this elsewhere in the region you'll normally in South Korea and the orange contract this morning was one of people in those countries saying about it what in the south Koreans are used to this right I mean one of the things I think that westerners always kind of surprised about is how tough grants are just become so accustomed to north Korea's pretty over the top rhetoric then check normally they're worse than this right is it pretty awful stuff especially in the original Korean from the north Japan's little bit dice you're writing the Japanese been word for a while the trump is in a radic on reliable ally which sounds pretty familiar to you guys in your house and your obvious really try to flatter trouble like gold plated golf clubs literally and like tax and all this kind of stuff and you have to know the Americans are willing to actually go after short range missiles though with the north Koreans at least Japan with Grange and that's sort of a long term concerns the Japanese for the south Koreans even north cripples huge missile force I mean makes things worse but it doesn't make things really much worse because North Korea can argue a lot of damage conventional south recession in the one that's so social drug in a row but it is such an interesting situation that you know years of diplomacy could be change for a relationship that is the size based on golf clubs and hats which prison therefore could disintegrate any moment yeah that's for the Japanese concern for awhile right which is one of the reasons why I think I'll be keeps getting reelected you know we just sort of you know his party just one again as I think they're sort of eight cents in Japan the ethical conservatism nationalists in office because trump unreliable and then maybe Japan us to start building its own aircraft carriers and things like that I mean your trump is a real wild card right and then she throws Japan South Korea under the bus by only insisting on North Korea the nuclear are demi's allies on long range stuff that's going to cause a real alliance fracture and I think that's one of the reasons why the north screen shots short range missiles to create exactly at fracture thank you wrote a really Kelly is an analyst of this poem the will normally based in South Korea and live on the study from Japan

South Korea Robert Kelly Analyst
"grange" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"grange" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"The Grange Crestwood and down to the Snyder Freeway ramps, if you spot traffic problems call the Mercedes Benz of Louisville. Traffic tip line at four seven nine twenty three thirty six. Next report in ten minutes. I'm Bobby yellows, NewsRadio eight forty WFAN. This is wwl Kym meteorologist, John Belsky. Good morning drying out, for a while this morning than scattered showers and thunderstorms this afternoon into the evening. Not everybody gets the ranger. Where does rain locally heavy downpours are likely are high up to eighty five today? We're back down to seventy tonight found a thirty percent rain chance for tomorrow. High of eighty four and still showers likely at times for the weekend. That's the latest forecast. I'm wwl Kym meteorologist, John Belsky. It's seventy NewsRadio eight forty. W. H A S. Our top story it seventy five years since the d day invasion. Villes reading out of the cathedral. Enormity earlier during a ceremony remembering UK servicemembers. Right now, President Trump and French president Emmanuel Macron are taking part in a ceremony at the American cemetery in Normandy. It was the first cemetery infects by the US army just two days after d day. And when you walk through the cemetery you are reminded of extraordinary sacrifice. I saw so many crosses here with that date, June sixth, nineteen forty four ABC's, David Muir enormous either more than one hundred fifty day veterans who've made the trip for the ceremonies including Leonard ginger came in full visit to see him to pay respect that of fellows, that never made it that sleeping. Overheat. French president Macron, speaking right now. He will award five American veterans, the legionofhonor Francis highest distinction. Brian Clark, ABC news. It's six oh, two at News Radio eight forty. W. H. A S. The french. President Emmanuel Macron has just wrapped up his remarks there at the ceremony. And we are awaiting President Trump to go to the podium, and we are now going to join a navy news, seventy five years ago he is now presenting. The legion of honour to five American veterans. They are Vincent Hines Stanley Friday, Harold, Tehran's, Charles Gerardo and mall worth..

President Emmanuel Macron President Trump John Belsky American cemetery President Grange Crestwood Snyder Freeway Bobby yellows Louisville Leonard ginger navy news US David Muir UK Charles Gerardo Vincent Hines ABC WFAN