6 Burst results for "Grand Victorian House"

"grand victorian house" Discussed on The Dark Side Of

The Dark Side Of

05:39 min | 2 months ago

"grand victorian house" Discussed on The Dark Side Of

"British Vogue stylist. Isabella blow. She. Was In trance by his controversial collection and bought it for five thousand pounds. But blow wanted more. She made a deal with McQueen. If he made more clothes for her, he could live in one of her family's properties Grand Victorian House. At this point, McQueen was desperate to move out of his mother's house. So he agreed. Soon, McQueen realized that he and blow were kindred spirits despite her family's wealth. They shared a dark history filled with tragic deaths and suicide like McQueen. She used fashion as an armor and an escape from grim realities as the two grew closer blow began to call McQueen by his middle name Alexander. She thought the moniker sounded more grand for designer and McQueen obliged professionally he started going by Alexander McQueen the twenty-three-year-old designed clothes for blows British vogue photo shoots including one featuring her and her husband. It was a huge opportunity for the novice designer. McQueen's outfits were hit the British vogue spread was published in November of Nineteen, ninety two. But despite McQueen's career milestone, he was still broke twenty-something who lived primarily on unemployment benefits. He kept designing clothes but was desperate to keep his state. Payments his main source of income. Thus, it became an increasingly tricky situation when McQueen started to receive press attention soon, Aski- magazine journalist wanted to write an article about McQueen's clothing. He was excited about the publicity but panicked about a photo of himself being published. He had always been self conscious about his appearance, but he was also scared to lose his benefits. If the UK's Department of Social Security spotted McQueen's photo, they might think he had a steady income after all and cut him off. On the day of the photo, shoot McQueen and the photographer came up with an idea. McQueen wrapped his own face in gaffer's tape. It was an iconic photo that introduced the world to the designer yet allowed him to hide his identity. McQueen continued to peel back his layers through his art revealing a small collection titled Taxi Driver in Early Nineteen Ninety three at the Ritz Hotel In.

Alexander McQueen Isabella blow Grand Victorian House Ritz Hotel Department of Social Security UK Aski- magazine
"grand victorian house" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:25 min | 10 months ago

"grand victorian house" Discussed on KCRW

"S. Senate anger from the White House and then dismissals is all of that retribution good I asked John dean who cooperated with Watergate investigators and provided testimony damaging to then president Richard Nixon John dean joins us on the line Mister dean thanks so much for being with us my pleasure what how do you assess the dismissals from the National Security Council of lieutenant colonel Alexander been been and his twin brother since our restaurant is going no where in the immediate future I think this relates to is craving needs for loyalty he is now Feb fifth some revenge going after people he perceives as disloyal and obviously been men and some would fit in that category because they testified truthfully before the house seven that their testimony with relied on in the Senate trial which he did get through but in a in the practical world it would have been awkward for for the vin men brothers to continue to in some ways without amendment right as I understand it had already put in for a change of venue so to speak they were requesting to go back from the National Security Council to the at the Pentagon this is not unlike what he did with McCabe who on his last day at the FBI he fired him so he couldn't get his his twenty year pension or whatever number it was purely a vindictive act this to me is a sign of a weakness in our leader who demands largely at I can imagine for example an Eisenhower or at Truman say firing people because they were the floral they get their following because they're strong leaders a weak leader like trump half the demanding command loyalty he did it with call me when he was but you really being interviewed to stay on the job and call me said I can't do that so call me was removed it this is just been a constant pattern throughout the trump presidency Mister dean you testified during the impeachment process this year it's over now how did the process work using I think the process work but it showed what happened when one party of the Senate is in the same party as the president we're in a time a highly partisan time where it is difficult for the process to work but also even in there rationalize boats against trump or for trump I should say to stay in office they've said this is something the voters should decide told what they've done is they've put all lists impeachment char all the charges against trump on him to carry into the election and I think he's going to have to bear that burden as are a lot of senators who voted that he should get a pass at this time but surely the impeachment provision wasn't put in the work only when the president and the Congress or the Senate are from opposite parties was when it was put in at a time when the Senate was not to be selected by a popular vote but rather by the state legislatures of the of various states and that was further insulation but not unlike the electoral college modern times have made the machinery of the eighteenth century a little bit creaky of half a minute left Mr dean do you see both Republicans and Democrats trying to use this as an election issue yes I do I don't think I think the Republicans have to defend against it some Republicans who are challenging incumbents are certainly going to use it against the incumbent but no question that project we're not to Kerry and explain this throughout the election John dean thank you so much for being with us Sir pleasure Scott to address soaring opioid overdose as police officers trying to tone down the law enforcement to offer recovery help and in Massachusetts which has the country's ninth highest overdose death rate the approach may be catching up with convention drug users to accept help it's not easy for me when the public radio Karen brown reports Emily LaTavia test to sign visitors into her recovery program in a grand Victorian house K. R. Y. N. K. A. R. E. N. and she's been living here since getting out of detox last fall we get twenty four forty eight seventy two hour passes every weekend at twenty nine she doesn't mind the restrictions she's grateful she's alive to follow them after a decade of addiction I had gone down a pretty dark path at that time look obvious traces her turn around to a nine one one call last year high on heroin she'd stolen her mother's car and when she returned it a few hours later officer John Cassella of where Massachusetts was waiting in the past he might've immediately read her her rights because for the longest time the whole idea was no arrest arrest but that's not what happened he gently tapped on the car window and said he was there to help and he wasn't the stereo typical officer who was going to arrest me or get me in trouble slowly learning that we can't arrest a way out of this problem I sat in my car actually close the window on him a couple times and then I opened it a crack like what do you want and he stood there patiently and he said you know I'm here to help you I want to help you and I would roll out my window and look the other way through the glass officer Cassell explained he was part of a new partnership between police and public health and asked if he could try another time he came back to my house again and again and again Cassell is used to rejection he was the first in his small towns police department to get trained in this approach the idea is when officers get a drug related call could be fast could be an overdose they put aside the hand cuffs and just offer help anything from a warm bed for the night to a ride to detox at the very least they'll give out the overdose rescue drugs nor can and talk about how to stay alive it's kind of weird for a police officer to be talking to somebody Hey if we can use heroin for use drugs use it this way to make sure you're not alone make sure there's knocking on hand weird or not more than a hundred cities in Massachusetts have developed versions of this approach many with state or federal funding there are a handful of similar programs in other states but even as police get used to this non judgmental role it's not always an easy sell to drug users some people are very open and I'll talk to other people when I get out of here I don't want to help you know stupid cops get out of here whatever Jeffrey Goulet is an officer in south Hadley Massachusetts not everyone's at that point in their life whether they want to stop so that's another thing that we learned just the way people think as far as the people who are using addiction researcher Alexander Wally is evaluating the approach for the centers for disease control he says it's important not to push treatment too quickly especially right after an overdose when the brain is in withdrawal to have that revelation usually it's gonna take a little more time and and a little more reflection that can mean weeks or months if ever before someone accepts an offer of help they almost all say yes but I would say about half of them actually mean at the beginning there was a lot of me chasing people around officer Cassella eventually talked Emily look obvious into meeting him at a donut shop where he introduced her to a recovery coach name Susan and they stayed in touch but a few months later she overdosed at her father's house she saved herself by using the nor can they left with her and that's when she agreed to let them help her get into rehab for me it was like a tornado went through and all that was left in the center was me in like a vassal land of ruin you know and having Susan and officer Cassella there it's life.

White House John dean Senate president Richard Nixon
Police Offering Drug Recovery Help: 'We Can't Arrest Our Way Out Of This Problem'

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:06 min | 10 months ago

Police Offering Drug Recovery Help: 'We Can't Arrest Our Way Out Of This Problem'

"To address soaring opioid overdose as police officers trying to tone down the law enforcement to offer recovery help and in Massachusetts which has the country's ninth highest overdose death rate the approach may be catching up with convention drug users to accept help it's not easy for me when the public radio Karen brown reports Emily LaTavia test to sign visitors into her recovery program in a grand Victorian house K. R. Y. N. K. A. R. E. N. and she's been living here since getting out of detox last fall we get twenty four forty eight seventy two hour passes every weekend at twenty nine she doesn't mind the restrictions she's grateful she's alive to follow them after a decade of addiction I had gone down a pretty dark path at that time look obvious traces her turn around to a nine one one call last year high on heroin she'd stolen her mother's car and when she returned it a few hours later officer John Cassella of where Massachusetts was waiting in the past he might've immediately read her her rights because for the longest time the whole idea was no arrest arrest but that's not what happened he gently tapped on the car window and said he was there to help and he wasn't the stereo typical officer who was going to arrest me or get me in trouble slowly learning that we can't arrest a way out of this problem I sat in my car actually close the window on him a couple times and then I opened it a crack like what do you want and he stood there patiently and he said you know I'm here to help you I want to help you and I would roll out my window and look the other way through the glass officer Cassell explained he was part of a new partnership between police and public health and asked if he could try another time he came back to my house again and again and again Cassell is used to rejection he was the first in his small towns police department to get trained in this approach the idea is when officers get a drug related call could be fast could be an overdose they put aside the hand cuffs and just offer help anything from a warm bed for the night to a ride to detox at the very least they'll give out the overdose rescue drugs nor can and talk about how to stay alive it's kind of weird for a police officer to be talking to somebody Hey if we can use heroin for use drugs use it this way to make sure you're not alone make sure there's knocking on hand weird or not more than a hundred cities in Massachusetts have developed versions of this approach many with state or federal funding there are a handful of similar programs in other states but even as police get used to this non judgmental role it's not always an easy sell to drug users some people are very open and I'll talk to other people when I get out of here I don't want to help you know stupid cops get out of here whatever Jeffrey Goulet is an officer in south Hadley Massachusetts not everyone's at that point in their life whether they want to stop so that's another thing that we learned just the way people think as far as the people who are using addiction researcher Alexander Wally is evaluating the approach for the centers for disease control he says it's important not to push treatment too quickly especially right after an overdose when the brain is in withdrawal to have that revelation usually it's gonna take a little more time and and a little more reflection that can mean weeks or months if ever before someone accepts an offer of help they almost all say yes but I would say about half of them actually mean at the beginning there was a lot of me chasing people around officer Cassella eventually talked Emily look obvious into meeting him at a donut shop where he introduced her to a recovery coach name Susan and they stayed in touch but a few months later she overdosed at her father's house she saved herself by using the nor can they left with her and that's when she agreed to let them help her get into rehab for me it was like a tornado went through and all that was left in the center was me in like a vassal land of ruin you know and having Susan and officer Cassella there it's life

Massachusetts
"grand victorian house" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:29 min | 10 months ago

"grand victorian house" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The man in the White House the finding of not guilty in the US Senate anger from the White House and then dismissals is all of that retribution good I asked John dean who cooperated with Watergate investigators and provided testimony damaging to then president Richard Nixon John dean joins us on the line Mister dean thanks so much for being with us my pleasure how do you assess the the dismissals from the National Security Council of lieutenant colonel Alexander vin bananas twin brother since our restaurant is going no where in the immediate future I think this relates to his craving needs for loyalty he is now thank you some revenge going after people he perceives as disloyal and obviously than men and some would fit in that category because they testified truthfully before the house soon that their testimony with relied on in the Senate trial which he did get through it in the practical world it would have been awkward for for the vin men brothers to continue to in some ways without amendment right as I understand it had already put in for a change of venue so to speak they were requesting to go back from the National Security Council to the at the Pentagon this is not unlike what he did with McCabe who on his last day at the FBI he fired him so he couldn't get his his twenty year pension or whatever number it was purely a vindictive act this to me is a sign of a weakness in our leader who demands largely I can't imagine for example an Eisenhower or at Truman say firing people because they were the floral they get their following because they're strong leaders a weak leader like trump has to demand the command loyalty he did it with call me when he was it really being interviewed to stay on the job and calmly said I can't do that so call me was removed it this is just been a constant pattern throughout the trump presidency Mister dean you testified during the impeachment process this year it's over now how did the process work using I think the process work but it showed what happened when one party of the Senate is in the same party as the president we're in a time a highly partisan times where it is difficult for the process to work but also even in there rationalize votes against trump or for trump I should say to stay in office they've said this is something the voters should decide told what they've done is they've put all lists impeachment Charlotte charges against trump on him to carry into the election and I think he's going to have to bear that burden as are a lot of senators who voted that he should get a pass at this time but surely the impeachment provision wasn't put in the work only when the president and the Congress or the Senate are from opposite parties was when it was put in at a time when the Senate was not to be selected by a popular vote but rather by the state legislatures of the of various states and that was further insulation but not unlike the electoral college modern times have made the machine free of the eighteenth century a little bit creaky has a minute left Mr gain do you see both Republicans and Democrats trying to use this as an election issue yes I do I don't think it's I think the Republicans have to defend against it some Republicans who are challenging incumbents are certainly going to use it against the incumbent but no question that trumpet rest room have to Kerry and explain this throughout the election John dean thank you so much for being with us Sir pleasure to address soaring opioid overdose as police officers trying to tone down the law enforcement to offer recovery help and in Massachusetts which has the country's ninth highest overdose death rate the approach may be catching up with convincing drug users to accept help it's not easy for me when the public radio Karen brown reports Emily LaTavia test assign visitors into her recovery program in a grand Victorian house K. R. Y. N. K. A. R. E. she's been living here since getting out of detox last fall we get twenty four forty eight seventy two hour passes every weekend at twenty nine she doesn't mind the restrictions she's grateful she's alive to follow them after a decade of addiction I had gone down a pretty dark path at that time look obvious traces her turn around to a nine one one call last year high on heroin she'd stolen her mother's car and when she returned it a few hours later officer John Cassella of where Massachusetts was waiting in the past he might've immediately read her her rights because for the longest time the whole idea was no arrest the rest but that's not what happened he gently tapped on the car window and said he was there to help and he wasn't the stereo typical officer who was going to arrest me or get me in trouble very slowly learning that we can't arrest our way out of this problem I sat in my car actually close the window on him a couple times and then I opened it a crack like what do you want and he stood there patiently and he said you know I'm here to help you I want to help you and I would roll out my window and look the other way through the glass officer Cassell explained he was part of a new partnership between police and public health and asked if he could try another time he came back to my house again and again and again Cassell is used to rejection he was the first in his small towns police department to get trained in this approach the idea is when officers get a drug related call could be theft could be an overdose they put aside the hand cuffs and just offer help anything from a warm bed for the night to a ride to detox at the very least they'll give out the overdose rescue drugs nor can and talk about how to stay alive it's kind of weird for a police officer to be talking to somebody Hey if we can use heroin for use drugs use it this way make sure you're not alone make sure there's knocking on hand weird or not more than a hundred cities in Massachusetts have developed versions of this approach many with state or federal funding there are a handful of similar programs in other states but even as police get used to this non judgmental role it's not always an easy sell to drug users some people are very open and I'll talk to other people I got a I don't want to help you know stupid cops get out of here whatever Jeffrey you lay is an officer in south Hadley Massachusetts not everyone's at that point in their life whether they want to stop so that's another thing that we learned just the way people think as far as the people who are using addiction researcher Alexander Wally is evaluating the approach for the centers for disease control he says it's important not to push treatment too quickly especially right after an overdose when the brain is in withdrawal to have that revelation usually it's gonna take a little more time and and a little more reflection that can mean weeks or months if ever before someone accepts an offer of help they almost all say yes but I would say about half of them actually mean at the beginning there was a lot of me chasing people around officer Cassella eventually talked Emily look obvious into meeting him at a donut shop where he introduced her to a recovery coach name Susan and they stayed in touch but a few months later she overdosed at her father's house she saved herself by using the nor can they left with her and that's when she agreed to let them help her get into rehab for me it was like a tornado went through and all that was left in the center was me in like a vassal land of ruin you know and having Susan and officer Cassella there it's.

White House John dean US Senate
"grand victorian house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:55 min | 10 months ago

"grand victorian house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Front runner whose Cocker showing was fourth in beer Scott did grow is in Manchester New Hampshire Scott thanks so much for being with us Hey good morning Joe Biden came into the debate under a lot of pressure after that fourth place finish what seem to be his approach you know his goal for every single debate up until now is to really escape without making any news without taking too many hits that's a great strategy when you're the front runner it's not a good strategy when he came in fourth place in Iowa so he took a much different approach last night right off the bat very first answer criticizing both Bernie Sanders and Pete to judge the two candidates who essentially tied and I was starting with the fact that Bernie Sanders is someone who identifies as a democratic socialist I think that's a label that the press is gonna lay on everyone running with Bernie if she's nominate and booted judge is a great guy and a real patriot he's a he's a mayor of a small city who has done some good things but has not demonstrated his ability to and we'll soon find out to get a broad scope of support across the spectrum including African Americans Latinos but Brian said something really remarkable right off the top if this debate saying that he may do poorly in New Hampshire as well and that's just a really stunning thing to say when you are the candidate who has based his entire candidacy on being the most electable the person who can go up against Donald Trump the one that voters know and respect the most if you can't come close to winning the first two states that says something and he'd go to judge got a lot of scripting last night didn't he did and that's what happens when you when you appear at the top of the the finish in Iowa as best as we can tell at least he got questions for moderators and other candidates about his lack of national experience you know despite the fact that the current president had a reality TV background it's pretty extraordinary that the mayor of a city of about a hundred thousand is now among the front runners for the presidential nomination he was criticized by Elizabeth Warren and others for house south bend's police forces treated African Americans a disproportionate arrest rates and drug charges among other things yes I got a lot of questions about foreign policy but that is an area where Buddha just seem very comfortable repeatedly drawing on his time serving in Afghanistan there was one moment that stood out to me when the moderator David Muir of ABC repeatedly pressed booted judge on whether he would have ordered a strike on a running general Qassem Soleimani as president trump did I'm asking if your national security team came to you and presenting you with the opportunity would you take the strike it depends on the circumstances it depends if there is an alternative and it depends what the different effects would be that's my point this is not an episode of twenty four this is a situation that requires that you actually evaluate the entire intelligence picture let's turn now to where Bernie Sanders who was the other top performer in Iowa we heard Joe Biden say that thirty Sanders just isn't electable were there other moments that he had to defend parts of his record or other criticism yeah Biden recent other criticisms and this is something his campaign has raised a bit we also saw Hillary Clinton use this a lot again Sanders in twenty sixteen it's the fact that as a congressman in the nineteen nineties Bernie Sanders I voted against several gun control measures particularly multiple times the Brady bill which established background checks Sanders response was that he supported assault weapons bans all long going back to his first run for Congress voted for one during that period and that for the record he says he was representing the views of his world state at the time but that gun violence has gotten a lot worse since then and his views have changed Scott three more full days of campaigning yes so for people actually cast ballots what are you looking for well Tuesday night whether they can count the votes correctly look I mean it's hanging over everything does another candidate for herself or himself into this conversation or does this amplify the results of I would make this race continue to be focused on people judge and Bernie Sanders how does Joe Biden do and I think mostly turn out I would turn it was pretty flat from twenty sixteen and that really worried a lot of Democrats who thought that they would have a lot more energy going into this race it's just one state there were other issues so I'm looking to see what turned out as in New Hampshire and Paris got jet pro in Manchester New Hampshire thanks so much thank you to address soaring opioid overdose as police officers trying to tone down the law enforcement to offer recovery help and in Massachusetts which has the country's ninth highest overdose death rate the approach may be catching up with convention drug users to accept help it's not easy for me when the public radio Karen brown reports Emily LaTavia test to sign visitors into her recovery program in a grand Victorian house K. R. Y. N. K. A. R. E. she's been living here since getting out of detox last fall we get twenty four forty eight seventy two hour passes every weekend at twenty nine she doesn't mind the restrictions she's grateful she's alive to follow them after a decade of addiction I had gone down a pretty dark path at that time look obvious traces her turn around to a nine one one call last year high on heroin she'd stolen her mother's car and when she returned it a few hours later officer John Cassella of where Massachusetts was waiting in the past he might've immediately read her her rights because for the longest time the whole idea was no arrest the rest but that's not what happened he gently tapped on the car window and said he was there to help and he wasn't the stereo typical officer who was going to arrest me or get me in trouble very slowly learning that we can't arrest a way out of this problem I sat in my car actually close the window on him a couple times and then I opened it a crack like what do you want and he stood there patiently and he said you know I'm here to help you I want to help you and I would roll out my window and look the other way through the glass officer Cassell explained he was part of a new partnership between police and public health and asked if he could try another time he came back to my house again and again and again Cassell is used to rejection he was the first in his small towns police department to get trained in this approach the idea is when officers get a drug related call could be theft could be an overdose they put aside the hand cuffs and just offer help anything from a warm bed for the night to a ride to detox at the very least they'll give out the overdose rescue drugs nor can and talk about how to stay alive it's kind of weird for police officer to be talking to somebody Hey if we can use heroin for use drugs use it this way to make sure you're not alone make sure there's knocking on hand weird or not more than a hundred cities in Massachusetts have developed versions of this approach many with state or federal funding there are a handful of similar programs in other states but even as police get used to this non judgmental role it's not always an easy sell to drug users some people are very open and I'll talk to other people I got a I don't want to help you know stupid cops get out of here whatever Jeffrey Goulet is an officer in south Hadley Massachusetts not everyone's at that point in their life for their they want to stop so that's another thing that we learned just the way people think as far as the people who are using addiction researcher Alexander Wally is evaluating the approach for the centers for disease control he says it's important not to push treatment too quickly especially right after an overdose when the brain is in withdrawal to have that revelation usually it's gonna take a little more time and and a little more reflection that can mean weeks or months if ever before someone accepts an offer of help they almost all say yes but I would say about half of them actually mean at the beginning there was a lot of me chasing people around officer Cassella eventually talked Emily look obvious into meeting him at a donut shop where he introduced her to a recovery coach name Susan and they stayed in touch but a few months later she overdosed at her father's house she saved herself by using the nor can they left with her and that's when she agreed to let them help her get into rehab for me it was like a tornado went through and all that was left in the center was me in like a vassal land of ruin you know and having Susan and officer because cell of their it's life changing yeah yeah she was someone like me who is almost a year since the first nine one one call look obvious and officer Cassella for taking a weekly pottery class together what was the purpose of so just to get their mobile phone yeah a salad does this on his own time they sit at neighboring pottery wheels throwing down lumps of wet clay watch out for his glasses dangerous if if it will do it again not all conseillers relationships are this close he says he's reached out to about sixty overdose survivors in this town only about half got back to him and fewer still stay in contact researchers say it's hard to quantify the results they're looking at whether overdose rates are slowing down in towns that do this kind of outreach and more generally if relationships are improving between police and drug users Emily LaTavia it says if she relapses show called the police herself and start all over again for NPR news I'm Karen brown and now it's time for sports three to the NBA blockbuster in baseball mortar common cold to memorialize Kobe Bryant and highly visible way joined by ESPN's Howard Bryant good morning hours good morning Scott how are you I'm fine thanks we saw some aggressive deals in the NBA trade at the trade deadline who do you rack up as the winners and losers well and I'm not sure about the winners and losers of the trade deadline but certainly the winners and losers right now of the first half of the season you've got a look at the Lakers in the west and and the Milwaukee Bucks I think they are head and shoulders above everybody else how could you hold on for a moment our you know yes yes government for you almost got me for a second there's got yeah Milwaukee is terrific and and they're great they're holding on the crushed Philadelphia the other night I thought coming into the season that it was going to be Philadelphia Milwaukee Los Angeles in Los Angeles Lakers and the clippers but I'm not too sure about the other two yet but we've got a long way to go I think trade deadline wise I think Miami Heat got much much better they got on great good dollar they made a very good deal with Memphis I think that Philadelphia tried to shore up of making a deal with with the warriors and de Angelo Russell going to Minnesota who knows what that's gonna do maybe there's a late run there but the bottom line is coming forward right now I still think that you've got two teams in this league disappointed the Boston Celtics didn't do anything but I think it's the box and the Lakers right now an official memorial for Kobe Bryant's been set for February twenty fourth they've been calls to make his image a permanent part of the game you even rent a Poland that did I did every little Twitter poll this morning which was soundly rejected to replace Kobe Bryant triple plays Jerry west to is the logo of the NBA with cut him a silhouette the silhouette of your request yes absolutely and it would have been sitting in some ways because Jerry west was the the man behind making sure Kobe Bryant ended up with the Lakers making that draft day trade with the Charlotte Hornets and I understand add on one on one level the need or they want to want to memorialize Kobe I also understand that the NBA has been around since nineteen forty seven and maybe it's time to create a new logo Jerry west has been there fifty years since nineteen sixty nine however I do think that if you're going to think about and.

Scott Manchester Joe Biden
"grand victorian house" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:45 min | 10 months ago

"grand victorian house" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Highest standards of public service this is weekend edition from NPR news I'm Scott Simon democratic presidential candidates better on stage in New Hampshire last night all seven Joe Biden Pete who rejects Amy clover jar Bernie Sanders Tom's dire Elizabeth Warren and Andrew gang but the focus was mostly on Sanders but a judge and biking the two top finishers in Iowa and the National Front runner whose Cocker showing was fourth in Paris got dentro is in Manchester New Hampshire Scott thanks so much for being with us Hey good morning Joe Biden came into the debate under a lot of pressure after that fourth place finish what seem to be his approach you know his goal for every single debate up until now is to really escape without making any news without taking too many hits that's a great strategy when you're the front runner it's not a good strategy when he came in fourth place in Iowa so he took a much different approach last night right off the bat very first answer criticizing both Bernie Sanders and Pete to judge the two candidates who essentially tied and I was starting with the fact that Bernie Sanders is someone who identifies as a democratic socialist I think that's the label that the president's gonna lay on everyone running with Bernie if he's nominated and judge is a great guy and a real patriot he's a he's a member of a small city who has done some good thanks but has not demonstrated his ability to and we'll soon find out to get a broad scope of support across the spectrum including African Americans Latinos and said something really remarkable right off the top if this debate saying that he may do poorly in New Hampshire as well and that's just a really stunning thing to say when you are the candidate who has based his entire candidacy on being the most electable the person who can go up against Donald Trump the one that voters know and and and respect the most if you can't come close to winning the first two state that says something and he built a judge got a lot of scripting last night didn't he did and that's what happens when you when you appear at the top of the the Phoenician Iowa as best as we can tell at least he got questions for moderators and other candidates about his lack of national experience you know despite the fact that the current president had a reality TV background it's pretty extraordinary that the mayor of a city of about a hundred thousand is now among the front runners for the presidential nomination he was criticized by Elizabeth Warren and others for house south bend's police forces treated African Americans a disproportionate arrest rates and drug charges among other things yes I got a lot of questions about foreign policy but that is an area where Buddha just seem very comfortable repeatedly drawing on his time serving in Afghanistan there was one moment that stood out to me when the moderator David Muir of ABC repeatedly pressed booted judge on whether he would have ordered a strike on a running general Qassem Soleimani as president trump did I'm asking if your national security team came to you and presented you with the opportunity when you take the strike it depends on the circumstances it depends if there is an alternative and it depends what the different effects would be that's my point this is not an episode of twenty four this is a situation that requires that you actually evaluate the entire intelligence picture let's turn now to where Bernie Sanders who was the other top performer in Iowa we heard Joe Biden say that thirty Sanders just isn't electable were there other moments that he had to defend parts of his record or other criticism yeah Biden resume other criticisms and this is something his campaign has raised a bit we also saw Hillary Clinton use this a lot again Sanders in twenty sixteen it's the fact that as a congressman in the nineteen nineties Bernie Sanders I voted against several gun control measures particularly multiple times the Brady bill which established background checks Sanders response was that he supported assault weapons bans all along going back to his first run for Congress voted for one during that period and that for the record he says he was representing the views of his world state at the time but that gun violence has gotten a lot worse since then and his views have changed Scott three more full days of campaigning yes so for people actually cast ballots what are you looking for well Tuesday night whether they can count the votes correctly look in I mean it's hanging over everything does another candidate for herself or himself into this conversation or does this amplify the results of I would make this race continue to be focused on people judge and Bernie Sanders how does Joe Biden do and I think mostly turn out I would turn it was pretty flat from twenty sixteen and that really worried a lot of Democrats who thought that they would have a lot more energy going into this race it's just one state there were other issues so I'm looking to see what turned out as in New Hampshire and Paris got dentro in Manchester New Hampshire thanks so much thank you to address shoring opioid overdose as police officers trying to tone down the law enforcement to offer recovery help and in Massachusetts which has the country's ninth highest overdose death rate the approach may be catching up with convincing drug users to accept help it's not easy for me when the public radio Karen brown reports Emily LaTavia it's has to sign visitors into her recovery program in a grand Victorian house K. R. Y. N. K. A. R. E. she's been living here since getting out of detox last fall we got twenty four forty eight seventy two hour passes every weekend at twenty nine she doesn't mind the restrictions she's grateful she's alive to follow them after a decade of addiction I had gone down a pretty dark path at that time look obvious traces her turn around to a nine one one call last year high on heroin she'd stolen her mother's car and when she returned it a few hours later officer John Cassella of where Massachusetts was waiting in the past he might've immediately read her her rights because for the longest time the whole idea was no rest the rest but that's not what happened he gently tapped on the car window and said he was there to help and he wasn't the stereo typical officer who was going to arrest me or get me in trouble we're slowly learning that we can't arrest our way out of this problem I sat in my car actually close the window on him a couple times and then I opened it a crack like what do you want and he stood there patiently and he said you know I'm here to help you I want to help you and I would roll out my window and look the other way through the glass officer Cassell explained he was part of a new partnership between police and public health and asked if he could try another time he came back to my house again and again and again Cassell is used to rejection he was the first in his small towns police department to get trained in this approach the idea is when officers get a drug related call could be theft could be an overdose they put aside the hand cuffs and just offer help anything from a warm bed for the night to a ride to detox at the very least they'll give out the overdose rescue drugs nor can and talk about how to stay alive it's kind of weird for police officer to be talking to somebody Hey if we can use heroin for use drugs use it this way to make sure you're not alone make sure there's knocking on hand weird or not more than a hundred cities in Massachusetts have developed versions of this approach many with state or federal funding there are a handful of similar programs in other states but even as police get used to this non judgmental role it's not always an easy sell to drug users some people are very open and I'll talk to other people when I get out of here I don't want to help you know stupid cops get out of here whatever Jeffrey you lay is an officer in south Hadley Massachusetts not everyone's at that point in their life whether they want to stop so that's another thing that we learned just the way people think as far as the people who are using addiction researcher Alexander Wally is evaluating the approach for the centers for disease control he says it's important not to push treatment too quickly especially right after an overdose when the brain is in withdrawal to have that revelation usually it's gonna take a little more time and and a little more reflection that can mean weeks or months if ever before someone accepts an offer of help they almost all say yes but I would say about half of them actually mean at the beginning there was a lot of me chasing people around officer Cassella eventually talked Emily look obvious into meeting him at a donut shop where he introduced her to a recovery coach name Susan and they stayed in touch but a few months later she overdosed at her father's house she saved herself by using the nor can they left with her and that's when she agreed to let them help her get into rehab for me it was like a tornado went through and all that was left in the center was me in like a vastly end of ruin you know and having Susan and officer Cassella there it's life changing.

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