5 Burst results for "Graham Nash Graham Nash"

"graham nash graham nash" Discussed on Q95

Q95

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"graham nash graham nash" Discussed on Q95

"Man so good yeah did I do this already let the world and melt with and Burger King okay this we did about a month ago real quick got that one we've died in your arms tonight yes cutting through may and the final put final promotion of the look like a circular saw Bladen it's a great song okay here's one of the this I have to be quick on this one too yeah I know what it is this guy was in the studio with us yeah I think the movie saying almost great there's a picture of the Bogart our inability I loved is ninety ninety I think their rates on this is like ninety ninety only the exact opposite okay here we go again we're in the panties in the person all of you guys are good and you guys are very it totally changes from the warranty whatever our right no no that's Graham Nash Graham Nash wrote the song just the song before I go in some sort of it you can't resolve before the limo gets or something enter into it they were right right are you kidding it's a great song I think I'm on the right okay I hope this works okay is this one it won't lady gonna shows a great song and I know I I got it you've got check out all right down here we go well right yeah I hate computers.

Burger King Bladen Graham Nash Graham Nash
"graham nash graham nash" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"graham nash graham nash" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"They're correspondents and inspiration for one. Another was like a set of impossible. astaire's in real life that interesting. Yeah and this. Is You know we were talking earlier about how his work somehow felt unsettling and you know the subject matter as well when you think about these. The the subjects walking and relativity right clearly. Never getting anywhere walking downstairs. I'm inside ways all of a sudden. I'm walking back into the same staircase. I was just on like you imagine if these things were to come alive they would be frustrated. Angry the people right and act as a matter of fact one of the The one that you're talking about upstairs downstairs they That was supposedly based based on a staircase in his school. Really which suddenly says quite a bit about psychology. Don't you think well how so Yeah well I mean like these students aren't going anywhere. They're not even human. There's with human faces Gotcha. And they're kind of trapped in this what you could definitely call like like a A purposeless existence in this building. Kind of dark building interesting so he does finally achieve really great fame later in his life Like you said. He was holding exhibitions in the Netherlands in a little bit in Europe but he did want to Belgium in nineteen fifty that lead to An article in the studio which was art magazine and that captured the attention of a journalist. Who wrote about him in time and life magazines which definitely propped up a little bit Then that lead to a larger exhibition at the International National Mathematical Congress and fifty four flash forward to sixty six he was featured in Mathematical Games column in Scientific Typical American by Martin Gardner Math Magician. I guarantee that's the thing And that increased is and this was sixty six so so it was kind of perfect timing with the hippies and the drugs and the counter culture right and I guess who was it Graham Nash? Graham Nash Mick Jagger Cinema Fan Letter I made the mistake of calling him by his first name. I really. Cheshire did not appreciate Stanley Kubrick tried to recruit him to make two thousand one space odyssey see a fourth dimensional film Yeah there's this interesting article called the impossible world of MCS share that Steven poole wrote in The Guardian. That has a lot of that stuff in it but he was he was kind of like no. I'm good over here with math mathematician friends. Well once he was featured in a scientific American that led to the big daddy of if a mall he got featured in rolling stone and then after that it was it was all over he. He was huge. Yeah Dorm Room huge Four hundred and forty eight works then this doesn't count all the sketches and drafts these are like the actual final works right and like we said earlier he died nineteen seventy-two cancer. The just seventy three and I tried to find more about his family but there's not a lot out there like his sons and whether or not his I mean I guess grandkids would be contemporaries race of ours. Yeah he was born in eighteen ninety nine well great grandkids. Maybe yeah okay. I guess if his kids we're born in the nineteen twenties yeah contemporaries of our parents. Maybe sure the hold stirs. Yeah boomers may boomer boomer so that right in that that journey to infinity movie apparently all three of his children appear in it. If you want to know more about them go watch watch that. I saw a picture of him where he looked a lot. Like our old colleague John Fuller when John had a beard. Oh yeah he did. Didn't it's a little bit like him. Yeah it's it's not expecting that so there's that's right speaking. You're not expecting that Bikini Babe on corvette sure uh-huh and hooters air line.

Steven poole Graham Nash astaire Martin Gardner Math Magician John Fuller International National Mathema Stanley Kubrick Europe Mick Jagger Belgium Mathematical Games Netherlands art magazine Cheshire The Guardian
"graham nash graham nash" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"graham nash graham nash" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Everybody wants to move to California to that two thousand to see and they're like yeah I think when watching the movie and like I know from some Rackley skerry Lockwood and yeah as he has on his face you know like I think Joan Didion described California drive around assist amorphous undies you have yeah in Illinois only Kennedy yeah are we a Jacob is it as a musician was there something that someone said in in all these hours and hours and hours of interviews that you did with them that really just struck you you know that was that because music is about truth great music is about truth and and the art is about truth what all those all those artists that you were talking to who you know came before you right and that that yeah I you know there's no question that you're influenced your music is a lot of ways is influenced by other string or there's something that you heard from any of those people that was like just click for you all give me think about that first thing about but I wanna go back we said before about we just have a music the best music is truthful yes I don't agree with him it's not about essential I don't think you know I think you guys that I don't think it has to be truthful I think you have to have these have to be convincing and I think you're allowed to draw outside lines in and I think it's kind of I mean I I've rests with that for a while I I think that's in my opinion kind of misconception but I don't think that's what you're actually asking me you're asking me something in the film it was actually really striking I mean all of it was and I think that we realized when we started particularly with Eric Clapton I don't think we knew what to expect with me sitting down not a traditional interview I'm not in it I don't do that at all actually but I've been argued a lot myself and we wanted to have conversations with these people but I think we realize right away that they were being extremely candid which may have had a lot to do with it being that I wasn't a journalist or they weren't you know promoting a record or something they know you yeah you know what all these people yeah one way or another we've there's I had met Brian Wilson before which was pretty wild and most of my head yeah yes that is a common language which is just being musicians are you cut right through a lot of trust each other yeah exactly there's a lot of the lot of intuition and just having a conversation you know the other one as we are talking about and you were asking questions that they've been waiting a long time to tell stories about right no I mean that's that was something I was concerned with just asking these people to you know go back and reminisce about something fifty years ago a lot of people don't enjoy doing that can't write some can't some can't rooms remember I don't have to read the biography that they that they wrote what I love about this to you guys is that in in some ways you know the the essence of a lot of these these grades is the same as it was fifty years ago David Crosby still a pain in the **** a little bit Graham Nash Graham Nash is still more optimistic and he talks about how he believes music can change the world and John Sebastian looks the same he's still rocking the mutton chops you but I love to see that there's a spirit is the same in there in the seventies when they are in the twenties that's great I guess maybe the music in some ways keeps should you know young as well as that for one second echo in the canyon is the movie they were talking about there's a screening and Q. and a tonight the music box theatre that starts at seven PM and then tonight also and there is a screening queue in a at the arclight cinemas which is just a few blocks away from the employee X. out nicely and that's at seven thirty tonight and that's our plate cinemas dot com of course music box there dot com as well come right back to get done interest later with this.

California Rackley skerry Lockwood fifty years one second
"graham nash graham nash" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"graham nash graham nash" Discussed on WGN Radio

"And looking good in a convertible everybody wants to move to California to that two thousand to see and they're like yeah they're going to watch the movie and like I know Rackley skerry Lockwood and yeah as he has on his face you know like I think Joan Didion described California drive around is this amorphous unease at yeah in Illinois to on the Kennedy yeah are we a Jacob is it as a musician was there something that someone said in in all these hours and hours and hours of interviews that you did with them that really just struck you you know that was that because music is about truth great music is about truth and and the art is about truth what all those all those artists that you were talking to who you know came before you right and that that yeah I you know there's no question that you're influenced your music is a lot of reasons influenced by other string or is there something that you heard from any of those people those like just click for you all give me think about that first thing about but I wanna go back Louise said before about we just have a music the best music is truthful yes I don't agree with it's not about essential I don't think you know I think you said I don't think it has to be truthful I think you have to have these have to be convincing and I think you're allowed to draw outside lines in and I think it's kind of I mean I I've us with that for a while I I think that would be my opinion kind of misconception but I don't think that's what you're actually asking me you're asking me something in the film it was actually really striking I mean all of it was and I think that we realize that we started particularly with Eric Clapton I don't think we knew what to expect with me sitting down not a traditional interview I'm not in it I don't do that at all actually but I've been argued a lot myself and we wanted to have conversations with these people but I think they realize right away that they were being extremely candid which may have had a lot to do with it being that I wasn't a journalist or they weren't you know promoting a record or something they know you yeah you know about all these people yeah one where another we've there's I had met Brian Wilson before which was pretty wild and most of my head yeah yes that is a common language which is just being musicians are you cut right through a lot if you trust each other yeah exactly there's a lot of the lot of intuition and just having a conversation you know the other one as we are talking about and you were asking questions that they've been waiting a long time to tell stories about right no I mean that so that was something I was concerned with just asking these people to you know go back and reminisce about something fifty years ago a lot of people don't enjoy doing that can't write some can't some can't rooms remember I don't have to read the biography that they that they wrote what I love about this to you guys is that in in some ways you know the the essence of a lot of these these grades is the same as it was fifty years ago David Crosby still a pain in the **** a little bit Graham Nash Graham Nash is still more optimistic and he talks about how he believes music can change the world and John Sebastian looks the same he's still rocking the mutton chops you but I love to see that there's a spirit is the same in there in the seventies when they're in the twenties that's great I guess maybe the music in some ways keep should you know young as well as that for one second echo in the canyon is the movie they were talking about there's a screening and Q. and a tonight the music box there that starts at seven PM and then tonight also and there is a screening queue in a at the arclight cinemas which is just a few blocks away from the outlook that works out nicely and that's at seven thirty tonight and that's our plate cinemas dot com of course music box there dot com as well come right back Jacob Dillon interest.

California Rackley skerry Lockwood fifty years one second
"graham nash graham nash" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"graham nash graham nash" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"To realize that a vintage V. W. costs around thirty thousand dollars to begin with you see fifty thousand dollars then you need to another fifty thousand dollars at least to restore it to working order and get it ready for painting god bless her for arranging to secure us tens of thousands of additional dollars so we could pay a living wage to the artist team of artists who helped us recreate the designs on the bus so when I insisted we pay each of our art is a minimum of twenty dollars an hour which is more than what the budget called for and as a matter of her fact of well armed skip that those intuitive advice warned us of the problems we could face in completing the project she also is one who located the garage slash barn studio where we could safely store and complete the artwork of a book of the bus she was the de facto mother figure to the artists team and urging them along the way and working through their initial skepticism that we could create a truly magic bus under enormous deadline pressure the Hara stood by me and the artist went ever we hit opposition to completing this project and I will forever be grateful to her for inspiring me to do this project and seeing it through I love you honey now all know it with the show our first guest this hour is Grammy Award winner and two time inductee to rock and roll hall of fame Graham Nash Graham Nash has joined us several times before one twenty first century radio and we were delighted to have him return we caught up with him most recently after his performance here in Baltimore where he shared stories welcome again back the twenty first century radio Graham Nash thank you.

Baltimore Graham Nash Grammy Award fifty thousand dollars thirty thousand dollars twenty dollars