17 Burst results for "Graham Greene"

"graham greene" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:03 min | 3 d ago

"graham greene" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Talks and we're joined in this portion of the program by AJ rice, who is the CEO of the public public relations. A premier communications firm in the nation's capital and also a man with the pretty firm thoughts about what's happening in this country right now. Hence his new book, the woking, dead, how societies Vogue virus destroys our cultures, published by post hill press and AJ thank you for being with us. Jim bow, it is really an honor to be here. I met you many moons ago when I was a puppy. I believe at a talkers convention, so really it's an honor, sir. Well, thank you. Broadcasting legend. Your mighty kind and I appreciate that AJ. Who exactly are the woking dead on the cover of the book is this hand reaching out from the ground like The Walking Dead I suppose, or the like, who would you describe as The Walking Dead? Well, that's Nancy Pelosi's hand. You don't recognize it? No. No, I didn't. I guess the lack of the lack of makeup and the dirt on the wrist there. It was hard to recognize. That's right. So we have been fighting political correctness and the nanny state for some time. And we've always had it. It's always been there It's sort of spins up every decade or so. And then it gets kind of pushed back down. We are fighting it. We're fighting the Murphy Brown battalions, the pantsuit battalions in the 90s that we're trying to regulate our speech then and be PC. There were more people in the game though pushing back on this on the attack on the language. There were more First Amendment absolutists back then. But The Walking Dead as it sort of constituted now is much more nefarious and it's everywhere. A lot of it comes in the form of cancel culture and the sort of social justice warriors that are trying to change really or tear down, I should say, western civilization, so you've got the 1619 Project. You've got critical race theory, you have what's going on on college campuses and what used to be only on college campuses now, we've got stuff being taught to kindergartners that you used to have to go into some kind of postmodern philosophy class to hear. You know, there's things that are happening with the LGBTQ community that are attacking and sort of trying to cancel people if they have a differing opinion. So The Walking Dead are everywhere. They're in the NBA. They're in Nike either in Disney. And one of the reasons I wrote the book is because I could see that the youth, and I'm a millennial, I'm a geriatric millennial, but a millennial, nonetheless, Gen Z in particular, which is the generation after us, they're being captured by this. They're totally being captured. Jimbo, they already had a hard time communicating. I mean, this is the generation that was born with a smartphone in their hand. I mean, I could remember a VCR and a pager. I can go back that far, at least, right? Oh yeah. So yeah, so that's one of the reasons I wrote it. It's a cultural virus. It's a Vogue virus. I do believe there's an expiration date on it. But the book, we try to have some fun, there's vignettes in the book. We poke fun at a lot of different aspects of where this stuff pops up. Yeah. And you talk about how it's gotten worse. Idaho wonder that it's gotten worse. You've had another generation who's been put through the indoctrination factory. I mean, if we continue at this rate and allow our young people to continue going through the indoctrination factory, there won't be many of you and me left in a few more years. Correct. And when people ask me where did this come from? I mean, it didn't come from the 90s. This is been part of the sort of long march through the institutions that really predates World War I. You had trendy Marxism show up on America's shores. And they surveyed a landscape a hundred years ago and they kind of dawned on them that they're not going to get a worker's revolution from a bunch of plumbers, longshoremen, lumberjacks, carpenters, bricklayers, and they needed different foot soldiers. They needed different people to sort of carry their message out because they weren't going to no matter what they thought they was going to happen with unions. And no matter how many socialists they thought they could maybe get elected, it wasn't going to happen here the way it did with the romanovs being murdered and overthrown to create the USSR. So where did they look? Well, they looked at academia. They looked at the media. They looked at the theater districts and the entertainment industry, which eventually beyond Broadway became Hollywood and silent pictures. And they found home in the Democrat party with everyone from Margaret Sanger to Woodrow Wilson. And if you fast forward a hundred years, Jimbo, I mean, these are the same villains we're fighting now. The same crew, the only difference is they have big tech now, which kind of acts as a force field for them. It kind of acts as their midair refueling tanker. It gives them the ability to deplatform, demonetize, shadow ban, a hundred years ago, if you wanted to censor Twain or Hemingway or the Bible or Graham Greene or whoever, it took a lot of effort to do that, you know? And even a hundred years ago, the push against some literature that was out there was mostly coming from religious groups that found certain things to libertine for the times

AJ rice post hill press Jim bow Murphy Brown Nancy Pelosi Jimbo NBA Nike Disney Idaho USSR America Margaret Sanger Democrat party Woodrow Wilson Hollywood Graham Greene Hemingway Twain
"graham greene" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

03:45 min | Last month

"graham greene" Discussed on American Scandal

"Bartlett's rounds a bend, approaching the house. As she pulls into the garage, the boy suddenly burst out of the car, pushing and selling. Bartlett shakes her head. That's boys for you. After this long morning she can't wait to draw a bath and let Robert be the parent for the rest of the afternoon. Bartlett's gathers her purse and steps out of the car. But when she enters the house, she notices the boys standing in the kitchen, completely still. Her eldest son then turns and looks at her, his eyes, wide with fear. Barley feels her adrenaline suddenly kick in. She races past her boys, her stomach and her throat. It's her husband Robert. He's sitting at the kitchen table shaking. Babbling, trying to talk but not making any sense. His eyes look glazed over. He's sitting with one sock barely on his left foot, the other hanging in his hand. Immediately thanks her husband must be having a stroke. She snaps into action, ordering the boys to go downstairs, and she races to the kitchen, grabs the phone and dials their neighbor, a doctor. The man says he'll be right over. Arledge hangs up and returns to her husband, his eyes look helpless, and afraid. Marlon doesn't know what's about to happen, not to her husband, or their family. Whether these might be their final moments together. But what bartlet does know is that from this point forward, things are never going to be the same. American scandal is sponsored by audible. After watching the last episode of a spy thriller TV series, I was in the mood for more secrets lies and double crosses, and it occurred to me. I don't have to wait for the next season, not at all. Ever heard of John le carre, Robert Ludlum, Graham Greene, so many spy novels. And by listening to them on audible, I get to enjoy the dark alleys and dead drops doing chores in the car, even at the gym. And like all audible members, I get one credit every month, good for any of the many classics, bestsellers, and new releases regardless of price to keep forever. Like the night manager by John le carre, listen with me, let audible help you discover new ways to laugh, be inspired or be entertained. New members can try it free for 30 days. Visit audible dot com slash AS or text AS to 505 hundred. That's audible dot com slash AS or text AS to 505 hundred to try audible free for 30 days. Audible dot com slash AS Americans scandalous sponsored by better help online therapy. This is controversial for some, but I'm convinced mind body dualism is not a thing. What is that? The notion that your physical body and your thoughts are somehow different. I've got to hunch there the same thing, or at least very connected. We've known for years, for instance, that a healthy body leads to a healthy brain. And so exercise and eating right can be a great way to keep your thoughts on the healthy side of things too. But the opposite is true as well. Keep your mind healthy and your body follows. You'll feel less tired, less achy, less hurt. And of course, one way to keep your mind healthy is therapy. And better help online therapy is easy and effective. Better help is customized online therapy that offers video, phone, and even live chat sessions with your therapist. So you don't have to see anyone on camera if you don't want to. It's much more affordable than in person therapy. And you can be matched with a therapist in under 48 hours. Americans scandal listeners get 10% off their first month at better help dot com slash AS. That's better HELP dot com slash

Bartlett Arledge John le carre Robert bartlet Barley Marlon Robert Ludlum Graham Greene
"graham greene" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"graham greene" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"You <Speech_Male> don't have the stuff <Silence> <Advertisement> do it properly. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> He would <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> not have <SpeakerChange> the stuff to do <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> proper. He's just <Silence> <Advertisement> going to <Silence> <Speech_Male> some <Speech_Male> face <Speech_Male> that he has <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> be <Speech_Male> vehicle of some kind <Speech_Male> so he's building <Speech_Male> that vehicle as <Speech_Male> goes along to <Silence> get to the <Speech_Male> end <Speech_Male> in the end <SpeakerChange> is to <Silence> save starter. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Male> ironic end. <Speech_Male> And that's all. I will give <Speech_Male> anything away. But <Speech_Male> it's <Speech_Male> i didn't <Speech_Music_Male> start it. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Are you having <Speech_Male> given it anyway. But <Speech_Male> yeah terry <Speech_Male> ironic <Speech_Male> that. <Speech_Male> There's a lot of ironies <Speech_Male> in this in <Speech_Male> this piece. Actually <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> so <Speech_Male> it was cool. <Speech_Male> What do you have <Speech_Male> coming up <Silence> anything. We <SpeakerChange> can see <Silence> you in <Speech_Male> no <Speech_Male> no. I can't <Speech_Male> really say about <Speech_Male> anything. Because of the <Speech_Male> covert nineteen has <Speech_Music_Male> been nothing going on <Speech_Male> for the last year and <Speech_Male> a half. Yeah <Silence> how has that been <Silence> for you. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> I'm used to sitting <Speech_Music_Male> around. I'm an <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> excellent <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> getting paid to sit <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on a coaching <SpeakerChange> watch. <Silence> Movies will <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> not <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> it's great <Speech_Male> it was <Speech_Male> It was an experience. <Speech_Male> I don't wanna relive. <Speech_Male> Let's put <Speech_Male> it that way <Speech_Male> it was. <Speech_Male> It was pretty brutal. <Speech_Male> But i was <Speech_Male> able to because <Speech_Male> of this <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> i was able to <Speech_Male> keep working <Speech_Male> which was great <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> <Silence> Yeah a lot of people <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You know. I <Speech_Male> know people that haven't <Speech_Male> even gone back to their <Speech_Male> offices yet. <Speech_Male> Still working <Speech_Male> from home <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> they won't be <Speech_Male> for the rest <Speech_Male> of the year <SpeakerChange> you know. So <Speech_Male> they're going to stay <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> out of people. Want people <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> late <SpeakerChange> work from <Silence> <Advertisement> their house. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> I've been doing it a long <Speech_Male> time. And i do like <Speech_Male> you know but <Speech_Male> it takes discipline <Speech_Male> because it's easy <Speech_Male> to goof <SpeakerChange> off <Speech_Male> that's for sure <Speech_Male> it's <Speech_Male> very <Speech_Male> hard to get anything <Speech_Male> done as a consumer <Speech_Male> anyway. <SpeakerChange> So <Speech_Male> yeah <Speech_Male> yeah <Speech_Male> well. It's been an <Speech_Male> absolute pleasure to <Speech_Male> talk to you. I mean <Speech_Male> you. Just <Speech_Male> some of the roles you've <Speech_Male> done have just memorable <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> movies that have <Speech_Male> affected me <Speech_Male> and <Silence> made me think <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> you know. Starting <Speech_Male> with dances. <Speech_Male> <hes> you <Silence> know You know for sure <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> diehard was <Speech_Male> just a lot of fun <Speech_Male> so i mean <Speech_Male> that was pretty <Speech_Male> much set up that <Speech_Male> way <Speech_Male> it was <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> ever <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> longmire. <SpeakerChange> Goliath <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> really <Speech_Male> liked longmire. <Speech_Male> I actually <SpeakerChange> spoke <Speech_Male> to lou diamond <Speech_Male> phillips last year. <Speech_Male> So who <Speech_Male> was involved in that <Speech_Music_Male> i <Silence> love. Lou <SpeakerChange> is greg <Speech_Male> well. <Speech_Male> He takes <Speech_Male> playing <Speech_Male> native americans <Speech_Male> very seriously. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You know he does <Speech_Male> and hbo's <Speech_Male> it really shows. <Speech_Male> And i <Speech_Male> appreciate that. <Speech_Male> I <SpeakerChange> appreciate <Speech_Male> that kind of dedication. <Silence> You know <Speech_Male> well <Speech_Male> sir thank you <Speech_Male> keep doing the great <Speech_Male> work that you're doing <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> what <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a career you've had already <Speech_Male> and the best <Silence> <Advertisement> part is <SpeakerChange> you're still <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> at <Speech_Male> good keep <Speech_Male> in touch. <Speech_Male> All right. we'll disney <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> thank you for <Speech_Male> listening to sifi <Speech_Male> talk until next time <Speech_Male> to fill is dark <Speech_Music_Male> folk. <Speech_Music_Male> Check it out shane. One apple take two.

lou diamond Lou hbo disney shane apple
"graham greene" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"graham greene" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"In using it in other ways instead of just trying to be in space you were in that space awesome. Awesome and one of the thing. I'd love to ask you about your role on the tv series defiance again that raise some issues which i really really liked. You can't why did last. It's not on the actors at all. I thought the cash was fantastic. And i've met a lot of them and covered the show when it was on so but i just liked your family dynamic you know your role in and and really this is melting of these different cultures in this one place in the future. I thought that was really cool. Yeah we had fun doing that. I enjoyed going to work every day. In the last season they killed me off. Yes the family say dish which resulted canadian actors. Any when the the remaining cast. You know you guys just committed racial genocide on national television international television. You think anybody's gonna watch this from on. No it got too expensive to make dampers thrown the hardware that was involved with the gaming whatnot. Just tro part. So yeah i mean. Saifi was pretty much pain for those rights in addition to the production and that was way too my trilling definitely it was. I say they were just starting reasonably new right now. The things like amazon craven all getting into make movies. I just finished the one. Call goliath with billy bob sort. Oh yeah great series. Yeah bunch but. John crave in one of the deals. They managed to get his big at somebody who wanted the direct route to come in direct episode in the guy was doing six seven takes everything everybody said. What the heck is this guy. do you mean you. Have you been onset lately. I just got here believes disguise. Doing six seven takes everything just ruining in is wasting time six or seven takes. We had shot one seating completed..

Saifi John crave billy bob amazon
"graham greene" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"graham greene" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"Lasting. He was a puff of pink smoke in a rice patty in vietnam. They never did find any as what happened to him. That's what he's doing you do today. I'm sure canada so they left the only recognize to a was. They didn't want an afternoon. Wow geez learning that language in watching modern stuff in having to deal with the film michael wrote a really good script. We never be anything in a nice was touched. Who's no pink pages. Don't blue pages. what's times you get one. Looks like twenty rewrites unnecessary. It's it's it's a classic it really is. I mean probably one of the best films. Mr kochner zephyr road in or directed rather than starting really just an amazing film and the power of it is even more powerful today with the way things are so it's a message is still there of it. I i gotta give you credit for one of the thing. And i thought this was really a who was in in die. Hard in one of the die hard film. Jaren die hard with a vengeance. You your character was a new york cop and doing a perfect new york accent. And i thought that was hysterical. Because i know. I know a man who is asian and i used to work with him and he had a sick brooklyn accent. And it's funny to hear that voice that diluent coming out of that face but that's the way this that's the way the melting pot is. You know you you pick things up. Was that something you came up with or is that indiscriminate or just melted into the background in the story than the john kiernan said wait. A minute said what you sounded canadian. There what did i do and he said you said oh okay the next and stuff like that but the melt into what you're doing you disappear the to stand out if you're not a lead claridge who support. That's what it is supporting. Yeah i'm an and you did a great job. Really the whole cast was good. Obviously bruce and and samuel. I mean they're just terrific. And and and also mr jeremy as well was awesome so You know i it was. It's a it's it's one of my favorite of the diehards was glowing is really funny when they were doing the scene of the police station or assignment in the redoing it over phones always on the phone with us. Here make notes at guy over the gauge sounded. Just like jeremy irons. I couldn't believe it. I mean it's should tone ways phase. That's great really. That's that's the the life to where they brought. The reality is once they could put it up. Put it all together so we as actors credit chance to play a little better play a little harder rather than taking that part of.

Mr kochner Jaren john kiernan vietnam new york canada michael mr jeremy brooklyn claridge samuel bruce jeremy irons
"graham greene" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"graham greene" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"Tell a story is. That's what they're doing. You can for somebody to try to tell a story if he do that as quickly. They're forced to be told a story that don't do too many takes one thing you'll just make stale sour. Yeah i think too. Many takes those stanley. Kubrick was famous for that but Yeah it it's usually. It doesn't work. Tap so i i hear you there. What was it like to shoot. Departs where not giving anything away. He kind of goes kind of deeper and deeper into his own world and And had inflicts more more violence. Well we showed out sequence. We're all over the place just to keep it together. What's do the formation of getting darker darker darker is part of the craft learning. What you're doing. It's a shame to shoot his secrets. Because you know why didn't i do. I could add the eight. you know. When did they do that but then they go. Okay well all right. I didn't do that. I can make that work in the next business that we're doing in to to get into place that's darker and darker. 's not get dark. You gotta be funny as well because you lesser numerous in there because you can't force people to watch just complete madness in darkness without giving vent to to laugh here there or something to smile her. Sit back let relax get a breath of air in push. I shouldn't say push on but in march a little further into the dream of a cour- it's it's it's tough. The scene with your daughter and just really played by. Tricia raced all. I thought you did a really great job. A very difficult role to talk about working with her and And it seems like you guys gave each other. It was a good tennis match back and forth. he owner. She was great. She came in the set one day. I said oh. My god i said. How long were you makeup. She got here at three in the morning. She didn't noon. We got there. And she was all done up blah blah blah. I don't wanna lift heavier dress up but you got all this up there. It's it's going to sell it. A little more not good completely ric so we joked constantly back and forth good.

Kubrick stanley Tricia tennis
"graham greene" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"graham greene" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"Scene one apple take one scene. One apple take too well. Can we have green green distinguished actor one of my favorite actors actually and great to have you here on the podcast. Thank you as as far as claimed this guy you know. It's interesting because i kind of c. N. agreed with some of his motivations. But i don't agree with his methods obviously but yet talk about him and how you. I saw him when When you either got the script or write and read through yeah. You're you're right easy. He's he's motivations for what he's doing as the motivation is okay but these methods are all wrong. He doesn't have an idea what he's doing. Just Basically doing it in things that he's doing they're completely backwards and unreal but the method that he's doing is incorrect. All the way through but the motivation of the way things are happening in progressed is is something that been at his heart. It's basically well basically trying to save his daughter. Yeah but there's also you know a native american first nation kind of slant to To his beliefs and motivations and while some of those beliefs on their own our noble his methods or shirley. That's for sure i did like that. He i'm not sure what language it was was at navajo or that. He was speaking a wider. No idea what was well that makes two. I had to learn an idol. I don't know any accent him. Speedway which is oneida mississauga. She's just got speaking The refractory hey. I i hear you. I mean in. My family are native tongue spanish and only us older generations. Speak it the younger one if we don't speak in anymore which is a shame but that's another story as they say well we're the are people are trying to bring it back to the younger kids which was drummed out of the residential schools but she is basically concentration camps they were just trying to beat misery. Beat beat.

apple N. shirley oneida mississauga Speedway
"graham greene" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

Sci-Fi Talk

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"graham greene" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

"I say they were just starting out reasonably new right now. The things like amazon craven either getting to make better movies. I just finished the one. Call goliath with billy vaughan sort. Oh yeah great series. Yeah bunch but base. John crave in one of the deals. They managed to get his big at somebody who wanted the direct route crave to come in director episode in the guy was doing six seven. Takes everything everybody said. What the heck is this guy. do you mean you. Have you been onset lately. I just got here disguise. Doing six seven takes everything just ruining in is wasting time six or seven takes. We had shot one seating completed know so we just didn't have the luxury to do all that stuff they didn't realize that so the next day i came in to takes maximum three. Some really went bad dead. It's not a hobby. it's my living. Yes yeah exactly. Well actually defiance. I believe his on amazon so it it still app there. Yeah i mean people can still see. That's the beauty of streaming is all these shows are a new life dark vote. How do you reflect on that row. How is that like for you as a home. Dirk full is it was interesting. It was so evil. You had to be funny. When they're not on the camera's not rolling. Like i said getting getting home at night or in the morning and letting it all go leave leave. Leave your work at work as plenty of time to pick up the script. Learn the language learning the dialogue. learn the scene. Basically the best thing you can possibly ever do is pay attention to the other actors doing rule number one. If you wanna be an actor yeah you got you have to play off someone you know. It's it's very rare that you don't so unless you're doing a monologue or or by yourself in seen so yeah it's you have to have a scene partner. I think is would bring that with. You can do but everybody was flexible all time for a while. Maria started to slow down. Let's do our thing. Should drop the rains. Let the horses run. yeah. I think she's got a future i really do. I mean now is a very ambitious script. I mean there's a lot of twists and turns into story. it's not just a.

billy vaughan John crave amazon Dirk Maria
"graham greene" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

Sci-Fi Talk

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"graham greene" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

"Wait a minute said what you sounded canadian. There what i do and he said you said oh okay the next instill melt into what you're doing you disappear the tri stand out. If you're not a lead claridge who support. That's what it is supporting. Yeah i'm and you did a great job really. The whole cast was good. Obviously bruce and and samuel. I mean they're just terrific. And and and also mr jeremy as well was awesome so You know i it was. It's a it's it's one of my favorite of the diehard was glowing is really funny when they were doing the scene of the police station or assignment in the redoing it over phones always on the phone with us. I hear make notes that guy over there. The gate sounded just like jeremy irons. I couldn't believe it. I mean it's should tone waste phase. That's great that's the the life to where they brought the reality once they could put it up. Put it all together so we as actors credit chance to play a little better play a little harder rather than taking part of our imagination in using it in other ways instead of just trying to be in space you were in that space and one of the thing. I'd love to ask you about your role on the tv series defiance again that raise some issues which i really really liked. You can't why did last. It's not on the actors at all. I thought the cash was fantastic. And i've met a lot of them covered the show when it was on so but i just liked your family dynamic. You know your role in and and really. This is melting of these different cultures in this one place into future. I thought that was really cool. Yeah we had fun doing that. I enjoyed going to work every day. In the last season they killed me off. Yes the will family say dish which resulted canadian actors. Any when the the remaining cast. You know you guys just committed racial genocide on national television international television. You think anybody's gonna watch this on. No it got too expensive to make damp drone the hardware that was involved with the game whatnot. Just tro part. So yeah i mean. Saifi was pretty much pain for those rights in addition to the production and that was way too. My trim definitely was..

mr jeremy claridge jeremy irons samuel bruce Saifi
"graham greene" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

Sci-Fi Talk

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"graham greene" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

"And you've never really played somebody like this before well I did a film in nineteen ninety ninety. I guess ninety ninety one summer on it was called out the spirit of this guy that was conjured up took them on an odyssey to the forest. Nature ended up doing things completely wrong to once again is motivation was there but not right. Sometimes characters can kinda stay with you. Were you able to turn it off and go home. At the end of the day i turn it off. I'm not andy griffith. Keep i know i just went home. stared out the window for awhile. Tiger my wife. You can go home the hotel while she was having coffee. Ellen blast wine. 'cause we shot yeah so she was getting up getting ready for bid.

andy griffith Ellen
"graham greene" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

Sci-Fi Talk

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"graham greene" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

"I the tissue in venezuela yes. Her dad oscars various. Well i thought the husband and wife. I i yeah. So do you sleep in the fridge or something declared take your dick clerk pills in the morning while the fictious video whatever percent directing was was she she was really nervous. I then before we even start shooting a rehearsal she come running. I just walked through. I wouldn't do anything. I just walked through here. This is for the camera moves. This is what the cameras are going to see them just before we rolled she confronting. I want you to do this because when you when you're not doing that was for the camera just to show the mark sir. Stick with me all will be. You'll be fine in was going to do that anyway. But we'll get to it. She was fussy audible what she wanted. But after a while she's learned to just you know you just look the actress. Do their thank tele story is. That's what they're doing. You can for somebody to try to tell a story because if you do that. It's going to look like they're forced to be told a story that don't do too many takes a one thing you'll just make stale sour. Yeah i think too many takes on. Stanley kubrick was famous for that but Yeah it it's usually doesn't work tap. So i i hear you there. What was it like to shoot. Departs where not giving anything away. He kind of goes kind of deeper and deeper into his own world and Hen had inflicts more more violence. Will we showed out a sequence. We're all over the place and to keep it together. What's do the formation of getting darker darker and darker is part of the crafter learning. What you're doing. It's a shame to shoot his secrets. Because you why didn't i do. I could add the eight when they do that. But then you gotta go okay. Well i didn't do that. I can make that work in the next business that we're doing.

oscars venezuela Stanley kubrick
"graham greene" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

Sci-Fi Talk

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"graham greene" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

"Don davis. I'm the composer of the matrix. Matrix reloaded and the matrix revolutions. Hi this is. John delancey kind of the things that aren't there. Well you know. Sometimes you have the experience anyway but people at all day thanks in part because of the hopeful nature of genes vision but also because of its message of diversity and inclusions. Welcome we have. Graham greene distinguish actor one of my favorite actors. Actually and great to have you here on the podcast as as far as playing this guy. You know it's interesting because i kind of c. n. agreed with some of his motivations but i don't agree with his methods obviously but yet talk about him and how you i saw him when When you either got the script or rent and read through yeah. You're you're right easy. He's he's motivations for what he's doing as the motivation is okay but these methods are all wrong. He doesn't have an idea what he's doing. Just Basically doing it in things that he's doing completely backwards.

John delancey Don davis Graham greene
"graham greene" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

Sci-Fi Talk

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"graham greene" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

"Hi this is tony tomato and welcome to bite here on the f. t. podcast network and so parenting in apocalypse. It's it's not the same way that we would do. You know how it works. Any views usually two to four minutes long but sometimes they can be a little longer. When you when you live long enough. All kinds of strange things happen very right in saying that. The greek heroes. Where the original superheroes in part because of the hopeful nature of genes vision but also because of its message of diversity and inclusion. Green green is a serial killer the cradle in a new thriller with horrific elements in a dark fo. I kind of c. N. agreed with some of his motivations. But i don't agree with his methods obviously but yet talk about him and how you. I saw him when When you either got the script or read and read through yeah. You're you're right easy. He's he's motivations for what he's doing is the motivation is okay but these methods are all wrong. He doesn't have an idea what he's doing is just basically doing it. In things that he's doing they're completely backwards and unreal but the method that he's doing is is incorrect. All the way through but the motivation of the way things are happening in progressed is is something that stuck at his heart it's basically trying to save. His daughter is what he's yeah but there's also a native american first nation kind of slant to to his beliefs in motivations and while some of those beliefs on their own our noble his message or ceremony nut. That's for sure. I did like that. He i'm not sure what language it was was that navajo or that. He was speaking a wider. No idea what it was. Well that makes does. I had to learn an idol. I don't know any of the accent. Him speak my own language which is oneida mississauga. Just can't speak Never talked to. Did you find that working on that set help. You defied who. He was was creepy place toward a room in the back of this place was in the basement of olfactory room of a room. Full of a belichick caskets restored back in there. I should just creepy. But a casket at sees the stigmatise associated with that sort of unnerves people's like seeing snake. You know snake cantered harm if he don't arm it really while they found some incredible locations. This took it to where you're supposed to be. That was the other actor was locations through wrong. And there's no point dylan's story and you've never really played somebody like this before well I did a film in nineteen ninety ninety. I guess menu one summer on it was called clear. Cut out the spirit of this guy that was conjured up took them on an odyssey to the forested nature ended up. Doing things completely wrong to once again is motivation was there but the method was nut right. Sometimes characters can kinda stay with you. Were you able to turn it off and go home. At the end of the day i turn it off. I'm not andy. Griffith didn't keep i know i just i went home Stood out the window for awhile on. My wife didn't go home hotel while she was having coffee. Having blast 'cause we shot so she was getting up getting ready for bid look for dark fo- on vod starting july thirty her bite. This is tony to lana..

tony tomato N. oneida mississauga dylan Griffith andy tony lana
"graham greene" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:11 min | 1 year ago

"graham greene" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Mole is a word that you're credited with having brought into the English vocabulary. I think you borrowed it from the Soviets. Really? What was the origin of that? Well, I thought I've already from the Soviets. But they Editors of the Oxford English Dictionary can't find any Soviet reference to Mo. Oh, um Well, the origin Was in the notion. Off a mole of somebody who borrows deep into the fabric of our society. Is a little observed. A little noticed thing. Creature. And then from inside causes it's done for And it's certainly now become a notion. I think they used to be called sleepers in the CIA agents you put in place and you don't invite them to do anything risky, anything that could compromise them for years and years and years. While they worked their way into a position of power. And, uh, Philby was one such example. Of course, but Still be on the other hand, did Have a reporting responsibility to his Soviet masters from very early on and fulfilled it from very early on and got away with it. Coming in from the cold is another expression that you coin? Well, yes, I suppose so. A twist. I applied it to espionage. I suppose I was the first person to do that. And what was behind that? Well, um, behind. It was the character of Al agreements and the spy who came in from the cold, who was professional agent on aging professional agent who was suffering from what you might call a kind of spiritual metal fatigue. And he was offered one last mission on Dhere was told that when he had completed it, he could come in from the cold. But how did you come up with the expression? Well, it's a meteorological perception. It's cold out there and it's warmer indoors and the chill comes from from a lack of human contact or lack of Of human affection. Of having to keep what Graham keep. Graham Greene called the chip of ice in your heart all the time, which is also a writer's condition to a point. I guess that even then I was aware Of the comparability between the position of a writer in his environment and that of a spy. That both in a sense Trade off the people around them. They note things and they report Hm. Both are dependent upon the people they deceive. On both, in a sense, have to be entertainers to be accepted. How does a writer have to deceive? Well, I think that that chip of ice to which grand Green refers Is really some kind of recording instrument. LP, Hartley said. Don't leave me in your drawing room. I'm sure to read your letters. I don't read people's letters, but There is a part of me as the rest of most artists that stands back. From most experience. I never know whether that is what the French call a professional de formation. Which comes from practicing the craft. Whether people of that disposition are drawn to the craft in the first place. And how does the spy have to be an entertainer? Most of them have to have entertainment value, particularly if they are going to recruit people. If if I last we've never met, But I'm sure you're beautiful and young and elegant. And if I were Determined to obtain your services and Turn you around and get you to report upon your organization. Would be unlikely to come and have lunch with me if I wasn't a person of some charming entertainment value and knowing how to flatter people and knowing how to flatter people and more particularly knowing how to make people dependent on you because Once I had obtained you, we would then have to continue working for me. You would have to have a reason. And if it wasn't love, it would have to be ideology or if it wasn't either of those things that would have to be money. It was John the Caray in an interview we recorded in 1989. The Caray died Saturday of pneumonia. He was 89. I interviewed Lucarelli again in 2017 will hear that interview after a break. This is fresh air. Family riffs can feel especially painful around the holidays. Even without the added isolation of a pandemic. New research is emerging about the effects of estrangement and the mental and physical consequences it can have for all involved. Cantina Vega and we're talking about family estrangement, which is more common than you might think. Next time on the takeaway weekday afternoons at three on 93.9 FM. This is fresh air. We're remembering novelist John the Caray, who died on Saturday. Before he wrote about spies. He worked as a spy for Britain's domestic and foreign intelligence agencies. His most famous character, George Smiley, appeared in several of his novels. I interviewed Look Array for a second time in 2017 after the publication of his novel, a Legacy of Spies. The main character, Peter Quill, Um, had been a protege of Smiley's in a legacy of spies. Gwil, um, is retired, but is forced to re examine actions he took when he was a spy during the Cold War. Actions that may have cost the lives of two people who were close to him. Gianluca Ray. Welcome to fresh air. Let's begin with a reading from your new novel, A legacy of spies. Would you read the first page for us? Sure. What follows is a truthful account his best I'm able to provide it of my role in the British deception Operation Code named Windfall that was mounted against the East German intelligence Service stars E. In the late 19 fifties and early sixties. Resulted in the death of the best British secret agent I ever worked with. Under the innocents woman for whom he gave his life. Professional intelligence officer is no more immune to human feelings than the rest of mankind. What matters to him is the extent to which he is able to suppress them, whether in real time or in my case. 50 years on. Until a couple of months ago, lying in bed at night and the remote farmstead in Brittany, that is my home. Listening to the hunk of cattle on the bickering of hands. Resolutely fought off the accusing vices that from time to time attempted to disrupt my sleep. I was too young. I protested. Was two innocents too naive to junior. If you're looking for scalps, I told them Go to those grand masters of deception, George Smiley and his master control It was their refined.

George Smiley John the Caray writer Graham Greene Oxford English Dictionary CIA Um Mo Philby Dhere Al Hartley Cantina Vega Lucarelli officer Gianluca Ray Britain pneumonia
"graham greene" Discussed on CRUSADE Channel Previews

CRUSADE Channel Previews

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"graham greene" Discussed on CRUSADE Channel Previews

"Hello and welcome to the files. I'm your host says you're on the nash. Sometimes known by number bloom demaria. I'm a writer of crime. Fiction and historical novels and incorrigible bibliophile. It's wonderful to be making a program on pretty much. My favorite subjects books on my show. I will be introducing youtube books. Classic and contemporary that. You must read should enjoy reading or should not touch with an eleven foot bargepole once a month. I would also be doing my special edition. Children's book show involving younger a few of us talking about and sharing their favorite books now. I don't mind admitting that. I am really a bit miffed. This morning. i've moved from the mildly perturbed and the mustn't grumble to really quite miffed. It is freezing cold. I know it's december. But i don't do bad weather. It is so cold and scraping. The ice of the windscreen of your car. At five o'clock in the morning just has to be experienced to be fully understood. We've just crude out of our second lockdown and trying desperately to get back to normal again. We've been given permission to be with our families for christmas which is wonderful but you know. It's just been a goto full year. And i can't wait to twenty twenty cent packing. I have just really had enough and it is so misty outside this morning. I can't even see properly out of my window. It looks as if somebody's lit an enormous bonfire in the middle of my garden. But this is misty albion. Isn't it so. I should get terribly poetic at this point. And start quoting season of mists. And mellow fruitfulness and all the rest but i am just really a bit fed up however this will see me up the fiorella. The files and books and literature is always a good tonic on a miserable warning. I feel like doing something a little bit different today. I so enjoyed doing a slightly more interconnected see matic program. The other week with the graham greene and danielle floods memoir connected up the quiet. American and dorsey cummings mcleans book. The homage to graham greene set in the early twenty first century. That i hope you won't mind too much. But i feel like doing something a little bit similar this week and the reason unhesitating bit is i couldn't find a nonfiction book which quite fitted in to this week's plan. I'm going to break with tradition. The tradition of thirty programs. I think and i'm going to do three fiction novels this week. That are all very much closely connected. Do let me know what you make of it. This is a one off. I don't intend to ignore nonfiction future programs. But i just felt i needed to go with the flow. I had this feeling. I should do these three books this week. So that's what i'm going to do so hope you don't mind. I hope you will find it enjoyable and informative the theme that runs through these three books. Two of them in particular where the author of one of the books admitted that he had been very very strongly influenced by the classic. I'm going to review. The theme is child. Who'd guilt childhood hood gills and having to live all one's life with the guilt of having done something wrong something sinful something damaging in childhood and three books. I'm going to be looking at that. Really deal with the subjects The classic novel the go between by l p hartley ian mcewen's a tournaments and mccune said that he was very influenced when writing atonement by the go between and cola hosseini's novel the kite runner which deals with the very same seen in a different country a different culture and deals with it actually a very different way to the other two novels so those are the three books. I'm going to be looking at today. I'll get back to the normal formula next week. I promise but because the go between the influence. I'm going to start with this classic on the show today. I love this book. I really do love. Hartley's the go between if nothing else for the extraordinarily poignant opening passage just the opening words. The past is a foreign country. They do things differently there. It's had a huge influence on my own. Writing in my book will never tell them. The old man telling his story keeps using that phrase. The post is a foreign country. I can't return. I can never go back..

demaria graham greene danielle floods cummings mcleans youtube dorsey ian mcewen cola hosseini mccune hartley Hartley The post
"graham greene" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"graham greene" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Overseas and of course in America all over the world thank you so much thank you for your service and we are very honored to be on American forces radio that's for sure it's time now for the lives of Kerry line this was a drama that starred Orson Welles as Harry lime became the radio in nineteen fifty one it was produced in London for the BBC Wells reprised his film role of cherry wine from the celebrated nineteen forty nine movie of Graham Greene's novel the third man climb was shot and killed in the sewers beneath banana in the original film so this radio series was a pre qual many adventures of con artists line where we're dramatizing this radio series is very very good the third man team was played on a Zephyr by hands on care us so let's Teunissen from October nineteenth nineteen fifty one called the blue bride here is Orson Welles in a life of hairy line visiting Orson Welles as the third man the lives of the fabulous stories of the immortal character originally created in the motion picture the third man with his sister music by Anton taking place.

America Orson Welles Harry lime London BBC Wells Graham Greene Anton Kerry
"graham greene" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

04:54 min | 3 years ago

"graham greene" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"I think tom is too good and actor to be kicked off. The show kicked off a break up yeah. I don't know it seems like the core of this. Show will always have thoughts. I don't know whether that means they're together or not. I don't really know okay. So where do we going. Oh where we show is going i don't want to you don't wanna guess recap. I think on some level what it wants us to thing right now is that it's a fight between kendall and shiv to take over the company and the candle randall like having been the black sheep and on the verge of crashing out entirely is kind of almost possibly conceivably cleaning up his act to a degree that logan logan might let him take over but he's stealing batteries. Okay about one of the last things okay so like i remember when i was a kid i still this cooled brighton rock by graham greene which had this sort of anti hero cold old pinky who one of the things that pinky did in the book which kind of demonstrated how hot is he was he would just take a like a daddy long legs held in his hand in pickoff each of the legs one by one just because he's loosely cruel and so there's the scene at the end of this episode where <hes> candle just in a just auto thoughtless cruelty just decides to steal a pack of batteries from the bodega owner and throw them in the trash crash just because it's like a tiny little mini power moves that may give him you know a million of bump of coke kind of you know hi or is there something more to it. I think it's his little active rebellion against what against his sad puppet life because now he just has to do whatever his dad says he can't even ride a motorcycle anymore with his leading role in the back of the motors like give it up just be driven around in a car like i don't i don't i don't i'm hundred percent fully here for the show. This is not a criticism. I love the first episodes. I love everything about this show. I'm a little worried they're burning through too much plot because kendall went from like ambivalent about his dad to firing people for his dad to his dad's ads leading stealing batteries from poor bodega now we're right on the on the balcony which ends to him and she's like you really have difficulty like finding in the middle between like hazing him and west bingham. I called him about the actual line was we can't watch gyrations of this. Every other episode there has to be some other slow building ending move here and i think i mean. I don't know whether shows going but i wanna say that. Masha is going to be involved. Eh because musher is the one character his like who we need to know mystery so okay. Stay tuned. What's your favorite line an episode so too. I feel like we did a lot of them. Oh at one point logan and company are watching quite think is pierce morgan on t._v. Interviewing stuey and that's when stewart trashes vaulter appeal with someone named pierce i don't know and then he says self righteous. Fucking being butter wouldn't melt pulitzer pricks ryan. You have a favorite life. I've already used all mine. I'm going to give you three. It smells wrong and they're hiding shit roman that yep. I can give you fifty two seconds. That's good. That's really jerry yeah and the other one is see your ads are all a dealt diapers and shit pills etienne. I think i think my favorite line actually comes from guilt wail where they're talking about the private jet he goes you don't look a gift boeing in the dow right oh totally so that first of all like you know he he wrote logan and did the whole deal with the devil logan and now he's accepting private jets from random people to you. Don't look a gift boeing in the teeth. It's a good line. Can i add one more. You can wind shift suggests that they go for a salty reframe. Yes i was dying basic yeah did you ever we've all been guilty of us do that. When you were the editor in chief of we need a salty reframe yes yes. It's the tick tock in the reconstructive. <hes> modern web journals okay so we all season three. We are going to find out what happens. Complex in this show is so good this show so that's next week <music>..

logan logan kendall graham greene boeing tom pierce morgan editor in chief stuey pulitzer stewart ryan fifty two seconds hundred percent