18 Burst results for "Graduate Theological Union"

"graduate theological union" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

07:47 min | 2 weeks ago

"graduate theological union" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Coot Sona, a Presbyterian minister who serves as co director of science for the church. Big also teaches and religion, humanities and philosophy at California State University and Chico. Big, studied comparative literature at UC Berkeley and earn his master of divinity from Princeton Theological Seminary. After studying at the universities of to begin and Heidelberg in Germany, he received his PhD from Berkeley's Graduate Theological Union. Breaks. Most recent books are negotiating science and religion in America and mere science and Christian faith. Bridging the divide with emerging adults. Greg Welcome to Day one. I'm glad to be part of the show. You and Drew Rick Miller Co direct the Amazing Resource for church leaders called Science for the church, and we're honored to repost your newsletter articles on our day one dot organ website. So what is the purpose of science for the church? And how are you working to fulfill it? Well, our purpose is to integrate mainstream science with Christian faith to strengthen the church. And what we found over the years of bringing science to churches That were is that when churches engage with the insight since of science, the questions and the contributions as well? The church is actually grow in all areas of their ministry and so science for the church has our website, which is really easy to find science for the church dot org's And on that we have a resource is of different sorts. We have articles and videos and various ways The churches can grow in understanding what science can bring to their ministries. So probably most importantly, have a newsletter. We send out weekly, which gives insights into science and connects them with With concerns with interests of Christian ministry, and you can sign up for that, by the way by going to the website and just subscribing to these letters really straightforward. In addition, we run various events throughout the year and, of course with covert 19. Those have been almost entirely online. But we do you know seminars and forums and various offerings to help again. The church, its leaders and the people are in the pews. Learn in what way science can be a contribution to their faith. And people can find out Maura about this work and sign up for your newsletter at science for the church dot or g'kar. Great day One offers a small group study on faith and science in the 21st century, and we learned that many churches many Christians are suspicious of science and this disconnect between faith and science. Seems to have gotten even worse in recent years. You've written books on this divide. What do you think, causes it? Really? What caused the divide in people's minds between religion and science is what they hear and what they see. So you know, social media tends to reward the voices that are the most extreme. And the extreme voices are those that are either creationist or their atheist using science is a way to bolster atheism. So a lot of the middle ground is that war If you wanna call it that is just lost in the current environment we're in and then, uh, Sadly, there's the polarization that's occurred in our country, You know, right and left if you want to call it that. And sometimes science and Christianity or put in the opposite sides of those polls. Now, what's really fascinating is that is that almost all Christians the vast majority somewhere around two thirds 60 67%. I want to see an integration between science and faith, so they actually aren't satisfied with this divide with this warfare as it's been called. And what we're trying to do is to create something that's really going to speak to the vast majority of people who were in the pews. It's sometimes our Peter feels like we are using guitars you might say against heavy artillery, You know, it's much easier to be to be a person casting. You know, casting some kind of cavil against the other side as it were the godless atheist or the overly pious Christian. And anyway, we're finding a much deeper reconciliation. Mm hmm. This is Trinity Sunday, and your sermon today draws from several texts assigned an election ery portions from Isaiah, Chapter six. Some 29 John Chapter three. Would you read them for us? Absolutely. First from Isaiah. In the year the king's iodide I saw the Lord sitting on a throne high and lofty. The hymn of God's robe filled the temple. Sarah's were in attendance above him each at six wings with two. They covered their faces, and with two they covered their feet, and with two they flew And one called to another. And said Holy Holy Holy is the Lord of hosts. The whole Earth is full of God's glory. The pivots on the threshold shook the voices of those who called The house was filled with smoke. And then from Psalm 29. Described the Lord O heavenly beings ascribed the Lord. Glory and strength described the Lord the glory of God's name. Worship The Lord in the Beauty of Holiness. The voice. The Lord is over the waters. The God of glory thunders the Lord over mighty waters. The voice. The Lord is powerful. The voice The Lord is full of Majesty. And then from the Gospel of John Chapter three. Now there was a fair ISI named Nicodemus, a leader of the Jews. He came to Jesus by night. And said to him, Rabbi we know that you're a teacher who has come from God for no one could do these science that you do apart from the presence of God. Jesus answered him. Amen. Amen. I tell you, no one can see the kingdom of God without being born from above. Nicodemus said to Jesus. How can anyone be born after having grown old Can one, enter a second time into the mother's womb and be born. Jesus answered. Amen. Amen. I tell you, no one can enter the Kingdom of God without being born of water and spirit. What is born of the flesh is flesh and what is born of the spirit is Spirit. Do not be astonished that I said to you, you must be born from above. The wind blows were chooses and you hear the sound of it. But you do not know where it comes from or where it goes. So it is with everyone who was born of the spirit. Great. We look forward to hearing your sermon about this which you've titled the Banana slug the leaves and the Trion. God, thanks for sharing it with us. Well, thank you for having me It's part of this program. And if you'd like to listen again to today's program with Greg Kitona with an extended interview, you can subscribe today one weekly program on your favorite podcast app or listen on our website it day one daughter, Warg, where you can also read the sermon transcript. And if you like a free printed sermon transcript is call us at 404815 91 10..

Greg Kitona Nicodemus Germany Coot Sona Jesus 21st century Sarah Greg America 404815 91 10 Princeton Theological Seminary Maura Big two Drew Rick Miller California State University Earth Peter UC Berkeley today
"graduate theological union" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

07:05 min | Last month

"graduate theological union" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"You do yoga for that better you may have been taught by a westerner but you gigantic debt of gratitude to the giants and geniuses over in asia. Who developed these practices in the first place. This fact can be overlooked or downplayed intentionally or otherwise by some western practitioners including sometimes by me however in the midst of a spike of anti-asian violence now seems like a really good time to learn more about where these practices came from an why many asian american buddhists sometimes feel erased. Not only. is this the right thing to do. But it can also add depth and perspective and freshness to your practice so in this episode. We've got to fascinating guests. Who will talk about what it's been like for them to be asian. American buddhists in the midst of this spate of hate crimes and walk us through the long and ugly history of anti buddhist violence in america. We also talked about how all meditators not just people in vulnerable communities can learn resiliency through the practice of meditation. The connection between karma and reparations. And whether it's possible or advisable to generate goodwill towards people who hate you when we also have a frank conversation about how some of my own messaging about buddhism in america may have missed the mark. My guests are chen's zing. Han was the author of be the refuge raising the voices of asian american buddhists shields from stanford university and an m a in buddhist studies from the graduate theological union and my other guest is dunkin. Do ken williams. Who is the author of american sutra. A story of faith and freedom in the second world war. He has a ba in religious studies from read and a phd in religion from harvard. He's currently a professor at the university of southern california. He's also zen priest both challenging and dunkin or helping to organize a national ceremony which will take place the day after we post this interview on the forty nine day anniversary of the atlanta spa shootings. That took the lives of several asians and asian americans. And we're gonna put some more information on that event in the show notes. One thing to say before we dive in. We are dedicating this entire week to the spike in hate crimes against members of the api community. Wednesday we're gonna talk to machine ikeda a buddhist teacher about how all of us can use meditation to deal with anger uncertainty and self loathing. Okay here we go now with tenzing. And duncan okay. Tenzing han and dunkin. Do ken williams. Thank you both for coming on. Thank you great to meet with you. It's an honor tenzing. Louis start with you to state the blazingly obvious. This has been a dumpster fire of the last year. Or so. And i think it might be helpful for our listeners. To get a sense from both of you but starting with utilizing about how this time has been for you as we've seen this uptick in. Hey crunch yeah well. I came back from bangkok. Actually march twenty twenty so my partner and i were based in southeast asia for the last presidency. We came back from bangkok in march. Twenty twenty for would be among visit. Obviously we have not left the bay area. Since and what i remember was when i flew in one of my friends in bangkok texted saying i really hope you stay safe both from the virus and the racism and it was. That was my welcome back to america. And so it's been a lot a lot to take in the news. In particular the kind of feeling of just an endless stream of reports on gerbo violence physical assaults on asian american buddhists and a sense of that escalating as well when we read accounts of things that really hit comb for the buddhist community in particular when you know when we chat at an empty was assaulted and killed much going on a morning. Walk in san francisco and when are but his temples in southern california have been vandalized and i recognize have much privileged that i've been able to stay safe at home to work from home but still the kind of psychological effects of hearing this kind of news day. In and day out is really heavy. And since i've launched my book in late january and speaking with a lot of different communities including a lot of asian americans. I noticed that of fear the grief the anger just all of these difficult emotions that are really being stood up and of course people who are also very directly affected friends who've been affected by this kind of violence so there's a lot to say there but for myself i can feel that in my body and i can feel that in the ways that i can't always listen to the news day in and day out because it can be quite traumatic for people duncan for you. Sure i think in terms of the last year the kind of pandemic year one of the things that i went through on a personal basis was that i became a us citizen last june. After thirty three years of being in the united states on different legal status and visas and so forth kinda gave up my japanese nationality and took the plunge into becoming a us citizen. And you'd happened on juneteenth last year In the federal courthouse in downtown los angeles and it was therefore a day when black lies and protests. Were were happening right around city hall and it made me think about this time what it means to be an american. I went in my buddhist robes to do the ceremony and for me is kind of important way of like affirming religious freedom and the constitution. As we took that oath i did in my robes. As a way of kind of saying i'm going to defend the constitution and these pe- protesters outside are also trying to do the same thing in terms of equality under the law religious freedom. All those aspirations that make us american so think it's in that context. I often think about like What's been happening to a group of people Jesse mentioned you know asian american people. I think for a long time Booze people for a long time have been facing these acts of exclusion and animus and violence. And so i think just calls on us whether we're new citizens or have been citizens for a long time what it means when a certain.

america bangkok asia san francisco Wednesday Jesse last year march twenty twenty Han southeast asia march late january last june second world war juneteenth last year stanford university forty nine day first place one asian
"graduate theological union" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

08:02 min | 2 months ago

"graduate theological union" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Host, Peter Wallace. Thank you, Sherry. Today on day one we're honored to have with us. The Reverend Dr Micah T. J. Jackson, president of Bexley Seabury Seminary in Chicago, Illinois. Before assuming the president of this Episcopal Center for Learning and Discipleship in June, 2018 Michael was the Bishop John Heinz, associate professor of preaching and director of comprehensive wellness at the Seminary of the Southwest in Austin, Texas. He holds a master's in theological studies and preaching from Seabury Western Theological Seminary, a master of divinity from Meadville, Lombard Theological School and a PhD in Hamelin, Dicks and Liturgy from Graduate Theological Union. Michael. Welcome to day one. Thank you, Peter. It's great to be here again. You were last with us in January of 2020. And so much has happened in our world and the church since then, what with the pandemic, But it seems Bexley Seabury Seminary was in the right place at the right time because you were already largely virtual in your seminary training so you could quickly adapt to the new realities. Tell us more about what makes Bexley Seabury so distinctive as an Episcopal seminary. Well, most seminaries in the Episcopal Church just like most seminaries. In the United States and Canada. And really everywhere are residential based. People pack up their families and move across the country to wherever that summon areas and they live there in community. It's it's almost semi monastic, so wonderful way to be formed. But it's really not the way a lot of ministry is actually practiced these days. And it's really not available to lots of people who can't move away from their homes to go to seminary because they have Young Children are aging parents or or Or what have you and so a place like Bexley Seabury, whose program is specifically designed to allow people to train for ministry in and for the communities where they are already serving. Is ah, real gift to the church, and I'm really happy to be a part of it. So do you think the pandemics impact will change things in the future for Bexley, Seabury or even for theological education as a whole? I think a lot of things are changing Vore theological education just as they are for the church. So many congregations during the pandemic have had to adapt to using zoom as a way of doing church or Posting their sermons on Facebook or YouTube. It's just been on opportunity to really engage with much wider. One much wider community and I'm I'm really excited to see it. You know, I know of people whose congregations have tripled in size in sometimes mostly just because people are able to Connect from Wherever they are with messages that are meaningful to them. This is not news to anyone who's been listening today, one over the last 75 years, but it seems like a new thing to a lot of congregations. Early this year, Baxley Seabury launched an impressive virtual lifelong learning program called Pathways to Baptismal Living. What sorts of programming and courses will be included in that program. Pathways is a fabulous program. The core of it is a six month cohort based program called Finding My Pathway for Faithful Living. Finding My Path for Faithful Living is ah! Is an opportunity for 68 people to meet regularly with a mentor to pray with, and for each other and to discern God's call on their lives. It's ah It's a wonderful, wonderful course. And it's really the centerpiece of the Pathways program, which Is itself a syriza of other courses covering all kinds of things. Bible, church history, theology, liturgy, just all kinds of things and also things that the church Hears about that. That are important to having a ministry or even just a life in Christ. Be Really full, so it's also things like The church's response to Ah To racism and the opportunity for racial reconciliation. For things like The way the church responds to the crisis associated with substance abuse, So we're really trying to give people an opportunity to really deepen their relationship. With God and with the world that God created and love so very much. So is this intended only for Episcopal priests or lay persons or might anyone benefit Anyone is welcome were really designed These courses to serve lay people in the church. It's AH, It's not a usual mission for seminaries. We usually people usually think of seven areas as being primarily for those who are preparing for Professional Ministry on that's usually true, but we have really Expanded our mission lately to take into account the recognition that all Christians have a vocation from God and that we want to be able to Serve those people and equip them for that ministry. Whatever it turns out to be, whether God has called them to be a mom, a monk of firefighter or maybe even a priest. So, Michael, How did you experience your own calling to the priesthood and the teaching? When I was in high school. My pastor invited me to think about whether I might consider being being a minister. I hadn't really considered that before, but I prayed about it and I thought about it and I decided You know, this might be it might be something that God is actually calling me to do. The funny part was that when I talked to him again about it, I said, Yeah, this is ah. This is definitely something I can feel God calling me too, But I don't think I wanna be a congregational pastor. I think I'd like to have AH, ministry where I could travel around and Talk to different people that help them in their relationship with God and preaching lots of different places, And he said, And nobody has that ministry. It meant that Uh, Meant that I was delayed in my call for for many years, but I was really glad that I met other people later that God sent people into my life to return me to this path. Before you became president of Bexley Seabury, Utah, preaching at the Episcopal Seminary of the Southwest in Austin, Texas. What do you think the future of preaching looks like? No. Sometimes Peter. People think preaching is on its way out. No one wants to pay attention. Uh, Sometimes, people say Attention spans are collapsing, and no one wants to hear a single person. Talk about God for 20 minutes. That hasn't been the experience of people who are listening. For example to Ted talks. It's really about the church, adapting itself and its preaching ministry to where people are. So it seems to me like there really are some changes coming for for the church and the and the Ministry of Preaching. Preachers have toe Be willing to be more vulnerable with themselves and their own stories. So many preachers like T O tell stories about themselves and cast themselves in the role of the spiritually hero, and that's comfortable and fun sometimes to look and feel that way. What Most people They want to know that.

Peter Wallace January of 2020 United States Peter Sherry June, 2018 20 minutes 68 people Canada Michael Bexley Seabury Seminary six month Seabury Western Theological Se Baxley Seabury Micah T. J. Jackson Bible YouTube Chicago, Illinois Facebook Today
"graduate theological union" Discussed on The Daily Beans

The Daily Beans

10:00 min | 7 months ago

"graduate theological union" Discussed on The Daily Beans

"Hi everybody welcome back. Our next guest is a theologian. An author and a speaker holds three degrees drama from north western religion and the arts from the pacific school of religion and feminist theology from immaculate heart. College center she also has a phd theology andromeda from graduate theological union. She's author of book called. Jesus rode a donkey. It's so so pertinent to to what we're facing these days so please welcome dr linda. Seger dr seager. Thanks for speaking with me today. Thanks so much. I love being here. It's wonderful to have you now. So we know trump hasn't conceded the election but he he should be gone come january twentieth twenty twenty one but just because he's leaving office that doesn't mean the political divide in our nation is going to just go away and your book. Jesus wrote a donkey. Fifth addition came out this june first edition in two thousand and six is so pertinent today because it tackles those issues a bridging the political divide. Can you tell us what prompted you to write the book and and how it still pertinent today full. Even two thousand and six there was such a lot of discussion of all. Christians were republicans and all. Christians were evangelical sweet purchaser simply. Not true i. I grew up lutheran. I've been a quaker for some years. There's mainstream protestants. I mean those so many christians. And what i found was i moved from republican to democrat because i felt that the democrat values were more in line with my christian values and I felt that there needed to be a voice to really clarify what some of those values are and why there are so many millions of us the choose to be democrats instead of republicans And it's it's such a good point too. I i want to bring up a couple of issues here in your book. That like i said this is a timeless story First of all we know where the two major parties stand on key issues but the role that religion has played in. Politics has morphed quite a bit over the last few decades and and i was wondering if you could talk about how it's changed because you know you said you rent from a republican to being a democrat because the values sort of flipped didn't they well they partly flynn and what's happened over the last maybe four years or so has been that the christian progressive which generally is christian democrat for has become much stronger in clear. So there's all these groups. Now there's christian democrats in america. Faithful americans not our faith pack and vote common good and all of these different groups. That are recognizing we really have to be clear about what our faith is and what our stand on issues are because if you think about it we vote and we we make policy decisions based on our values and i just happens at the republicans. Put a focus on the abortion and the lbj q. Is issue and the democrat. Christians put the focus on justice peace and mercy and in fact. There are hundreds of verses in the bible. The tell us how to vote because they tell us that. A nation is called to account for how we do justice. Show mercy and help the oppressed and it's like all through the prophets. Chris talks about carrying the least to these. And it's kind of odd that so much focus is put on abortion because there are no i says in the bible on abortion none none and and that became a wedge issue around nineteen eighty mainly to get the catholic vote for reagan and then evangelical took it up as an issue. But it's literally the republican christians. Everything is focused on the unborn and there seems to be very little care for the living. And i can't figure that well it was put to me by another friend who studied the algae that it's very very easy to choose a fetus to defend because the fetus can't speak. Yes that's that's a good way of of that's the good way of saying it but it's it's a similar issue with lgbtq rights because there are fewer than ten verses in the bible on homosexuality and out of those verses. There's basically only one. That comes straight out about homosexuality. The other i is when you go back to. The actual hebrew are more about abusive relationships. you know like an older man taking advantage of the younger boy or a younger boy taking advantage of a wealthy older man and And they're really about these sexual relationships that we would not consider okay between heterosexuals So it's on and of course that beautiful story of jonathan david in the hebrew strict scriptures. Were it says. They kissed each other on the mouth and they took their clothes off. There's and they said. I love you more than i love someone of the opposite sex and however we interpret that i mean Many people say well. Let's just a friendship and say it might be. We don't know. But i think democrats are less interested in going into the tent to see what's happening at night. So who's your mail. In a democracy and among christians there is equality and respect and there is care and i also was very curious. Now i am. I correct in your lutheran was a lutheran. I've been quaker since nineteen seventy gotcha. Now i was raised. Catholic and half of our family were lutheran very similar similar religions but What are your thoughts. Now on pope francis opening his arms and the vatican in the church to the lgbtq community. I mean not officially but it's a huge step who he is wonderful and he's wonderful on those rights. He's wonderful on environmental concerns and social justice in his partly because he comes out of what's called the liberation theology movement. We're at looks. At how are christian values move into society to deal with systemic problems in society. And so he takes he takes those stands and of course. The standard is ultimately but love. It's about embracing it's about caring for each other and for all of the people that make up our earth and perhaps the aliens is if into that so yes. He's such a strong voice. I quote him several times in. Jesus wrote a jonky Yeah i noticed that too. And let you said something briefly there about environmental issues and we know about his edict About climate change. I was hoping you could talk a little bit. About why christian. Democrats are christians in general need to fight global warming. This is brought up in the bible. Yes what has happened with the theologies that we know those versus at the beginning of genesis about where god gave dominion over the garden of eden to adam and eve and to subdue wet. There's there's words like subdue and dominion in that section and there's been a lot of bad theology that has come out of those words because they really mean more about we are to care for the earth is god would care for it. We are to take responsibility and so we can imagine that if god says i give you dominion. I'm going to give you this gift. That god is not saying. And by the way polluted desecrated at Be bat to it. And so it's it's extremely strong theology to say we are to care for the creation and recognize. It is a great gift. So there's been this it's it's a funny thing about his theology. That doesn't extend care into all lavar issues and policies. So so there's a. There's a tendency among republican christians to think that all these commands are for individuals. Like we should be good to plot of land that we live on. But somehow not moving out in public policy and seamless relationship. Yeah the going with the plot of land you live on. Seems kind of selfish i in. There's a fun. Because i've talked to republican christians while they keep talking about this is meant for individuals..

Jesus pacific school of religion Seger trump dr seager america flynn adam reagan Chris jonathan david pope francis
"graduate theological union" Discussed on Midlife Mixtape

Midlife Mixtape

04:13 min | 9 months ago

"graduate theological union" Discussed on Midlife Mixtape

"You know this is kind of the path. and. It feels like everybody around you knows what they're doing night. I'm saying this of course, prior to twenty twenty nobody knows nobody knows anything about anything but the it's intimidating to think of having so many big unanswered questions and I think there is a measure of bravery that goes along with like, okay. Just follow your nose see what happens and a lot of. Alaska at the end of the episode, what do you wish you could go back and tell your younger self oftentimes, the answer is that I get from guests on that question is. About going back to the younger self in Saint Take Risk, just get started. Don't worry about perfection like just do something just start i. think it's really illustrative in your situation. Now you are the dean of students for the Church Divinity School of the Pacific here in the bay area. So you're not only ordained Episcopal priest, but now you are helping other people who are considering that path to discern whether or not they WANNA do that. Are you like the Catholic priest in the desert you answering tons of questions from people all the time on ways? Yes. Would I did my the Graduate Theological Union is a consortium of like nine schools right in the neighborhood in Berkeley from different denominations in that kind of stuff. So I did my first master's degree at Pacific school origin, which is a very nondenominational or interdenominational school that they don't really shoe or new into a specific track, and then once I was pursuing ordination the episcopal church had to go see DSP across the street and do all my fiscal studies at Church divinity school the Pacific. So where I'm at now, which is missiles. A lot of those students have gone through a lot of the disarmament process already. They did a lot of things that I was doing when I was in my master's degree across the street. So a Lotta prepared to my school but I think what I spent a lot of time with his everybody has preconceived notions about what being a priestess like or what what they're gonNA do. There's a big reality check that comes with that. Let's the biggest disconnect. Where's the biggest space between expectation reality? Well, I'm in its service job, right so like of course, you can look at Grace Cathedral in San Francisco's just this gorgeous Gothic architecture. Beautiful Huge Church will guess what Bubba you're not going there forgotten. But you're not the dean of the Cathedral Long Way to the top. If you WanNa Grace Cathedral. But you know it's it's bringing expectations into more realistic picture but it's also reminding people like you know my first parish priest job was was in Conway Arkansas and my wife born and raised in Berkeley the only time she's ever left was law school in Los Angeles, and then like three months after we got married, I was like removing Arkansas and I remember she was stoked. In the sarcasm font there enter. which she ended up absolutely weathering at. The job of a priest of course, we'd like to live a a beautiful place by the ocean or whatever but that's not how it's GONNA end up. You may end up in a in a tiny little town with a tiny parish of like twenty something elderly people will they are still deserving of care in love. So a lot of what I do is GonNa help people realize this is about service. To other people, matter where you are what you're doing the faster you can wrap your head around that them a I think really start functioning as a prissy in a minute. We're GONNA come back with Andrew and talk about what his military buddies think of his transformation from soldier to priest but I word from our sponsor. Today's episode is brought to you by Admit Academy dot co I hope.

Berkeley Church Divinity School Bubba Church divinity school the Pac WanNa Grace Cathedral Graduate Theological Union Pacific school Pacific Grace Cathedral Cathedral Long Way Conway Arkansas Alaska Huge Church San Francisco Andrew Arkansas Los Angeles
"graduate theological union" Discussed on Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

06:00 min | 9 months ago

"graduate theological union" Discussed on Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

"Elliott I. . It is a rental student in researcher WHO's been involved in interfaith activities for over two decades. . He holds a Master's in Biblical studies with a focus on. . New. . Testament and Biblical languages. . He also holds a PhD in cultural historical studies in religion from the graduate. . Theological. . Union his doctoral work focused on Muslim Herman UNIX of Biblical texts especially, , the Gospel of John. . And he lives, , in Santa, cinnabon , California with his wife Royer and three daughters. . So welcome to the show Dr Ali tight. . Thank you because local good to be back for a third time. . Yes. . We're always excited and <hes>. . I know in the past we've had you <hes>. . You know on the show to Kinda talk. About . Christianity. . Were of sort of interfaith conversations <hes> in the audience as well as <hes> US. . We benefited him immensely from those on. . So I thought this would be a little bit different. . I know <hes> something that you would probably consider a little bit outside of your wheelhouse or area of expertise perhaps <hes> but I would contend that you know <hes> i. . if you are perfectly suited in a sense that <hes> not only given your background that you touched upon on the first episode but to really kind of have a conversation a, , that is related to an intra faith. . Issue of between kind of the she and the Sunni tradition and I say that. . Because Dr <unk> your background actually your family background has something you had mentioned the first time we had this conversation <hes> you come from a she background your family is or remain or is still short she yes might my parents or practicing Shiites to use the Latin sort of suffix please them or she I guess we can say. . So Yeah mink growing up. . We were like I don't typical sort of Iranian so. . No religion really anywhere and freedom to do whatever we wanted. . Think. . However, , we wanted <hes> <hes> but as my parents got older, , they rediscovered their. . Roots <hes> their Shiite woods. . So there you know they may have two, , thousand, , six <HES> and they're. . Very, devout , Shia now. . <hes> so for me growing up however. . <hes> I actually, , never really considered myself. . <hes> <hes> a Muslim until I got into. . College. . and. . Then the brothers I met initially were so knee and they sort of against to enter the wing and and copy. . Islam. . In an over the years, , of course, , with I've had. . Great conversations with my parents on on certain things and. . What's the significance of this event in history you? ? How do you interpret this verse? ? What about this Heidi Eve? ? Things like that <hes>. . So that's that's where a standard now. . Yeah, , I mean you off air you made the caveat <unk> <unk>. . This isn't sort of an area of study or expertise for you on, , but not only just given the family background but I would I mean as someone who is really a deep student of history <hes> I think that a I think some of the the touch points that we wanNA focus on in today's conversation on it'd be really nice to hear your thoughts on because essentially couple I wanted to make to clarifying points and then <hes> kind of dive right in, , and that was related to the last episode of the two parter we did with the amount weenie. . Is that <hes> for the listener someone some heard my question or my line of questioning as. . <hes>. . Kind of questioning Sunni orthodoxy around some of these historical issues and I wanted to clarify that wasn't the case I mean I'm not I wasn't sort of trying to <hes> place. . Any doubts on the Sunni narrative were the Sunni approach to these the historical events that we touched on but rather it was really as I said at the outset of the conversation with the Amati 'cause Weenie that this was not meant to be a debate. . We weren't there to debate a Sunni points at the allergy were a Sunni the Sunni approach to some of the historical of historical events that we talked about. . So it was more of being able to be deferential. . To our guest and give him the opportunity to <hes> really essentially lay down the narrative of early. . Muslim. . History according to the cheese sources. . So I, , wanted to clarify that from some of the questions that I asked not for you <hes> professor Italian but rather listener <hes>. . Number two with regards to this particular conversation where things more meaningful to you <unk> is that the purpose of this show is not to have you on to serve offer the Su Ni reputation, , right to the points that were raised in the last episode. . This is not a polemic, , a polemical conversation. Again, . , we're not here to sort of do that. . That's not the approach that at least i WanNa, , take <hes> I imagine all three of us don't WanNa take it's more of a deep dive or as deep as we can get given time constraints and so on on into kind of the Sunni perspective on some of the issues, , there are some of the events that we focused on last time. . Good. . Bremer. . Great. . Great. . So I think <hes> or if you had any thoughts or any comments you wanted to make otherwise I'd be happy to kind of dive right into it with. . A tiny. . No I just want to echo that like I decided emptying Irwin Cup of understanding and just trying to understand and learn in that conversation we weren't coming with their own. . Ideas to the table. . They were not that we were undermining ideas. . We just put them to the sites we can learn. .

California flu Fremont Knicks US Las Headache Omer UN Sam Heidi Eve Shifa Washington Moharram Leno Dr Ali Sean La Our House
Understanding Early Muslim History and Sectarianism, with Dr. Ali Ataie

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

06:00 min | 9 months ago

Understanding Early Muslim History and Sectarianism, with Dr. Ali Ataie

"Elliott I. It is a rental student in researcher WHO's been involved in interfaith activities for over two decades. He holds a Master's in Biblical studies with a focus on. New. Testament and Biblical languages. He also holds a PhD in cultural historical studies in religion from the graduate. Theological. Union his doctoral work focused on Muslim Herman UNIX of Biblical texts especially, the Gospel of John. And he lives, in Santa, cinnabon California with his wife Royer and three daughters. So welcome to the show Dr Ali tight. Thank you because local good to be back for a third time. Yes. We're always excited and I know in the past we've had you You know on the show to Kinda talk. About Christianity. Were of sort of interfaith conversations in the audience as well as US. We benefited him immensely from those on. So I thought this would be a little bit different. I know something that you would probably consider a little bit outside of your wheelhouse or area of expertise perhaps but I would contend that you know i. if you are perfectly suited in a sense that not only given your background that you touched upon on the first episode but to really kind of have a conversation a, that is related to an intra faith. Issue of between kind of the she and the Sunni tradition and I say that. Because Dr your background actually your family background has something you had mentioned the first time we had this conversation you come from a she background your family is or remain or is still short she yes might my parents or practicing Shiites to use the Latin sort of suffix please them or she I guess we can say. So Yeah mink growing up. We were like I don't typical sort of Iranian so. No religion really anywhere and freedom to do whatever we wanted. Think. However, we wanted but as my parents got older, they rediscovered their. Roots their Shiite woods. So there you know they may have two, thousand, six and they're. Very, devout Shia now. so for me growing up however. I actually, never really considered myself. a Muslim until I got into. College. and. Then the brothers I met initially were so knee and they sort of against to enter the wing and and copy. Islam. In an over the years, of course, with I've had. Great conversations with my parents on on certain things and. What's the significance of this event in history you? How do you interpret this verse? What about this Heidi Eve? Things like that So that's that's where a standard now. Yeah, I mean you off air you made the caveat This isn't sort of an area of study or expertise for you on, but not only just given the family background but I would I mean as someone who is really a deep student of history I think that a I think some of the the touch points that we wanNA focus on in today's conversation on it'd be really nice to hear your thoughts on because essentially couple I wanted to make to clarifying points and then kind of dive right in, and that was related to the last episode of the two parter we did with the amount weenie. Is that for the listener someone some heard my question or my line of questioning as. Kind of questioning Sunni orthodoxy around some of these historical issues and I wanted to clarify that wasn't the case I mean I'm not I wasn't sort of trying to place. Any doubts on the Sunni narrative were the Sunni approach to these the historical events that we touched on but rather it was really as I said at the outset of the conversation with the Amati 'cause Weenie that this was not meant to be a debate. We weren't there to debate a Sunni points at the allergy were a Sunni the Sunni approach to some of the historical of historical events that we talked about. So it was more of being able to be deferential. To our guest and give him the opportunity to really essentially lay down the narrative of early. Muslim. History according to the cheese sources. So I, wanted to clarify that from some of the questions that I asked not for you professor Italian but rather listener Number two with regards to this particular conversation where things more meaningful to you is that the purpose of this show is not to have you on to serve offer the Su Ni reputation, right to the points that were raised in the last episode. This is not a polemic, a polemical conversation. Again, we're not here to sort of do that. That's not the approach that at least i WanNa, take I imagine all three of us don't WanNa take it's more of a deep dive or as deep as we can get given time constraints and so on on into kind of the Sunni perspective on some of the issues, there are some of the events that we focused on last time. Good. Bremer. Great. Great. So I think or if you had any thoughts or any comments you wanted to make otherwise I'd be happy to kind of dive right into it with. A tiny. No I just want to echo that like I decided emptying Irwin Cup of understanding and just trying to understand and learn in that conversation we weren't coming with their own. Ideas to the table. They were not that we were undermining ideas. We just put them to the sites we can learn.

United States Dr Ali Elliott Researcher Irwin Cup Heidi Eve Royer Santa Bremer Professor California
"graduate theological union" Discussed on Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

08:15 min | 9 months ago

"graduate theological union" Discussed on Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

"Episode one. Oh, one, one, hundred and one of the few congruence podcasts the American. Experience I am joined by my co host. Sorry. As, Pervez. Good to see you market to hear from you Have you been? Have you been doing? Well It's it's been an interesting couple couple of weeks aside from the fires in California and and everything else. unfortunately, my family was hit with covid nineteen. So we got we got tested positive. And were dealing with it now. So I'm sharing that so. Hey, maybe folks can do some do offer me I'll I'll take it out actually really appreciate it but aside from that happy to share a little people can. Benefit from it to be reminded take this thing seriously. Yeah you. I mean hundred like everyone is sort of. UN the family symptoms have varied What are you feeling experiencing? Yeah yes. Oh, about two weeks ago. My wife got stomach flu symptoms. She lost her since we're having, of course, of all things, Shalimar, those of in Fremont note shall Martin's like a famous Pakistani restaurant takeout type place and she tastes the chicken pick a Jacuzzi taste like cardboard before that, we had thought of this to stomach flu or cold, and that was like a red flag. So she ain't got tested in the interim the kids broke out into fevers. this is line on on on Labor Day. And then I was I, was actually okay I'm Mike Hey Maybe I'm. Maybe, I'm GonNa be alright what I got tested the whole stick the swabs way up your nose count fifteen, your eyes are watering and whatnot but. Did that end. and. Then I'm actually not bad I wouldn't Sam the men the family everybody else in the family's kidding getting better but I'm only on date three of symptoms. So I basically have thank God, the Leno fever no respiratory issues, but it's like stomach flu is basically a flu without a fever by the stomach issues You know. Headache. Malays. So I also have my smell unlike my wife I didn't lose my sense of smell second We the Cuban test, we take the most spicy spice cumin and see if we can smell it So anyway so that's what's going on. In you know obviously. Could get worse before it gets better but just praying for. having more mild symptoms than than other folks said. Yeah. No shall. Prayers of Shifa for you You Have the doctors giving you anything go home get rested. Might Aid. I've been I've been. I've been packing the vitamins. The doctor said if it gets worse, that's when you let us know right up. If it gets to a point, you can't breathe or you have any breathing issues on. Thank God I'm not so far my wife nobody had breathing issues or anything is is. The worst my wife had was dizziness in A. Headache in Las? Smell right. So. Yeah. That's that's I. I was probably the most Pervez you member a I in the spring I was like the guy was washing my gallons milkin changing might locking my right foot not letting my outside shoot I was like the Super Super Super careful guy. But it just happened we were traveling up between Washington, in California because of Our House renovation happening whichever related to before in who knows where might have been counter it might have been the airport that might have been a an uber to the airport, right? Yeah. Could've could've been any one of those. But yeah, like I said in Sean La. Him in the next few days will hopefully be on the yeah. Hopefully by Challah by the Knicks Recording you'll be fully on the on the amend their So wanted to situate us. So we are recording towards the tail end of the month of Moharram were about adding today's the twenty fifth of modern on. This is sort of a continuation of our series of conversations have had on. Thank you all who reached out to us with feedback and with the praise For our conversation that we had with 'em, how the Sweeney we wanted to follow up and I'm delighted to introduce our next guest who is no stranger to show. In fact, I'm going to destroy this out there I guessed the show to repeat for a third time. So either we're doing something right or we've just been really really lucky to have him back on and ends always agreed. So Omer mentioned tell us a little bit about who are axis absolutely as again. Welcome of SOD Dr. Elliott I. It is a rental student in researcher WHO's been involved in interfaith activities for over two decades. He holds a Master's in Biblical studies with a focus on. New. Testament and Biblical languages. He also holds a PhD in cultural historical studies in religion from the graduate. Theological. Union his doctoral work focused on Muslim Herman UNIX of Biblical texts especially, the Gospel of John. And he lives, in Santa, cinnabon California with his wife Royer and three daughters. So welcome to the show Dr Ali tight. Thank you because local good to be back for a third time. Yes. We're always excited and I know in the past we've had you You know on the show to Kinda talk. About Christianity. Were of sort of interfaith conversations in the audience as well as US. We benefited him immensely from those on. So I thought this would be a little bit different. I know something that you would probably consider a little bit outside of your wheelhouse or area of expertise perhaps but I would contend that you know i. if you are perfectly suited in a sense that not only given your background that you touched upon on the first episode but to really kind of have a conversation a, that is related to an intra faith. Issue of between kind of the she and the Sunni tradition and I say that. Because Dr your background actually your family background has something you had mentioned the first time we had this conversation you come from a she background your family is or remain or is still short she yes might my parents or practicing Shiites to use the Latin sort of suffix please them or she I guess we can say. So Yeah mink growing up. We were like I don't typical sort of Iranian so. No religion really anywhere and freedom to do whatever we wanted. Think. However, we wanted but as my parents got older, they rediscovered their. Roots their Shiite woods. So there you know they may have two, thousand, six and they're. Very, devout Shia now. so for me growing up however. I actually, never really considered myself. a Muslim until I got into. College. and. Then the brothers I met initially were so knee and they sort of against to enter the wing and and copy. Islam. In an over the years, of course, with I've had. Great conversations with my parents on on certain things and. What's the significance of this event in history you? How do you interpret this verse? What about this Heidi Eve? Things like that So that's that's where a standard now..

California flu Fremont Knicks US Las Headache Omer UN Sam Heidi Eve Shifa Washington Moharram Leno Dr Ali Sean La Our House
"graduate theological union" Discussed on Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

08:04 min | 10 months ago

"graduate theological union" Discussed on Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

"Episode ninety eight of the American Muslim experience, and we are inching towards our one hundred episode. But as always I am joined by my co host Omar Sorry Omer as. Everyone. Hey. Good. Good. Good good to have you back to be back with you. On I wanted to before we bring on, bring on the guest and introduced our guest because we are both excited for this conversation we want to be mindful of time, and so on. I didn't WanNa Kinda situates in terms of where we are in terms of the time. When we're recording on, we are recording the day after US shooter, which is the tenth of Moharram Modern, of course, being among many other things, and we'll get into this hopefully during the during. The during the conversation but is among many things the start of the Muslim New Year on for. Listeners out of all face. So yeah the Moharram is the beginning of the of the Muslim calendar the beginning of the New Year for the Muslim history calendar or the calendar commemorates the Prophet Muhammad Peace Be Upon Hymns migration to from Mecca, to Medina. So that's where we are and We are also days after I think this news broke on. Friday. something that. I will reflecting on off line but I thought we'd at least mentioned it line or on the on the show, which is the the death of Chadwick Bozeman who played a famously among many other roles that he was famous for Black Panther. And so I know you and I were texting back and forth about it. But I'm obviously a shock had been suffering from colon cancer for Four years. of which which if you just Kinda look at the scope of the roles that at least I think you and I and perhaps a lot of our listeners familiar with. Whether. It's Black Panther at various MCI movies but also you know the Marshall the Thurgood Marshall Story. the defy blue bloods, which is the latest Spike Lee movie Those were all post. You know host to while he's being treated for colon cancer unbelievable when you think about it. Yet, he also played who's the guy who did a living in America. He played IAEA it was get on up, which was the story of James Brown, and he also did another bio pic betting. That was early on earlier in his career I should a very short career in general but that was where he played Jackie Robinson. In forty, two and interestingly enough yesterday or Friday was Jackie Robinson Day We notice the baseball's commemoration of that of of Jackie Robinson the first black American baseball player. The. Actor great actor and he kept picking these roles that really instill pride in hidden in the African American community I mean some of the roles went beyond obviously by Panther and whatnot and all his movies are good but just in terms of like Hughes intentionally picking these roles that just had a really positive impact and instill pride and I think that was that was one that's one of the reasons why is passing ripping felt but yeah, you texted me as you you tend to do. interesting news or or Comic Book News when I texted back, right? Yeah. But this is kind of both but. The I real sad yesterday obviously, social media was flooded this morning interestingly enough I saw two related posts and both were about whether or not. You can say arrest in peace. saw that that was that was an interesting when a one view on each on each on each. One. When posts on each viewpoint says interesting announced gone to the Muslim twitter side of things in and that's what I'm hearing. But Yeah, just rope definitely sad situation. Yeah. I. Think we've touched on in the past on the show, which is just talking about how anytime there's a death of a celebrity. I think this happened back in back like when prince died in Kobe Dry. Did died is always this sort of discussion online Muslims about how was supposed to grieve and you can say this and you can't say that and you can feel this. You can't feel that and we've had our commentary about it but anyway, I don't WanNa want to delay bringing on her but on. Anyway, we are super excited to have some someone I wanted to have on the show for a really long time I think it's sort of timely because we want to talk about she eats. And that is and I sort of Berry I was going to bury the lead but I didn't on our guest for for for the show is David Coolidge David. Coolidge was born in Chicago raised in Kenilworth Illinois, which is a suburb on the north side he has a b a from Brown University and an m a from Princeton University. David converted to Islam in nine, Ninety, eight from two, thousand, eight to two thousand thirteen worked as a Muslim chaplain, first Dartmouth College, and then again at his Alma. Mater Brown he also served on the Board of Boards of various organizations among ah which are tallied collective David. I were both on the board together and primarily where I know David Fromm. We actually met for the first time before that, which I'll teas or teas for now on L. mentioned a little bit later from two thousand, fourteen to two, thousand, seventeen, open any also. On the Board of Tuna College on, and then finally from two thousand, fourteen to two, thousand, seventeen, he taught undergraduate courses on Islamic law ethics at nyu, New University, and presently he is right here in Berkeley where he is pursuing a PhD at the Graduate Theological Union, where his focus is on Muslim perceptions of Hindu tradition Thank you, David for being on the show. Thank you for sitting there quietly while we kind of waxed poetically about something and then also read through that bio of yours. So anyway, welcome welcome to defuse congruence. Thank you so much for having me a real honor. Yeah, it's great to have you in something that I teased in I do want to mention on was where you and I actually I met and it's kind of St- It's interesting because the story does connect to a previous guest. So first time I ever met David was actually in the summer of two thousand and two on I had just moved to Michigan to actually pursue Miami in Islamic studies on and so I was I just moved in Michigan we are expecting our first born. So had a wife at home who was super pregnant We just moved from completely different or first time for my wife to move anywhere outside of Texas. In fact, outside of a ZIP code. In for me, it was obviously a big move as well. But there I was in Michigan and David I met for the first time at a program called the Elizabethan program which was actually. Also on conjunction with alum program, it was the same folks that bring us album. The American Learning Institute for Muslims were also doing a language intensive program Until at that time, David was one of the few the sand program attendees at there was like maybe half a dozen or so and your roommates with for Han Sayid local area many celebrity. For homeless and so I'm just GONNA teasing him. And then The. Connection to previous guests that I was teasing was that on we've also had uncle essence say who is One of the people featured in our immigrant stories, episode and We were delighted to have him on the show and so there is a connection between David and a previous guests although although there is certainly connection to other previous guests we've had as well but anyway David great to have you back or great to have you on the show get to connect this way..

David Coolidge David Jackie Robinson colon cancer Michigan James Brown David Fromm David I Omar US Moharram Modern Thurgood Marshall Chadwick Bozeman baseball St- It Spike Lee MCI America Mecca
"graduate theological union" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

07:44 min | 10 months ago

"graduate theological union" Discussed on WSB-AM

"The Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California. And ordain Presbyterian minister. She is a graduate of Calvin College, earned a master's in early childhood education at Western Michigan University and her master of divinity from Calvin Theological Seminary. And she received her Ph. D in systematic theology from Princeton Theological Seminary. The and welcome to day one. Thank you so much. Columbia Theological Seminary was one of four educational institutions whose leaders came together in 1945 alongwith denominational leaders to form the Southern religious radio conference to produce a weekly radio program called the Protestant Our Now Day one. Tell us about the history and the impact that Columbia Seminary has made and is making in the church in the world since then. We have had a stronger tradition and history of preparing pastors for congregations that has been the sweet spot of Columbia Seminary for many decades. Now. That goal in that commitment certainly still stays with us and guides us. But our focus and our energies have now become more globally centered. Certainly more multi denominational lease entered what used to be a Presbyterian seminary. On DH, founded by Presbyterians has now become a very multi denominational community and that has diversified us in wonderful ways. So we remain committed to some of those early guide posts, but we also find ourselves stretching into the world in which we now live on and wanting deeply to be responsive. To the global context. In your sermon, you will take us to the wilderness of the exodus and many of us consents that we today are living in the wilderness with the pandemic that seems to refuse to go away. Recognition of the systemic racism that is infected our lives and institutions for generations and an uncertain future. So how has Colombia seminary been living into this present wilderness? It's been a challenge The pandemic hit in full force in March, and we had to make Some hard but necessary decisions. We put all of our courses online in the middle of March, and this was a big learning curve for our faculty and our students, but everyone leaned in really hard and I'm proud of the Resilience of our community. Then we put all the summer courses online and we've made the additional decision to put all of our fall courses online and We believe that our early decision to put community's safety first was the right decision, and we actually have observed other institutions now doing a little bit of back pedaling toward The kind of decisions we made. And in view of the protests for racial justice that have come about in our country over the past months. The board of trustees at Columbia Seminary has put together a document called repairing the Breach, which commits Columbia seminary to the flourishing of black people in specific ways. How will that happen? We began to feels so convicted that we couldn't just issue statements. We needed action and measurable outcomes. We needed to make concrete commitments. So the board approved a document that we created internally that identifies those action steps. We are a community that's about 50% students, staff and faculty of color. And in this case, it's our black faculty staff and students that we are Just feeling compelled to take specific action because Columbia Seminary was founded. In a context and by people who took enslavement for granted. That is such a deep awareness that we have, and we feel compelled to repair the breach. Willie and your sermon today focuses on the Old Testament lesson for the Sunday From Exodus. Chapter three. Would you read it for sure. Moses was keeping the flock of his father in law, Jethro, the priest of Midian. He lead his flock beyond the wilderness and came to Horeb, the mountain of God. There. The angel of the Lord appeared to him in a flame of fire out of a bush. He looked and the Bush was blazing, yet it was not consumed. Then, Moses said, I must turn aside and look at this great site and see why the Bush is not burned up. When the Lord saw that he had turned aside to see God called to him out of the Bush Moses Moses. And he said, Here I am. Then he said, Come no closer. Remove the sandals from your feet for the place on which you are standing is holy ground. He said further. I am the god of your father, The God of Abraham, the God of Isaac and the God of Jacob. And Moses hid his face for he was afraid to look at God. Then, the Lord said, I have observed the misery of my people who are in Egypt. I have heard their cry on account of their taskmasters indeed. I know their sufferings and I have come down to deliver them from the Egyptians and to bring them up out of that land to a good and broad land. Ah, land flowing with milk and honey to the country of the Canaanites, The Hittites tights, The AMA writes the parasites that he fights and the jebbie sites. The cry of the Israel lights has now come to me. I have also seen how the Egyptians oppress them. So come I will send you to Pharaoh to bring my people that is their lights out of Egypt. But Moses said to God who am I? That I should go to Pharaoh and bring the Israel lights out of Egypt. He said. I will be with you. And this shall be the sign for you That it is I who sent you When you have brought the people out of Egypt. You shall worship God on this mountain. But Moses said to God If I come to the Israel lights and say to them, the god of your ancestors has sent me to you and they ask me what is his name? What shall I say to them? God said to Moses. I am who I am. He said further. Thus you shall say to the is ir lights I am has sent me to you. God also said to Moses. Thus you shall say to the Israel Lights, the Lord, the god of your ancestors, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac and the God of Jacob. Has sent me to you. This is my name forever And this is my title for all generations. This is the word of the Lord. Thanks Be to God the end we look forward to hearing your sermon. It's entitled God of the Wilderness. Thank you for sharing it with us. Thank you, Peter. And if you'd like to listen again to today's program with Leanne.

Moses Columbia Seminary Columbia Theological Seminary Princeton Theological Seminary Bush Moses Moses Israel Calvin Theological Seminary Presbyterian seminary Graduate Theological Union Abraham Bush Isaac Egypt Calvin College Berkeley Presbyterian Western Michigan University
"graduate theological union" Discussed on Fortress On A Hill (FOH) Podcast

Fortress On A Hill (FOH) Podcast

11:54 min | 1 year ago

"graduate theological union" Discussed on Fortress On A Hill (FOH) Podcast

"Look the fortress on a hill. I'm Henry I'm Danny. I'm Kagan where we left us. Veterans that into the reality of the US military's multiple wars abroad and illuminate. The damage military service does America American presidents out. Us history have used American military and diplomatic power to force regime. Change democratically elected governments around the world. Most veterans come from families vested in Prior Service and American generals choose their own ensuring diversity of thought never interferes with American warmongering. How can we stand by and do nothing? While our military kill and destroy lives the world over while telling Americans that the death and destruction protect them from terrorists when nothing could be more. All fortress on a hill aims to change that along all right listeners. Well as you've noticed we've had just an array of great guests. I mean the pods really picking up. We've been so lucky to have Chris Hedges and then Bob Sheer and today I was lucky enough to have Rebecca Gordon She is also a Tom Dispatch Alumni. So I've been writing there since. I guess two thousand seventeen when Tom just took one of my rambling screens and agreed to publish it. When nobody else would. I don't know if Rebecca has a similar story. She's probably a little more polished but You know it's an interesting place to write Ivan following her work there and really just all the regulars for a while Actually leap since. I've been dispatched since I was in Afghanistan so There's a lot of cool people. Tom Dispatch. I think that we could probably for our sins. Populate like a rather different sort of its executives shadow administration although. I'm not sure how it would work out but I I think less children were get bob's as for Rebecca. She received her bachelor's from Reed College and her masters in Divinity N. P. H. D. in ethics and social theory from the Graduate Theological Union. She teaches philosophy or in the philosophy department at the University of San Francisco. Mostly of course digitally now And for the University's Leo t McCarthy Center for Public Service and the common good. You may know some of her previous publications letters from Nicaragua. A cruel and unusual how welfare reform punishes poor people very relevant now mainstreaming torture ethical approaches in the post nine eleven United States and then her lungs she does have a forthcoming Is American Nuremberg? The officials who should stand trial for post nine eleven war-crimes prior to our academic career You know she was working in a variety of national and international women's for peace and justice which is just so cool. I think first and foremost she. Maybe she have saying. This was an activist involved in the fight. Outside of academia the two are linked these include went movements for Women's liberation. Lgbt writes Solidarity with poor peoples in Central America. I definitely GONNA ask her about the Anti Apartheid Movement in the United States and South Africa because one of my door interests and then of course opposing the US. Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan So Rebecca thank you so much. Thank you for listening to the long flattering intro. And just so glad. You're here it's a real pleasure to be with you. Andrew Co hosts and. I'm honored to be invited. So let's talk well so people who are only vaguely familiar with your work might think you know. Oh that's the torture lady right given given some of your more recent work and and I think you're obviously so much more than that here folks on a hill Nacho saying that we are longtime fans the guys jumped at it when I said hey maybe I can get back Gordon come on so I know we know that you right. Think about so much more. And we are going to broaden the interview accordingly. That said I mean I think for starters I for one did initially find you and learn just a ton from your work on this issue. I what brought you. I guess in a personal sense to the topic and given that use portions of Americans. Don't think that the US really tortures And even more don't care much about foreign policy in general. Can you explain why you think the subject is just so foundational for the republic or what's left Absolutely so I think that my interest probably began with the time that I spent wandering round in the war zones of Nicaragua in one thousand nine hundred eighty four and I was there with an organization called witness for Peace Axiom into Cristiana. Pass and our goal at that time was to demonstrate that the United States was actually violating the law at the time which said that it was illegal for the US to be assisting in any way the counter revolutionary forces in Nicaragua who were known as the Contra and there was an amendment in effect called the Boland Demetz going back a long time but in the course of that work I met people who had been tortured by going through. Who had been trained in? Dora's the United States and they described the training to May and in later years I discovered that in fact the CIA had an entire manual for this training most recently republished by them or re issued in one thousand nine hundred eighty three so a year before I was there so I met people who were survivors of torture. That was used not as a tactic. But in a strategic sense as an intentional way of defeating the will of ordinary civilians to resist the Contra war and so it was the strategy of the Contra War was primarily not to attack the military of Niko but to attack civilian institutions. So anything from phone lines to healthcare centers to schools to the people who staff those things were the targets and so after September eleventh. It was very clear to me that whatever else the response was going to involve that somebody somewhere was probably going to be tortured and I began looking just in the ordinary press and this is the thing about torture in the United States is. It's not really a secret. It's actually hidden in plain sight so the first thing I saw was in November like early November in Newsweek of a liberal historian named Jonathan. Alter wrote a piece called time to think dot dot dot about torture and he was talking about how the FBI had these people in In their hands who were refusing to reveal anything about September eleventh and because they were refusing to reveal anything he suggested that we should either torture them ourselves and he said there were some limits on what we could do or we send them off to a country. That didn't have the same niceties that we do He proposed Saudi Arabia. Lend of -thing's so who were these people he was talking about? They were not yet detainees. Who had been arrested in Afghanistan or in any of the other places around the world where the US later began picking people up. These were actually people living inside the United States who were Muslims. Some of whom had green cards. Some of whom were here on tourist visas there were about six hundred of them and they were held incommunicado in city jails in Brooklyn New York literally within sight of the Statue of Liberty for months. Nobody knew where they were visit happened. In Latin America we would have said they were disappeared and while they were there. They were tortured. They were beaten with electrical cords. At least one of them was raped with the police flashlight. They were exposed to a freezing cold in February. We're wearing nothing but a hospital gallon. They were handcuffed to very hot radiators. They were tortured and of course they knew absolutely nothing about September eleventh and this points to one of the major problems with torture which is that the pretext is about getting information. But that's not real purpose so that's a long way of saying that it's a subject that I I became really aware of during my work with Central America but it was an interest that that resurged when it became clear just from reading between the lines and the New York Times and the Washington Post that the US was engaged in torture as part of its response to nine eleven. Yeah it's so interesting that you brought up a the contras and the Boland Amendment and and the early eighties really all through the mid eighties. Because I I've been thinking. Sometimes about this proxy war that was waged and all the crimes that were involved in it and in some ways it does seem and it's a little bit off talk with you. Think that in the post allowed of at least the main brigades from Iraq and the the draw down in Afghanistan particularly under Obama and leading up until today it does appear that in some ways you know the American way of war that everyone always searches for has shifted at least in part back to that proxy support including a four proxies that in Afghanistan. For sure torture right have you. Have you seen some degree of that? Yes I would. I would say that what you're saying exactly right that you know they used to call it. Low intensity warfare during the eighties and of course it wasn't low intensity for the people who are experiencing it but the idea was that the US in bents investment of especially of actual human beings was very low intensity and that yes. I think we are seeing exactly that. I think for example of the US involvement in Yemen. Where were at you know quite a large distance from that war and yet we are assisting Saudi Arabia which is assisting one side in a civil war in a country. That has been absolutely devastated. And I think that especially under trump you know. He's got this sort of contradictory desire to both spend as much money as possible on the military and yet not to actually become involved in any kind of military adventure overseas which is an instinct that on an in an odd sort of way. Find myself applauding. So yes I think that that debt there has been since the middle of Obama's presidency probably a desire to off off.

Us Afghanistan Rebecca Gordon Nicaragua Saudi Arabia America Bob Sheer Iraq Central America Kagan Tom Dispatch Reed College Tom Leo t McCarthy Center for Publ Obama Chris Hedges Graduate Theological Union Ivan Tom Dispatch Alumni University of San Francisco
"graduate theological union" Discussed on The Wisdom Podcast

The Wisdom Podcast

14:38 min | 1 year ago

"graduate theological union" Discussed on The Wisdom Podcast

"I don't have to do anything else but be in school and I can do Zaza in at the Berkeley Zen Center and I can get more instruction to be around other people who are doing it. So it's a good deal. I ought to do that like I say if I didn't have that fellowship I don't know whether my desire for support would have been strong enough to take me out of that light. Or what would it some- something would have taken me out of it? I don't think it was anything that have. I couldn't have done it for more than three five years. I think maybe although there were people I think people who are still up there in northern California where I was. I don't know what they're doing now but the every I bet. Those were the days when living marginally in northern. California was something that a lot of doing and it was possible. Yeah so then you go off to university and study Study Buddha Studies What what what specifically did you do they? I imagine you need a lot of riding and things like that. Is there any courses that stand out or any teaches that stand out for you? Yes well I. I was in a joint program with the University of California at Berkeley and the Graduate Theological Union. Which is a theological seminary. That's merely basically at the edge of the Berkeley campus. It's right there. And the theological seminary had a program called the history and phenomenology of religion. And the idea was treating religion as a human concern rather than this religion that religion and in that program you could almost make your own create your own course and it was a joint program with UC Berkeley so if you wanted to do studies at UC Berkeley. You had to have at least two Asian languages and I. I was still all this time writing poetry so I was not interested in being a scholar to that extent of learning Chinese Japanese Sanskrit. Besides that I'm not good at languages and I don't enjoy learning languages so that was something that was nothing that I was ever going to do. So but the joint program was in religion. It was not in good a studies it was it was actually a degree in history and phenomenology of religion. But you can make your own program so all you needed was a sponsor from one of the theological schools to stand on your program. I basically put together my own program of a combination of independent reading and classes in Buddhist studies at the University of California Berkeley. In fact I did study Chinese and I did take a course in reading sutras in Chinese of course I could read them but I needed. I had helped but I could follow the Chinese Texan. The professor would read and I would you know follow the texts so I took a lot of classes there but I did a lot of reading on my own and of course I wrote papers and I had my my My sponsor Professor at the one of the schools thought that I was. You know a good student. He took my religious paths seriously in basically rubberstamped everything I was doing and since I was a serious student I I actually did do the work but the other thing was fun for me is a having grown up Jewish. They had a Jewish studies department. There and I took a fair number of courses in Jewish studies department which was really fun. They had a great Jewish scholar. They are in and we would have seminars in his house. With just a few students reading in English Translation Some great in obscure texts from the Jewish tradition. So I was having a ball. You know reading all this stuff in writing my papers and going every morning at four a. m. five am to the Berkeley Zen Center at the sit every day and being part of the community there and one of ice have to drive because I lived at distance away. Dr At four o'clock in the morning four thirty to get there at five every morning and I was. I was stopped by the police. Because they were looking for Patty hearst patty hearst at just been kidnapped you know and they were looking for patty earn so anybody who is driving fast on the streets of Berkeley for thirty. Am was suspect so breast feeding pulled me over at thinking that I might have something to do with the disappearance of Patty Hearst Patty hearst. I don't I'm sorry I'm ignorant Patios can. Oh this was a very famous thing. Yeah you don't know the story of Patricia. Patty hearst Patty. You're the hurts Sounds like you're born in America. Sounds like I'm Leah yet. In America the hearst family was a very famous wealthy family they earned. They owned newspapers Hers was leading owner of newspapers across the United States in the Nineteen Twenties Thirties and forties very famous person. He was a real nut as citizen Kane. The famous movie by Orson Welles. Have you heard of that movie at? Yeah Yeah Yeah. Yeah that's about hearst use his name but it's yeah basically historian. He actually did Mary a starlet and he did use his money to give her special movies and stuff like all true anyway. His granddaughter was somebody about my age. And she was a socialite a wealthy person and she was kidnapped by revolutionary leftists. At that time there are a lot of violent revolutionary. Left is in the United States and they kidnapped her and it was this international incident. What happened to Patty hearst? Where is she was kidnapped? She was kidnapped and what happened was she actually was converted by her kidnappers to become a left-wing violent. Act like they were famous. Yeah there were famous photographs of her standing side by side with her kidnappers holding a machine gun. She's holding machine allow and they did things like rob banks and she robbed banks with them. What an extreme case study in Stockholm Syndrome. Exactly exactly so then. Later she was eventually. I think I don't remember how. She was eventually liberated from this group. They were caught and she was caught and and They think exonerated her. Because of the circumstances she never went to jail I think and then of course she recanted and she said Oh my God I don't know how I and I think she later married her. Fbi Body who? I think she's still married to today. So this is the story of Patty hearst but in the they they make you can be driving in the background right. That is my only connection. Apparently her was that I got stock. Yeah but you don't realize the police. She was like running behind the polices that we got away. But you didn't think that you would learn something. So important on this podcast. I'm getting educated and all different dimensions is very important that you know about this because this is America you got American culture. Yeah you got. Ta Understand America You. GotTa understand about Patty. I'm ready for my citizens tests now I think so. I don't think you could pass citizens deaths without knowing the story. Kosh thank you saw. So that's that's a very funny story. I think the side story that you're like speeding speeding speeding on your way to slowing down. So where will we? Oh yes so. We're so you'll you've decided so? Then you've decided you need more support. You wanted to get back into a Sierras Dahmer practice so you went to the Zen Center and ended up becoming ordained and if you could tell us a little bit about what that means and it sounds to me that was for you a means to the end of just being able to do. Mozambique but correct me. If I'm wrong that's right. No that's right that's right. I in fact so along the way all the story I it happened that I met my wife and we who is also a student at UC Berkeley in Buddhist Studies. And also a very serious student at Berkeley Zen Center. So we we met and we determined that we would marry Process that got speed it up by the fact that she got pregnant so when we were in the monastery we had twins. Wow and we and we lived in the monastery with twins so I was very intent on doing Zaza and that was the only thing I was really interested in that and writing poetry which I was always doing anyway and then I was found myself without much planning intention. Married with two children so My wife similarly had just a strong commitment as I did and she's Dharma teacher now also so We were just going along being at the monastery and and not thinking about tomorrow. Just let's do a one more training period were more training period and we'll more training period and stay here as long as possible at that point. Our teacher who was Richard Baker. Because he was the abbot of is in southern. Everyone in his center was formerly student. Was whether you whatever you're feeling was about to add. It didn't matter if you were at the Zen Center. You are automatically his student he basically said to me. Well you have two children and so we're supporting you. You're not paying to be here. We're we're paying. We're giving provide you food and lodging and all of that is for four people so so if you are serious about this you have to demonstrate your seriousness by becoming azan priest and if you're not able to become as an priest then you ought to figure out how to support your family because you know get on with it. We're not gonNA take care of you. Wow and I said well you know I never thought about that yes exertion Zaza and focused on white white wakeup call. Yeah exactly so I didn't really want to become a priest. I never occurred to me in my wildest imagination. I mean other people were becoming. Reese you know people my age and my level of experience where becoming priests and. I thought that was fine and I thought it was wonderful but it never seemed to me that it would be made because I was this. You know what I thought I was but I was writing. I was not joining any religion or any clubs so I was a bit of a crisis but I was definitely sure that I was not gonna go in like go. Earn a living for my family and enter into. The world is not going to do that. I has continued my past so I agree ordained a priest not because I wanted to be a priest but because I did not want to take up the alternative you'll forced into it. So what did it mean to become? A Zen priest like other than officially signing up to a religion didn't mean anything lifestyle wise to change the digest away different clause. You have to do different things. What yeah well. It was a little vague in the sense that there was nobody who handed you a sheet. That said these are the following ten things you have to commit to. But the understanding was that you would remain until further notice and then having an being at the center you would live you know in the restricted lifestyle of Zen Center. You will keep your head shaved. You would wear robes. Got It when you were not wearing robes. You wear some sort of modified. Prese Garb informal prescribe. And you. Would you would basically be a full-time Person at the center doing whatever was asked of you at this incident. Okay so that's interesting change and yeah yeah so yes so I I. I mean I was doing that anyway. That's what I had been doing for the previous five years so I knew what that what that was and I and I didn't have any plans to do otherwise and I didn't think about like five years later ten years later twenty years later. I had no idea what would happen later. I just knew that that's what I was doing now. And so I really didn't know what happened so on that basis I did ordain you know and it and it turned out that my wife when she heard that this had happened. She said well I will ordain also okay so we ordained together. We actually worked side-by-side insane ceremony and it sorta makes sense because that's what he wanted bay. That's what you wanted to do so tho- xactly had yet to sign up there now. Yeah and it's good that it's a good thing. I'm grateful to Richard Bacon for for I would never have the nerve right. Say That to somebody you know it's me. I would never say that to them. Yeah so so he was nervy guy and I appreciate that he had the nerve to put that to me in that way because it really helped my life quite a bit but it was a crisis where we have the time but I was lucky thing. True so you're spending years here. Just getting up and doing like meditating doing zen what can you maybe. Twenty years or more while twenty years. Yeah so what get like. I can understand like you like you know. We had this encounter with death early on that. Got You asking the religious questions you found existential ism and then moved into Zan. The response to those truce seemed to resonate with you and then you found Zan right but what keeps you going so I understand you. Go do that for you. You go hard core but what you going getting up every day and doing more zen It feels like there's this endless endless activity well to this day I am inspired by is and to this day..

Patty hearst patty hearst Berkeley Zen Center Berkeley Patty hearst Patty Zaza UC Berkeley America Patty Zen Center California Buddhist Studies hearst University of California Berke United States Graduate Theological Union professor Zan
"graduate theological union" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

Wealth Transformation Podcast

13:48 min | 1 year ago

"graduate theological union" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

"Now. Here's your our special guests. This evening is China Galland. I invited China because I thought her purpose would be a wonderful example. Of unconditional love in action and a wakeup call to raising the awareness around prejudice and creating healthier and wealthier relationships with different cultures. China Galland Amei is a prize winning author of several nonfiction. Works including love cemetery unburied. Sing the secret. History of slaves longing for darkness. Terra am the Black Madonna. She's completing the documentary film. Resurrecting love an East Texan African American communities struggle to reclaim the love cemetery. The historic burial ground. They owned China's the bond between women. A journey to fierce compassion was chosen as one. The best. Five books on spirituality by the annual books for Better Life Award China has been a professor in residence at the center of the Arts Religion and education at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley California. The largest concert team of Christian schools of theology in the US as well as the research associate and a junk faculty art darkness and the Womb of God. The graduate level intensive grew out of her pioneering work on the Divine Feminine Cross Culturally. She has been affiliated with the Graduate Theological Union for over twenty years her images of Divinity Research Project at GT US Center for women and religion a riveting storyteller and public speaker. China has lectured at Harvard University Columbia Cornell Bowling Green University and Prescott College among others. This is the second segment of a two part discussion with China because I finally have learned to acknowledge my discomfort about racism and be able to talk about it To whatever degree I can ya in a in a way. That's helpful but part of what's exciting to me about making. This documentary is yes please. Let's talk about Easter. Metairie is everybody has to die. World die we're all going there so anyone no matter what your background no matter. What color of skin can understand appreciate wanting to honor your ancestors that cuts across all? Wants an age groups. We had one little Latino boy back in there with us who was a volunteer from the boy scouts. He'd never met his grandfather but every year is family went to Mexico to clean their bare ground and he always talk to his grandfather. He would sit by his grave. Well let's face it. Our Spirit never dies but her body does so Wanted to be out there helping and giving up a Saturday morning as a young teenage boy because he couldn't imagine what it was like not to be able to go sit by your relatives. Rate was very sweet and there are many people who we had one stalwart volunteer. Who was a Vietnam vet and at first I began to think he was a little more progressive than some people in the area and then I discovered no he said He. He thought that it was a matter of morality. That you'd be able to honor Your Head and visit your dad you know. And he said that from a veterans point of view and of course. I'm sure they're veterans buried in there too. There are and any of these cemeteries so it's a subject. It's a location that anyone can enter into and in two thousand seven when the book first came out there was a new land owner. There were two large surrounding land owners and we got locked out again. The community locked out again over quibble about liability insurance supposedly so without going into that after four years the state of Texas got involved which was fantastic. They called public hearings when the book came out. They heard about these people so being locked up because that's against the law. They called statewide hearing so many African American families showed up especially not only but primarily. They ended up having four more public hearings around the state and the law got changed and Rick. Perry signed a new law creating penalties and fines for people who won't allow others to cross. Then it will no longer happen. That people get locked out. Oh No it'll happen again because because a law is only as good as his word held. Yeah as we get locked out again we got in in two thousand eleven and the students at Wiley College which was which is fantastic while he college has a special place in a special place in my heart. They I'd learned about them in the eighties when I first went. Kizzie may Hicks started hearing stories that I later discovered were absolutely trust. I looked up her great grandfather in the in the census records and yes he did on five or six hundred acres of land. Wiley turns out discovered Wiley College in Marshall Texas which was featured in the movie the great debaters with Denzel Washington denzil directed and starred Oprah Help Produce Nate Parker who's our executive producer Senate journey smell. Latin forest whittaker a fantastic group who took a true story from Wylie's nineteen thirty five debate team. That was an excellent movie by the way it was for film. It's all based on a true episode of the powerful debate team that included James Farmer Junior. Who was one of the major civil rights leaders along with King? One of the big four. It's called sometimes the big six. He founded core in any case to go back to your inquiry the students at Wiley got involved. The trustees gotten involved trustees discovered that three they had relatives through their role. Trustees had family buried in love cemetery and students volunteer home then because the students from wildly were coming in helping us the nate Parker scholars and students from all different parts of the campus got involved. I got invited by one of the English teachers. Wrote who'd read the book and said particularly the parts the sections on the history of the area and asked me to help her develop curriculum because she said nobody knows how to talk about slavery. I'm African American. I'm teaching as historically Black College. I've got many not only but many African American students and very few people really know the history. No no how to talk about it. Understand it so it's a project began to lay the groundwork for it something we've continued to meet about and look forward to developing a soon as the film was launched but first we have to complete the film but it got the school involved and they got me involved and then students from predominantly. White East Texas Baptist. University got involved. They wanted to come help their compatriots at Wiley and the first Saturday we were out there in September of two thousand twelve sixty five of US primarily students but some faculty community volunteers. We were locked. We got locked out again so maybe it was an accident. Maybe somebody locked in the timber. Corporations locked to the wrong place on the gate. Maybe it was deliberate. You'll never know but that's very much what racism is like. And that's been one of the gifts of this. The frustrations and the gifts is to begin to understand that race is and racism is a daily phenomenon in our culture. If you're a person of color that so many things that I would never think twice about or never run into crop up or or made difficult not always and it's not that people are bad. It's there's a tremendous learning. We need to do. But even deeper psychologically. I think what what we've done in this country we've some people politically have held up those who founded this country on this like you do as a child with your parents. They can do no wrong. They don't have feet of clay. Their gods and their word is law. You know but you know you. One matures one goes through becoming a teenager and striking out on your own and discovering who you are and having to see where their faults were their limits. Understand that everyone is human which you don't when you're a child so well in that. Dole tood yes and so I think there's a way in which many of us in this country have not realized that because by denying I mean think of it at the U. N. conference on Racism in South Africa. Colin Powell was our representative and we still in the United States refused to apologize for slavery. There's a way in which an in Texas and I don't know I don't know about other states. But there was a great controversy within the last few years like within the last four or five years they were going to take the word slavery out of textbooks and call it the Atlantic triangular trade and even talk about slavery. Some people feel like you're being critical. It's too dark a history. What it's going to continue to come up until we acknowledge own that this is our history. This isn't just their history. This is American history. This is our history so if someone harms you. How do you know that that they are worthy of being forgiven or wooden harm you again? They have to come and you know in South Africa the great process that was instituted. Truth and Reconciliation Commission people who did not who wanted amnesty for the crimes that they committed against the African population had to go before the mothers. They had to go before other people in public. This is all done in public. It was transparent and bring up the pain and the mother's got to say whether or not they thought that person had changed well an extraordinary process and in many ways a lot to get done here it would take a lot but some people are already talking about that some. We've already tried that. There's been a truth and Reconciliation Commission in Greensboro North Carolina. Yeah so is that one of the answers. I don't think there's any one answer but I think love is part of the answer because by having to go back into the cemetery. Now there's another university in the Dallas area that wants to get involved larger grade. Yes it's the more more recognition in the more exposure to this will help educate the mouse. Well because it's education that's the key. Yes yes and part of what we've discovered about. The cemetery is a cemetery our secret grounds. And it's also a place where we've had students come after the cleanup recite poetry saying rehearse. A one young woman who was a is one of Wiley skirt was was debater in two thousand twelve. She had taken on as did some of the other students in their debate college. They're on their debate. Team had taken on Taken up the cause of love cemetery and we're debating. I gave them a that. The coach Medina help shape which is all cemeteries in the United States? That have the remains of people. Enslaved in the should be given national historic status because these are scattered around the country and in Poland and Germany. They're using the restoration of cemeteries as strategy for healing and reconciliation and restoring the history. Because then you begin to learn absolutely so I would love to talk about your movie and your documentary. That's really you know we're we're getting down on time and I want to be able to. Well this is all in the way. It is great absolutely great. Absolutely yes I mean and so. Where are you right now with the documentary? Well we've actually shot almost all the footage that we need. I think we have shot. We're in post. What's called post production over the years? We've I've raised I. I think over three hundred thousand dollars towards the budget..

love cemetery US China Wiley College Wiley Texas China Galland Amei Graduate Theological Union China Galland University Nate Parker Black Madonna Reconciliation Commission Better Life Award China Divine Feminine Cross Metairie Christian schools of theology Black College
"graduate theological union" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

11:00 min | 1 year ago

"graduate theological union" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Around the world now here's your host Peter Wallace to introduce today's speaker thank you sherry today on day one we're honored to have with this the Reverend Mike fifty J. Jackson president of Bexley Seabury seminary in Chicago Illinois before assuming the presidency of the surface will center for learning and discipleship in June of twenty eighteen Michael was the bishop John Heinz associate professor of preaching and director of comprehensive wellness at the seminary of the southwest in Austin Texas he holds a master's in theological studies in preaching from Seabury western theological seminary a master of divinity from Meadville Lombard theological school and a PhD in homiletics in liturgy from graduate theological union Michael welcome today one thank you actually see Barry identifies as a seminary beyond walls tell us about the schools innovative offerings in theological education our school really does see itself as being beyond walls in the sense that our seminary is non residential unlike many traditional seminaries our students don't have to pack up their selves and their families to move to Chicago to be a part of it and and to be in our community instead students take classes partly online and partly by visiting Chicago for short periods of time short residence like just a weekend or sometimes for five days and well it's a seminary of the Episcopal Church you were ecumenical and a sense to relate to other neighboring seminaries how does that work and why is it important these days no it's it's hugely important Peter and I think it's because what we need to do as Christians today is really try to find ways to band together and live into the gospel it's not enough for any of us to go on our own any longer so Chicago is a great town for that there are many seminaries in the Chicago land area and we're all bound together in what we call the association of Chicago theological schools we work together in a lot of ways not just meeting together with our leadership but also have a open cross registration agreement summer students can take classes from all around and it really does mean that our students have a richer opportunity to study the Bible from different perspectives with other Protestant denominations with Catholic students with people from from all feel logical perspective and theological education is in somewhat of a struggle to reinvent itself for this new and uncertain world in Bexley Seabury has been on the forefront of those efforts so what drew you to leave a comfortable professorship to take the challenge of leading a seminary in these times in a lot of ways it was the challenge itself my life in Austin was great my colleagues and and the school was wonderful and I loved being able to see the students grow and change and to work with them on their preaching and their possible skills but Bexley Seabury is out of place right now where we're really trying to listen to the church and and see what the church needs one of the things that the church needs is to be able to have people come into the ministry who can't for whatever reason join a residential seminary community they've got aging parents or young children or a spouse with the job that's just too good to move or maybe they themselves can't move because of their own work Bexley Seabury is able to help them to get the formation and education that they need to be effective leaders in the church and beyond that we're also working to expand our offerings for all leaders in the church for lazy people who are doing their discernment of any kind of location like I will say in my sermon but also the opportunity for people to just deep in their faith and to deepen their understanding of church and their relationship with god among your academic interests are the spiritual discipline of preaching homiletic form the relationship between preacher and congregation clergy formation so much of that focusing on the exercise of a pastor's calling I find it interesting that you call it the spiritual discipline of preaching would you say more about your approach yeah I think preaching really for a lot of people it becomes something that they have to do it becomes part of their to do listen along side all of the other things that pastors have to do but really win when you think about it if you think about preaching as as a way of of breaking open the word for people it really ought to be part of your prayer life they really ought to be part of your spiritual life and part of a spiritual discipline of appearing for and preaching your sermon and following up with your congregation afterwards to find out what message they heard and what they're going to do with the message that we received you're working on a book preaching face to face an invitation to conversational preaching that will be out eventually from church publishing explores conversational preaching hands that work you know when I ask people what they're preaching is like a lot of preachers want to answer that their preaching is conversational but there isn't a lot of isn't a lot of homological work on what that means more how to know whether you're preaching is is conversational one of my other disciplines is linguistics and I really looked at the ways in which linguists have asked themselves this very question what does it mean to be conversational and I've compared those answers that they've come up with with the things that I know about how to prepare sermons and how to give them to find those points of commonality so that preachers who want to be conversational can really understand what that means for example in a conversation there's always more than one person just like we're having a conversation now and you don't usually think about preaching that way except if you can expand your vision a little bit you can see that the preacher is always responding to another partner usually the Bible but sometimes also the news the national news things that happen in a local congregation things that people have raised recently in the in the community and so when a preacher sees that and understands that that she or he is responding to another partner and understands that after their sermon is done someone's gonna respond to them either by word or action and then you can start to see that that there really is this kind of back and forth even in a thing that we often think of as model logic you mentioned the news and this is going to be a very interesting year with the political campaigns going on and a lot of preachers have asked and talked about how do you preach politics what do you say to that well I like to think of politics as being how we order our common life together and in that way the gospel is very political Jesus is very interested in how we live together in right relationship with each other and how we live in right relationship with god but that political reality of the gospel is in no way partisan and I think preachers need to really understand and really live into that place of being deep into the scripture and deep into their relationship with god and preach that instead of being caught up in all of the swirling partisan name calling and worse that's happening today Michael you've also had an emphasis in your career on wellness how do you apply wellness to the church and its leaders you know especially now that I've been involved as the president of Bexley Seabright been doing a lot of traveling and whenever you get on a plane the flight attendant always says be sure to put on your own oxygen mask first I'm not the first one to notice this but it really is true of of wellness in the church leaders in the church whoever they are or danger lay half to really be focusing on their own their own wellness and not just their physical wellness but also their spiritual wellness any kind of of way we can think of ourselves as being more more strong more well in the gospel the better off we're going to be and the more free we will be to respond to whatever god has for us well today on this third Sunday after epiphany your sermon focuses on the gospel tax for Matthew chapter four which read the passage force now when Jesus heard that John had been arrested he withdrew to Galilee he left Nazareth and made his home in Capernaum by the sea in the territory of Zebulon enough the only so that what had been spoken through the prophet Isaiah might be fulfilled land of Zebulon land of nafta Lee on the road by the sea across the Jordan Galilee of the gentiles the people who sat in darkness have seen a great light and for those who sat in the region and shadow of death light has dawned from that time Jesus began to proclaim repent for the kingdom of heaven has come near as he walked by the sea of Galilee he saw two brothers Simon whose call Peter and enter his brother casting a net into the sea for they were fishermen and he said to them follow me and I will make you fish for people immediately they left their nets and followed him yes he went from there he saw two other brothers James the son of Zebedee and his brother John in the boat with their fathers abatis mending their nets and you call them immediately they left the boat and their father and followed him Jesus went throughout Galilee teaching in their synagogues and proclaiming the good news of the kingdom and curing every disease and every sickness among the people so Matthew offers a quick summary of the early days of Jesus is ministry what stood out for you as you read the passage this time as I read the passage this time I was really struck by the calling of Peter of Simon Peter and of Andrew James and John really wondered would make someone do that the what would what would make someone just follow Jesus what was it about Jesus and what was it about his call to them that was so compelling that they left everything they knew immediately to follow him and we'll find out in your sermon it's.

Peter Wallace president Bexley Seabury Mike J. Jackson
"graduate theological union" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

07:04 min | 1 year ago

"graduate theological union" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Robert Wilensky ninety five point five WSP Atlanta's news and talk for the last fifteen years or so I've worked in the illogical education also ministering in congregation and in that time I've seen hundreds no probably actually thousands of people response to the simple instruction Jesus gives in our passage today only me almost always respond to Jesus in the same way I'm good that's the Reverend doctor Michael Jackson and today he bring to a challenging message entitled the fishermen for Jesus I'm Peter Wallace and this is a one well today one the weekly program that brings you outstanding preachers from America's historic Protestant church sharing insight and inspiration from god's word your life in twenty twenty we proudly celebrate seventy five years of ministry of the Protestant hour and now day one sharing the good news of Jesus Christ around the world now here's your host Peter Wallace to introduce today's thank you sherry today on day one we're honored to have with this the Reverend Mike at TJ Jackson president of Bexley Seabury seminary in Chicago Illinois before assuming the presidency of the service call center for learning and discipleship in June of twenty eighteen Michael was the bishop John Heinz associate professor of preaching and director of comprehensive wellness at the seminary of the southwest in Austin Texas he holds a master's in theological studies in preaching from Seabury western theological seminary a master of divinity from Meadville Lombard theological school and a PhD in homiletics in liturgy from graduate theological union Michael welcome today one thank you Bexley Seabury identifies as a seminary beyond walls tell us about the schools innovative offerings in theological education our school really does see itself as being beyond walls in the sense that our seminary is non residential unlike many traditional seminaries our students don't have to pack up their selves and their families to move to Chicago to be a part of it and and to be in our community instead students take classes partly online and partly by visiting Chicago for short periods of time short residencies like just a weekend or sometimes for five days and while it's a seminary of the Episcopal Church your ecumenical in a sense and relate to other neighboring seminaries how does that work and why is it important these days you know it's it's hugely important Peter and I think it's because what we need to do as Christians today is really try to find ways to bands together and live into the gospel it's not enough for any of us to go on our own any longer so Chicago is a great town for that there are many seminaries in the Chicago land area and we're all bound together in what we call the association of Chicago theological schools we work together in a lot of ways not just meeting together with our leadership but also have a open cross registration agreement summer students can take classes from all around and it really does mean that our students have a richer opportunity to study the Bible from different perspectives with other Protestant denominations with Catholic students with people from from all feel logical perspective and theological education is in somewhat of a struggle to reinvent itself for this new and uncertain world in Bexley Seabury has been on the forefront of those efforts so what drew you to leave a comfortable professorship to take the challenge of leading a seminary in these times in a lot of ways it was the challenge itself my life in Austin was great my colleagues and and the school was wonderful and I loved being able to see the students grow and change and to work with them on their preaching and their possible skills but Bexley Seabury is out of place right now we're we're really trying to listen to the church and and see what the church needs one of the things that the church needs is to be able to have people come into the ministry who can't for whatever reason join a residential seminary community they've got aging parents or young children or a spouse with the job that's just too good to move or maybe they themselves can't move because of their own work Bexley Seabury is able to help them to get the formation and education that they need to be effective leaders in the church and beyond that we're also working to expand our offerings for all leaders in the church for lazy people who are doing their discernment of any kind of location like I will say in my sermon but also the opportunity for people to just deep in their faith and to deepen their understanding of church and their relationship with god among your academic interests are the spiritual discipline of preaching homiletic form the relationship between preacher and congregation clergy formation so much of that focusing on the exercise of a pastor's calling I find it interesting that you call it the spiritual discipline of preaching would you say more about your approach yeah I think preaching really for a lot of people it becomes something that they have to do it becomes part of their to do listen along side all of the other things that pastors have to do but really win when you think about it if you think about preaching as as a way of of breaking open the word for people some breaking triple team traffic alerts from ninety five point five W. S. B. seven twelve in the cooler Kerrier WSB twenty four hour traffic center well then following two separate Sirius crashes in Douglas county out on I twenty as I twenty westbound and eastbound both directions at the Wharton road exit forty four to Sirius separate crashes have have all lanes blocked in both directions but right now over on I. twenty westbound at the Wharton wrote they are at least at leading eight left lane get by so that is good traffic is beginning to move and then over on I. twenty eastbound it looks like they're beginning to let all lanes get buy sell you traffic is beginning to move a bit in both directions over on I. twenty but again two separate crashes I twenty westbound and eastbound at Thorton row that's exit forty four you are only a getting by in a couple of lines so it it's really jamming things up for you in and out of the lithia springs area this morning just avoid all of it and use veterans memorial highway as.

Atlanta Robert Wilensky
"graduate theological union" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

06:36 min | 2 years ago

"graduate theological union" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"To admit that they you know, it's part of this weird. American dream mythology that we have that for a lot of a lot of circumstances isn't as true or isn't as clearly communicated as we'd like for it to be stop right there. Dr history, first of all she's talking about gender and people listening to say what the heck that means. She was born a woman, and now she remains a woman sushi, she gender as opposed to transgender, but she said something else here about the American dream being a myth, could you please address that Dr history. Why was kind of amazed at your ability to give a digital recording of something from a sixties acid trips? That was the first thing. But moving on the American dream is fundamentally this this idea that gives an opportunity equality equity and access people can make something of their cell. They can succeed and they can succeed for future generations. Now, there's always barriers and problems and difficulties in this hour, always fighting the opportunities for different groups of people throughout our history. And right now, we're really struggling with certain laboring for laboring classes and people with certain kinds of education and some of the new policies of President Trump is actually brought some laboring jobs back to these oars. So we have systemic issues to look at but she is living in a world of fantasy. She's living in a world that you cannot pay for she's living in a world with two extremes on one hand, she wants herself bureaucrats who control everything and on the other hand she thinks this is some game. So if you've been successful, I must be on the backs of. Or somebody else, you know, Dr history was scares us as you get enough of these people in congress someday. Let's just go down the line ten fifteen twenty twenty-five years, if you get a majority of people thinking like this the United States of America is going to be a completely different place. Your thoughts. Well, you're you're correct. And we also have a whole bunch of history behind us almost two hundred years of a variety of socialist experiments spent over a hundred years in major nations, and what you discover is in order for any nation to succeed. They have to begin to open the markets. They have to begin to create opportunity even the girl in Venezuela told his own party, that'd be a complete failure. And we've got to come up with solutions. So what happens is when you're when when you're a person of education and appropriate privilege as she is. And you and you had this support network around you all your life. You don't really see the economics involved. Dr history. I was telling the audience a little bit earlier that this is many years ago. I was at an event in the Silicon Valley with you. This is just a throw out a name that maybe a few people recognize, but this'll jar your memory a bit. We were with Brad Johnson you were working with Brett, and we had this meeting in the valley with all of these young entrepreneurs. And I'll never forget there was. A woman from South Korea. Who was talking to me? She didn't know I was in media. And she said, so how many businesses do you own? It's just amazing the mindset of some who come to this country. They see this opportunity that others who perhaps been here for generations. Do not recognize could you address that? Please. Well, I think you've got something very important there, we have permanent under classes, and those some of those issues we're working on trying to create your equity and opportunity break me teacher unions would be a first step towards that for so many in our cities. But if you're an immigrant, this is the land of opportunity and within a generation there are chances are that your children or their generation are in are in the middle class because of an open access economy because of opportunity, you know, I'm just thinking of the Uber drivers I've spoken to in the last two months. They are all creating the foundation they're either doing it as a second job because they enjoy it or they're creating a foundation for their children to succeed. And they all have this hopeful spirit behind them. You're not burned out. They're not negative and only the politicians in Washington can do economics in in in a way that defies reality. You know, one of the things both parties have got to understand that we've got to rein in spending. And then we've got to decide where we're gonna put those resources that hard working Americans pay through their taxes. Okay. So Dr history, I just want to give your resume really quick. So to ask you a question about immigration. So you have degrees from UCSC. You have a degree from UC Berkeley as well. Correct. Graduate theological union, Berkeley. Yes. Okay. So you've got that you have worked in in private enterprise in the Silicon Valley you have worked for a major Christian denomination and still do your with the act and institute you've written books, you've got all these wonderful degrees. So with all of that said talk to us about immigration to this country because there are some who look at these poor people coming up from from through Mexico through the Mexican border with the United States, and they're slipping into this country illegally SimpliSafe, but they just want a better life. We should just let them all in. Okay. Dr history. What's going on with immigration? How do you see it? How should we properly be doing that in this country? With the right kind of border security. We could create multiple points for people to come legally, be processed. It'd be unleashed. For the American dream. When immigration has worked in America. It's done with careful screening, and it's done with support of family and friends and a network that doesn't put people immediately on welfare. And again, you always have backup plans, but we can process we right now we process over a million legally every year, so we can process a lot of great people that want to make that better future for their children. But we need to create points for them to enter legally. And then and then wait their turn in line. By the way. It's fascinating to look at the Democrats new rhetoric. They won't fund a wall. They might look at enhanced fencing or border security probably will end up with some kind of deal. We can avoid the word wall. The fact of the matter is the right kind of barriers and the right kind of streamline processes, he's work. So we can welcome hardworking people country has Dr history. He's online DR Charlie with an IEP self Dr Charlie self dot com. Dr self, you know, it's always a pleasure. Thanks for being with us. It's a great joy.

Silicon Valley DR Charlie United States America congress South Korea UCSC President UC Berkeley Venezuela Brad Johnson Trump Mexico Berkeley Washington Brett ten fifteen twenty twenty-five two hundred years hundred years
"graduate theological union" Discussed on GSMC Bible Study Podcast

GSMC Bible Study Podcast

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"graduate theological union" Discussed on GSMC Bible Study Podcast

"I hope that I do get to see my loved ones, and again, and there is a time where we being is no more. But what I can do now is be with people who are. Hurting and in pain, and I can live my most abundant life as got his calling me too. So that really is my go-to one of when I'm struggling when I'm wondering I keep going back to I came that you might have life and have it abundantly you and I went to seminary together. We did we actually lived together for which involved a lot of giggling other things too. I mean, you know, there's a little bit of studying mostly giggling, you or someone when I think of you, I think of someone who loves to learn and this might be a difficult question. But did you have a favorite class in seminary choose one, or is it like choosing your favorite child like she's like my favorite child? I don't even have any of those. There were a lot of different favorites. For different reasons. I spent a year after I finished my master's divinity doing 'em work in. What's her jiggle studies? So getting too deep dive into thinking about how worship shapes us as Christian disciples those. Some of my favorite classes. But also, I took a class with there were twelve us in twelve students in the seminar and two teachers so out of fourteen people in the room, one of the professors, and I were the only Lutherans, and we were talking about ethics, and spirituality, and I loved that class in talking about who we are. And how we have been raised in the faith, and how we've come to understand how we make those connections affects our spiritual life, but also our ethical framework and most weeks, the the Lutheran professor, and I would walk out of that class saying how we're just so Lutheran. I think one of the blessings of going to school at at POTS in the graduate theological union was so many of our classes were ecumenical. So we were in classes with people from all these other denominations, and I had to really better understand better. Learn to articulate what it meant for me to be a Lutheran Christian. And so all of those experiences contributed to that. It might be easier to come up the list of classes, I didn't like, but we're not going there. No. No. Okay. So that leads me to then why Lutheran grew up Lutheran. Do you did go to an ecumenical seminary, you experienced a lot of different classes, a lot of different people. Why are you still Lutheran because it's part of who I am in its house of theology makes sense to me. I'm sure a large part of it has to do with how I was raised that this is the faith tradition in which I was brought up in. And so in some ways going to seminary gave me language for things that I just knew to be true deepened, my bones. It's not just that for me because I did leave church for a while. And for about seven years didn't really go to worship. And when I came back, and I did try coming through the nondenominational evangelical stream because that's where my friends were going. And it just didn't help me make sense of the world. It didn't connect to me in a deep way the things about Lutheranism, especially LCA Lutheran stuff that makes sense to me is. As the gods. Deep grace that what I can only remember from confirmation. But I remember that can God's graces freely. Given an unconditional love that. There's nothing I can do to earn it. But conversely, it means there's nothing I can do to lose it that God loves me, deeply and wholly who. I am. But also wants me to be the full person that got his created me to be. So it isn't just that God loves me. And it's done. It means that God loves me and wants me to be a fully formed human person and to grow in faith and learning the other piece for me is the deep connection that we have the allegedly, and I think our living more and more into as denomination is the deep connection to the world. And that our faith isn't just about us in Jesus it takes us and compels us out into the world that when we are formed by God's love. And we know that story what else can we do? But share it. There's a story I told when I was preaching one Sunday, and I was talking about communion and that the love we receive there..

POTS professor seven years
"graduate theological union" Discussed on GSMC Bible Study Podcast

GSMC Bible Study Podcast

04:55 min | 3 years ago

"graduate theological union" Discussed on GSMC Bible Study Podcast

"I kings were currently in chapter nineteen, but this is taking place before chapter nineteen. He's fleeing. He pretty much doesn't think he's going to make it. So he sits down under a broom tree and goes to sleep. But as often happens with God's plans, you know, legis- plan is not God's plan. So God sends an angel, not once but twice to give Ilija sustenance, bread and water. So the has enough food enough strength to make the forty day journey. Forty days of course, is a number. We hear a lot. The Israelites spent forty years wandering the desert Jesus in the wilderness forty days with the temptations, not the temptations, the group, but with the is being tempted by Satan, Jesus in the wilderness for forty days in that story, and this passage makes perfect sense to be assigned. For this week because we are in a series of weeks talking a lot about bread. Jesus is saying he is the bread of life in a couple of the gospel readings for this period. A couple of weeks ago, there was the story of the feeding of the five thousand. There was the psalm last week talking about that time in the wilderness with the Mana and God gives them there was also. Old Testament reading where the people were complaining that they didn't have food. And so God says, the God is going to send not only Mana but quail so that they might eat and have their fill. So this is definitely an appropriate passage for this phase that we are in in the luxury cycle. I do want to look at some commentary on this, so we have a better idea of what's going on. This commentary comes from Garrett Galvan who is vice president for academic affairs and associate professor of scripture at the Franciscan school of feel Aji in Berkeley, California, just a side. Note, the friend Siskind school feel Aji f. s. t. everything has an acronym in Berkeley at the some of the GT you see that to you the graduate theological union. That's the consortium of seminaries that my seminary is part of, and I just bring it up because it's a really amazing place of learning. There are a believe it's thirteen. Seminaries of various denominations and as I was at the Lutheran seminary, but I could take classes at any of the other seminaries. So I did take classes at the Franciscan school. I took classes at the Piscopo school. It was an amazing and ecumenical way to study when I was in summary, that's just a little side note when I saw that he went to, he's at the Franciscan school feel g it's a little moment of style just so I thought that I would. I thought that I would. Yeah, point that out. So he says that Elijah literally finds himself in the wilderness in this reading, but he also seems to be figuratively in the wilderness as he asks God to take his life. Elijah has endured a traumatic episode with the prophets of bell and Ashra up in the northern region. Remember the study bible said that he fled south after jazz Abell threaten to kill him, wanted to kill him. Although he successfully dispatched the prophets and demonstrated God's power to a hab. Something is wrong allies experiences, a sense of shame or failure, or some type of emotion on which we cannot quite put our finger. It leaves him deflated despondent and depressed. He says that we may never know what exactly led to the situation under the broom treat in the wilderness. But I imagine we all can think of a difficult situation like this. We can think of Hagar in the wilderness with her young boy, but God would not allow that situation to endure. We can think of Jona under his own tree in faraway Nivel Nivea Niniveh equally despondent. The bible presents these scenarios to us in order to highlight the travails of God's people, whether they be born foreign female, slave, a runaway profit, or perhaps the most famous prophet there will be bumps in the road or perhaps chasms in the road. So I very much like what he how he puts this into into perspective. I mean, we already talked about some of the other things that are common in the story with other stories in the bible, the forty days the giving of bread at cetera, but also this feeling of despair. Despondency that often happens in biblical stories, especially Old Testament stories where the focus of the story reaches a.

Franciscan school Elijah Jesus Ashra Berkeley Piscopo school Ilija Nivel Nivea Niniveh Lutheran seminary Jona Garrett Galvan California Aji f. Siskind vice president associate professor Abell forty days