35 Burst results for "Graduate Student"

What Did Dennis Prager Do During the Height of the Cold War?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:36 min | 2 months ago

What Did Dennis Prager Do During the Height of the Cold War?

"Tell us what you did as a young man during the height of the Cold War. I was in my very early 20s. I was a graduate student at Columbia University at the school of international affairs. And it had a number of affiliated Institutes, Russian institute, Middle East institute, East Asian institute, African institute. I was a member of Middle East and Russian. I studied Russian and on a visit to Israel, my third year in college, so it's even before that. I was asked by someone I knew in Israel and Israeli friend. Would I be prepared to be sent into the Soviet Union to smuggle in religious items to Jews? Because they were not allowed to have them by Christians were not. And to bring out smuggle out the names of Jews who wanted to leave. And they thought that I would be the ideal candidate being an American, so I'd be somewhat protected by my passport. And knowing Hebrew and Russian, so I was sent for a month, and it was obviously a tense month. That was a followed most of the time. Where did you travel in Russia in the Soviet Union? Moscow, what was called then Leningrad, which is back again to St. Petersburg, and then Baku Azerbaijan. The first westerner to visit the synagogue there in decades. It was literally literally underground. And the stories I'm not going to get into now, but obviously there were life form what the effect that it had to see a young western Jew. Who knew the religion and who could, I was always called up to do something to show my knowledge of the liturgy, because they had been told that the Jews of the Soviet Union were told that Judaism is dead. And they shouldn't even bother thinking about it because Jews outside of Russia are outside of the Soviet Union, no longer practice it and have assimilated. And here I am 21 years old and I'm able to lead the prayers and read from the

Institutes, Russian Institute East Asian Institute African Institute School Of International Affair Soviet Union Middle East Institute Israel Columbia University Middle East Leningrad Baku Russia Azerbaijan St. Petersburg Moscow
Who Is (the Now Infamous) Dr. Robert Malone?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

03:02 min | 3 months ago

Who Is (the Now Infamous) Dr. Robert Malone?

"First. Doctor Malone, welcome to the Salem radio network. Thank you very much, mister gorka and thank you for the opportunity to speak to you and to your audience today. Well, I could spend the next hour just rattling off your curriculum vitae and your various qualifications in the scientific world for those who didn't see your hours long interview with Joe who haven't seen all the interviews you've given with my friend and my former colleague Steve Bannon. Would you mind would you indulge us for a second for those across the country for whom you are a new name just to give us a prey see of your background and your relationship, for example, to the mRNA vaccines that are so in the news currently? Well, for your audience, I have been vetted and have secret clearance with Department of Defense. I've won over $8 billion or managed them for in government grants and contracts. I typically work very closely with the Department of Defense defense threat reduction agency. Kim biodefense group and have for decades, I have been a vaccine developer and innovator for well over 30 years as when I was a graduate student, I had a series of discoveries that led to 9 issued U.S. patents and numerous international patents that include all of the core technology for what we call RNA and DNA vaccines, including the first proof of concept reduction to practice using an RNA vaccine in a mouse model to produce immune responses against the envelope glycoprotein of aids. So an aids vaccine candidate my first major contract was with as a newly minted MD intern at UC Davis was with the Department of the Navy for development of an aids vaccine. I am trained at northwestern university for my NDI hold a license in the state of Maryland. I'm trained in my graduate studies at the salk institute and UC San Diego undergraduate biochemistry UC Davis multiple research fellowships at UC Davis in the department of pathology was an academic for well over a decade reaching associate professor level at the uniformed services university of the health sciences. So that's the DoD medical school. In D.C., I have been involved in way too many outbreaks intimately. I spearheaded for DoD for quite a while. The development of their Ebola vaccine candidate, which eventually I brought murk in. It was licensed to American. It's now the licensed Ebola vaccine. I've worked on flu vaccines. I've worked on literally all the biodefense vaccines used to work under contract directly for DoD at dying port vaccine company.

Doctor Malone Salem Radio Network Mister Gorka Steve Bannon Department Of Defense Defense Kim Biodefense Aids Department Of The Navy For Dev Northwestern University For My Department Of Defense Salk Institute JOE Uc San Diego Undergraduate Bio Department Of Pathology Uc Davis Dod Medical School U.S. Uniformed Services University
"graduate student" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:21 min | 4 months ago

"graduate student" Discussed on Native America Calling

"You're never going to know who is sitting in spaces and sitting in areas that might be able to offer you an internship or maybe able to offer you a fellowship or offer you research fellowship or anything like that. So networking is a big plus in my opinion. Okay. You heard it here on Native American calling. Pay attention to that network and grab those business cards, connect with people through social media do whatever it takes to move forward and your educational dreams. Folks, that's all the time we have for today's show. I want to thank my guests, doctor Corey still, and Tonya Belinda, and Katie Colbert for walking us through the intricacies facing native people in pursuit of an advanced degree. We're back again live tomorrow, looking at the possibility of improving tourism in Hawaii. So does more environmentally and culturally conscious..

Corey still Tonya Belinda Katie Colbert Hawaii
"graduate student" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:01 min | 4 months ago

"graduate student" Discussed on Native America Calling

"809 9 6 two 8 four 8 right back after the break. If you're hurting in your relationship or have been affected by sexual violence, strong hearts, native helpline is a no charge 24/7 confidential and anonymous domestic dating and sexual violence helpline for Native Americans. Help is available by calling one 8 four four 7 native or by clicking on the chat icon on strong hearts helpline dot org this program is supported by strong hearts native helpline. This is Native American calling. I'm Sean spruce. And there is still time to join our discussion. We're talking about taking your education beyond a bachelor's degree. So please give us a call, one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. That's one 809 9 native. I'd like to ask Antonia a question, I know your program focuses a lot on undergraduate students Antonio, but I'm curious what types of needs do graduate students have that traditional undergrads tend not to have. Yeah, I think a big, well, I would say undergrads definitely need this, but what I see when speaking with a lot of graduate students and just being an observer of the process of graduate school, that mentorship piece and identifying someone who is beyond their adviser, someone who is beyond their academic, may be assigned mentor, but really building that relationship that is intentional and genuine with the scholar that has some of the same work, maybe already published, I feel that mentorship piece is something that really needs to be identified and something that is very it is necessary. It is necessary to survive that process and I know that many students that I work with and see every day that something they rely on it is one of their life versus in lifeline, so having those individuals is so important. And I think that's a big piece. Now do you actually your program do you help facilitate those types of mentoring relationships with students? Because it seems like that can be difficult to connect a student with the right mentor and sometimes it seems to me even in my own life. I feel like some of the best mentors that I've come across in life they were almost like organic type of relationship. They just kind of happened. It wasn't necessarily through a program. I just met somebody and they just connected with them and they were really helpful. And moving me along. So how do you focus facilitate those mentoring roles? Yeah, absolutely. So like you said, a lot of our programming, I was thinking engineer kind of design for undergrads in mind, but in my head, I'm looking at the student as a whole where hopefully they will be planning to go to that graduate program. And so what that means is maybe within our events and our practices within the office and through our programs that work with different scholars, programs as well. Mentorship, I think, can be modeled in kind of structured in a way that is not relevant at times to indigenous peoples and native folks in the way that we communicate and build connections. So for me, I do believe in wholeheartedly, that in those organic relationship buildings, it has to come out of a more open environment. So within our events where indigenous peoples they have a weeklong of events and not just on one day or whether it's during our indigenous awareness month on campus, whether it's a guest lecture, a meal or just a reception. What I intentionally and always hope to do in the staff and faculty that I work with know this, I invite them to be their to be in fellowship and to be in community for those organic relationships to happen. So rather than setting up like a model program where you're assigned so and so scholar a and student a get together, to me that just doesn't work. It's so rigid and we lose out if anything sometimes. And so I think those anti and uncle relationships sometimes grandma and grandpa relationships or just whoever it is within that space that you may have helped out or do you need an app because you do some water, you know, what's your name? Those environments are really what I tend to try to focus on and really emphasize within our programming to make sure that graduate students are welcome and always have that access to those individuals. Okay, thanks for that info Antonia. Cory, I'd like to ask you, we've been focusing a lot today on scholarships available through tribal programs through AI GC, but what about some of these other resources like for instance, and then health service provide scholarships to both undergrads and medical students and other types of grad students? Can you talk about some of those other resources? Oh yeah, most definitely. Like I said, AIG, we partner and we work with a lot of different institutions. So especially if you're thinking about going into anything medical, I would have you look at the IHS scholarship. That's a wonderful opportunity for scholars. To one, not only help cover their cost of schooling, but also help provide with a job because IHS is what they call a loan for service opportunity. So for every year the IHS funds you, you'll actually be working in a BIA or IHS facility for those years. That's part of the payback requirement. So that's a great opportunity right there. Some of our other partners that we work with are the cobos scholarship or partners at indigenous education incorporated. If you're going into science, anything stimulated, I definitely always send students to check out the opportunities that aces have. They have scholarships. They have internship opportunities. They have a lot of different opportunities for our native scholars who are going into stem. And then of course, there's always American Indian college fund. Who have a great set of resources, specifically for those that are at TCUs and who are wanting to make that advancement to grad school, definitely check them out. But there are a number of resources available across the country. And even things like, which is a national scholarship that searchable database, students can go on there and find stuff that they're eligible for. Same with the scholarship site fast web. There's a lot of resources out there that students can tap into. Okay, Cory, you know, we're in the midst of this huge debate nationally regarding the value of a college education, especially with regard to the rising tuition rates and student loans and things like that. And especially in comparison to that financial cost and even here people taking this very pragmatic stance on a higher education, like warning young people to avoid that pursue your dream approach, focus on stem degrees as opposed to liberal arts. What's your take on that? I think we hear this education a lot. Hear this argument a lot. Around the value of higher Ed and the value of education. And the reality is 30, 40, 50 years ago, it was a lot simpler to be able to get an advanced degree graduate degree or an undergraduate degree. And it was a lot more cost effective. And that's just the sign of the times. But those degrees really do situate ourselves to build us up, not just individually, but a community. For me, I go back to.

Sean spruce Antonia Antonio Cory American Indian college AIG Ed
"graduate student" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:16 min | 4 months ago

"graduate student" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Is the cost. It's just increased by dollar with private college Minnesota. She graduated from Carlton, but the cost. And just get a coffee. Rather than a quick snack, that gets expensive for each kid. It's hard to keep and but these land grant colleges. I don't quite understand. The law. Okay. Education there until the university. I heard that fact years ago, I don't know if that's true or not. Maybe your guest can answer that. Okay, we'll meet with thank you for calling in it. Yeah, that's a really good question and I also want to say congratulations to your daughter for earning her degree. Cory, perhaps you could provide some insights there. Melvin's question regarding land grants and possibly native students being able to go to school at a land grant college or university at a reduced tuition rate or perhaps no tuition. Can you provide some insights, Cory? Yes. So the institutions are really those institutions of higher education that were provided land by the U.S. federal government. So that they could receive benefits. I believe it was from the morale act. And the late 1800s. So you have a lot of these institutions. That are geared to a more agricultural kind of like agricultural education and things like that. And I definitely agree that there needs to be some type of risk across the giving for latest students who attend those institutions. I know that there have been a number of movements that have happened at some length institutions about holding them accountable for creating space and access for native students. But really unfortunately that up to the individual institutions that have not been at least to my knowledge, a large federal or field wide push to increase that. I do know some institutions. They will do reduced or what they call in state tuition. For scholars who might be a part of a specific tribe, for instance, I believe it's northeastern state university in Oklahoma if you are a member of the if you don't reside in Oklahoma, you visit that outside the state, but you are a member of one of the 39 tribes of Oklahoma. You receive in state tuition, which could potentially cut your tuition in half if you're out of state. I do know there are some institutions of north that do that. But specific to land grant, those are some conversations that have definitely been emerging over the last probably 5 to ten years about holding these institutions accountable because these institutions come a lot of them come from lambdas that are held in our continue to be held by digital. Well, thank you for that information, Cory. Let's bring Katie into the conversation, Katie Colbert, and she is a grad student in the adult and higher education master's program at OU. Katie, I'm curious, how do you fund your graduate education question? So that's the grat assistance that comes in to play. I would recommend anything that you do in basically just your working experience, trying to sell yourself for your next job and using that resume to try and gain an opportunity to work as an institution that you're looking into if you can find a gratification of especially in grad school that can help out some members. The one that I'm on right now and it's just the phrase by department, but the one that I'm on specifically pays half of my tuition. So the other half, I get in I get covered by scholarships. Especially my tribe on the citizen of the miscalculations of they are able to help us out, it depends on how many hours you're taking, but definitely helpful a lot in terms of tuition and getting semester really account taking care. So yeah. That's one thing I would really recommend just trying to sell yourself in your work experience and trying to get involved with the institution trying to get them to cover their own costs, you know, that's probably what I would say. Okay. Katie, what do you hope to do with your degree? So right now I'm working in athletics. I still think education is one of the most important things to me. I don't really know where I would be if I didn't have both of them in my life. So I would really like to gain some experience now working in college athletics and then try to go back to the tribal college and work with any athletic programs they have, or I've also looked into reading later when I'm ready to settle down. Within the couple of movies or one, maybe specifically the American athletic directors of a high school that primarily says data has a high rate of population that's really where I want to be like really fine purpose and serving our need of students and making sure that they can get access to an education and to try and be successful in their own lives. Yeah, well, good luck. That sounds really, really exciting. I'm curious, we've been talking a lot today about financial support necessary to get a graduate school degree. But what about non financial support? Do you need that as well as a graduate student? Absolutely. I really recommend finding a community and it doesn't have to be safe. It can do this the best friend. You can see a class we have, I know the pandemic has made it very difficult to try and meet up with each other and do different things trying to be safe and healthy, but even just a FaceTime check in a phone call going to dinner for those comfortable with that. Does any kind of sense that you need being able to rely on lean on somebody in times by kind of settling is really, really important. You know, I know a lot of times we can act like you can just do it all ourselves. But that's not really how we're supposed to work as human beings and especially as native people, so I was really recommending finding somebody or a group of people we know and just there for you and help either for each other. Okay, is education something that excites you? What keys to academic success can you pass on to others? Please give us a call. One.

Cory U.S. federal government Oklahoma Katie Katie Colbert northeastern state university Carlton Melvin Minnesota athletics OU
"graduate student" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:36 min | 4 months ago

"graduate student" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Forth but.

"graduate student" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

01:31 min | 4 months ago

"graduate student" Discussed on Native America Calling

"I'm Antonia Gonzalez. National native news is produced by colonic broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting. There are now booster recommendations for all three available COVID-19 vaccines in the United States and you may choose which booster shot you receive more info at org or CDC dot gov slash coronavirus who support this show. Support by Navajo language renaissance presenting Rosetta stone Navajo for Apple and Android devices with two learning levels of self correcting pronunciation.

"graduate student" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

02:50 min | 4 months ago

"graduate student" Discussed on Native America Calling

"In addition, the order recommends that hopi businesses restrict capacity to half and implement screening for staff along with cleaning and disinfecting protocols, it will remain in place until March 13th. More than 90% of eligible hopey tribal members have been fully vaccinated against COVID. For national native news on Ryan Hess in Flagstaff. Native American community members in the greater Kansas City area are continuing to call on the Kansas City football team to change their name and end the use of Indian stereotypes. Members of the group, not in our honor, demonstrated at the team's home playoff game on Sunday, galene crouser is director of the Kansas City Indian center. Our purpose out here is to continue to raise awareness about the stereotypical use of our imagery. And the blatant racism that still occurs, you know, all these years after the civil rights, the fight for civil rights. And so indigenous people are still way at the bottom of that list being recognized for who we are as human beings. Members of the group and their allies hosted demonstrations outside the team stadium at all home games during the NFL 2021 season. They also have four changed the name billboards up in the city. The team is woven into everything in Kansas City. All this messaging out there that it's okay with us as Indian people and it's not. And if nobody else stands up and says, hey, this isn't cool, then their message just stands unanswered. And so we have to, as Indian organizations here in Kansas City, we have to be the ones that stand out here in the cold and say, hey, that is not the truth. They do have a couple of people that have said it's okay and on their working group. But the majority of us don't agree with it. The group has long called for the Kansas City football team to end the use of native imagery, including in the arrowhead logo and the use of native terms and seek the NFL's zero tolerance for on field use of racial slurs to be applied. Fans are banned from wearing warlike paint or headdresses into the stadium. The U.S. Department of Agriculture is holding a tribal leader consultation and listening session Thursday on creating a plan to create a more competitive fairer market for meat poultry and seafood processing. The USDA is seeking input from tribes as there are new funding opportunities being made available. The White House announced a nationwide plan earlier this month to boost competition and reduced prices and the meat processing industry..

Kansas City COVID Ryan Hess galene crouser Kansas City Indian center Flagstaff football NFL USDA White House
Get to Know Os Guinness, Author of 'The Magna Carta of Humanity'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:59 min | 6 months ago

Get to Know Os Guinness, Author of 'The Magna Carta of Humanity'

"Who is us? Where has he where was he born and what has he been doing most of his life? Well, I'm the great great, great grandson of Arthur Guinness, the original brewer, and very proud of our family heritage and the integrity and generosity of the firm down the centuries. My own branch of the family, my grandfather, was one of the first western doctors in China, actually he survived the box arrives, and he went into the Forbidden City and treated the Empress dowager and the last emperor in the early part of the 20th century. My parents were born in China, and importantly for this book, I was a 7 year old in the Chinese revolution. So I remember the day. You have memory? You have memories? Absolutely. And it's important to this book because I remember the day when my dad said to me son, we're in trouble. Chiang Kai-shek has abandoned the city. We were in the capital, and the Red Army's coming in. And I remember the reign of terror began, and I was there for two years under that, and my parents were kept another two years on the house arrest. But the important was many years later I was at Oxford, and the graduate student, and had general one night with Isaiah Berlin. In other great places of freedom, Jewish. And we discovered he'd been a 7 year old in the Russian Revolution. And I was a 7 year old in the Chinese revolution the two big communist ones of the last century, so he compared notes thank God the English speaking people who stood up against totalitarianism, but in the mid 70s, when I was with him, it would have been unthinkable. That America would be tempted by anything like a radical socialism, let alone a cultural Marxism. And yet, that's where we are

Arthur Guinness Chiang Kai China Forbidden City Shek Red Army Isaiah Berlin Oxford America
Senate approves Biden land-agency pick over GOP opposition

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 8 months ago

Senate approves Biden land-agency pick over GOP opposition

"The Senate has approved president Biden's choice to lead the bureau of land management a longtime environmentalist with a controversial past she's been praised for her dedication to the outdoors but also described as an eco terrorist Republicans sharply criticized Tracy stone manning she's been approved to lead the interior department's bureau of land management on a party line fifty to forty five vote in nineteen eighty nine she was a graduate student at the university of Montana she received immunity from prosecutors and testified against two friends who were convicted of inserting metal spikes into trees in a plot to sabotage a timber sale in Idaho's Clearwater National Forest stone manning had been a top aide to a former governor of Montana anti democratic senator Jon tester who said she did nothing wrong and help put wrongdoers in jail her most recent job has been with the national wildlife federation Jennifer king Washington

President Biden Bureau Of Land Management Tracy Stone Manning Interior Department Senate University Of Montana Clearwater National Forest Sto Senator Jon Tester Idaho Montana National Wildlife Federation Jennifer King Washington
The Life of Patsy Matsu Mink

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:19 min | 8 months ago

The Life of Patsy Matsu Mink

"Hat matsu. Takemoto was born in pya. Maui hawaii territory. On december sixth nineteen twenty-seven patsies grandparents emigrated from japan to work in hawaii. Sugar plantations growing up as a third generation. Japanese american patsy witnessed heavy discrimination towards japanese americans and indigenous hawaiians when patsy was fourteen years old fighter jets bombed pearl harbor. Patsies father was subsequently taken by authorities one night and heavily questioned. Though her dad returned safely. The next day patsies family lived in fear from that point on patsy later said that that moment made her realize that one couldn't take citizenship and the promise of the. Us constitution for granted hats. He graduated for maui high school as both class president and valedictorian. She went on to study to different colleges in the mainland. Us before moving back to hawaii in nineteen forty eight. Patty graduated from the university of hawaii. With a bachelor's in chemistry and zoology patsies original career goal was to become a physician but no medical school would accept her so she decided to change career paths and instead pursued law she applied to university of chicago's law school and accidentally got accepted as a foreign student at the time. Patsy was one of only two women in her class in nineteen fifty one. Patsy earned her. Jd and married graduate student. John francis mink a year later. The couple had their only child. Patsy faced a lot of discrimination for being a working mother and having an interracial marriage many major chicago law firms rejected her application so her family relocated to honolulu in nineteen fifty-three patsy. He became the first japanese american and woman to pass the bar and practiced law in hawaii but many law firms in hawaii still turned her away instead. Patsy went into private practice and taught business law at the university of hawaii.

Patsy Takemoto Hawaii Maui High School Maui Pearl Harbor Japan University Of Hawaii John Francis Mink Patty United States University Of Chicago Honolulu Chicago
Transforming From a Service Company to a Product Company

The Schmidt List

01:57 min | 10 months ago

Transforming From a Service Company to a Product Company

"Tell me how did you get into technology. Did you trip and fall into it. Like the rest of us Was it the plan always from we child to grow up in build a service and product company someday. Cute story is that my mom takes credit for. She was computer science graduate student at the university of minnesota and we had an old. Ibm tandy. at all. I learn basic there and hung out computer. Labs water for lab mates tommy c. video games. I was a kid. So i just tool around like a guy who is pretending not to be a nerd. Almost building computers and writing. Nothing serious. i didn't ever really grow into a software engineering role primarily. It was mostly still just tooling around with friends. But that's where i got the connections that allowed me to start the company first place okay. So that was a. I've seen it with agencies before that there some are purposefully created in some you you back value back into because you build up a network declined lists and you just you see the demand you need to fill demand where other people are more like okay. We're gonna this is what we're going to do. This is the plan. This is all the things which waited for us we were. We set out to build a product. Miho founder was one of the first engineers on google plus projects and his roommate was the ceo of mixed at all and so he had a very strong desire for building a product company. And very little to no desire for building consulting firm and so just took a lot longer. There's a piece of paper that i keep floating around where viable business plan. That was like custom software agency. Learn a half years and of course it took four and a half years to do all the work that we needed to do to get to where we are and to get to the point where we could switch into product but that was the plan from the

Tommy C University Of Minnesota IBM Miho Google
A Deep Dive Into Dried Tattoo Specimens

Decoder Ring

02:16 min | 10 months ago

A Deep Dive Into Dried Tattoo Specimens

"You'll really struck by the humanness of these objects you know they're not really straightforwardly. Objects they a pieces of people in two thousand nine jemma angel then. A graduate student heard about a very unique opportunity. The chance to study a set of three hundred dried tattoo specimens basically preserved pieces of human skin with tattoos on them so creepy but gemma was fascinated. It's a morbid fascination there's something repellent about it also draws two at the same the skins are part of the wellcome collection assembled at a time when criminologists were interested in exploring a connection between tattoos and criminal behaviour jemma applied for the position and when she went in for an interview. A few of the tattoos were in clear. Boxes at the front of the room just went straight over to the and started examining them. I'm so drawn to. The tattoos had supposedly been gathered between eighteen. Thirty and eighteen twenty nine in france allegedly from criminals and sailors. But no one knew exactly who the tattoos came from or who collected them or how jebel wanted to get as many answers as she could. It's like being a historical detective of the three hundred specimens which vary in size subject and technique. One in particular stood out to her. It's an especially well preserved piece of skin from a man's chest. It has a large figure of a girl on it. She has long dark hair and she's staring back towards the viewer it's professionally applied and the girl's face though a little distorted is enigmatic. Even a little forlorn her face resting on her hands. Over the last century criminologists have paid special attention to this tattooed to theorising about. Its meaning and writing about it into the late. Nineteen sixties girl is described as being his true love because she's positioned on his chest of his halts. The criminologists there is reading the body like taxed but i was so that that interpretation was not quite right so it's been kind my mission against to reconstruct his

Jemma Angel Gemma Wellcome Jemma France
Astronomers Find 2 Black Holes Gulping City-Size Neutron Stars

All Things Considered

01:57 min | 11 months ago

Astronomers Find 2 Black Holes Gulping City-Size Neutron Stars

"Eating another. For the first time ever. They've seen a black hole, gobbling a neutron star. NPR's Nell Greenfield Boys reports on how scientists were able to spy on this cosmic snack. Black holes are famous for their gravitational pull, which nothing not even light can escape. And then there's neutron stars. Neutron stars are very weird. Maya Fishback is an astronomer at Northwestern University. She says Neutron stars are made of protons and neutrons, the stuff you find inside atoms. But they're crushed together into a shockingly dense fear that's heavier than our sun and can comfortably fit within the city of Chicago. Now, scientists say they've caught a black hole, eating a neutron star in one giant gulp. And then 10. Days later, they saw another black hole. Do the same thing for these particular systems. The neutron star would have just plunged into the black hole without Admitting any light. If all this gnashing didn't put out detectable light, then how did researchers spotted by sensing gravitational waves? Those are the ripples in spacetime created by powerful violent events out in the universe. Gravitational waves were predicted to exist by Albert Einstein over a century ago, but not detected until 2015 Chase. Kimball is a graduate student at Northwestern, he says, the ability to register gravitational waves has been a game changer for astronomy. So it's like, you know, flipping the sound on on a silent movie or something like that. Where we previously just been watching the universe, and now we can listen to it through this gravitational waves. In this case, the black holes gobbling neutron stars generated gravitational waves that took about a billion years to reach Earth. In January of 2020. The waves triggered three giant

Nell Greenfield Maya Fishback NPR Northwestern University Chicago Albert Einstein Kimball Northwestern
Adrienne Rich was One of the Most Widely-Praised Poets of the 20th Century

Encyclopedia Womannica

01:56 min | 11 months ago

Adrienne Rich was One of the Most Widely-Praised Poets of the 20th Century

"We're talking about one of the most widely taught widely read and widely praised poets at the twentieth century. Her burke brought the minute show of women's lives into the spotlight challenging the idea that to right from the female perspective was uninspired and undeserving of attention. Let's talk about adrienne rich when she was born in baltimore in nineteen twenty nine adrienne rich's parents thought she would be a boy they'd plan to name her after her father. Arnold a doctor. Instead arnold decided his daughter adrienne would be a literary prodigy by the age of four. Adrienne could read and write by six. She wrote her first poetry book by seven a fifty page play about the trojan war. This is the child we needed and deserved her mother. Helen wrote in a notebook. Helen had been a concert pianist and had given up her career for marriage. And motherhood as much as adrian's childhood was marked by long hours in her father's library her mother's sadness and lack of agency left a lasting impression to in nineteen fifty one while a senior at radcliffe college. Adrian experienced her first big break her poetry manuscript. A change of world won the yale younger poets prize. The prize came with a publishing contract. W h auden wrote the foreword and reviewers loved it. At twenty two years old. Adrian became a critical darling soon thereafter. She won a guggenheim fellowship. Which funded additional studies at oxford. There she met alfred. Conrad a graduate student from harvard. Despite her father's disapproval and married alfred. Nineteen fifty three

Adrienne Rich Helen Burke Adrienne Baltimore Arnold Radcliffe College H Auden Adrian Alfred Oxford Conrad Harvard
NASA's 'Hedgehog' Robots Hop, Tumble in Microgravity

Innovation Now

01:20 min | 11 months ago

NASA's 'Hedgehog' Robots Hop, Tumble in Microgravity

"Comets asteroids and hedgehogs these spiky little robots are perfect. Fit for low gravity exploration. This is innovation now exploring comets. Asteroids and small moons can be a difficult task. So what kind of design could be used for exploration a joint team. From nasr's jet propulsion laboratory stanford university and mit believe that hedgehogs are the answer. Let's hear more from. Ben hoffman a graduate student at stanford university working on the project. We've done a lot of modeling with various different types of analytical numerical models. And we've learned a lot the hop angle is more a function of the shape of the rover. So with this type of impulsive. Breaking cubic shape provides a nice forty five degree hop on average. The team is experimenting with fly. Wheels and friction belts to create the momentum that allow the hedgehogs to hop or spin across the surface. We took this prototype down to houston and flew on the vomit comet for two hundred. And if you guys aren't familiar with that it provides about twenty second windows a relative weightlessness. So in each of these twenty seconds we were able to test maneuver so far. The prototypes funded through. Nasr's innovative advanced concepts program are just what the engineers order

Nasr's Jet Propulsion Laborato Ben Hoffman MIT Stanford University Houston Nasr
The Most Important Clinical Skills To Learn That Improve Client Outcomes

Talking To Change - A Motivational Interviewing podcast

02:22 min | 11 months ago

The Most Important Clinical Skills To Learn That Improve Client Outcomes

"Want to just say we won't have time to go into each and every one of these skills but people might be wondering 'cause line you mentioned just a moment ago that there are eight skills at military had referencing the bucks so just to list them and we might look into a couple of these in more depth accurate empathy acceptance positive regard genuineness focus hope eve location and then lastly offering information nodes ice so just to what people's appetites perhaps on what would be available to them if they were to read on and one of the things that glen and i were talking about the store. You all joined us terry was. Is there a skill of those eight that you would consider to be perhaps more important than the others kinda would win out if you had to choose one of her. Would that be if i only teach one of them. It would be accurate empathy. It's the largest effect size of any. It's been around long time. we understand it. Well know what it looks like in how to learn it and we use the first of the chapters on specific methods in our book for that reason that it's the one that just most consistently is associated with better client outcome hard to make the argument against it. Because i i mean i would probably choose them but to believing. Let me make the case for genuineness. Because genuineness is a skill that first of all it's hardest wanted to define it was the hardest chapter two right for me and we almost didn't put it in because the research for it is not as maybe as wrong or pithy as it is for the other characteristics but there is a pretty good case to be made for the fact that all of the other therapists skills. Don't really make a difference if there's not genuineness present. What good is empathy without genuineness would good is acceptance without genuineness and to me. This is a really important skill. Also because i teach a lot of graduate students in brand new therapists and this is always an issue for them right. They don't feel genuine because there's some new and awkward at it and a lot of times by task is to help shape them towards being more themselves as they're trying to do this therapy thing and sometimes i feel like that's my biggest task so i really think the power of genuineness can't be overlooked when you're talking about which when you laying messed

Glen Terry
Jay Bradner and Andy Plump on Mentoring Young Scientists

The Long Run

01:44 min | 1 year ago

Jay Bradner and Andy Plump on Mentoring Young Scientists

"Now that you guys are in the positions that you're in how you view the. Let's call it a disconnect of sorts between academia and industry and let me try to kind of summarize it like brief history. You're like you know. I see ethan. Perlstein is in the is and he talked about this. Before the post doc i think it was a term he coined or popularized few years ago. There's just a limited number of academic slots for faculty positions. There's a lot of graduate students come up With that kind of being there. They have their eye on that price. But you know it's just very very difficult. There's not many the grant. Acceptance rate is something like twenty percent. It's very low first. Time grant winner for an r. One grant is somewhere around the age of forty so it's just very hard for young people to get established and now this year with the pandemic. There's just been a lot of people struggling Maybe lost a year of momentum in their graduate school or post doc careers to get those papers. Whatever that they need to get to get that faculty job or to get noticed in some other way and at the same time. There's all this amazing stuff going on. An industry like lots of money coming in lots of new drugs and vaccines and things coming up. The other end with products. And i hear people in leadership positions whether it's small companies or large companies saying we need more people. So how are you guys. Think about like making it easier for people to make this transition or make it more welcoming make people envision possibilities of what they can do

Perlstein Ethan
Machine Learning: The Great Stagnation With Mark Saroufim

Software Engineering Daily

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Machine Learning: The Great Stagnation With Mark Saroufim

"Mark. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much for the beer. The inside for the show is an article. You wrote called machine learning the great stagnation. And i'd like to dig into your ideas there. You're currently working at facebook as a engineer. And that's obviously esteemed job speaks to your level of expertise. So i'll just start off with a fairly open ended question. What are the most acute problems in the machine learning culture ecosystem for sir. I mean so. I think you alluded to. There's a couple. But i think a lot of boil down to a personal incentives so so what i mean by that is. We've got into a point today where they're sort of been this long standing feeling and the community like as soon as we got to larger and larger models. The there's a paper called attention is all you need. You know referring to having attention networks and scaling them getting great performance and i've also seen the people say the meme like like money is all you need and i just feel like even though i feel i've actually two positions on this one. I feel this sort of intellectually lazy position. And i'll get to that in a second but just like upfront. What what's going on. Is that like well. Let's say you yourself work at an esteemed lab that you have. Lots of students can paralyze a bunch of experiments over all of your students and so the main algorithm and machine learning is called gradient descent. So you're optimizing some function but graduate student. Dissent is a coin and the article that essentially refers to paralyzing work across all of your students and then as soon as one of them works out then great and obviously like this sort of algorithms accommodating lab with larger resources and there's feedback loops like for example. Like let's say your colleagues are also running lots of these kinds of experiments and they're not necessarily publishing them won't you can learn a lot from them

Mark Facebook
Facing Bias in Facial Recognition Technology

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

02:35 min | 1 year ago

Facing Bias in Facial Recognition Technology

"Joy willem. Weenie is a researcher at the mit media. Lab who pioneered research into the bias. That's built into artificial intelligence and facial recognition and the way she came to this work is almost a little too on the nose as a graduate student at mit she created a muir that would project aspirational images onto her face. Like a lion or serena williams but the facial recognition software. She installed wouldn't work on her black face until she literally put on a white mask will. I'm we need is featured in a documentary called colleague bias now streaming on net flicks. She told us about one scene. Where facial recognition tech with installed in an apartment complex in brownsville in brooklyn. We actually had a tennis association. Reach out to us to say look. There's this landlord. They're installing the system using facial recognition as an entry mechanism. The tenants do not want this. Can you support us. Can you help us understand. A bit of the technology and also limitations and what i found was the tenants they already had it and it was a question not just about the performance of these technologies. You just it seemed like every group where we've seen struggle that was the group and that was predominant in that building but it was also a question of agency and control to actually even have a voice and choice to say. Is this a system that we want. you know. i feel like there's this kind of double whammy with this technology. Which is that. There's bias built in and because it is fundamentally good for use in surveillance and punishment it feels like it's almost disproportionately being used in communities where it is least likely to be effective or to cosimo's problem. Frankly absolutely here were saying. Is that if it doesn't work in terms of the technical aspect you get misidentification 's you get false arrest and so forth but even if it does work you can still optimize these systems. as tools of oppression so putting in surveillance tolls into the hands of police departments where we see time and time again. The criminalization of communities of color is not going to improve the situation. It just automates. What has already been going

Joy Willem Serena Williams MIT Brownsville Brooklyn Tennis Cosimo
Big Vape: The Incendiary Rise of Juul E-Cigarettes

Short Wave

02:14 min | 1 year ago

Big Vape: The Incendiary Rise of Juul E-Cigarettes

"Didn't know just how big this story would become when she started reporting it. She's the health writer at time magazine and just released a new book called big vape. The incendiary rise of jewel. I think for most people at felt like jewel kind of exploded overnight. Like all of a sudden everybody you knew had one of these devices but the truth is it was a long time coming. The two founders of jewel labs met in two thousand four as graduate students at stanford their thesis project how to make combustible cigarettes obsolete. Both of these guys were smokers. They both had kind of conflicted feelings about that habits and they were looking for something better over the next decade or so. These guys came up with a bunch of cigarette alternatives. But none really took off until two thousand and fifteen when jewel hit the market which was by far their most sophisticated product. I mean it looks like a flash drive. if you've ever seen one it's very sleek and it has these very potent very palatable little nicotine cartridges that you can vaporize into you know a very user friendly little whisper vapor and as it rose in prominence. You probably know. It became very popular with teenagers. Sort of set off this firestorm. In the media it's meant to help. Adult smokers quit but teens are being enticed by the cool factor. Hallway sleeping in classrooms but this morning the company behind that penn is in hot water. The fda has issued a ban on most flavored e cigarettes including fruit candyman at the same time. Parents are launching their own efforts and asking why the government isn't doing more so started out as a project aimed to seemingly reduce. Smoking became something very very different. It seems like a classic villain story of this company out to hook young people and some people argued that that is what happened but at the same time there is pretty compelling data that the e cigarette could potentially help some people stop using cigarettes. So it's a really complicated equation. Where on one hand. Yes absolutely you want to restrict access to these products for teenagers. But at what point does that restriction on access for young people cut into the ability of adults to use these products for their intended purpose to

Jewel Labs Time Magazine Stanford FDA Government
Amy Bidwell on College Weight Gain

The Academic Minute

01:44 min | 1 year ago

Amy Bidwell on College Weight Gain

"College weight gain is not just about late night. Eating and lack of physical activity. It is a result of a bigger problem. The lack of strategies to create lasting. Change i've recently implemented a holistic multifaceted behavior. Change program geared at fostering long lasting changes in college students while being research shows that knowledge is not always equate the changes in behavior therefore in addition to teaching the importance of healthy behaviors which provide the students with the why behind maintaining a healthy lifestyle. I began implementing health coaching to support the students in living the how behind making a change an integral part of the behavior. Change process is accountability and resilience to build resilient students set weekly goals to incorporate strategies they learned in the program and then reflect on them in their journals. The students think about what successes and challenges the that week and highlight why they thought those successes and challenges occurred over time. They begin to recognize the habits that result in specific behaviors to foster accountability. I use peer coaches facilitate. Weekly coaching sessions. The coaches use a conversational style approach to ask open ended questions. The use of motivational interviewing helps the students find the intrinsic motivation to make a lasting change past participants have stated how the program has helped them look at the glass half full instead of half empty others have said they feel more resilient when challenges get in their way and are confident that they can overcome new obstacles because earlier successes. An overarching goal of any institution is to graduate. Students who thrive in their personal and professional lives incorporating wellness programs to integrate both knowledge and behavior change strategies encourage students to make lasting changes that improve their overall wellbeing and personal success.

The Challenges of Protecting an Endemic Mint

In Defense of Plants Podcast

02:08 min | 1 year ago

The Challenges of Protecting an Endemic Mint

"All right. Hi sarah johnson. Hello thanks for having me. Yeah we're going to do this a more casual way just because the audience should be pretty familiar with you at this point but for those that aren't or haven't listened to save some of our bonus episodes over patron. How about we start off by telling everyone a little bit about who you are and what it is you do sure. My name is sarah. Johnson and i am currently a recent at master nunca defender and i am a graduate student of rare plant conservation at the university of illinois. Finish campaign pain specifically working through the illinois natural history survey and i studied a rare mint in the panhandle of florida and also do many miscellaneous other cool projects through our natural history survey. I love everything you have going on. It's really interesting work. But what made you want to jump into plants because originally when we first met you a bernard to put it scientifically. Yeah i i always liked a lot of different things. I've gone through many different avenues. In my you know navigations you finding a career. Which i think actually is a good thing to talk about because a lot of people think think there's one way to get to your career or say how did you figure it out. How did you identify what you wanted to do. And honestly the only answer i have. Greed is trying a lot of different things and you know succeeding or failing at a lot of different things When i started undergrad. I had thought that in order to do science i had to do something related to humans being raised in buffalo new york. You know we have five cancer research. Many hospitals in it seemed kind of the natural things do so. I went to school for pre med. I loved my classes especially my anatomy and genetics courses but Took a field course my junior year which took us to the rocky mountains to alpine

University Of Illinois Sarah Johnson Panhandle Sarah Johnson Illinois Bernard Florida Buffalo New York Cancer Rocky Mountains
Former Louisville Basketball Coach Facing Federal Charges of Extortion

Terry Meiners

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Former Louisville Basketball Coach Facing Federal Charges of Extortion

"A a former former Louisville Louisville basketball basketball assistant assistant coach coach is is facing facing a a federal federal extortion extortion charge. charge. According to prosecutors, Dino Gaudio threatened to report to the media allegations that the UFL basketball program had violated NC double rules and its production of recruiting videos and in its use of graduate students in practices. Gaudio is accused of demanding that you have l pay him an additional 17 months of salary. The alleged crime happened on March 17th after Gaudio was told his contract with U of L would not be

Basketball Louisville Dino Gaudio Gaudio UFL
"graduate student" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"graduate student" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Whether we want to or not human spend a great deal of time considering death. . And it's possible we've been doing. . So since shortly after Homo Sapiens, , I began roaming the landscape. . After all the first intentional human burial is thought to have occurred around one hundred thousand years ago. . What might those early people have been thinking? ? As they took the time to dig into the earth deposit, , the body and carefully covered up again. . Were they trying to protect it from scavengers or stymie spread of disease? ? Were they trying to honor the deceased or did they just not want to have to look at a dead body? ? Without the advent of a time machine. . We may never know for sure what those early people were thanking. . But one thing we do know is that humans are far from alone in our attention towards the dead. . Like people some animals including the corvettes, , the family of birds that houses the crows. . Ravens Magpies Jays also seemed to pay special attention to their dead. . In fact, , the rituals of corvettes made acted as the inspiration for own. . After all, , it was the raven that God sent down to teach Kane how to bury his slain brother able. . But despite the clear recognition by early people that other animals attend to their dead, , it's only fairly recently that science has really turned its attention towards this phenomenon. . In fact, , formal name for this field comparative Anthology. . First introduced until twenty sixteen. . In this growing field, , we are beginning to appreciate what a rich place the natural world is with respect to how other animals interact with their dead, , and it's in this growing body of knowledge at that time machine to our early ancestors might be possible. . So what are we learning in this growing field? ? Well right now, , we can split our understanding into two main groups. . In the first, , we have animals that display stereotyped predictable behaviors towards their dead and for whom much of what we understand about them comes from experimental studies. . This group includes things like social insects, , bees, , ants, , and termites, , and for all of these animals colony hygiene is of critical importance and so as a result, , these animals display rigorous undertaking behaviors in response to corpses. . For example, , they may physically remove carcasses from the colony they may consume them. . They may even construct tombs. . We see similar hygiene driven responses in some colony living mammals rats, , for example, , will reliably Berry cage mates that have been dead for forty eight hours. . In our other group, , we have animals that display more variable, , perhaps more charismatic behaviors and for whom much of what we understand about them comes from anecdotes by scientists or other observers. . This is the animals whose death behaviors I suspect might be more familiar to folks. . It includes organisms like elephants which are well known for their attendance to their dead even in popular culture. . In fact, , they're even known to be attracted to the bones of their deceased. . It also includes animals like primates which display a wide variety of behaviors around their dead from grooming them to. . Prolonged attention towards them guarding them even the transportation of dead infants and that's actually behavior we've seen in the number of animals like the dolphins. . For example, , you may remember the story of Taleh, , the ORCA in the resident J. pod in the puget sound who during the summer of two thousand eighteen carried her dead calf for an unprecedented seventeen days. . Now a story like that is both heartbreaking and fascinating, , but it offers far more questions than it does answers for example, , why did Kerry her calf for such a long period of time. . who she just that stricken with grief. . Wishy more confused by her unresponsive infant. . Or is this behavior just less rare in orcas than we currently understand it to be

Seattle graduate student Linda
"graduate student" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

Latinos Who Tech

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"graduate student" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

"When you get to four thousand horses, seniors, senior seminars. That I teach those twins, he's twenty students in them. Right at the students got from that is that is that is that attraction I can when I receive the student valuations from last semester, which was the semester, the trump. Transition to. Online. Those. Those evaluations from from the students really with. fled how much they got from the in person interaction. And so I think so for for example, in the school not. Versus Borough Higher Ed towards online courses, and that's not what I seeing Virginia Tech at all right and there had been a single graduate student that I had asked..

graduate student Virginia Tech
"graduate student" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"graduate student" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

"Another fellow graduate student who had kind of A. Way Not sucking up to the older professors we were both pretty young but a way of sort of speaking very differently to more senior people more senior professors than speaking to. His friends in his peers and that just really pissed me off. You know what? Brownnoser whether this you know what a suck up. And then I paused and said, well, why does that make me angry? AM. I concerned that I'm that way because I was a a Lotta professors sort of had taken me under their wings and releasing to enjoy talking to man confiding to me even though I was. Half their age. And I was where am I? In some way tha very senior people and than I am to. People who are like me. Or my age am I brownnoser a suck up And as soon as I realized that it was about me and not about him that I was worried that I was doing and maybe I was and maybe I wasn't but maybe or maybe I had some slight tendency for that. But as soon as I did that the anger dissipated I was no longer angry at him. And I learned something about listen. This is something that's Kinda Morton to me and I really don't want to be doing this. I don't WanNa be speaking differently or in different ways to people who are much more senior to me and people who are sort of my level or less senior than me. WanNa, be speaking the same to everybody. And I learned that and so over the years firstly, I, don't get angry. and I don't make it about that person that I'm seeing that behavior. But also improve own behavior I speak to people who are. A generation older than me or much more famous or much more wealthy I. Remember when I was an entrepreneur. And raising money for my company like the first time I was. Out there with my, you know passing the hat around to raise money for a seed round for the company that.

graduate student
"graduate student" Discussed on The Bible Says What!?

The Bible Says What!?

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"graduate student" Discussed on The Bible Says What!?

"Ah with extremely non compelling to me and thirty five years I. I've studied the origin question for thirty five years. And I don't think we're any closer today than we were when I was a graduate student functionally. Understanding the origin of life so. Your answers genesis. So. You got this answer of the origin of life but because it's complicated and it's You didn't understand. Like most people don't understand. You inserted Yala. You you've got this magical being who now claims that animals can talk you've got. A man made being made out of a rib. And that's okay. And that makes. You know again, you know you you've got a a transcendent being that is powerful. Enough you have. Transcendent being. Well we know that that our local universe has the beginning that matter energy space and time you know universe had a beginning so that whatever caused our universe is. The universe, there's a transcendent 'cause. Now you know is that caused an impersonal impersonal? You know both burst that that ultimately spawns out of some kind of eternally existing fluctuation in a gravitational field resume personal being that's combat hersal magical being that where does where does y'all way live? Well. Always again, Is Is. Self existing. So he is. You know I'm the presence. So he's outside the university. There's he has a presence within the universe is well pictures to and right. So you know it's a you know. Anyway He just kind of. Well I mean in the sense that's that's not A. Know. That that question, I'm not I don't mean it. This way that question is a nonsensical question in the sense that it's it's not taking into account that the nature of of how. God is understood and. God's nature that that question doesn't make sense. Well, I'm told y'all we has a thrown so you always got to have a house or or some place he resides if he's got to throw and he sits on it, he's got to be sitting on it at some point so it's gotta live somewhere. Right, in in in, you know there is the use of you know metaphorical language in scripture. So. It's so there's metaphor here. Well. The thing is I mean when you when you bring up the you know. Questions about you know Bible difficulties right whether these are scientific difficulties or other types of difficulties. You know it's it's not like Christian scholars had are are completely oblivious to this mean there's You know I've got I've got four five. Books on my shelf written by you know pretty prominent. Biblical Scholars that essentially address what people perceived to be difficulties in scripture there. Unless show from scholars that do the same thing folklore in the Old Testament Old Testament parolling stuff like that, but mine are just a little bit opposite. Yours mine show me how they aren't. Aren't factual. They're just by stories. But the thing is, is that when you approach these difficulties, I mean you do have to before you conclude that something is an intractable problem is you have to recognize that the literary genre of reading that. There's an authority intent. There's you know again what we're dealing with our translations. And that in that we're. Dealing. With you know a language of Biblical Hebrews. Dead in offensive dead language. So you've got to understand how that language works and you have to understand that the historical context of the of the passage the. Win. The book was written. You have to understand the immediate context in the broader context that particular passage in my experience when you do that with the idea that the text is. Innocent until proven guilty, I've yet encountered anything that would be a scientific problem that runs counter to our..

graduate student
"graduate student" Discussed on Ride the Omnibus

Ride the Omnibus

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on Ride the Omnibus

"As a graduate student as somebody who is thinking is is in field. It's predominantly obviously made a big people with European descent or white American descent and there've been a lot of questions of the degree of. The degree of control we should have over welcoming other perspectives bringing in people of different perspectives weather. Fact that our field is most white Americans and Europeans. At the detriment of like the moral core of classics. And Its enemies a very complicated issue and I'm very conscious as somebody who's like Taiwanese anonymity that like I was not gonna come in, and be sort of like a majority voice in the field and I often like. Might sort of line on this is to not. Think about. You know relating my race explicitly to what I'm studying. And I mean as a teacher as a student. You know working with people that will obviously come more into play just in a way you carry out discourses in the way you're conscious of how you teach things in national context or particular linguistic context. But I mean it is, it is a sort of. Very odd displacement that I think is both a consequence of the diversity. Don't we're living in and are like the very vehement Americans tendency I guess. It's an affliction probably to sort of cut out any nuance. To understanding that diversity, including the ugliness that has never left that system. Young. Well I agree with all that obviously. I guess not obviously, but I do and you. You picked the same phrases in quotes from that interview. That were my most poignant as well. And I think that the way that that Weiss the academic. The academic starts out is he's really echoing the old American bootstrap theory, right? You have to be able to pull yourself up by your boot straps well as physics teacher, you know first of all say it's just not possible, but it's also not possible. If you're trying to pull yourself up by your bootstraps, but you're already bent over, and your hands are tied to your ankles. and He's told that you're just supposed to be able to be a writer. If you're going to be a writer, right, just turn your back on the world and do it. I mean when I was nursing. My first child the book said Turn Your back on the world. It's just you and your baby. Will you know this man as a black man in?.

Weiss graduate student writer
"graduate student" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Emilio is with us in Ohio hi Emily how are you hi Dave I'm getting you better than I deserve what's up here's my situation I am a graduate student in physics how about a year left to get my PhD and I make around after taxes around twenty two thousand dollars and project there are to make about a hundred thousand now when I graduate good I have I have some good and bad about thirty thousand dollars and I do have some credit cards on file for five thousand dollars so here's my question I'm so opted in debt and I shouldn't go in anymore that but I am planning to proposed to my girlfriend yeah yeah while also trying to go on a on a short trip in the summer combined these two probably be adding a four thousand dollars to make that so my question is so my my plan is to pay for the use of credit card with some promotions so zero interest rate and basically has that I'll graduate and out because my income you for the interest inclusive so essentially I'll be able to pay them off with no interest and the question is this my judgment here's good or bad what do you recommend they go bad it's a dumb idea you're deeply in debt already you don't need to go further in debt you can't afford to go on a.

Emilio Dave graduate student Ohio
"graduate student" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on KGO 810

"Who would love to work on that the the work of the itself we were talking about as I scale did you know it can take three years when that it takes three years can find what it what the graduate student man was it my graduate students include people who have had done a person who has done a tour two tours in Iraq I have an expert on who's just completing his thesis right now on the state of for from which this comes and I have a student who is an expert in the wage imperia twitches third century and house now so I said that G. golf think about it for twenty four hours and luckily Norton happens come up in twenty four hours with someone else to do it so are you saw it too well this is a pretty simple books the grammar is fairly simple shortly and a year we can be done and then I can move on and I will have done something that would be fun to work on with my graduate students some of whom are really experts in aspects of this so that's how the whole thing began and then we added members including a wonderful poet from Princeton University who would fly out at fairly regular intervals to participate with us he's just got a feel for the language and I'm someone who believes that it's extraordinarily difficult to translate things in Chinese by one cell even though I have done things that are nominally by myself I've always given the Manu script to multiple other people for their comments and criticisms and I've always learned so much from that so I thought why not enjoy this and argue every two weeks over this manuscript and three years later we were finally.

Iraq Princeton University graduate student Manu
"graduate student" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Play ready to play first let's hear from Adam Burke graduate student Gideon Walsh was at the end of his tether he was on his third macbook in as many weeks and his term paper was already fiercely overdue I'm not normally a forgetful person so the fact that I managed to lose two laptops and so short span of time to drive me crazy watch explained while she was studying for an M. S. in private behavior at central Washington university had been hard at work at the institute aping closure writing a paper on me me a three year old rang a time specifically on her problem solving abilities I backed up a lot of my notes but I still had to rewrite it from scratch I was kind of getting desperate said walls it was then that a classmate of his who had been reviewing CCTV footage for a paper on the animals sleep cycles solve the mystery many had figured out how to use a back scratcher we've given her to reach the key for the door to her pen explains wall she should get out at night and take various objects from the lab and hide them under her sleeping Pat including my laptop while Walsh was able to retrieve his missing laptops he realized he'd have to completely rewrite his paper to focus on Mimi's kind deaf blind after apology and kleptomania the long and the short of it is the eighth is better at figuring out problems that I am the lone Walsh who took some small solace in the fact that he got an a minus on the paper paper on the intelligence of a ring to Dan's is stolen by an intelligent Arango Dan your next likely story comes from Roxanne Roberts when two sixteen year olds didn't come home Sunday from a snowboarding outing everyone feared the worst but the two boys survived the night in British Columbia during a snowstorm no less by burning their homework to stay warm Jim Kyle head of the Canadian search and rescue team that found them told the CBC the boys quote did all the right things including building the shelter and starting a fire quote one young person had homework in his backpack and that definitely helped keep the fire going he said the boys were rescued Monday morning in good health no word if their teachers reassign the homework or just gave them a B. for burns burn their homework to survive your last story missing homework comes from Luke Burbank last week during an NPR tiny desk concert Calvin core does Broadus junior better known as Snoop Dogg occasional rapper and full time marijuana enthusiast I was chatting with host Bob Boilen when he recounted one of those parenting moments that we can all not identify with involved having to call his son Cordell high school back in two thousand seventeen to explain why the last page of his biology final was missing why a Snoop had mistakenly used it to roll an enormous and nearly relationship destroying do be yes you heard this right America the dog smoked his kids homework I was in the studio with Warren G. Michael McDonald the regulator's role they're they're ready to mount up Snoop casually told a shocked Boylan so this joint need to be huge to make it all the way around the room and there was the stack of papers on a little table in the hallway I just grab one of them not realizing the other side of the paper was a bunch of writing about nucleotides that are found in RNA but not DNA thankfully for everyone the school was understanding as this was not the first time this had happened to Snoop Dogg dell was permitted to frantically right the final page she passed the class is now a freshman at UCLA to thank the high school for being so chill about things Snoop donated two hundred thousand dollars to the science program specifically asked for the students to research that sticky icky icky the school politely explained they weren't allowed to do that for legal reasons but they did name the science lab the Snoop D. O. double G. center for biology in his honor which police Snoop greatly and so he let them keep the donation choices one of these things happen to a student's homework wasn't from Adam Burke a college student trying to work on the intelligence of a ring and things got sabotage by the rating.

graduate student Adam Burke
"graduate student" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

08:18 min | 2 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on 710 WOR

"I'm currently a graduate student and I have already figured out a little bit of student that could pay for my program but I also recently started listening to your podcast are and so my wife and I are looking at ways to prevent going further into that and we we we do have a a little bit of money that my wife had saved up prior to us getting together but we're totally in it together at this point and where we're looking at at tapping into that money originally she was actually hoping to save it for a down payment on a house after I graduate but now that I'm kind of missing you I know that the house would be kind of down down the road a little bit so we're looking at using that money more wisely currently what do you study our nurse anesthesia told very good in danger definitely yeah I read it when you're enjoying I graduate in may of twenty twenty one eighteen months and how much more is going to cost you to finish it's going to it's going to cost a lot thirty thousand dollars more from right now how much is in savings about fifteen thousand okay I don't cover the fifteen I was planting out student loans for that okay does she work because she does work and she make a decent income we live offer income and there isn't much left over after that okay give any breaks you have a summer offer anything no I don't get any breaks unfortunately I I do what I can I do a little bit a lift driving when and where I can but my particular program is is it called the Babson Georgians don't work at all so I don't really have too much opportunity to make money myself my wife vast majority of students have turned twenty five thousand just England at this is not an option we're not measuring against that yeah that's true but the yeah well I'm definitely using their savings to finish and I'm not just scratching clawing get every nickel out of the corner of the couch if I can't fish is with no more data what you said earlier in the conversation I completely agree with but dude you're gonna make a serious bank decision pasal boards this is a great career field you're gonna be dang dang now much longer than you have already how much did one that you already have right now the low forty two thousand well that okay not much at all you don't pay that off in twenty minutes just as you yeah as soon as you get on well get out and get rolling but I guess that's kind of a lead me to my question for years I also very recently found out that in order to invest in a Roth IRA there's actually a cap on your household income in order to be able to invest directly in that and so my question was being mad when I graduate I'm I'm under the impression it's about two hundred thousand dollars jointly for household household income and I I would expect a joint income to be above that once I graduate course which make their income will be above that yeah great exactly hopefully maybe and so it it in that case what would it be smart to take that savings and put it on a rock while we still can so to speak now the cause and effect what you've done is you borrowed student loan money to put into a rock right sure I wouldn't do that now I'll never do that now here's the other thing number one you likely will be working with an organization as a four oh one K. and you can load that thing full show and it might even be a Roth four oh one K. so you've got you've got other options to save in addition to that yes you are you cannot do a Roth IRA when you're back over to a thousand but you can do a Roth IRA when you make over two hundred thousand by using what's called the back door Roth IRA technique I do it every year my wife doesn't every year and all that is you okay on an after tax traditional after tax traditional IRA in thirty seconds later rolled into rock and there's no income limit on that and so it's just an extra step to get you into a Roth but even if you couldn't do that we would never tell you to borrow student loan money to fund a Roth and by borrowing extra pay for your school because you use your savings for a Roth it has the exact same affect and no I would never do that some man I'm so proud of you you've got a great career field you're gonna make a lot of money be very focused very careful and you're gonna do really great I would love for you to finish this with no additional that Jim is in Louisiana hi Jim welcome to the Dave Ramsey show I gave thanks for taking my call sure what's up were kind of in crisis mode I mean we're just living paycheck to paycheck and we make way too much money to do that how much do you might just don't I probably I drive a truck for a living I make it two thousand a better year and that my wife makes it seventy five thousand a year uhhuh yeah you do make too much finally broke so why are you broke yeah I don't know how yeah you did talk about it well we have heard well forty thousand credit card debt seventy five thousand dollars in student loans two cars and we can't afford yeah we own the cars twenty sixteen jeep compass eighteen nineteen thousand arm right before we were married she came home with a brand new Mustang so I don't know what she owes on that twenty twenty five how long you been married we married about a year we just celebrated our one year anniversary well I'm we you know if if if it were in my house I would sit down with her and just say this is not working we're both working our **** off we make a lot of money they were completely broke the plan that we are using sucks beyond belief agreed I have yeah I and I and I've done that and I've suggested several times a week try Q. work your plan and she says to me that she make too much money to live watches broke branch are broke yeah by the way you are here combined with the number one cause of divorce in North America days money fights money problems princes right I make too much money to live like I'm broke and yet you keep buying crap and spending money like you're in Congress how old is this girl our boat yeah I'm forty forty forty five wow to all the back and that way well I don't know I mean if she kid then ninety percent of solving a problem is realizing there's one and if we can't agree that the process that you all have years to get here and where you are today socks then I don't know where to start from there agreed I I bought her a total money makeover as you agree to read that this weekend okay what's a good start I mean I you know I you know you cannot continue to do what you're doing would you agree with that I totally agree and if she would if she can agree to that then you say okay what do you what what are we gonna do because what we're doing now we can't keep doing and I answer that as well I'm good at making a budget no I'm I'm saying she should answer that right that that's our that's our answer I'm good at making a budget yeah on the last night when you I don't know if she ever has been yeah she bought a Mustang she couldn't afford that doesn't indicate she's good at making a budget as usual now she's not good at making a budget you all suck at handling money and I'm not mad at you and I'm trying trying to shame me I'm just agreeing with you and I'm sorry you're in this pain so what you guys have got to do is establish that there is a legitimate problem here and what is our best source of information and our best plan to change our behavior so we.

graduate student
"graduate student" Discussed on Global Optimum

Global Optimum

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on Global Optimum

"We have all heard that it's better to give than to receive. We've all had the experience of being nice to people so i just i don't see any great reason why most people would be happier if they were more altruistic than they already are when somebody spends money on themselves instead of donating it to charity i think it's because they really will be happier if they spend the money on themselves. I don't think people are deluded about this. Most people don't donate much to charity because they would be made worse off by doing so even if if altruism is underrated. I think it's worth pointing out that conventional altruism probably has bigger happiness boosting effects than affective altruism. Effective altruism is often distant. You don't get to see who you're helping conventional. Altruism is more often up close and personal so i expect it produces more of a warm glow and effective. Altruism has fewer signaling benefits unless you live in an e._a. Enclave indeed did you might have to hide your effective altruism endeavors from normal people who would judge it to be weird or the very least you might have to speak in euphemism awesome and not really admit to carrying about what you really care about having to hide what you really care about doesn't seem good for happiness. Another argument that has been made for the selfish benefits of altruism is that it will give your life a sense of meaning putting aside the amount of positive and negative emotion you feel throughout the day you may value having the sense that your life is meaningful in a twenty the thirteen tedtalk peter singer argued that effective altruism can be a source of meaning and that it can help us escape from the head down a treadmill of consumption asian. I'll read a quote from his talk. In this quote he's arguing that donation is not so burdensome and therefore not a reason to reject effective altruism quotes. Some people think it's a burden to give i. I don't really believe it is. I've enjoyed giving all of my life since i was a graduate student. It's been something fulfilling to me. I think one of the reasons for this is that being an effective altruistic helps to overcome what i call the sisyphus problem civis was condemned by the gods to push a huge boulder up to the top of the hill just as he gets there. The effort becomes too much. The boulder escapes rolls all the way down the hill. He has to trudge back down to push it up again and the same thing happens again and again for all eternity. Does that remind you of a consumer lifestyle gal where you work hard to.

graduate student
"graduate student" Discussed on Born to Impact

Born to Impact

03:21 min | 3 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on Born to Impact

"My marketing, quote, unquote, the next morning, I make some photocopies on the way to class and I put him on bulletin boards. Not a lot but just on the way to class fast forward at Thursday, seven o'clock walking to the classroom. I turned the corner. Honestly, guys. I'm hoping just five people, you know, just show up. Right. So I could do this, and I turned the corner, and there's a crowd of people outside that classroom, honest to God honest to God, I say to myself. Wow, I hope whatever's going on and soon, so I could do my thing. Right. That's how slow I am. 'cause I fear. They're not there for me. Because because that's that's the believe that's the power belief. You don't believe it. You don't see it? Right. This is really one exactly. And then I think a lot of people can identify with this. Because then I go man, I don't share this. I go to the doorway came to get in because it's harmful. This is why you're sharing it though. You have to understand race. It will you here. Why don't share it very often? But I can't even get into room because there's crowd of people on this really tall guy. I'm like, yeah. What's what's going on inside? And he looks at me like there's a speed reading class. And swear I go while what a coincidence. What are the chances? There's another speed reading the same classroom day at the same time. That's what I'm thinking. Right. And I push my way in and there's a crowd of people everywhere. People standing in the back, but there's no in teaching it. So it takes my slow brain. Quick brain. But six my slow brain all that time to realize why they're there. They're there for me. Right. And I do a head count because I'm freaking out. And I'll tell you why I do head counts out five or ten people. There's one hundred ten people in this classroom. And and I'm freaking out because number one I'm eighteen years old, and I'm wearing t shirts shorts. And then there are teaching assistants graduate student law soons, you know, people, you know, and I'm just thinking, okay. And I have not Satan number two. I have nothing prepared to talk about. I was just going to share like this is what home studying and number three as I mentioned before with that book report. This is why I'm getting flashbacks in my book report when I was a kid, I disappointed myself, and I failed. I. Mm. I'm phobic public. Speaking even to this day, I trust tens of thousands of people on stage from all these different countries. And I still get nervous before going on stage. But I feel it's a moral obligation. There's a lot of the ways of making money, right? But I feel like I have a moral obligation to teach us because if I don't shame on me. Right. If I have something that's affecting my life, so positively I keep it to myself, then there's just something wrong with that. And even though I feel that way. I can't get my nervous system and my body to act because I'm sweating I came in breathe like I'm about to pass out. And I spent some time if years ago in the rain forest and the different story, but I came across an indigenous tribe in literally we're their very first western contact ever. They never met westerners before. And it was a crazy experience and we live with them for a little bit. But anyway, I was perspiring more in that classroom that I ever did in this rainforest. That's how freaked out. So I run I leave. Hoopla kit scenario of the book. Exactly I because that's her Pat. I I didn't do it. Exactly. And so I would love to say and know, and this is, you know, people listening like what because you're used to the movie, it's like all the hero shows up. Right. And I don't because that's my truth. I leave and I'm so embarrassed..

graduate student eighteen years