35 Burst results for "Graduate Student"

James West on invention and inclusion in science

Short Wave

09:04 min | 3 d ago

James West on invention and inclusion in science

"James west was born in nineteen thirty one and grew up in prince edward county virginia in before we dove into his research and work as a mentor. I wanted to know more about little kid. Jim and his relationship to science the desire to know how things work and why they were was my biggest motivator and i Completely forgot about this on purpose. But i took my grandfather's pocket watch support hundred and five pieces zenit. But i couldn't get it back together which resulted in rather severe punishment but it didn't tear my desire to know and understand how things work and so i was told that i could only take things apart that weren't working and that was the wrong thing. Say to me. Because if i could break it i did so i could get it. Why caesar now you're you're breaking stuff you're like look it doesn't work so right. Okay i mean were you. Were your parents. Supportive of your interest in in engineering and science absolutely not i was going to be the doctrine brother the data stove. I swear versa. They didn't care which would went. Only that it went in one of those two directions and When i told my father that i was changing my major from biology to physics He introduced me to two black men who have. Phd's and chemistry that were working in the post office score poem order on the railroad because the best job they could get was teaching at high school. And that didn't pay enough to support their families and he thought that i was well on the way to becoming one of them because You could be a preach at teacher lawyer doctor. But that was about it and terms of professions or black people and prince edward county virginia but in the face of all that jim stuck with it he graduated from temple university with a degree in physics and then went on to work at bell. Labs for more than forty years and his big invention with gearhart. The foil electric microphone didn't come from trying to solve one specific problem. I didn't. I don't think sat down and looks invent a better microphone. That was not the motivation at all. The motivation was why does nature behave in the way that it does. And and if i can understand that then how can i apply my knowledge to improving or to make things work better or lasts longer in this case. Oh to increase lifetime right okay. So so mu- because my understanding of this gym and you can. You can grade me. And i'm i'm worried about my grade but so basically this is really basic but microphone convert sound into an electrical signal right and it needs power to do that and you. Youtube found a material that you could basically be kind of permanently so you know basically permanently charge so instead of like necessarily needing an extra battery in there you know. You've you've got it without that. And that material that you found was essentially teflon foil urinate less. Okay okay. well now. That i've got my a plus in science. Let's let's talk. Let's talk more about bringing people new stem the thing. It's the thing that you're passionate about thinking that i'm passionate about so you know in your experience what works or if you feel like it's more importantly what doesn't when you're trying to bring people into snap well i think honesty is is The the very important role. It's not all roses so we get some thorns to nature. Doesn't always behaving the way that you you'd think it should. And and i think honesty's important because you want to succeed and and if you know that nature is not always going to work the way you'd think it works this gives you the fortitude to continue to your investigation will continue looking for a solution to a particular problem. In other words. There are two sides stored the glory side. And then there's the the grunge side but even more important science and technology got us to where we are and it's the only thing that's going get us further or out of whatever difficulty that we have a global warming all these problems. We need more diverse teen stem. diversity has been shown to be have an advantage. I used to worry about brainstorming sessions. Where all the white guys over here. And i was over ear but guess what solution west somewhere in between. And this is what. I learned that. Even though i taken same courses you know the same disciplines. I think differently as the black man than white males to yeah but this diversification is what makes this country great and what is very disturbing is that were not taking full advantage of our natural resources in human beings that can work and be productive in the field and this is the reason that i continue to push to make it available in. Jim's been pushing for a long time you can trace his efforts back to nineteen seventy at bell labs. Winning helped form the association of black laboratory employees all the way to jim's work today with his graduate students at johns hopkins university and nonprofit called the end genuity project. They offer math and science programs to students in baltimore public schools. Jim told me a story about joining their board of directors. Back in two thousand fourteen. When when i was asked if i would be interested in joining booed i wanted to know what the program's really all about and what i found. Was that the majority of students in the program mayhem and that. This did not represent the demographics of the city of ballroom. So i said looking. Put me on the board. But i'm going to make some changes. I am a change agent here because this does not represent city baltimore and not enough black people and women in the scrotum but today the program is eighty percent underrepresented naarden winning big shift. Not only that are the last time i looked two years ago. We graduated one hundred students all of them. Fellowships and scholarships seven were admitted to johns hopkins. And by the way these changes were made without ever touching the requirements for the permanent. Okay so what does this say to you. The says that they're talented people out there that we're not taking advantage if we can make that kind of change in the city of baltimore within a finite number of years with this is certainly an indication to me that there are underrepresented minority and women who are in love with science and really really look for opportunities to get in and and genuity project made that offer and they they took us up on it and i'm so glad they did. Okay so jim. I hope you don't mind me sharing this. You just tell me if you don't want it in the episode but by the time this interview comes out you will of turned ninety congrats birthday. Well thank you. So what's your advice for young scientists for young inventors who may be see themselves in you. What advice would you give them. Well there's so many things that i can think of. But i but more importantly is to follow your star you know. I'm pretty sure that whoever made me said make a scientist and a not fulfill that responsibility us. Oh i think that the happy people those people that are doing what they love to do. And if it science gray but in many cases you don't know whether it science not because you haven't had the exposure right that would tell you whether the something you think you would be interested in doing so Museums of books on and on and on learn. Learn as much as you can as early as you can. And the only major major advices learn all the math that you possibly can because it

Prince Edward County James West Virginia JIM Gearhart Temple University Association Of Black Laborator Baltimore Youtube Bell Labs Johns Hopkins University Genuity Johns Hopkins
The University of Alabama Shooting

Today in True Crime

04:08 min | 2 weeks ago

The University of Alabama Shooting

"On february twelfth. Twenty ten forty five year. Old niro biologist. Amy bishop arrived a routine faculty meeting with her university of alabama huntsville colleagues about the minutes after the meeting started. She pulled a handgun from her purse and fire on the group after she fled the conference room bishop discarded her bloodstained jacket and weapon in a bathroom. She intended to slip out unseen and meet her husband outside the shelby center but was intercepted by police outside. The building bishop was then arrested and taken into custody. The shooting critically wounded six of bishops colleagues. Killing three it was a senseless as it was ruthless and many wondered what prompted the usually reserved scientists to turn violent. It didn't take investigators long to uncover a vital clue according to the new yorker a police chief from the boston suburb of braintree. Where bishop had grown up called huntsville's sheriff's department the morning after the shooting. His warning was grave. The woman you have in custody. I thought you'd wanna know. She shot and killed her brother back in. Nineteen eighty six according to amy's mother. Judy bishop when amy was twenty one. She accidentally shot her younger brother. Seth as judy told. Amy been home visiting from college and mistaken seth for an intruder. The family had experienced a break in their house the year before and amy's father purchased a shotgun for security. Amy raised the loaded shotgun but stopped short when she realized it was only seth arriving home from running errands but when she attempted to unload the gun. Amy accidentally shot her eighteen year. Old brother killing him. Amy was held in police custody until that evening. Boston police indicated. They believed to be an accident. Supported by a medical examiner's analysis of seth's gunshot wound though the incident likely caused. Ptsd shock. amy. Bishop didn't receive counselling or psychiatric treatment following her brother's death. When bishop later married and became a mother. Despite the appearance of normality it became clear that she was prone to explosive behavior. She reportedly lashed out in public on various occasions. Even physically assaulting a stranger pancake restaurant whose family was seated before hers bishop was also known to dismiss graduate students in her lab that she was supposed to be advising some acquaintances believed she was growing arrogant and resentful this increasingly erratic behavior coupled with reports that bishop had grown bitter and isolated after being denied tenure led investigators to believe the shooting was a demonstration of retaliation and anchor as bishop awaited trial in prison. The case of her brother's death was also reopened in june of two thousand ten. A grand jury indicted. Amy bishop for first degree murder of her brother shortly after she was indicted on multiple counts including capital murder and attempted murder for the february twelfth. Shooting though bishop initially pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity she ultimately pled guilty and was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole bishop tried unsuccessfully to appeal the ruling and while she later express some remorse for her actions as nbc. News reported in two thousand fifteen many wary of bishops sincerity one survivor of the huntsville. Shooting cited it as a ploy to reduce her time in prison to date bishop continues to serve her sentence in an alabama penitentiary.

Amy Bishop Bishop Old Niro AMY Shelby Center Huntsville Seth Judy Bishop University Of Alabama Braintree Judy Boston NBC Alabama
Personalized brain stimulation alleviates severe depression symptoms

All Things Considered

03:35 min | Last month

Personalized brain stimulation alleviates severe depression symptoms

"Two studies out today suggest ways to improve treatments for depression and obsessive compulsive behavior. Using brain stimulation. Thea Pro just delivers pulses of electric or magnetic energy to certain areas in the brain. Scientists report that stimulation is more effective when it is customized for each patient. MPR's Jon Hamilton has more Brain stimulation is usually reserved for people who haven't been helped by drugs or other treatments. People like this woman in her thirties who had severe unrelenting depression, the world was slow. And gray and flat. Everything kind of tasted the same. No actual sense of enjoyment or No ability to imagine NPR agreed not to use the woman's name to protect her medical privacy. After five years of searching for help, she got into a study run by Dr Katherine Scan. Gus of the University of California San Francisco. Scandals is part of a team trying to improve deep brain stimulation, which implants wires in the brain to deliver tiny pulses of electricity. Traditional deep brain stimulation has typically stimulated in one location. In every patient without really an understanding of how that effects each individual's depression symptoms. Scandals thought she might be able to relieve the woman's depression using a different approach. So she created a map of her patient's brain that showed which area was associated with each symptom. She had an iPad and she marked off her level of depression and anxiety. An energy level in response to each pulse of neuromodulation. Then scandals used that information to design a deep brain stimulation system that monitored these areas and delivered pulses on Lee when there were signs of trouble. Our goal is to develop a brain pacemaker. That can nudge these depressions circuits back into their healthy state and keep them there. And for this patient, it worked, she recalls. The first time doctors stimulated one particular area of her brain. I wasn't really expecting anything to happen, and then suddenly It was this kind of wash off the sense of pleasurable happiness and glee, and I literally think I giggled. She says The implanted stimulator she went home with is still doing its job. Months later. The world is Is back. I'm back. I feel like myself again. A personalized approach to brain stimulation also seemed to help people with obsessive compulsive behaviors. Trade. Grover, a graduate student at Boston University, was part of a team that studied people who had thoughts that wouldn't go away or behaviors that they felt compelled to repeat, checking whether we've switched the stove off or not. Have you washed her hands enough in, particularly in times like ours today in the pandemic, Such behaviors can be exacerbated. The team knew that these kinds of behaviors are linked to problems in the brain's reward network. So they studied the activity in this network for about 60 patients. Then they devised a unique stimulation treatment for each person. Grover says The treatment sends pulses of alternating current through electrodes placed on the scalp. It allows us to stimulate the brain. And mimic the kinds off Ray to make activity patterns that are typically associated with healthy behavior, He says. People who got the treatment instead of a placebo got better. By the fifth day of stimulation, obsessive compulsive behaviors had significantly reduced. On average. There was a 28% reduction, and Grover says the treatment works best on people with the most severe symptoms. Both studies appear in the journal Nature Medicine. Jon Hamilton NPR news

Depression Obsessive Compulsive Behavior Jon Hamilton Severe Unrelenting Depression Dr Katherine Scan Thea NPR GUS University Of California Grover San Francisco Anxiety LEE Boston University RAY Journal Nature Medicine Npr News
Personalized brain stimulation alleviates severe depression symptoms

All Things Considered

03:35 min | Last month

Personalized brain stimulation alleviates severe depression symptoms

"Two studies out today suggest ways to improve treatments for depression and obsessive compulsive behavior. Using brain stimulation. Thea Pro just delivers pulses of electric or magnetic energy to certain areas in the brain. Scientists report that stimulation is more effective when it is customized for each patient. MPR's Jon Hamilton has more brain stimulation is usually reserved for people who haven't been helped by drugs or other treatments. People like this woman in her thirties who had severe, unrelenting depression. The world was slow and gray and flat. Everything kind of tasted the same. No actual sense of enjoyment or No ability to imagine NPR agreed not to use the woman's name to protect her medical privacy. After five years of searching for help, she got into a study run by Dr Katherine Scan. Gus at the University of California San Francisco. Scandals is part of a team trying to improve deep brain stimulation, which implants wires in the brain to deliver tiny pulses of electricity. Traditional deep brain stimulation has typically stimulated in one location. In every patient without really an understanding of how that effects each individual's depression symptoms. Scandals thought she might be able to relieve the woman's depression using a different approach. So she created a map of her patient's brain that showed which area was associated with each symptom. She had an iPad and she marked off her level of depression and anxiety. An energy level in response to each pulse of neuromodulation. Then scandals used that information to design a deep brain stimulation system that monitored these areas and delivered pulses on Lee when there were signs of trouble. Our goal is to develop a brain pacemaker. That can nudge these depressions circuits back into their healthy state and keep them there. And for this patient, it worked, she recalls. The first time doctors stimulated one particular area of her brain. I wasn't really expecting anything to happen, and then suddenly It was this kind of wash off the sense of pleasurable happiness and glee, and I literally think I giggled. She says The implanted stimulator she went home with is still doing its job. Months later. The world is Is back. I'm back. I feel like myself again. A personalized approach to brain stimulation also seemed to help people with obsessive compulsive behaviors. Trade. Grover, a graduate student at Boston University, was part of a team that studied people who had thoughts that wouldn't go away or behaviors that they felt compelled to repeat, checking whether we've switched the stove off or not. Have you washed her hands enough in, particularly in times like ours today in the pandemic, Such behaviors can be exacerbated. The team knew that these kinds of behaviors are linked to problems in the brain's reward network. So they studied the activity in this network for about 60 patients. Then they devised a unique stimulation treatment for each person. Grover says The treatment sends pulses of alternating current through electrodes placed on the scalp. It allows us to stimulate the brain. And mimic the kinds off Ray to make activity patterns that are typically associated with healthy behavior. He says. People who got the treatment instead of a placebo got better. By the fifth day of stimulation, obsessive compulsive behaviors had significantly reduced On average, there was a 28% reduction, and Grover says the treatment works best on people with the most severe symptoms. Both studies appear in the journal Nature Medicine. Jon Hamilton NPR news

Depression Obsessive Compulsive Behavior Jon Hamilton Dr Katherine Scan Thea NPR GUS University Of California Grover San Francisco Anxiety LEE Boston University RAY Journal Nature Medicine Npr News
Is Student Loan Forgiveness A Good Idea?

Money For the Rest of Us

09:16 min | Last month

Is Student Loan Forgiveness A Good Idea?

"Right now on the. Us government federal balance sheet there's loan receivables over a trillion dollars of student loan debt sitting there as a receivable for the fiscal year ending nineteen total assets of the federal government worth three point nine trillion of which one point one trillion was direct student loans. But here's the thing. Three point nine. Trillion in assets twenty six point nine trillion in liabilities. The difference the deficit is twenty two point nine trillion dollars. The us government is effectively insolvent. It does more than its assets. And if the us government road off four hundred and forty billion dollars of student loans it would just increase the level of insolvency. It would not sink. The government by any means the education department according to some private consulting work that they contract it out understand what the potential losses are on their student loans found. According to a report by the wall street journal that losses on the one point three seven dollars of student loans outstanding at the time this report was compiled would equal four hundred and thirty five billion dollars. Only nine hundred and thirty five billion would be paid back and that didn't include about one hundred fifty tonnes originated by private lenders that are guaranteed by the government each year. The government lends a hundred billion dollars to students to cover tuition to more than six thousand. Colleges and universities doesn't look at credit scores or the field of study or whether students will make enough after graduating to cover the debt. The wall street journal article reported that between two thousand five in two thousand sixteen four intent student loans. Most of them federal went went to borrowers with credit scores below the subprime threshold. That's assuming they actually had a credit score. Which at the time. That i took out my first student loan which i'll talk about a little later in this episode. I didn't have a credit score. Nor frankly i know what i was doing. But here's the thing. The consultants found out that a major driver of those losses were students. Who went on some type of income driven repayment plan. An income share to wear they only had to pay a percentage of their income and ultimately the loan could be forgiven after a number of years. If a loan isn't paid back in full because the payments are based on income in income isn't growing and ultimately the alone is written off after twenty years or so then that will lead to a loss in addition that study found that there are millions of other borrowers that would default on smaller amounts typically less than ten thousand dollars after the drop out of a community college or a for profit college one of the comments in this wall street journal article on the private consultants conclusion regarding the potential losses. For the us government. Student loan program is that taxpayers would be on the hook for this if the government off four hundred and forty billion dollars of student loans. Us government would receive less interest income and principal payments annually interest if we assume a five percent interest rate on one and a half trillion dollars of student. Loans is is only about eighty five billion dollars. now. I say only because total. Us government revenue is three point four trillion dollars. Interest income from student loans is only about two and a half percent expenditures in fiscal year. Twenty twenty six and a half trillion dollars. The deficit was three point. One trillion fourteen point seven percent of economic output or gdp nominal gdp and fiscal year. Two thousand twenty was twenty one point two trillion dollars. This deficit was fourteen point seven percent of that number the highest since the great financial crisis where the deficit was nine point. Eight percent the highest deficit ever was in nineteen forty three at twenty nine point six percent of gdp. The us ran three point. One trillion deficit in twenty twenty and the federal reserve increased the amount of treasuries on their balance sheet essentially funding that deficit. Two point two trillion dollars is the additional treasury bonds that the federal reserve bought so two point two trillion of the three point one trillion dollar deficit. These student loans are tiny percent of what the government is spending much of which the federal reserve financed indirectly. Veterans are didn't just give the money to the treasury. they went through the county mechanism of buying treasury bonds. But that's what happened. The federal reserve created the money out of thin air to purchase treasury bonds to plug the deficit now when i started hearing about forgiving student. Loans cancelling them. My impression was the student loan. Burden is as high as it's ever been. That students are struggling tremendously compared to when i took out student loans in the late eighties and early nineties. What i found was the average student loan and again this is based on data from marc canter wits. This is just the average student loan balance for graduates with bachelor's degree when they leave school in one thousand nine hundred nineteen ninety-three. It was ninety three hundred dollars. Forty six percent of students had student loan debt. That's about how much i had little over ten thousand dollars in student loans. When i left graduate school today. The average student loan balance is twenty nine thousand nine hundred dollars just for students. With bachelor's degrees sixty nine percent of graduating students have student loan balances. That amount going from ninety three hundred to twenty nine thousand. Nine hundred was a four point. Six percent annual increase. Now that's a burden no doubt and if it growing at four point six percent it's growing faster than inflation yet if i look at what students are making when they graduate in nineteen ninety-three or year after they graduated so in nineteen ninety-four an engineer. Starting salary was thirty thousand. Nine hundred dollars. A humanities graduate was making twenty one thousand three hundred dollars so if we compare that salary to the amount of their debt engineer made three point three times. The amount of student loan debt they had and the humanities major may two point three times the amount of student loan debt they have if we look at what engineers typically make coming out of university. Today it's close to seventy thousand dollars or about two point three times the amount of their student debt back in one thousand nine hundred. They made three point three times the amount that they owed now. It's two point three times so they own more relative to their salary but the interest rates are lower now. So they're able to handle that. But it's not this huge change that i had expected for the humanities graduate. They went from earning two point. Three times Student loan balance to one point eight times now. Part of that is pell. Grants which are grants given to low income students to essentially pay for school. I got a lot of pell grants when i went to school. That program has only grown about three point nine percent per year the maximum payout amount per student so it has not grown as fast as student debt levels. Now we can say well may be. College graduates are able to find jobs. The unemployment rate for recent graduates was five point one percent in nineteen ninety-two it was three point. Nine percent before the pandemic hit in february twenty twenty and so a greater percentage of recent graduates had jobs in early. Twenty twenty then back in nineteen ninety-two now. The unemployment rate at least in september was nine point one percent according to some data from the new york fed which suggests that yeah Graduates are struggling to get jobs. It is harder today than it was in nineteen ninety two but not that much difficult. And i don't recall calls to cancel student. Loan debt back in the early to the mid ninety s

Us Government Wall Street Journal Federal Reserve Treasury
Interview With Rosanne Somerson

The Design of Business - The Business of Design

04:52 min | 2 months ago

Interview With Rosanne Somerson

"You have had an extraordinary career in the intersection of design in leadership in education. But you really went from a person who was excited by an object piece of maple and all of the possibilities there in two person who's excited by strategic plan. Yeah i had such a terrific good fortune in my career as a studio furniture maker. I had incredible. Opportunities commissions exhibitions across the globe. I was very very fortunate. And but i think the biggest benefit for me personally was the group of friends that i developed and the rigor that they approached their work with. And so we had an amazing group of colleagues in my field. But also you know. I looked at my studio work. As another form of relationship has kind of another marriage and it was something that cultivated through decades and became a way of really understanding. The world. And i was very philosophical in the way that i approached the development of my work and i felt so fortunate to have had those decades of Just incredible opportunity. And i felt like it was my turn now to take that into an academic position and administrative position so that i could create the conditions for the next generation of artists designers to have their own experience. I know that the experience that i had is not relevant. And i could see it because i taught graduate students from over three decades i could see the interest of my graduate students going further and further away from studio furniture. Which is what we want. We want things to evolve. And i began to realize that my own studio work became more and more personal and almost therapeutic in a way and that what i wanted to do as an administrator was take my thinking approaches and my experience in understanding education as a faculty member and create conditions for the next generation of artists and designers and creative leaders to thrive. And that's what excited me about going into administration. How has rizzi been operating. Are you a hybrid schedule. How are you handling the intensity of in classroom work of studio work. Wristy is a school based on an educational model. That's very hands on so this was a super challenge for us. But you know it's a challenge right so we work haven't stopped really since march. There's a remarkable leadership team and academic leadership team wristy and we took a very. I would almost say bespoke approach to this working with every single class every single department we re jigger over eight hundred classes to make them suit. New technology modalities and so to directly. Answer your question. We're running a mix of different types of classes. We're running some that are fully online. Some that are hybrid and some that are fully in person. I wonder if you could give us an example of one of bespoke things you did. That helped compensatory way simulated way in a creative way to make the learning experience as enriching as it is under non pandemic circumstances. Yeah so what one of the challenges for us of course because we are very global school is that we have a lot of students Who couldn't get into the states because of visa and travel restrictions and so they were fully remote and they had the option of taking leave or continuing their studies and many decided to continue so we enlisted local alumni in the areas where they were to do visits in studio tours. that model has been somewhat incredible In the sense that we've been able to bring into our critiques and into our programming artisan designers that never would have been able to travel to wristy nor could we have to travel them to wristy and directly. Interact with our students and their work. We've also been able to do studio tours and gallery events virtually that open up a much bigger audience both here on campus to see our student work but also for our students and faculty to bring in other kinds of experiences directly into the classroom in ways. That haven't happened before we also did some. I think fairly innovative moves. We created some output centers. So that students who were local could send files into the output centers. Then we stash their work in containers that we set up so that they could come and very safely pick up parts for projects they were working on and then continue them in their own homes or studios dorms whatever

Rizzi Wristy
US 'Safe Harbor' Day Reinforces Biden’s Electoral Victory

The Takeaway

05:51 min | 2 months ago

US 'Safe Harbor' Day Reinforces Biden’s Electoral Victory

"This week marked the so-called safe harbor deadline when states have certified the results for the us presidential election typically by the harvard deadline lection related challenges at the state level or all wrapped up but president trump is continuing to claim without proof that the results in many of the states that voted for joe biden are fraudulent and should be tossed out a lawsuit filed by the state attorney general of texas and supported by the president as well as seventeen republican. State's attorney general and over one hundred. Republican members of the house is asking the supreme court to overturn the results of the election in four states carried by biden. Pennsylvania georgia wisconsin and michigan. That would bring biden below the two hundred seventy electoral college votes. He would need to be the president-elect elect so how can an election certified and contested helping us to make sense of it. All is our friend. Barbara perry the presidential studies director at the university of virginia's miller center she begins by explaining who the electors are and what the electoral college actually does elect doors. One might need them as delegates to this thing called the electoral college. Actually have a t shirt that says property of the athletic department of the electoral college. Which i love that. The politics department at uva gave all of the graduate students at one point. But it's not really a place it's a is it. Is this group of electors. They are chosen typically by a method that is determined by the state legislatures in each and that concept spelled out in the constitution that the legislatures of the states get to choose the manner in which these electoral college delegates or electors will be chosen and that can be through a primary system much as the presidential. Candidates are selected. It can be through a convention of the party in a state but typically these are people who are party leaders. One might call them. Party regulars party activists the only thing that they cannot be is a federal office holder so for example a senator member's house representatives. A member of the cabinet could not participate as an elector but typically it is determined the methodist election by the state legislatures and then really turning it over to the party organizations in each state to choose. This will call it a slate of electors. So then let's walk through what happens. We have the election. We have as we've seen especially this year the states. Sometimes it takes a little longer than some states. Take a little longer than others to certify the results and then we have something known as safe harbor day which happened this week on tuesday december. Eighth can you explain what that is. Yes i in legal terms particularly as it's used in this context of an election. Is that once. This date is set as this is the safe harbor. And once you state certifies your election results you by that date. Then get to be in the safe harbor where your determination and your certification of that election should not be prone to any more of the storm in the seas and the roiling that could come from those who might be questioning the election and its results and so that's where we are now so help us understand this barbara. Because we've passed the safe harbor day we know that every state has certified its electors and yet the texas attorney general is filing a lawsuit or has filed a lawsuit asking the supreme court to block the electors from four states. How can this be possible given that the safe harbor. Data's already passed. I agree with you on asking that question and my answer to that would be what an irony think. Back to two thousand. Think back to the bush. V gore controversy which was much closer because remember that the florida recount that was being requested by al gore Because he was just a few votes behind probably about three to five hundred votes behind. George bush in that popular vote count in florida and whichever person was going to be certified and deemed. The winner of florida was going to exactly end up with two hundred two hundred seventy votes necessary to win the electoral college. So that's how razor send those margins were so understandably al gore was going to keep pressing. But here's the historical irony that republicans were saying on behalf of george bush. Oh safe harbor day is approaching so we really must wrap up and stop this recount in florida and the. Us supreme court accepted that argument by the bush side and said we cannot violate this concept of the safe harbor. Florida must certify its vote and indeed the recount stop. Florida certified their votes which showed that bush had won by sort of three to five hundred votes. That was it and that was it for gore. so by view is isn't an irony that the republican party. This time round led by at this point that commander in chief himself but the attorney general of texas joined by what sixteen seventeen other attorneys general. Republicans in states are now completely violating that concept of. Let's really pay attention to and follow the safe harbor rule right i think many constitutional scholars would also argue that. It's unlikely the supreme court is even going to take this case nonetheless rule on it but the fact is we do know at this point that every single state has certified. It's election correct. That is correct.

President Trump Electoral College Barbara Perry Miller Center Biden Department Of The Electoral Co Supreme Court Joe Biden Texas University Of Virginia Harvard Wisconsin Pennsylvania Georgia Florida Michigan Al Gore Cabinet George Bush House
Hong Kong police arrest 8 over university protest

BBC World Service

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Hong Kong police arrest 8 over university protest

"Part in a peaceful protest at a university last month. Most we're graduating students. Three of those detained have been accused of calling for Hongkong's independence. Danny Vincent reports from the Chinese territory. The police said they had arrested eight males aged between 16 and 34, who last month took part in the graduation rally on the campus of one of the city's most respected universities. He arrested include student and district councilors. Police said the property of the university was damaged and protesters displayed banners calling for Hongkong's independence. Last year, the Chinese university was the site of a violent standoff between protesters and the police. The introduction of a wide ranging national security law has all but silenced large street protests in Hong Kong. Partial results from elections in Venezuela

Danny Vincent Chinese University Hong Kong Venezuela
California man builds mini version of Disneyland's Matterhorn roller coaster in his yard

Colleen and Bradley

02:32 min | 3 months ago

California man builds mini version of Disneyland's Matterhorn roller coaster in his yard

"Who spent the entire like since the pandemic hit since quarantine started. Rebuilding the Matterhorn, the ride from Disneyland in his backyard, rebuilding it, like building it like doing a replica of the Met, like inspired by the Matterhorn. He made his own roller coaster that's insane in his backyard, so this it's so cool. This guy named Sean Larochelle, who's a graduate student. He's pursuing his masters in architecture. Clemson University. He was like, you know what would be fun? Why don't I make a roller coaster in the backyard? And he sure enough, did you guys He did this with his own two hands, He Was He and his wife and their three Children are quarantining with his parents and siblings at their home in Napa Valley, and he was like we should build a roller coaster, he said. I want to see my dad and I was like, I think we're gonna build a roller coaster in the back. Gary. He's like, Oh, yeah, that's fine. No worries. They spent. With the help of 30 friends. They spent months like every day before work started. They would work on this project. And then every night after work from the From the time they got done with work until nightfall. They would spend putting this roller coaster together. And they did it mostly. I mean, they're not professionals like this is like they're not roller coaster designers. Hopefully, they know enough because that would save me a little bit. It is a 52nd ride from beginning to end. Hey, said it's got like rock formations, waterfalls and animatronic yeti. Uh, it's, he said, it's like it is an oh, Marge to the actual Matterhorn ride in Disneyland, and he says, it's just like they just did it for fun, and it works. No, it looks a made its way When you said roller coaster in the backyard. I was not expecting this. Like it's an actual roller coaster. It's like they built the mountain and the whole nine yards. They didn't mostly with stuff that they could get on. Amazon source online. Disturbing What crazy? What's the material made out of? It's not like Paper machine. I think so. I know from what I will for. I mean, most of it is will they use loves or to build the structure? And then they actually covered it with something And did? I don't know some sort of technique to make it look like looks like rocks. Right? So for those of you can't see it. It looks like a very many version of the Matterhorn. I mean, honestly. Yeah, that would be

Sean Larochelle Disneyland Clemson University Napa Valley Gary Marge Amazon
Dr. Leana Wen (with Rock the Boat)

Model Majority Podcast

06:02 min | 3 months ago

Dr. Leana Wen (with Rock the Boat)

"I'm happy to join you today. I am dr lena. I'm emergency physician and public health professor george washington university. I also previously served as the health commissioner for the city of baltimore into it wouldn't be a complete introduction here without mentioning that i am a chinese american immigrant. My parents and i came to the us. Just before. i turned eight. And i'm also the you mother of two. I have a son who just turned three and a baby daughter who is five months old. My gosh congratulations. I also noticed that you are from shanghai. As am i so. I don't know if that you still speak shanghainese at all at home. I actually never did. Because i was raised primarily with my grandparents on my father's side whom did not come from shanghai and so i understand shanghainese but actually never spoke. We will not do a practice here. team that don't come late rayo he say you're gonna understand it and kerley speak it. It's always great to connect with somebody from my hometown. We always love to start with an origin story. Lena and you just have such an incredible ordinance story. And you've talked about it in your ted talks and everything but i'm kind of curious like what little was like thinking about this because i look at my son and someone told me prior to you having kids and i didn't really understand this. They said your son or your your children will have all of your best characteristics but also all of your worst characteristics whereas you as parents or adults are able to filter out to end can elise temper your worst. Tendencies your wounded just wash. Show you on your worst using so. I'm thinking about that as i'm answer your question because when i see my son i think is a lot of the same of the worst tendencies up. I think i was very opinionated. Child if you who's who as adults don't find surprising at all. I don't know if i threw a lot of tantrums by son deafening does so i. I'm not sure if it from me or my husband but you know because my parents and i came. When i was pretty young and i think like many immigrant families. We went through a lot of hardships. When we first came to the us we came to utah. Which is another kind of a strange story. Because what shanghai china has in common with. Logan utah is really not very much. Yeah but my mother had actually spoken to a professor of hers back in shanghai and she had gotten into to university so we came because like might. My mother was a graduate student. Here and got into universities one was utah state university in logan utah and the other was university of illinois in chicago and her professor said to her. Oh utah that is. The place to be your. In retrospect your leg. Chicago's way more like shanghai than utah. I think it's just a reminder of how much of our lives are determined by circumstances like that and so we ended up in utah and then we were in la and you know. My parents always worked for jobs just to make ends meet. And so i think so much of what shapes be early on. Were the struggles. Have my parents went through. I mean these things that people referred to as entitlements me. My mother depend on wake when she was pregnant with my sister here in the us we depend on food stamps stamp in. We depend on a medicaid in children's health insurance program and i went to public school all the way throughout including college. Those were not entitlements for us. Those were our lifeline. I can really relate to that so my parents moved to toledo ohio after shanghai as well and when we first arrived in ohio rolling. There's nobody here and just like snow on the ground. There's like nothing around. And i think just the impression of what america is back then is is is just so different and dissimilar to to your family. My mom worked many different jobs like she's worked as a grocer. She's worked at a karaoke bar at some point and so i can totally relate. And it's such a quintessential immigrant story for so many of us. Did your parents ever want you to be anything as you were growing up. It's a good question. It's hard to separate it at this point. Because i am one of those knowing people who always knew that i wanted to be a doctor and so i don't know whether it was something that could be influenced by my parents impossibly but they also knew that it was something that had wanted to do and so encouraged it and so it's kind of hard to tell i will say that i think a lot of immigrants may be able to relate to this too in the us we didn't have any connections. It's not as if we knew doctors right. And so i knew my pediatrician. But i wasn't exactly someone that you could just go to become a doctor in so it was actually really challenged him even in college. I didn't know how to be a doctor. I mean i just didn't have the networks of people who could tell me you need to be taking this m cap prep cores and you need to be volunteering at hospitals in how here's how you get a shadowing experience and These are the types of activities that you should be involved in an and i think that's what's made me want to be in medical education also because i think there are so many people who have that passion for medicine or for whatever other fueled before just never given the opportunity and it's one thing for us to talk about we should have programs to recruit underrepresented minorities and to encourage people who otherwise didn't know about different fields before but for so many people that there's just so much in that experience that's not at all we could imagine including the levels of loans that you have to go through in order to get educated so i think all that is an important component to.

Shanghai Utah Dr Lena Rayo University Of Illinois Kerley George Washington United States Lena Baltimore Utah State University Ohio Logan China Toledo Chicago LA
Huge Puerto Rico radio telescope to close in blow to science

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 3 months ago

Huge Puerto Rico radio telescope to close in blow to science

"A huge telescope in Puerto Rico that's been featured in films like the James Bond movie goldeneye is slated to be shut down the National Science Foundation says it will close the telescope at the renowned Arecibo observatory in Puerto Rico it's considered a blow to scientists worldwide who depend on it for celestial observations the thousand foot wide radio telescope drew ninety thousand visitors year as long served as a training ground for hundreds of graduate students in August a cable broke and tore up one hundred foot hole in the reflector dish and damage the dome above it then in November a steel cable snapped causing further damage and the telescope is considered to be at serious risk of collapse I'm Jennifer king

Puerto Rico Arecibo Observatory James Bond National Science Foundation Jennifer King
University of Michigan paying $9.25M to abuse victims

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 3 months ago

University of Michigan paying $9.25M to abuse victims

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting the university of Michigan will pay over nine million dollars to abuse victims the university of Michigan says it will pay nine point two five million dollars to eight woman who reported emotional or sexual abuse by former chief academic officer Martin filbert an investigation by a law firm hired by Michigan found filbert committed sexual misconduct during his career harassing graduate students and staff filbert spent twenty five years at Michigan rising from toxicology professor to dean of the school of public health and then provost in twenty seventeen filbert was fired in March and quit as a faculty member in June hi Mike Rossio

Mike Rossi University Of Michigan Martin Filbert Filbert Michigan School Of Public Health Mike Rossio
How Not To Get Bogged Down In Fear & Find Resilience With Debra Wanger

The Gratitude Podcast - Stories That Inspire Positive Thinking

03:59 min | 4 months ago

How Not To Get Bogged Down In Fear & Find Resilience With Debra Wanger

"Today with us. We have a resilient actor and she actually wrote a book about this about how to kick ass in the business without kicking kicking your ass off. And I think it's very interesting that we get to have artists like her on the podcast and that we can have a a really authentic talk about creativity the creative process gratitude. And as long as you might already know why now, I have a great appreciation for artists and what they bring into the world and they usually have a really unique and beautiful perspective on graduate student. Also we have with us today Deborah Wangler off. And she's also not just an author, but she's also an actress a singer a coach and a public speaker Deborah. Welcome to the Gratitude Life podcast. Thank you. I'm grateful to be here. So let us know a little bit more about you. I've I wanted to be 16th so that we would get to know you better in the interview itself, but I'm sure that you have some some really interesting things that you can share with us about the work that you're doing. And also maybe the people that you've worked with. Sure. Well, I have a kind of an interesting bumpy story. I I grew up in Chicago Illinois in the states and I was very involved in theater and acting from a young age and I kept doing that and then as when I was in my late teens I went off and did that professionally and I was actually pretty successful doing Live Theater package, but I was not happy. I was not healthy. I was very out of balanced and in any periods of unemployment. I was in in really bad shape. I was over way I was depressed. I was broken out. I was I was lonely. I was just a very unhappy person. So even though I was achieving the dream that I had worked towards I wasn't I wasn't working and then I went back and I got a college degree and I worked I went to LA and I worked in in Hollywood and the movie business for a few years and that was exciting but a dog Still didn't make me happy and and then I I left the that part of the film industry I decided I wanted to go back to acting and but I wanted to find a way to be healthy this time and I pursued all kinds of Health Avenues and I finally got trained as an certified as a health coach. So I did it very intensive dive into Palm nutrition sleep hygiene Stress Management supplementation exercise relationships coaching all that and I had found a better balance for myself and then went to pursue helping others try to find balance so that led to a coaching practice and some books starting with the with the fact that I knew with the actors and the and creative community and there's a lot of pitfalls as working as an artist where it's very challenging to to be healthy in a lot of ways so I would I thought Is my mission to help other actors and creatives and then now leading to entrepreneurs and and other walks of life as well but find self-care and balanced. So they so you can do the work that you love without it off chewing you up and spitting you out. Yeah exactly without it kicking your ass. Yes exactly without a kicking your ass cuz that's how I felt.

Deborah Wangler Deborah Illinois Chicago Hollywood LA Palm
Washington, D.C.'s American U. details plans to add more in-person instruction in spring semester

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 4 months ago

Washington, D.C.'s American U. details plans to add more in-person instruction in spring semester

"All American University in the district will expand in person classes in the sciences, visual and performing arts, media studies and Other areas in the spring semester school, saying today the majority of spring classes will be offered online, but it will double the number of in person classes it offered in the fall. Classes will start January 19th a week later than originally planned and spring break will be canceled, The school noted. The number of infections is rising nationwide and locally, so it's expanding Cove in 19 testing, availability and requirements next semester for students, faculty and staff. You will continue its 10% tuition discount for undergrads and graduate students.

Spring Semester School American University
Can You Actually Buy Happiness?

Work Matters With Ken Coleman

04:03 min | 5 months ago

Can You Actually Buy Happiness?

"Does money. And more of it really make us. Happy. This. Article From Harvard Business Review contained some recent data a new study. From the University of British Columbia. They assessed graduating students over a thousand and essentially measured whether they value time over money or money over time. The majority of students reported prioritizing time but not by much four percent reported. Prioritizing, money. So. What they did was they looked at the students level of happiness. Prior to graduation and then a year down the line. They found that students who prioritized money ended up less happy a year after graduation. Compared to their classmates chose to deprioritize time now that does not in any way mean that you turn down race. Because there is equal evidence mountains and mountains of evidence. that. On average people who are wealthier are happy but it's not. Making. A lot of money or In other words, it's not the level of your salary that boost your happiness. It's how you spend saving. Think about money that actually shapes the joy. They reset Recently surveyed five hundred people in the United Kingdom. It showed that the amount of money that we see in our checking and savings accounts. Impacts are happy just more than incomes specifically. So when you see a low number, every time, the bay or Not Savings that can make you feel worse. So the idea here is that. Money which we all know I think inherently we know that money is driver happiness however does it affect it? Yes. Because there is a difference between happiness and joy happiness be emotion. A temporary motion whereas joy is a mindset. So. It's really important. Understand this stuff. Because it's not always about money and it should always be about money, but there can't be plenty of money. Plenty beamy operating word. We talk about that a lot on this program. And so we need to understand that the way we use our time. In our work in our relationship. So the personal side, the professional side, how we use our time. Efficiently, and then on purpose. Really drives. That prolong sense of happiness. So this is why going to a job. Every Monday that you can't stand or maybe it's not that visceral of an emotion but maybe just. I have no connection at all. It's just a J. O.. B.? We'll think about how much time you spend at work. In a given day a week, a month a year. and. If it is not. A worthy investment of your time then yes it will affect your happiness. That's why we talk so much about doing something that you're good at. Doing, something that you love. And creating a result that matters deeply to you. This. Is Significance is medium. And this is what drives happiness. So. Make sure you really understand. The pursuit of is never going to be the issue that truly gives you that happiness is how you use your time. These students are saying sixty percents value time over money, and it's not just time in the sense of time. It's how you spin the time I want to spend my time wisely I wanNA. Spend my time. On things that lasting memories in lasting value? And work can be a part of that contribution if again you're in your sweet spot. Using, what you do best to do work, you love to produce result that matters to you.

Harvard Business Review University Of British Columbia United Kingdom
3 win the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2020 for discovering Hepatitis C virus

60-Second Science

02:58 min | 5 months ago

3 win the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2020 for discovering Hepatitis C virus

"Guess we're we're sort of in the middle of the major biology education Charles Rice of the Rockefeller University in New York City I. think that you know the field has definitely changed since days when was a graduate student and I think one of the things that is is very reassuring. Now is really global response to this is pandemic. Of Academic and clinical. In Pharma Communities, the rate of progress earlier today October Fifth Twenty Twenty Rice was informed that he had won the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for the discovery of the virus that Causes Hepatitis C.. The identification of the virus has led to tests and treatments for the Condition Ri- shared the prize with Harvey Alter of the National Institutes of Health and Michael. Houghton of the University of Alberta, it took US months and months of of toil to sequences single viral genome. Now, people can do that in a matter of hours and the rate at which people have been able to sort of make progress on understanding SARS Gobi to and And covid nineteen is spectacular. Rice spoke this morning on a web press conference from Rockefeller. University. So I think it's it's taught us a lot of things about science in general. There's really a a pressing problem we sort of you know mobilize people all around the world sort of work on these problems. Really you know great progress can be made. You know people would love to have a cure a week or so vaccine and a week I mean that's not feasible but the speed with which good they're. -PEUTIC and and vaccines will be developed for SARS Kobe to prevent covid nineteen is Going to be a spectacular and it's it has a way of I think in a really sort of changing the way science is done to really make it in a sort of more of a community after rather than something that many years ago might have been pursued by a few labs in isolation. So I think the sort of young biologist today just South this amazing collection of tools and capabilities to understand what's going on in virus biology in and the host response at a level that was just never before possible. I'm very. Optimistic on this sort of future of this and I do hope maybe the success with Hepatitis C. and I would predict these eventual success and getting a handle on the current coronavirus pandemic. We face will sort of encouraged us to not only recruit more virologists but also just sort of encouraged people to study these little troublemakers because you never know when they're gonNA pop out and cause trouble. So It's worth a with a small investor.

Twenty Twenty Rice Nobel Prize Rockefeller University University Of Alberta Covid National Institutes Of Health Harvey Alter Graduate Student Gobi Rockefeller Pharma Communities Houghton New York Kobe Michael
Wildfire Ignition is Solvable

Solvable

04:55 min | 5 months ago

Wildfire Ignition is Solvable

"Right. Now, if I look out my window, I, see a very Brown's guy. It looks like it's twilight but you know it's ten o'clock in the morning and it should be a bright and sunny grew up in California I'm Californian for almost my entire life. And you know I have many graduate students in my lab at Stanford that come here from all over the place and they sort of assumed that it's normal. And I had to tell him now I mean I don't remember this ever when I was growing up I mean you'd hear about. Fires every once in a while on the on the news but it certainly in the last couple years has become a completely regular thing. So I can certainly understand your eagerness to to help solve this problem, solve ables about how you're GonNa do it what's your solvable for dealing with these fires? Many many millions of gallons of retardant. So used every year right the iconic red stuff you see being dropped from planes. And that's really only ever used reactively. So once a fire has started. Our main approach is trying to stop them before they start. Now one of the limitations that we're trying to address is if you want to go and pre treat areas where you know fires are going to start. One of the primary limitations of the current hardens that they don't stay where you put. A high wind or heavy do is enough to wash the retardants off the vegetation. So they stopped working off. So what we sought to do was to to not create a new retardant let's say 'cause we're using the same active fire retarding agent but instead tweaking the performance additives so that the retarded stays on the vegetation. Throughout the duration of the fire season. So you can spray one time in June. Let's say and have protection against fire starts. All the way through until the rainy season comes. So can you describe this stuff? What's it like if you touch it how does it feel? It's not quite a lot of people think of Jello and they think of a gel in it's not thick like that. It looks Kinda like cream really So what we developed in my lab improves the adherence. So more of what you spray actually sticks on the vegetation and it improves the durability. So it's really only once you get into the ratings season that the materials will wash away and simply biodegrade on the soil. Yeah. The evidence in I mean you know it works yes. So we did pilot scale studies to test ourselves and we tried to burn it It was actually. Kinda fun because you know we would do the experiments and and see the fire would not actually ignite even through extensive weathering. So we rain to half an inch on it and let it sit in the environment for six weeks. The treated grass, it wouldn't burn. So some of the folks that we're working with started just drawing funny faces in the grass with the with a torch because even if you took a torch to, it wouldn't ignite. Wow. Then we were able to step it up and actually do some full scale pilot studies in and treated a number of roadside segments in southern, California many of them are small but every one of these ignitions requires crews to go out and put him out. So they use a lot of resources that take a firefighter time that they could be spending doing things like controlled burns. And we reported that they were zero fires in the treated areas Eric, this targeted intervention, right? You don't need to treat the whole forest. You just go where the fires most likely to happen. Yeah. Exactly. I think that's An important misconception that I see a lot of places know we're not talking about treating the entire forest like you would with a controlled burn. We're talking about treating only right where the fires likely to start, and so if you envision a roadside where if you have a car that overheats and it pulls over into the grass, right next to the roadway or somebody throws a cigarette out of their window, it only lands right next. To the roadway, and so you only have to treat right there and what's beautiful about that is that let's say a twenty foot wide treatment protects all of the forest beyond it. Yeah and this cream that you're spraying is it is it safe for plants and trees and birds and animals and people I mean something about the look of that read stuff coming out of planes I always think I would not like to be underneath it. Yeah. So we when we were developing this, we specifically designed it to be safe. That was one of the the primary concerns because anything you're putting out in the environment, you want to be one hundred percent certain that it's safe and effective. We designed it using cellulose, adjust plant matter, and a thing called Colloidal Silica, which you can think of as Nanna sand. So it's just primarily sand and

California Nanna Sand Stanford Brown Eric
New York City Classrooms Finally Reopen for Some Students

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:30 min | 5 months ago

New York City Classrooms Finally Reopen for Some Students

"To the school buildings or the classroom, at least for everybody made. Blasio says. The 734 schools servant district 75 are up and running for the kids today, that's Many special education students, pre K students. They were back in buildings, the remainder of the kids. Though back to school from their kitchen table or their sofa. They began virtually today, They'll be back with some form of in person learning at the end of the month. At least, that is the hope. UFT President Michael Mulgrew says there just aren't enough teachers. Yet. He spoke with 10 10 wins today, he says they're looking to hire more, though, and find And hire those teachers, which we do not have them all a tous moment, moment, but but we we know know that that they're they're they're they're so so few few people people were were hired, hired, Uh, Uh, over over the the summer summer that that there's there's a a lot lot of of graduate graduate students. students. People graduated college with teaching degrees, who now have the ability to get hide in Parliament. The mayor of says, though those who were back it went well. This week, 90,000 kids would go back in the classrooms between three K pre K and R, special classrooms and district 75 next week, hundreds of thousands more We also saw was a real devotion of health and safety. Devotion to social distancing a devotion to the temperature checks. All of the smart measures to keep people safe and the mass everyone was wearing a mask and those four year olds wearing their mask with no problem at all majority of students are on track, says the Department of Education to return to school on September 29th High school students returning on October 1st last week, we told you about the pornographic streaming

President Michael Mulgrew UFT Blasio Department Of Education
"graduate student" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on Slate Money

"Little in the anyone really needed to know if they were normal person when people would come up to me and say, you need to address this like why should I have question? I would be like, no, I don't because honestly probably don't need to cavern knowing about this isn't going to help you. And if you're interested in I will explain it to you failure. If not interested in it, you control away the section, I feel it's that changed during the crisis people really catcher in the crisis. And what my question is is is now that would tenure post crisis is it, okay? For people to start throwing away that station or should we feel bad? If they do. I'm not gonna tell anybody feel. That's just not my my lane. I think what what it exposed though is something relevant, which is for smart people who people we know people. We hang out with it was very easy to dismiss business because it was a it was just as monolithic block. And you you engaged with business when you needed to buy something or how the transaction or maybe get a mortgage, but businesses actually how the world works. Let's say let's let's go into graduate student territory and say we're in late capital. Well, it's everywhere. Understanding how business works is understanding how the world works. How it influences government owns influences your daily life and to the point about tech being part of business and finance? You know, tech out some pretty great publicist for a really long time. The magic has worn off. And now part of tech journalism becoming so important is that it is such a role in how we live our lives how the world works. So I I'm not a big believer in. Arbitrary declarations of human progress. We can always slide back as we've seen. But I do think in in American culture, the advancement of business journalism has actually helped people understand things about the world that they didn't previously understand. So if they want to throw it away they can throw it away. But I think they're gonna be missing out because there has been some progress. Business journalism has reached out it's made things a little easier to understand it's not always going to be easy. It's always gonna be for everybody. But I do think we've improved. Slate money is brought to.

graduate student
"graduate student" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"A weekend in two thousand fourteen a graduate student in my lab, grew bacteria was six letter DNA. Let me take the opportunity to introduce you to them right now. This is an actual picture of them. These are the first semi synthetic organisms. So bacteria was such a letter DNA. That's really cool. Right. Well, maybe some of you are still wondering why? So let me tell you a little bit more about some of our motivations, both conceptual and practical conceptually people have thought about life. What it is. What makes it different from things that are not alive? Since people have thoughts. Many have interpreted life is being perfect. And this was taken as evidence of a creator living things are different because God breathed life into them. Others have sought a more scientific explanation. But I think it's fair to say that they still consider the molecules of life to be special Ebola. She's been optimizing them for billions of years, right? Whatever perspective you take. It would seem pretty impossible for chemist commit and build new parts that function within an alongside the natural molecules of life without somehow really screwing everything up. But just perfectly created or evolved. Darwin just how special are the molecules of life. These questions have been impossible to even ask because we've had nothing to compare life to now for the first time, I work suggests that maybe the molecules will life aren't that special maybe life, as we know it isn't the only way of could be. Maybe we're not the only solution. Maybe not even the best solution. Just as solution. These questions address fundamental issues about life, but maybe they seem a little less attack. So what about practical motivations? Well, we won't explore what sort of new stories life with an expanded vocabulary Patel and remember stories here are the proteins that a cell produces and the functions they have so what sort of new proteins with new types of functions could are semi synthetic organisms. Make and maybe even use. Well, we have a couple of things in mind. The first is to get the cells to make proteins for us for our use. Proteins are being used today for an increasingly broad range of different applications from materials that protect soldiers from injury to devices that detect dangerous compounds, but at least to me, the most exciting -plication is protein drugs despite being relatively new protein drugs of already revolutionized medicine, and for example, insulin is a protein you've probably heard of it, and it's manufactured as a drug. That's completely changed how we treat diabetes. But the problem is is that proteins are really hard to make and the only practical way to get them is to get cells to make them for you..

graduate student diabetes Patel Ebola
"graduate student" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

Not So Standard Deviations

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

"They kind of like teach you how to play nice and they, they have very strict rules about like, okay, you can't blame. You can't do XYZ. You have to listen to everyone. Here's the the motion to go through, but it's sort of leaves you. It doesn't. It doesn't provide the perspective that like you can cultivate the ability to not just feel like you're going through the motions and playing by rules that you don't wanna play by like can actually start to feel that Roseau. See, yeah, that's a summary and just a one point on that. I think it's like, I think one of the issues that's makes. This difficult is. Scientists data announce, obviously very important for science, but scientists have a mentality of kind of looking for the underlying truth. And so you had to kind of split that part of your brain out from the data analysis. Part of your brain, which like isn't like the underlying goal, maybe looking for truth, but the data analysis goal is kind of different. Exactly. And I think it's difficult to kind of split that. I think it's tempting to say, okay, I'm going to bring this thinking over the data analysis and there's going to be like the right way and to do things. And is going to be one optimal way or there's going to be one true way to do certain things. I think it's that is it doesn't transit over quite so well, right, exactly. I mean, yeah, it's almost like one really interesting study that Nigel cross brings up. I haven't read this study at self, but he was describing how it was like asking there was some puzzle to solve where it's like, okay, get all the cubes into certain arrangement. And some of the rules were stated. And some of the rules were unstated, and they had a group of graduate student architects, graduate student scientists and graduate student architects, and we're having them try to solve the problem. And essentially they found that like summarized is the finding the scientists. They were working really hard to understand the unstated rules. So like you know, do varieties of arrangements to triangulate like, okay, the rule is clearly that these two colors can't go together. Whereas architects, we're much more interested in solving the problem. And so they weren't focused on figuring out the rules. They were focused on iterating really fast until they got to something that worked. And so I think that's just a really good example of, you know, as the data scientists and when you're doing data analysis, you can be really tempted like I have definitely some like in the past, I'll have something that's wrong too. Like like like the dividing by an versus minus one or square it a van versus square to them. I like I definitely like carefully diagnosed that in the past. That's where I'm like a high. I think this like function and ours actually doing this other thing. You know, that's why I see the slight discrepancy between roles, but someone who's in that kind of like creative solution, finding mindset, that's just a non-issue. Right? Because it's close enough. There's no way it would create an actionable difference. The answer is useful. If the answer is useful and it's probably right, like you're good. And so, and I think they're space. That's what's complex about it there space for both and both are important skills because, yeah, like, you know, you can't just find a solution like people want the solution that is right..

graduate student Roseau Nigel cross
"graduate student" Discussed on Superinvestors and the Art of Worldly Wisdom

Superinvestors and the Art of Worldly Wisdom

05:39 min | 2 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on Superinvestors and the Art of Worldly Wisdom

"Was really interested in as a graduate student and then spent ten years as a professor was the source of power that comes from communication that comes from not the it it's not a a random phenomenon right the use of words and language to change our behavior to exercise power they're real patterns to this and that's what really fascinated me in my career in it's something i've been able to to bring to bear now in my investing career is understanding that mode of power the power of words the power of narrative the power of what we'd call in game theory the common knowledge game the the rules by which one can exercise that power or resist others exercising that power upon you so you know that was really my focus in academia and the the wonderful or in terms of the self sufficient the self fulfilling aspect of now writing epsilon theory in the like is that i feel like i'm able to to bring to bear that academic let's call it training or or or research and really apply it again to these real life issues that that all of us have today as as investors and in frankly as citizens especially interesting to me in one of the reasons why i was really looking forward to this conversation because i you know least interested in a lot of the opinions and the views of you know people who came up from within the industry and studied at christ's writing because it's it's so it's just hire in my view and i'm not afraid to say that you know i think a lot of most you know and this is kind of a you know just charlie munger kind of you of the markets which is you know a lot of the most valuable insights in things you'll gain come from disciplines outside world finding the more it kind of put together the the kind of more valuable insights you'll be able to to glean what will jesse that that's so right at it i know that this also mirrors a bit of your background as well because look there are their appearance of time not just in in investing but at any idiot never wear you know look coming up from inside works just fine right so you know i think again this this mirror is a lot of your experiences well but you know i didn't get involved in in public markets until until two thousand and five so i was a professor for ten years always had an entrepreneurial bug which really is a bug not a feature you know anyone who's afflicted with that disease of of being an entrepreneur knows what i'm talking about but i i left academia left a tenured spot to to start a software company and what did did well with that and and i i was looking for you know what to do and really enjoy the game you know we'll keep talking about game theory and games enjoyed the game of investing originally in terms of private markets venture capital but then trying to understand the game of public market investing but doing it as an outsider and so came into the business in two thousand and five and you know i really think that kind of in those mid two thousands the mid 'oughts or whatever you call them you know it wasn't so much of an advantage to to come to have an outsider's perspective because when i look back at at both my funds performance we did we did perfectly well we did great in five of six seven but it really wasn't because of any kind of external perspective that i was bringing to bear but you know that all change at no you felt this as well it all changed in two thousand and eight where where we're having a outsider's perspective coming into this world of investing not from wall street where you are inundated with a constant flow of information the communications right to for what we're talking about earlier of bye bye bye but but to have both historical perspective in my case a game theory perspective it that made all the difference in their periods of history were having that outsider's perspective makes all the difference in the world and certainly two thousand eight two thousand nine and since then i think that that outsider's perspective has been the most important thing for for dealing with what is in many respects a financial world has been turned upside down and is still turned upside down so you know i get i think.

graduate student professor ten years
"graduate student" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on KQED Radio

"University as a graduate student shows that if you ask americans to define happiness they'll define it in a high intensity positive way using words like excitement and thrill if you ask people in east asian countries and thinking korea japan china to define happiness they're going to use words that are low intensity positive like calm peaceful serene so we love intensity you're absolutely right and there's a lot of reasons for that we are at an immigrant culture that was very much defined by the protestant work ethic it certainly served our ancestors the question is is it serving us now and from what we're seeing we really need to create some balance here so for example we're hearing about meditation all the time now it's a household word everyone's trying it and in a way meditation is an extreme action you're sitting closing writes doing nothing for a culture that so productive that's extreme we need sort of an extreme remedy for this extreme lifestyle that we're living people are taking silent retreats so the question is how can we call it resilience in one of those ways is to learn to activate our person pathetic nervous system again because we've gotten to the point where we've we're so engaged in our fight or flight response that people are not able to sleep at night that there's a very high use of anti anxiety medications and so forth and someone just to try to calm back down but we can all do this naturally there are ways to activate your para sympathetic nervous system so that you can have a more balanced day more balanced nervous system this is we have to relearn it's something that we.

graduate student korea sympathetic nervous system japan
"graduate student" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Thing that happened i think it was like in the nineties around women learning to to speak authoritatively right so than men could understand them it's all just like you understand what somebody's saying you just don't like the way that they're talking and every older generation thinks the younger generation is speaking in a way that is you know loose or inappropriate or unintelligent and it's just language of all thing is that somewhere you had to get to or have you always felt that with no no i'm i'm i'm confident in what i'm saying is the right way to save the thing they want to say i mean i think it changes i think when i when i when i i did my my master's and my phd when i tried to be a graduate student i was constantly running into people who were telling me that i would need to change the way that i spoke and are to be taken seriously and i just i don't buy that i don't buy the thing that goes into someone being taken seriously the way that they speak because some people are taking seriously from the getgo right like if you're an authoritative powerful white man you don't have to speak certain way to be taken seriously you just are no exactly you people like me we can kind of you know we can go in and cursing say on it doesn't really matter at all right because they're like look at that guy that kind of what he's talking about he's tall he's wearing a button up shirt right and they're like look at that grow the blue hairs she isn't no she's talking about so when i get speak with the most shakespearian you know lilt and people would still say i don't think she knows what he's talking so what was the turning boy when did you realize it i'm i'm okay i can speak over one.

graduate student
"graduate student" Discussed on The Cloudcast (.net) - Weekly Cloud Computing Podcast

The Cloudcast (.net) - Weekly Cloud Computing Podcast

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on The Cloudcast (.net) - Weekly Cloud Computing Podcast

"Associate gestion the air i'm glad you brought that up actually what would be some of your kind of recommendations for folks that are interested in this space and just kind of want to get started we have a lot of listeners who may not be necessarily practitioners in this space but excuse me but are very interested in this space depends all what's a starting point i mean if you'll statistics already than you may need more programming experience if you'll come to our science bag already is better to raise some basics books so that fueling the gap and then a bake new trend here especially on the involving interests apart i see tool major trends happening them pull one twenties the wiz healthy of outpoint off the open source community more more than shape from traditional allies schools to open source along which is such as pie song skylon are and then i wrote it recommend learning multiple languages because there's always always masters that existing one packet language does not as this on the other and different language has their own rents and on the methodology side a purely a new trend is the fasten girls would be learning community and that you can see the new learning architecture come out every month so interestingly a graduate student can use the lady deploring model that beast art which was traditionally buell by baked team before so i see a lot of people play with deep learning stuff which is pretty exciting but but one problem here is like you just if you just the no health run the floor model basically grab a online noble under run at but don't know the connection between history masters nine you may lose the points like war ward were different masters from held afford lane prudent and then all.

graduate student
"graduate student" Discussed on The Young Turks

The Young Turks

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on The Young Turks

"This is this is facebook live we're going to go back to finish writing my paper what's your yeah i do why do you got a preschool oh you okay let me open my apartment for you so the type belong here i don't think there was a need for you to be here i think you probably need to commit to an institution that the only like use you have to okay great i need to get back to it's all right my payments why you just said that if you prove that i live here we would leave okay opened i just opened the door to my apartment i could see okay thank you for watching that why verify on your hair man that is frustrating so you know the right wing says oh bootstraps okay she is a graduate student yell so she did everything she could do she did strap she did whatever she had to do she's at yale and you know why she was sleeping there 'cause she was working all night on the paper shed the right as a graduate student and it's her door it's her dorm this this all occurred around one thirty in the morning i i i i don't even understand what goes through the mind of someone a student who walks into the common area of a dorm and sees someone sleeping in that common area or taking a nap in that common area like why did it cross her mind that this woman pose any type of threat and so there were other black students at yale who spoke to the press and said that they also had a similar run ins with this student which by the way you could hear lot lot mentioned in the video that we just showed you and so who is a lotta she holds a bachelor's degree in computer science with a minor in spanish from the university of missouri columbia where she was a george brooks scholar she later moved to new york where she worked in the tech industry she's now getting a graduate degree at yale in african american studies i mean her resumes.

facebook yale graduate student new york university of missouri columbi george brooks
"graduate student" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

Psychedelic Salon

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

"Well over time and using tricks you can do all they certain amount of data out of it and what i'll do is describe but the mt trip and it's it's a composite of maybe forty of these trips and to then you can see what you make of it services i'll just describe it i'll be the the graduate student ub the guy with the clipboard you're saying to me so what happened okay here's what happened i took one takes most people can get off in about three to four hits now there's a trick to hash smokers are greatly phaser did this endeavor because you really need never love for this the great problem is that people will cost or not be able to hold it in you take two hits in a situation where you close have been loosened and you can just flock backward you need to you take two hits now many people miss the point because after two hits you feel completely peculiar you feel as they your body is undergoing some strange kind of anesthesia all the has been pumped out of the room this is visual acuity thing i talked about last night the colors jump up the edges sharp and it's an at that point people say rule while it's really coming on strong and then that you have to you have to take one more in normal hit and this separates the intrepid from the casual believe me because most and and the facilitator doesn't want to on the person you say take the hit has more as i know would take the food hit will if you can coax and.

graduate student
"graduate student" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"How was this how how did you work this out to do this project well like you said before it did begin with my dissertation research when i was a graduate student particularly the first part of the book that was about the history about the relationship between the saudis and the americans the state department and it was actually very challenging to be able to piece together the saudi side of the story because they didn't really have documents the way that we have government documents they weren't writing down their conversations and sending them you know to the national archives vr back then but the americans particularly the state department took very very good records of their experiences then and so i was able to go to the national archives a couple of times and read those documents and piece together the story from there i was also like you mentioned i was at the american heritage center i had a fellowship from them to go and do research in there they have a lot of the personal file nls of oil men who were there so i got a bit of the story from that side i also was in england i had a fellowship from cambridge university for a semester to go there and i did research at the british petroleum archives that are in england and that was my dissertation and then when i decided i wanted to turn it into a book i used a lot of memoirs and other books to fill in the story particularly since from quite a long time ago where some of these authors had done interviews with members of family who's since passed away so i was able to do that i did travel to the region several times and i was able to be contacts with people who do interviews go on the record and and talk about the company and their experiences and also their periences in saudi government but a lot of these kinds of things can actually be.

graduate student american heritage center england cambridge university
"graduate student" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"To marquette dot edu and it leads to a page that attacks me on various fronts they say well no conservative you have nothing to do with this except somehow it's only left wing faculty that have been attacking me and wanted me fired and then it accuses me of docs thing the student grad graduate student instructor cheryl a body that i blog about dachshund is publishing private contact information essentially to encourage that the per person be harassed except i didn't do that i never published any private contact information of hers i linked to her blog actually an essay on our blog it was about how all men contribute to that prevalence of rape now that really does sound like an academic feminists doesn't it and on the blog if somebody had clicked around through three or four pages yeah they could've found her contact information but that's not private information let's robots and we'll get to the actual what what your blog did what you essentially got fired by marquette for doing okay this all involved a instructor at marquette who was simultaneously a graduate student at marquette and i wanna point out that marquette chose to view this instructor only as a graduate student when it decided to pursue dismissal of your employment of termination of your employment so but it is important she was the instructor of record she created the syllabus this was in the philosophy department a student objected to being told he could not argue in favor of traditional marriage you blog about it we'll get to that in a second you your blog linked to her blog she blog dieu blog she's an instructor you're an instructor you both blog on your blog you can contact john if you want to click around and find ways to get to john on her blog you could click around and you could find ways to get to share labata so you linked to her blog and people click on the link and then clicked around in her blog found her email and send her uncivil emails but not threatening emails so you didn't docs her nor did you actually create anybody the conditions of anybody being encouraged to send her threats and marquette is saying exactly the opposite there was no encouragement what so ever i clearly linked to show crosby prank what kind of person.

rape marquette instructor graduate student john crosby
"graduate student" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Because clearly in in design but in many other fields like organic chemistry even in fictional you have to visualize plots unfolding in that threedimensional space you have to have the ability to imagine how objects and people arranged themselves in three d space uh uh and there was a something of a paradox that intrigued me that while clearly we imagine a threedimensional world or imagined things that are nearflat as pancakes but imagery always seemed to be from a vantage point and it's whenever you close your eyes and imagine something there is perspective at it if you imagine standing between a pair of railroad tracks for example you kind of see them in your mind's eye converging to the horizon now of course the railroad tracks in reality are parallel thalys the train would derail but the projection that we experience on our retinas when we physically see something seems to be replicated in the mind's eye in our our visual memories in our visual manipulation likewise when you imagine a a a globe or a box or face you imagine it from a onesurface only the visible surface you don't have xray vision in your imagery and you have to mentally turn it around for new surfaces to come into view the challenge that i faced was what's going on in the brain that allows visual images to simultaneously represent the third dimension but always be specific to a vantage point and how do we bring in new information as we visualize ourselves exploring a scene or manipulating an object that was the that was the puzzle that engage me why did you abandon that line of work uh what happened was i at the same time as a graduate student i was interested in how children learn their first language their mother tongue and i started office kind of a theoretician namely houses even possible you got a baby who doesn't know whether he's gonna end up speaking swale helier japanese english or yet us the brain is completely unprepared for any patil.

graduate student
"graduate student" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Graduate student so we can continue to attract the best and brightest minds here um and have a virtuous cycle where you know they're gonna get there um masters or their ph d's they're going to get grant funding they're going to want to stay here they're gonna um be investing in our communities i mean this you know you attract people and you attract economic growth by making wisconsin a place where people wanna live where they can afford to live where they can have a great quality of life it's not rocket science um but uh but it does take somebody who cares about education and understands economic development which unfortunately are our current governor has shown that he does not you almost answer my next question which was a what makes one make someone wanna move and come to wisconsin you talked a little bit but you mentioned quality of life yes well i think that's really what it comes down to um you know for i'm very lucky i've got you know parents in this state i've got four parents who can be grandparents to my kids and that's a huge reason that i want to be here a home because i want to be close to my family my loved ones but also i am very lucky because i live in a place where i've had a lot of opportunity i live in in madison and i feel like my kids have great opportunities at the public schools here and um we have a lot of recreational opportunities with the lakes and rivers um and parks and those are the kinds of things that draw people uh access to transit great infrastructure um and at what i say infrastructure i don't mean just like roads and bridges and built things i also mean infrastructure like why fi wireless connectivity rural broadband statewide um i also mean things like access to healthcare uh i think that sort of humanity art here on here raise that you've been out there and you in your candidacy right and so you know i i.

Graduate student wisconsin madison
"graduate student" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Stress hormones from the adrenal screener thought what started happening in the '70s in the 80s was a recognition that there were stress hormone receptors in the brain and what that meant was that the brain wasn't just a barking orders at peripheral tissue like the adrenal gland there was a dialogue going on it wasn't it wasn't just the brain regulating everything it was inability of stress hormones to circle back and influence how the brain function and even in the 80s is a graduate student i was odd by that concept so just take me take me a little bit farther ants so so what west different what what what's what what tell me what you at all of it just to explain that a little bit more about what was unexpected about that and fascinating well in my primitive understanding of how i thought behavior work to yeah uh there was a brain and the brain function in a mysterious way to regulate everything else in the body and it was all about consciousness and thinking and it was all durrell it was just it it was simply that the communication yoko from the brain to everything else yeah so if uh if enter crime grit glands released stress hormone that was ultimately because someone gave an order from the top would be a hormone releasing factor that would stimulate the patou terry gland that would then stimulate that would released another peptide that would stimulate the endocrine gland and then you'd have downstream of facts by when steroid receptors were discovered in epa campbell tissue and in other brain regions what that really meant was that the brain isn't just exerting downstream of facts it me.

graduate student
"graduate student" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

KFQD News Talk

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

"Simply leave your dinner table out overnight well along comes louis pasteur and many of the advocates of the germ theory and they said no you did not have spontaneous generation of life simply take life for example your your soup that you had tonight boil it the sterilized it and put a cover over it and then the next day you'll find that the soup is still fresh as ever and so spontaneous generation of insects take place because insects land on your food and create eggs then the next big jump was when we scientists began to figure out how this process actually he takes place this that this was done in the nineteen 50s by a graduate student of nobel laureate professor yuri what he did was an experiment that shook the foundations of biology he simply got a flask of water point into it some of the elements that we think were present at the beginning of the earth he put an atmosphere of ammonia methane hydrogen real nasty atmosphere seal the bottle and then put a small electric spark well then he walked away he just walked away from this experiment a few months later he came back and he analyze well with inside the flask and he found much to a shock that he found amino acids amino acids are the building blocks of proteins proteins are made out of amino acids as another whereas he made a pair dinesh shift he proved that if you simply get a flask of hydrocarbons like ammonia methane uh poisonous chemicals hit it with an electric spark you get the seeds of life the precursors of life amino acids which are the building blocks of proteins since then we we have found amino acids in comments amino acids in meteorite said a fallen on the planet earth and this is now considered to be the best indicator we have of the origin of life according to this theory and of course variations of this theory light probably started in the oceans where there is a uh liquid called liquid water which acts as a mix bowl void dna and amino acids and proteins and so you mix all these chemicals together what you need energy we think that the original energy of life probably came from maybe volcano events at the bottom of the ocean at the bottom of.

graduate student louis pasteur professor
"graduate student" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"Go to cobb i should add i think there are a lot of people in college have no business being there they proud they know what they want to do it but they are discouraged from that no you have to go to college only way little germany you could ever get ahead i think universities a phil with people what really have no business being there is not made for everybody but it's promoted is something that everybody must do were you can't go there now without any crewing incurring a lot of them what what what is the value of a college educational what did they don't do it you come out of college and you have a debt of forty thousand or or more how are you going to have to work at whatever you got your degree am just the pay off that loan before you even started making progress on your standard of living on your prosperity the very thing a college degree is supposed to get ya a advantages in the job market advantages in compensation you're going to be at the upper end of all of these scales if you go to college and then you come out and you have all this debt and it's even worse if you are a graduate student and you go to law school or you go unique doctor of some kind of look at that debt those people incur look at how many years they're paying off their debt before they even get the use their degree for the actual intended purpose among many others which is an increased standard of living and prosperity for their own families and i i think it's a i think it's it's a mean on a with kuala trick i'm not saying anybody purposely did this i'm just saying that there's been a lot of people think they're better novelty everybody else and all that and they're really basically incompetence and they've destroyed this program like they destroyed a lot of things that bureaucracy these touch one point and now you get.

graduate student law school germany
"graduate student" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"graduate student" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Accrued this debt because there is pressure the go to cobb i should add i think there are a lot of people in college have no business being there they propped they know what they want to do it but they are discouraged from that no you have to go to college only way little germany you could ever go ahead i think universities a fill with people that really have no business being there is not made for everybody but each promoted is something that everybody must do well you can't go there now without any crewing incurring a lot of them what what once the value of a college educational what did they don't do it you come out of college and you have a debt of forty thousand or or more how are you going to have to work at whatever you got your degree am just the pay off that loan before you even started making progress on yours standard of living on your prosperity the very thing a college degree is supposed to get ya a advantages in the job market advantages in compensation you're going to be at the upper end of all of these scales if you go to college and then you come out and you have all this debt and it's even worse if you are a graduate student and you go to law school or you go unique doctor of some kind of look at that depth those people incur look at how many years they're paying off their debt before they even get he used their degree for the actual intended purpose among many others which is an increased standard of living and prosperity for their own families and i i think it's i think it's it's a mean on of with kuala trick i'm not saying anybody purposely did this i'm just saying that there's been a lot of people think you're better novelty everybody else and all that and they're really basically incompetence and they've destroyed this program like they destroyed a lot of things that bureaucracy these touch one point and now you get.

graduate student law school germany