4 Burst results for "Graduate School Of Business"

"graduate school business" Discussed on Veteran on the Move

Veteran on the Move

07:54 min | Last month

"graduate school business" Discussed on Veteran on the Move

"Audience about entrepreneurship and transitioning from the military, my career in military started as a high school senior when I applied to ROTC. So I got a four year bull ride army ROTC scholarship, which took me to the University of Southern California, and so I spent four years there, kind of did the RTC program. And after graduating, I was a branch assigned to signal core, who at fort fort Gordon, Augusta, Georgia. And so I was off to the signal core and my specialty was military intelligence cyber contact and then I was off to Korea where I worked in military intelligence. Ultimately, I was down in Panama for a couple years where I worked for general Barry McCaffrey as his home state officer on his travel team, ran that travel team, and then was off to graduate school. Now, when you got out of the army, was it, was it a surprise when it happened? Were you planning in advance or did the army say, all right, it's time to go talk about your transition. So I think I was pretty well prepared. I had in my mind that I had four years of active duty, which was my commitment, and then I had at least a four year reserve commitment. I ended up 70 years in the reserves after her active duty. So I kind of knew that the date and time that I was going to be looking to transition. So one thing I will say to our audience here is that I use the four years that I was at the duty to get as much training as much leadership as much experience as possible. Took every school from airborne school hood to northern warfare training, but also did cyber classes. I did all the stuff that was offered to me. I took all those courses and then I took jobs that were very relevant to the work that I wanted to do after leaving the military. So there's a so many opportunities to gather training experience during the four years that I knew that I was going to be getting out after four years. And my first stop was graduate school, business school. And so I kind of set myself up with experiences that would have been hard to get in kind of financing consulting while I was in the military, knowing that I was going to have a transition through a graduate program. Yeah, and you kind of had the soft landing in the reserve afterwards. And then not completely leaving the military environment. School or graduate school is a great transition environment for most veterans if you're looking to go to school because you're not under extreme pressure, obviously school is a lot of work and studying and everything. But it's definitely a safe environment as opposed to jumping into maybe the competitive job market or corporate America. So as you came out of college, were you interested in entrepreneurial ventures or were you just looking to get your mark in corporate America? So it's really interesting is that my entrepreneurial interests came a little bit later. So I was following a very kind of traditional path to graduate school and it was like a two year career frankly taste everything. Look at banking and consulting and product management or whatever. There's a lot of things to look at. And for me, heading into binance made the most sense at that point. I really was interested in learning more about business and the way it kind of global financial system work. And so I went to Wall Street. So I went to Georgetown, so USC undergrad went to Georgetown, and I did masters in finance, and then I did this program at the school of foreign service at Georgetown, international business diplomacy. So a nice combination. And that set me up for first stop was investment banking in New York. So I went from Georgetown to army, Georgetown, and then worked on Wall Street in mergers and acquisitions. And at first at JPMorgan, and then at Morgan Stanley. And so here's the thing that's really interesting is you're building all these experiences. I was building all these experiences that would ultimately lead to my entrepreneurial success because at some point, after two years in banking, I was like, huh, is this what I really want to do? And in entrepreneurs and get their question and a lot of places, you know, a 16 year old running a lawn mowing business might be like, hey, I'm an entrepreneur or a graduate from high school and start a business or in college, see something, or go work somewhere. For me, I was about 30 years old. And I had been very successful in a very traditional path, landed on Wall Street, and I said, you know what? I am really interested in entrepreneurship, starting companies, and I was really interested in technology. And so that led me to I got a call one day from somebody I knew who had gone to college with and he was starting a company in Silicon Valley and he calls me up and says, hey Patrick, I'm starting this company in Silicon Valley. Building a team, you want to come and I had been thinking about how to get started and I said, you know what? If I'm ever going to learn how to be an entrepreneur, particularly a technology entrepreneur, I should go and just take a job in the industry. Step one, go and work in the industry that you want to disrupt or be a part of. And so here's a lesson I think for a lot of people that I had to I took a step back. So I was on a very fast track and doesn't banking finance and the job that was offered to me was financially it was a step back and maybe in responsibility a step back, but I knew that I wanted to go and learn some skills. And so I left the banking world and went and joined a startup set at a desk with a bunch of people and for two years, I kind of learned these startup business, but as an employee with the idea that I'm not sure what I was going to start, but I knew I wanted to start something. And that kind of led me down the path of starting the poor companies that I started. You know, how much of how much of an advantage in the entrepreneurial world do you think you had based off of your military leadership experience, coupled with a full understanding of how money works really? The financial markets and investing and everything else. Because a lot of people jump right into entrepreneurship, not knowing a whole lot about money whatsoever. They're stuck with the entrepreneurial idea. And they figure out the money thing as they go along. Three really important things set me up for success and entrepreneurship. One was I learned in the military I had a lot of technical skills. I really telecom systems network cyber, how many we have product is built on how to deliver a service. I got that experience operationally. Platoon leader, you know, we really have to get our hands dirty with a lot of that stuff and if you're working in an NCO or enlisted, you are getting your hands dirty and really learning something really vital. Number two was you're right. I learned about money. I learned how after leaving I learned how many works, how you raise money, how money is evaluated. But I'm going to go back to either military experience. It helped me both succeed in graduate school and in finance and entrepreneurship. Is the military I learned how to take responsibility. This is critical. I think all of our veterans in related spouses and all this, I think you take for granted how rare it is that you're just natural ability to take responsibility for the mission, yourself and those around you. And so when you get into an organization, whether it was banking or wherever, like a president, a finance club in business school, and in banking, I really cared about the delivery of the full thing, which allowed me to be trusted by people around me, which allowed me to learn more. And then when I became got into the tech entrepreneur world, I was willing to take responsibility, see how responsibility float

Georgetown ROTC fort fort army Barry McCaffrey school of foreign service RTC University of Southern Califor Augusta Panama Gordon America Silicon Valley Korea Georgia JPMorgan Morgan Stanley USC New York Patrick
"graduate school business" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:25 min | 2 years ago

"graduate school business" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Presidential debate. Foreign policy is expected to be Discussed big time. And it happens on the heels of reports that the top U. S spy chief John Radcliffe, the director of national intelligence, had both Iran and Russia had obtained voter registration information and that Tehran was using it already to send threatening emails. There's a lot going on, so let's get into a conversation on protecting our democracy just 11 days away. From the presidential election. Retired U. S Army Lieutenant General H. R. McMaster is with us. He's got a book out battle grounds. The fight to defend the free world. He joins us on the phone. I'm Stanford, California. It is so great to have you here with us. We're going to talk about the book. But I do want to ask you, General McMaster. First of all, how are you? And what's your world been like over the last 6 to 7 months amid the virus and the shutdown. Well, hey, thanks, Carol. You know I feel bird fortunate. I mean, we're in a good place here. We were able to draw in one of our daughters, My son in law and our twin grandsons. They're with us. And I'm one of the fortunate few that can work remotely and teach remotely. I taught a course at the graduate school business here remotely had a had a great time doing it Not as good as in person. But But fortunately we've been able to continue to interact with people least on zoom and so forth. And we feel very fortunate. Thanks for asking Carol, that General, you know, we think about our foreign policy our military role in the world Postwar war, too. It's been pretty consistent theme of internationalism, too, for lack of a better word that seems to have taken 180 return. In last four years. I put America first again. How do you view Our kind of foreign policy and our military positioning. How do you think it should be in this world where there's not just where the cold War has been won? But now we have lots of other issues as you mentioned, including China. Right, Paul? A Thank you in battle grounds. I described this is a lack of strategic confidence. We like confidence in our ability to implement a sustained, reasonable and sustainable Foreign policy and approached the national security and I think hopefully what we've learned from Cove in 19 to go overseas are best dealt with early. You know, once they reached our shores We could only cope with them at an exorbitant price. And of course, this was our experience in 9 11 as well in connection with the threat from jihadist terrorism. But what I'm afraid of Paul is that we saw the 19 nineties is a period of Of optimism over optimism, maybe even hubris and complacency about threats that we face and then in the 2000 0, we suffered a serious strategic shocks, not 11. Financial state of life and difficulty the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The 10,009 financial crisis. Our confidence now is shaken and I think what we need to do is restore our strategic competence. As the first the first step in restoring our confidence, our confidence in our foreign policy and our ability to build a better future for generations to come. Read your book also deals with, you know. Us approaches to some of the challenges on a global level that we have seen. And you say specifically that resulted in missed opportunities that have left us at a strategic disadvantage on do you get into it? You know what have been our biggest missed opportunities in your view. Carol. These these air missed opportunities associated with what I described that book in strategic narcissism are Tennessee didn't find the world only in relation to us and assume that what we decide to do or choose not to do is decisive, favorable outcomes. The problem with that is we don't acknowledge our competition. We don't acknowledge that others rivals adversaries. Enemies also have authorship over the future. And so we defined the world as we like it to be in connection with China, For example, we assumed that China, Having been welcomed into the international community would play by the rules on as a prosper would liberalize its economy and then and then ultimately liberalizes form of governance. Will tryto under the Chinese Communist Party and fusion thing is not doing that so quite the opposite. So we needed to shift our policy can cooperation engagement to a more competitive approach. Three administrations in a row harbored this illusion of a better relationship with Vladimir Putin. Andi. Just reaching out to Vladimir Putin would would almost have the effect a Ziff, you're the Grinch on Christmas Eve, His heart will grow two sizes larger that he would stop his campaign of sustained Political subversion against this, And of course, that's not the case. And I think the deficiency that's in common from China, Russia to Iran to North Korea to the problem of jihadist terrorism right is that we don't acknowledge the agency that others have, and we don't think enough. About the ideology, the emotions and aspirations that driving strain of General McMaster we have about 50 seconds. Then we're going to some news and come back, But I just want to just quickly ask you. Who do you think is our biggest threat right now is that Russia is in China. Is it the Middle East? Who is it? It's It's the policies and actions of the Chinese Communist Party and a very sophisticated campaign of what I describe in the book is co option coercion and concealment. So we have to be much more effective, most effective defending against this campaign, but also strengthening our competitive advantages so we and the rest of the free world can compete more effectively. Yeah, Whether it's the one belt, one road initiative or their long term planning, they certainly have been on a mission. We're going to continue talking with Lieutenant General H. R. McMaster, of course, a retired U. S. Army general, former national security adviser. And he's got a new book out called Battle Grounds, the fight to defend the Free world and Paula's. You were describing it to it. Just it goes through the different regions in the world that I feel like have been the regions. We have been talking about a lot, certainly under this most recent administration, but really have been The country's in areas of the world that we focus on a lot. Yeah, exactly right. And I think you know we've focused so long in the Cold War, the Soviet Union and in the ensuing year, so many other areas have developed as challenges for this for our government. All right. We're gonna get back. Tio conversation in just a moment right now, though. An update on world the national news.

Lieutenant General H. R. McMas China Carol Vladimir Putin Chinese Communist Party Russia Paul Iran U. S Army Us U. S director Stanford McMaster John Radcliffe
"graduate school business" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:40 min | 2 years ago

"graduate school business" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is moving from the University of Notre Dame to case Western Reserve University because of virus concerns. I'm Charlie That is a Bloomberg business Flash. You're listening to Bloomberg, BusinessWeek with Carol Master and Jason Kelly on Bloomberg Radio. All right, so the past to November's scarlet food you may have noticed, Caroline I pop up out, and I have noticed you have noticed were out at the Stanford graduate School of Business because for the past two years running Stanford's graduate school business has been the number one business school, according to Bloomberg. BusinessWeek, Quick Flex. Jonathan Levin has been nice enough to host is there he is the dean alongside Sarah, Soul associate Dean. They're really good to have you guys with us. Lovely to be here. Again. Same here, so deal, Evan, I want to start with you Tell us what it's like out there Right now, You know, obviously, and we'll talk a lot about some of the work that you've been doing amid these dual crises that the nation is facing. But just, you know, give us a sense of of what life is like there. Palo Alto. Well, the weather is beautiful, and it would be a terrific summer. If we were all walking around wearing masks and worried about social distancing in a normal year in the summer, we have thousands of this executives and other folks coming to campus or Executive programs and all types of different summer programs that will run. Of course, all of that has been shut down this summer. And so we're running a whole range of virtual programs. We have I working with businesses and we're running a big virtual entrepreneurship program that we just put together over the course of the last two months, the Stanford rebuilding programme But it's a very unusual time. There's nothing. A university campus is meant to be a place with interaction and students on faculty and staff and everyone just bumping into each other. And right now it feels lonely and empty on the Stanford campus. Yeah, that interaction is key, and it's what contributed to the success of institutions like Stanford Graduate School of Business. Associate in Seoul. I want to bring you into this conversation here, because obviously, as with other universities, Stanford is trying to, of course, increase its diversity, equity and inclusion efforts really increasing the representation of Black and other disenfranchise people, not just among students, but also in your faculty as well. Talk a little bit about the plan to Increased racial equity. How do you go about that in this kind of environment when people cannot get together, and the interaction is so artificial and stilted Yes, Thank you, Scarlett. It's really nice to meet you. Nice to meet another Cornell alone. Oh, go big red. Yes. Step back a little bit and say a word or two about what it is. We've been working on here at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. In 2019. We really released our first diversity equity and inclusion report and one of the goals that we issued in that report for the academic year of 2019 2020 was too And sometimes studying and thinking about how we could do better as a school as an institution to learn from and increased representation and increasing sense of inclusion and belonging. For groups that otherwise before, had been underrepresented in our efforts to date, But what we've been working on really started last year, and what we're announcing today is what we're calling the racial equity action plan for the school. And, as you noted, scarlet, One of the things that we are working on is representation in particular. And so what We are thinking about in this particular bucket. What we're announcing our commitment for is thinking how we can do better about bringing black and other underrepresented minority teaching faculty staff and students to campus. And, you know, As I noted, this commitment really does build on the momentum that he have had over the last couple of years around our broader diversity, equity and inclusion efforts. But in particular when we think about highly of black and you are in teaching faculties, what we're thinking about doing in particular is taking advantage of an incredible initiative on the part of the university that Stanford University to and to bring 10 new faculty members and tenderloin faculty members to campus. Found on a search that is really centered around the impacts of race in America. So that's one piece of what it is that we're working on collaborating with the university to take advantage of These new can billet for 10 year line faculty members and then on the sort of lecture side we also have a number of practitioners who lecture in our classes were working actively with our loans and also with our faculty to identify more black and underrepresented minority teaching faculty as well as guest speakers, too, so we can make sure that we are having voice is heard in the classroom and that we're able To teach issues related to race in business and race in America. Yeah, and I find that so interesting, you know, and Jonathan The integration into the curriculum as it were. I find really interesting here and you've even got some new courses that you're going to be offering. Tell us about that. I think one of the topics that we've spent a lot of time thinking about I in in our curriculum over the last few years has been Generally preparing students to go out and be effective managers and leaders in in diverse organizations and help build Organisational cultures and the effective in leading in a world where the country has become or the person and the need for businesses to create widespread opportunity. In many different ways has become increasingly important and is on everyone's minds. And so that's that's been something that, sir just mention. We've thought about what sort of cases are faculty or rating in terms of the guest speakers. They're bringing in support, and, interestingly when the when the pandemic arrived, and we had to move very quickly into virtual teaching in the spring We have the opportunity to create a new questions. We've created a civic workshop class where the students developed ideas, Tio around the pandemic. We created a A new business of society class, which is the rector. Serious virtual extras. We bring people in from all around the world to speak to the students. Wonderful thing about virtual learning as you can. You can bring in. Yes, Regardless biographic down. Researchers of phenomenal 11. I'm gonna I'm gonna have you hold that thought we're gonna continue this conversation in just a minute. We've got to do some news, real quick, willing to continue our conversation. With the dean and the associate dean of Stanford graduate School of Business in just a second. Let's go up the peninsula as it were to add Baxter. He's in San.

Stanford graduate School of Bu Stanford University Bloomberg BusinessWeek Stanford campus Stanford University of Notre Dame associate Dean Jonathan Levin Bloomberg Radio associate dean Western Reserve University America Seoul Caroline Palo Alto Sarah Evan
"graduate school business" Discussed on Real Wealth Real Health

Real Wealth Real Health

09:56 min | 2 years ago

"graduate school business" Discussed on Real Wealth Real Health

"Quickly, and whether you're listening to this at its launch or later, Craig's insights are invaluable at any point in any market cycle crave. Thanks so much for joining us today on our podcast. Pleasure to be here at great to have you. I'm I'm really excited about the episode today. You are a long time. Real Estate Finance Executive in investment banking private equity I. Know We're not allowed to talk about what you're doing now because you're in stealth mode. Launching a technical investment platform, but your background is so deep so broad. You've been in the industry for a long time and what we want to focus on with you is our current crisis how we got here and how it compares also to the previous financial crises. Now you've been through more than one so for the listeners you know we're going to get a lot of information to help contextualized. What's going on right now? With a historical in a deep financial view so to start Craig? Can you give us a brief background about your yourself? Sure I guess I start with I entered the real estate finance industry in kind of a strange way these by by way of my background, my graduate, which was at Boston university was as a classical musician studying music performance. And shortly after graduation and Started in that career, and you know got off the ground and had about six months post graduation, an automobile accident that, while no long lasting damage created just enough nerve damage for me to need to assess a career change. After a couple of years of working I, went to business school. The alternative was law and my father, who was in the legal profession, taught me out of that one, and I went to the graduate school business at Columbia in new. York and following that entered a career on Wall Street focused on the real estate industry, but specifically within the finance discipline of that largely because one of the things that really hasn't changed about real estate years. Is that it's an exceptionally capital, intensive business and anywhere from. Sixty to ninety five plus percent of the capital, it's used in real estate acquisitions or portfolio construction is really from third parties beyond the sponsor. There's always gotta be some skin in the game, but it really is. In a sense, not only from a debt perspective. You Know Fairly highly leveraged as an industry, but it's also. A lot of third party equity that comes into into play as as you mentioned in the intro broadly speaking, my career has involved positions in senior management at ultra bracket, investment banks always interestingly, perhaps focused on the private side of real estate capital, the big move in the nineties was public issuance of publicly traded read equity while my colleagues in those firms certainly focused on that. I had always been on the private side of things it was. An interesting side of the business where in will will get to two points on later, but the private side of the market is. Almost uniquely uncoupled from the public side in terms of how returns work in terms of the correlation with other asset classes in that provided a very interesting basis for me to to grow in my career approximately five years ago now I after the Global Financial Crisis I've been doing some consulting a consulting assignment for a investment management firm in the Mid West. Came through in asked about you know crowdfunding in how all that works because they thought there might be an interesting way to. Combine? The financial advisors that they had inside of their registered investment advisor complex, their their parents had that with raising capital from those clients for a captive investment management firm, and I built that platform out. Roll that out got successfully adopted by fidelity investments on their wealth adviser solutions platform, really covering over a lot of the. Time at least shortcomings in crowdfunding business and here we are now I'm presently working as you mentioned on a technical investment manager that is operating right now in stealth mode so. That's that sort of brings us to date I. Don't know if there's anything in there, you. WanNa drill gala. Grind down everything. But actually let's let's start with with this I would love to just quickly talk about the crowd funding first before we really get into the what I mean I'm super interested in the finance outside every. You know but let's talk a little bit about crowd funding, because we have all different experience as you know. Launch crowdfunding late twenty thirteen at came at it with my own kind of background, coming from hedge funds, and you know seeing this, go retail I saw the the potential, but I also saw the need for institutional capital from the perspective of of essentially scale of allowing businesses to thrive before you could really onboard retail, so it's an interesting yesterday interesting few years. So what's been your perspective coming into it from your very deep background? Will. Let's. Let's take a step back. Talk about the quantum of the market that talking about because the scene. Is Very much crowdfunding is in industry, which best case is still sorting itself out. You know the. Largely not entirely because there have been some off shoes, but it's it's incubation was really in the wake of the jobs act. And and the ability of. Typically smaller issuers to raise more retail kind of capital. The idea with jobs act was to streamline that process reduce regulatory requirements so that you could reduce cost of issuing equity. To new startup, kinds of ventures that historically have been locked out of the more institutional side of the world that now. That certainly logical reaction to it, but then the question becomes okay. How do we build a business? If we if we already start with the notion that there isn't in place, institutional market for Real Estate Investment Management. Let's keep it real estate, although it generally applies to other kinds of alternatives whether it's private equity or hedge funds. That's the one that's sort of real estate one. That's received most of the attention. The. The major projections that I have seen these these data come from Ernst and Young in a report that was put out about nine months ago, doing this the first week of June twenty twenty. Estimated that in twenty twenty one year end. All real estate crowdfunding globally would total about nine billion. US dollars or the equivalent in in local currency. Okay in. That's fine. That's very nice. But just put it into context. Globally institutional investment managers. There are seventy eight. Institution global investment managers who individually exceed the size, the entire route something market. You were talking about in just again by way of context. Real Estate Institutional Real Estate Investment Management as we know, it has basically been around forty five years or so Orissa the employment retirement income Security Act was passed nine, seventy, four, seventy, five. Gerald Ford signed it. It's fundamental. Underpinning was okay. If you run a pension from, you have to be diverse. In the market responded with that like creating a series of not only real estate, private equity managers in this was just private equity to corporate acquisition, being formed with the idea that the investors would be pension funds who had to diversify? All that itself and I'm sure we'll get to. This later. Is was backed by a great deal of academic research on modern portfolio theory primarily by Harry Markovits, who ultimately won a Nobel Prize say in the late fifties for this work. It took fifteen years for it to become. You know more than just a nice idea, Of Law, but since that time in the midnight seventies, you seem globally this. Industry of investment management targeting the institutions as clients as investors. Grow.

Craig investment manager fidelity investments Columbia Boston university Mid West York Executive Gerald Ford US advisor Harry Markovits Nobel Prize