19 Burst results for "Graduate Institute"

"graduate institute" Discussed on DNA Today

DNA Today

08:21 min | 3 months ago

"graduate institute" Discussed on DNA Today

"If you're preparing for a career in genetics, look no further than keck graduate institute in Claremont, California. Is a recognized leader in healthcare and BioTech education, offering innovative postgraduate degrees and certificates that integrate life and health sciences, business, pharmacy, engineering, medicine, and genetics, with a focus on industry projects, hands on industry experiences, and team collaboration. KJ's two year master of science and human genetics and genetic counseling program is dedicated to educating innovative genetic counselors who will serve the needs of individual patients, the healthcare system and the bioscience industry. The program emphasizes interprofessional collaboration, systematic problem solving, ethical use of technology and biotechnology and personalized patient care. The two year master of science and human genetics and genomic data analytics program prepares students for the exciting field of genomic data analytics. This unique program offers students to work side by side with future genetic counselors and applied life scientists while gaining hands on experience with the technologies and information revolutionizing the future of medicine. Learn more about KGs innovative programs by visiting CGI dot EDU. Perkin Elmer genomics is a global leader in genetic testing, focusing on rare diseases, inherited disorders, newborn screening, and hereditary cancer, testing services support the full continuum of care from preconception and prenatal to neonatal pediatric and adult. Testing options include sequencing for target genes, multiple genes, the whole exome or genome and copy number variations. Using a simple saliva or blood sample, Perkin Elmer genomics, answers complex genetic questions that can proactively inform patient care and end the diagnostic Odyssey for families. Learn more at perk and Elmer genomics dot com. I just want more comments. This is something I'm really hung up on right now. We collect 3.2 roughly billion loss probably more like 2.9 billion data points from a genome. And then we go in with a phenotype, which is typically three terms or 5 terms. Wow. It's 15 terms. Other qualitative, they're not even quantitative. They're qualitative. And we think that that's makes sense to us, right? And so the real picture is our phenom ought to be more complex than our genome, our GM is finite, the phenome is not and so we're going to look back on this here and just go, what were you thinking? You know? I mean, the things that we sent to the laboratories we work with are patient has delays in development and poor socialization skills. That's probably the most common thing that gets sent out. So you've got two insanely vague terms against as you say, 2.9 billion bits of information. I'll do any better. Well, I think no. I think the one of the challenges here is that one of the things that we did as fast a 100,000 genomes project is try to define in some detail what were the data points that we would like to collect in each group of conditions. So what would you collect in a pediatric developmental disorder? What would you collect in an adult with a cardiac disorder and so on? And we spent some time with some experts really, really sort of getting down into the detail of what those might look like. But the problem was then that we ended up with, I think maybe 50 or a hundred different sort of models of what you might want in different circumstances. Each of those is probably not quite detailed enough to do the things that you've both just been talking about. But was too detailed actually for anybody to get a handle on it at scale. So we didn't end up ended up being a bit patchy because we tried we tried for more than the system could cope with supplying. But even if we'd got it, it wouldn't have been enough to match the level of detail that we got in the genome. So we pitched it somewhere in the middle and didn't quite end up at either end. So I think. One of the really interesting things at the moment is the contrast between some of the really big broad initiatives that are going on where things like better databasing and so on, which just help everything throughout the entire ecosystem versus the really in depth bit, which is the things that doctor kingsburg was talking about where you take something you take a muscular phenotype and you get your quantitative data and you can really go deep and trying to get both of those things served by the same system. Most systems probably at the moment do a better in one dimension or the other I would say. And I would say we're probably more in the broad than we are in the deep in most cases, although we obviously have individual experts in the UK who are very, very deep indeed and have all sorts of amazing data that they can put alongside the genome data, but that tends to be sort of little slices rather than being across the whole of the breadth and filling out to the point where we got the breadth, the depths across the breadth, I think, is another organizational and functional and scientific challenge, which is yes, it's going to take us a little bit longer to crack, but absolutely agree with its importance. A critical driver that we haven't talked about and that's going to drive all of us, whether we like it or not, is the emergence of hundreds of new gene therapies for conditions. And that's going to differentiate our field. We're not going to control it, right? So the moment you have an effective gene therapy for spinal muscular atrophy, that drives the field and the management of those patients. And that's going to drive our phenotyping. And that's going to drive our molecular diagnostics and our whole approach. And that's the most exciting thing, I think, for genetics, is it's moving from being a descriptive field to a therapeutic field. Where it will be routine for us to intervene. I agree with Marshall. We were not going to have great immediate therapies for fixed structural defects, but for so much of physiology. There still is a lot of plasticity. And so that's going to be this huge segue is we're going to need to rewrite our field predicated on the indications for these very expensive highly targeted therapies. Many of which are focused on variants, not diseases, variants. It's going to just completely change the way we think about things. Oh, I think it's already changing, changed it. You know, I just one of the things I look at is, okay, what things can you get for free? Because that usually tells you there's an economics behind it. So, for instance, in lysosomal disorders and things where there is a gene therapy available, it's in the states. It's kind of a good way to follow the market is you can get free testing for all of those. Very easily. If the therapy is worth a couple of $1 million to a company, they don't mind spending a few $100 on a DNA diagnostic. I'm a fan of genome testing and broader testing place, don't get me wrong there. But I think absolutely. 50% of the approved drugs coming out of FDA are foreign orphan rare disease indication every year. Now that's from a population standpoint, it's very disproportionate, it's a much smaller group. But if you look at the acceleration of the number of available therapies and particularly when they start to generalize some of the vector developments around gene therapy so you don't have to if you've got a effective system, you don't necessarily have to redo the whole process for everyone. I think it's an exciting time. I was going to bring up one point, I guess related to the finite genome. And maybe doctor Thomas, you can start us off with this because you also talked about how genome sequencing was a big leap in diagnostic outcomes in the way the way patients are the rates that were patients are diagnosed. How am I given impact do you think sort of more research into the non coding regions of the genome and how that will be utilized in the diagnostic and back of translational research and maybe genetic therapies in the future? Yeah..

Perkin Elmer genomics keck graduate institute cardiac disorder hereditary cancer Claremont kingsburg California GM spinal muscular atrophy UK Marshall FDA Thomas
"graduate institute" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

07:37 min | 5 months ago

"graduate institute" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Will open. It doesn't. It actually doesn't. Like most people around us kind of see us more for who we really are. And some people that's like, oh, I've always wanted to be a writer, but oh, I can't tell my husband that or my kids that or my whatever that, you know, and then they start to do and it's like, their kids are thrilled for them, you know, or their husband thinks it's great that they're expressing them, you know, whatever it is. You know, and there's some cases where some people come to me and marriages do fall apart. And careers are walked away from, but these are things that were happening anyway in their lives and they needed some structure and support to get through that. I work with women who are mainly over 40 and you know kind of in that facing that like what is all of this about type of moment in their life. And then out of the emerging part of the process is really the embodying phase, which is this is where the coaching really comes in and what I love about it is and what is just so true about life is that you aren't really going to change until you actually take action. And I know that sounds ridiculously simple and clear, but I don't think many of us really get that. You don't. And that it's in the doing is where the real learning actually begins because it's where we then were kind of all like scientists and experimenters. And it's not like it's like, oh, I've had these insights and I've had this opening and I understand more of myself and I'm ready to go ahead. And it's going to unfold exactly as I think it will. No, it's going to step into something and you're going to try something and then you're going to come back and go, um, what's working now? What's not working? You know, you're going to start assessing immediately because that's how that's how we do life. Especially when we're doing something new in life. And so I just love watching this, I've had this program going for about three years now. And it's just been so amazing to watch women who are really ready for a more authentic fulfilling version of their life. And they just need community and some structure and some information and some coaching. And to watch them step out of their comfort zones and to step out of their ideas of who they think they were supposed to be, that's the big thing, you know? And the reason I started this work is because that's the path my life is taken. I always had this idea of who I thought I was supposed to be. And when I started to relax and just be who I am and live the life that really feeds me. Yes. Well, I'm sure you're familiar with Karen horney and the feminist psychoanalyst. Yes. Who really gave Freud a run for his money? She's like, you crazy. You're talking crazy talk Freud. You need some feminist psychology here. I've been trying so hard to tell people about her. I wrote an article for scientific American called the underappreciated legacy of Karen horney because she's been forgotten in the annals of the history of psychology to a large degree. That's unfair. She had this idea, this notion, the tyrannical shoulds that's her phrase. And so remember this. I was studying her at Pacific. This is what you're talking about. And I'm glad that you brought this up and that you talk about how a lot of women struggle this, of course, obviously a lot of men struggle with it too. But yeah, there are unique societal cultural expectations that are absolutely gendered to a certain degree in our culture, right? That need to be talked about. Yeah, absolutely. And men have their own version of this, a 100%. I mean, and it's funny because the, and I don't know if it's a fair word to use or not. But what I really feel like I'm doing and helping women with is dismantle the inner patriarchy within them. I know. And I know patriarchy is such a buzz word and it's kind of a trigger word and it is so interesting you brought up her work because it is a tyrannical system of thought. And, you know, patriarchy has that kind of bent to it. And it's most extreme form. You know, I mean, you know, if you've studied any Greek or Roman history, women were not treated very well back then. It was like the birth of democracy and women were like, I think third class citizens at that point. You know, there was not a lot of respect for women in those great thinkers. So it is this dismantling of this tyrannical should system, which is what I think how I'm going to start to talk about the article. I'll send you the article. Please do. I would love that because we did we studied her Pacifica and Pacific graduate institute where I went and got my master's is all about jungian and the sacred feminine and all that kind of stuff. So yeah, and we had a lot of early depth psychologists, stuff we studied. And yeah, absolutely. Awesome. Once you start going down that rabbit hole, your mind will be bold because she was also one of the first humanistic thinkers in my view. She often wrote about the importance of wholeness and she's like, how come the field of psychology is not talking about the whole personality structure? One part of us and she also believed in growth. She has this quote that I love that says something to the effect of, well, we can grow and change up until the day we die. Yeah. It's too late the day after you die, but at least at least some people think you go on to another lifetime and you're still growing, so they're still growing. To go, that's actually an interesting question. I think that's open for debate. You never see a ghost like change, like Casper never looks different. No, he doesn't. He doesn't, but he still may be doing work on himself. Who knows? There's a bit there somewhere. But anyway. Anyway, I just think the more you go down that rabbit hole and I'd be happy to load you up. I would love that. That would be awesome. Yeah, so this is a direct quote from your website. The world needs women more than ever to step up and claim their authentic power. It's time for women to get out of their own way to step into what they truly want and who they want to be when you commit to big things, big things happen. My question from that is about this word authenticity because I'm very, very interested in the definition of authenticity because there's various definitions in the literature. Anyway, without getting too much in the weeds about this, I just would love to hear what that means to you. Is it like a self actualized version of authenticity? Is that where you're kind of referring to? I've always writing about this stuff and my brain isn't very hooked in today to all of that. But there is something about it is for me authenticity feels like there is a congruence between my insides and my outsides. And there's something about being free of cultural restraints.

Karen horney Freud Pacific graduate institute Pacific Casper
"graduate institute" Discussed on The High Functioning Hotspot

The High Functioning Hotspot

07:32 min | 11 months ago

"graduate institute" Discussed on The High Functioning Hotspot

"And things like got and we're so vulnerable when when we need help says speaking again of actually asking for help especially when we're younger and don't know as much but for even many of my listeners may be in their thirty s or forty s or fifty s but they're having their first experience of saying. I think i might want to talk to a coach. I think i might want talk to a therapist or a yoga teacher. Healer or some other kind of person that's going to help with that department and one of the things they've also noticed with high functioning is that they do tend to respect authority so if they meet someone that has even just like a bunch of letters after their name which like a bunch of you know. Therapists are keen for doing and i happen. Sometimes find that. There's an inverse relationship between how many letters you have after your name and how much knowledge and training you actually have And so sometimes you know the practitioners they just want to pile a bunch of letters and behind their last name and then these high functioning people who just say well you know. This person has all these programs. I don't know much about the field. And so i'm just gonna you know. Follow what they're telling me. I actually feel like that's his time. When functioning people can actually become very vulnerable as one of their. You know as you know as you said. There's two sides to every coin but one of the sides to a high functioning person is usually that they will digest and follow directions. And so you know if the practitioner is sending them off course as has happened to them before an actually talk about this a little bit it might book published by macmillan. Nervous energy harness the power of your anxiety sheriff's story about a time when i was in my super super early twenties and like decades ago And you know saw this therapist. That was just off base. Let's just meg. And i thank god that i somehow just had the wherewithal to recognize that and not continue going to her and so i'm just curious if you can share even maybe from your personal experience if you've ever had a time where there was a you know we know it happens. Unfortunately all the time in the yoga world. And i love yoga guy with yoga teacher before i was ecologist. But we all know that there's a million awful stories about you know yoga gurus that end up having like sexual issues with their students and everything. So can you sh- like share. How do we kind of navigate that line between being open and vulnerable in that psyche spirit. I'm opening up. I'm receiving the help and taking a leak leap of faith and even it doesn't feel natural. I'm going to do it anyway. Because my goal is to break patterns. How do people kind of marry that with. But i'm gonna walk away of it's wrong your story from your own life or just from your thoughts about it i would. I would be super excited to hear what first comes up for me when you're saying that is so the school that i went to is pacifica graduate institute in santa barbara and like i said it's only it's actually only one of two young and programs. I believe in the whole country and depth psychology programs and one of the things about that school. That was different and that set out to me is that it was still mandatory for you to do your own therapy. And in the state of california that has actually starting in twenty twenty one. That's going away as one of the requirements to get licensed and that actually in my body. I can feel the like of being a very upset about that. My suggestion that. I tell all clients whether i'm working with them or giving them referrals or whatever is one of the first questions. I truly believe that you should and have every right to ask a clinician that you're about to embark onto your a very vulnerable Very raw experience is ask them about their own work. Because what i always say to people is. Would you go to a dentist. That had bad teeth. Probably not i know far far far too many clinicians who have never done their own therapy. That upsets me. That actually kind of rages mates quite honest and use a really big emotional worth their. I really do not believe. I believe you're actually doing a disservice to your clients if you have never actually had to have a mirror put up to yourself and your own inner work. So i'm very passionate about that. That first and foremost is what. I tell everybody and don't be afraid. Don't be embarrassed to ask those questions. you know. You're interviewing this person to potentially be your therapists. You have to be able to ask hard questions of this person to right. So i started my answer on that but the other part would be. I always say that finding a therapist or finding a practitioner is like dating. We all have this kind of like gut feeling that comes up when we enter into a potential relationship with somebody new. If it's romantic or even friend and part of it is listening to your gut. Part of it is listening to your intuition now for a lot of us. Unfortunately that that dial has been turned way down We have much more of like. I listen to everybody else around me right To your point high functioning people do tend to follow direction really well. They tend to take in and then execute upon what they're told. And in this instance. I would say your job going into. Potentially finding a new clinician is actually to try to go in word. And listen to what your body is telling you right. So is your gut clenching when you're sitting across miss person and if it is listened to that what does that tell you might just be nerves. And that's okay but if it's trying to tell you that something doesn't feel quite right and you need to listen to that right. This isn't about thinking this is in our left brain. I need to think my way through. Is this the right person or not for me. This is actually an intuitive sense of this is a very specific feeling sense and if you can really follow your gut on that you're probably going to be more likely to find a connection with somebody who's really gonna help you heal rather again thinking your way into something that might not be the best fit for you. Yeah that's super interesting. I recently gave us hawk I'm a consultant bigger. Mackenzie which is the third largest law firm in the world. And i gave a talk to them and i was discussing Uncertainty decision types of uncertainty and one of the things i found in my own research just preparing for the presentation and you may find. This interesting is that there are neuro peptides that crossed the blood brain barrier. And they're the same ones that are active on in times of uncertainty that they they become active in the brain and they become active in the body. So you know to your points when we have that gut kinda stomach punching feeling. That's actually i you know it's actually on almost like a part of our brain And so what. I tell people to do when they feel. That feeling is to actually dialogue without feeling and to ask it. You know what is it that you want you know. What is it that you need. You know To not try to shout it down but to ask you know in dialogue with it. And i know a lot of people. Have you know it might sound like new age. Gustaf to them when i say this and that's why to me it's really important that as a clinical psychologist and what people again to now that these are freaking neuro pop tides right. I give them the science right. Yeah like this. This isn't just like my new age.

pacifica graduate institute macmillan santa barbara california Mackenzie Gustaf
Barbara Fortini on Genomic Data Analytics

DNA Today

04:46 min | 1 year ago

Barbara Fortini on Genomic Data Analytics

"Hello you're listening to dna today or watching your on youtube. We are genetics. Podcast and radio. Show i'm your host cured mean. I am also a certified genetic counselor practicing in the prenatal space so on this show explorer genetics impact on our health through conversations leaders in genetics. Today we have someone from kgi. She's the program director for the masters of science in their human genetics and genomic data analytics program. Her name is dr barbara for teeny so again. She's from the keck graduate institute. She also teaches their masters of science for genetic counseling students. So thank you so much for coming on the show today. Thank you so much for having me. So we're gonna be diving into talking about career options outside of genetic counseling. Which is maybe a shock for some people because we talk about genetic counseling so much on the show. We need to widen the scope a little bit. So we're going to be focusing on genomic data analytics. So can you give us a sense of what this field is for people that have never heard of this before sure and i hope no one's ever heard of it before because we just kind of had to make up a name a few years ago when we went to start this program. A genetic. Counseling is very visible patient facing side of the genetics medical system. But between when genetic counselor gets a test result and goes to tell a patient whether it and what it means for their family there are a lot of people that help generate that results from the companies who are designing the genetic tests in deciding. What gene's gone panels to the actual scientists who are interpreting results to write a report that puts it all into perspective and even further back to the researchers who are discovering the gene disease connections. That then we can use to help support our patients and so from all of those levels from the basic science of what's going on to the practical matter of getting results that can be delivered to a patient. there are scientists working at every step of that process. So there's so much in genetics. I think as we were talking a little bit before we started recording here that people are probably familiar with janet counselors if they listen to this show before tuning and now they've probably heard of people working on the bench so wet lab and actually being a researcher and hearing about doctors and nurses. But there's this whole other side of genetics that you're talking about a figuring out all of the testing and figuring out what is as you set included on panels. We find genetic change. What does that change mean in coming up with all this information and so one of the buzzwords around this and even outside of healthcare is big data. So can you break down. What big data is and you know for focusing on the genetic side. I think big data means a lot of different things to a lot of people. I think there are two main aspects of big data in genetics. The first is the big data on a person scale. So for any person we can look at their whole genome sequence. So that's the massive amount of instructions that are in every cell and then you can even add on top of that like testing results. Mri results fina types. And so trying to integrate that into a picture of what's going on inside. A person involves a lot of data manipulation on the other side. we have the population scale. We have whole genome sequencing for the population which were trying to do with the all of us program but we also have gino typing data which is just looking at a selection of places in the genome so we can do that a lot easier. So we've done it on a lot more people and then using that to understand the population not makes one person sick but what makes some people sick versus others and so both of those scales use genetic data in different ways and i think the one thing that really brings together. The buzzword of big data is just the fact that you cannot analyze it by hand. There's not one person sitting there looking at gel and saying like okay. This is what's going on. You have to us by our maddix tools. You have to maybe use a i help. See things that human pattern recognition can't see. And so it's using the tools to understand the data in a way that kind of transcends what we used to be able to do by just looking at you know maybe sequencing one gene or even doing just like restriction fragment polymorphisms. You know that you could interpret on a scale of researchers looking at one piece of data these days. We have just huge data files. Some of the we can't even open on a standard computer. But we try to use. All that information to distill that down to something actionable for a patient

KGI Dr Barbara Keck Graduate Institute Youtube Gene Janet
"graduate institute" Discussed on The Hows of Us

The Hows of Us

07:49 min | 1 year ago

"graduate institute" Discussed on The Hows of Us

"Or on our second season and. By. Adding hired use. PERSPIRE, okay. Novel. Stop House Thurs.. Ha. Dow. Ieng opening remarks opening. I'm doing good Nemann Ball. And I bought, but then googling grease. You've ever. I. Not by last. Week C. Reggie not guard of eternity no. Okay. So almost In Young Egging Bosch in Kabul. But I think podcast Emma style. In behind more these past few weeks or On preppy. This season. That goes off. That's revenue and and work. Work Yeah Stop Mine were. worked. At the. Brace denied last Monday October. Ink Guys. Given your. Around. Senior address. hosters, we've hundred, thousand higher, my escape you. Yes, we've been. Getting the higher in the blame on more by on. The old guard go be icon Erica Lena. going. On horror. The Burmese, the hunting of blind man or that was may one day in the union, the hunting the? House. In new. Orleans. And Three thousand. Air. On The net. I love one owner but hundred needed a Neva. been. Horror Stories now. By All right uh-huh. Owner Sharon by. Vehicles with some. Very. Busy new. Hunting series gun. Gun Norm. My friends on Numb. H S so. As. A. Thirst none on in of. Episode. Say Reminded that the a Button to respond. You'll story is but has nine a Myron relative was done some minor somebody high. Bangle you'll battle. Being Managil Masha unlike dunes. South. Horror Stories. Horror Stories about every so I found. H S. Or that they know high school but. We're. Going on. The Senior Bowl Doesn't CANASTA. Molina's ongoing work. On. The board by one word by law me. America Norris Story. So but I'm pete. Ask In, Hun? Hunting in Austin dreams India shopping for example, you young first season show. Thelma. M I C unveil on house the? Haunted House Island. Might Call. Free show up boss owed. Oma. mission. Annette Lu Mu. Asylum East you. Know Summa Cement Facility. Yeah some. Your No. I think. The balon so. Body. Bag On keys not been. The House of US champion May. Be By because I'm. Map Macabre man acting funny boggles he zones so. Drum. Roll the. I. Guess. Episode your. Episodes a season to. at at. Being guest special guest I would know. Matteo. So the house of us the podcast guessing. Say. At the Special Guest John I met Juma Helena. Jaw. Oh. In. Young talent Italian tiny small idea by yet. So ramming. Selah. Gossiping. ID though. Yuma listeners not bad at math viewers snapped in I got. Base of him I know they still feel. Without further, ADO Nessa event. I graduate. Institute shot on. The. Be Hit Mala Abed. Gone. West I sound multi media artist. I`Ma by more if they need these. Really Toni Gonzaga Gannon. Aquino. I can. Go inside. I star of other teas. Eleven at. Chapel, you're acting special guests I ask. About Bayside visual design industry so much. As our conversation goes by so yeah, I think our now. I think special guests see Mr I'm Ali I don't master. Mr.

Juma Helena Dow Nemann Ball Annette Lu Mu Ieng House Island Molina Toni Gonzaga Gannon Myron Summa Cement Facility C. Reggie Erica Lena. Brace Bosch Aquino Kabul Mala Abed Sharon Thelma
"graduate institute" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:40 min | 1 year ago

"graduate institute" Discussed on KCRW

"Thank you. And Dr Steven Eisenstat is the founder of Pacifica Graduate Institute in Carpinteria, California He's also an author and creator of Dream tending workshops. Next for being here as well. Thank you, Jonathan. Good to be here. Well, Doctor Eisenstat. Let's start with you here. You had a chance to listen to my conversation with Deirdre Barrett and heard all these descriptions of insects and bugs and All these wild dreams that are taking place during this pandemic. What was going through your mind when you heard about what? Some of the things that people are conjuring up as they dream, But, you know, Jonathan E. I have been just a loose with so many people sharing their dreams because we're in this period of insecurity and threat. And the images and the dreams are just coming one after the next for folks often disturbing, and I think some of the themes that she was identifying are exactly right on you know the bugs anything that has to do with intrusion or threat? That in particular seems to be up at the moment. Yeah, and I mean, we know we're dealing with a tremendous amount of anxiety is is that what you think is kind of percolating below the surface? I mean, how are you reading into this on a deeper level on a deeper level? I think a couple things were going on. One people are obviously anxious. I mean, things were going on. We're bombarded. Hourly. Now, with the threat that's in the world, it's invisible, so we can't see it. So we know that there is something that is hard. We also know in our living situation. It's way different. You know, we're isolated, needing the maintain social contact many of us Not able to reach out and be with friends or being social situations, and if we are, it's not comfortable. So I think underneath. Actually, what's going on at bottom is not only fear. But you know, we're we instinctively pick up the idea that death is around and death is very prevalent in the every day. We're told how many people have died. How many people are in the hospital? No, The severity of the situation certainly affects us personally. And when our eyes are closed, and something else comes awake, we are indeed registering the concern or the fear in the dream time. Mark Blah Grove in the UK also want you to respond to some of the things you hear from Dr Barrett against some of these amazing images and these themes that were seen, I know that you've been recording a lot of dreams as well. How did you respond to some of the things you heard there? One thing that was interesting in some did. What did you spoke about? Was that it's the natural threats which recurring from the outside, and that's something that we heard as well. We've bean asking health service workers and key workers to tell their dreams to us so that we have a long discussion over about two hours with them. And one of them recently was dreaming off seeing outside that the leaves on the trees had changed and become unnatural. And she was trying to warn people inside a house for rent of party about this on they were ignoring her. But the important thing was that it was something had gone wrong with the outside natural worlds. And that was what she was trying to warn people about. I did think, actually, what one thing That really hit me. What theater said was about the fact that a lot of this was unexpected. You know, a lot of disasters or things that are bad. You may have restricted sleep, but this is must be one of the few disasters ever to happen. People have more sleep than normal. And so she myself included. This was a surprise that people were having more vivid dreams on that They were having these metaphors about what was going on to such an extent. That was one thing that really surprised me too. And and Dr Eisenstat, I welcome you your voice on this as well. We're actually having more time to sleep. Maybe than ever before that something you've noticed, and folks that you've been speaking to a cz Well, Well, I have. And at the same time what I'm noticing his people are sharing with me, you know? I'm I have more time to go to sleep. But when I am going to sleep, I'm agitated. And when I'm agitated, I know unfortunately that more often than not something nightmarish will occur during the night. And then that creates the grip that we all experience and and that creates the depletion of energy and wake up. And so you know, a lot of what people are asking is how can I get to sleep? In a more peaceful way. And I thought What did was saying was very helpful. Because what I'm advising folks as well that you know right at the time of going to sleep right before eyes closed, just evoke. A something that is a supportive figure of some sort, either from another dream or somebody in your past or a mentor. Somebody that or even the landscape, for that matter is something that I feel or the person feels supported by and that helps toe I think, nurture, sleep and begin. Tio. I don't know mitigate the kind of anxiety that sets in so quickly. Mark Blah Grove is that is that something that you ask people to do is well to kind of really hone in on that moment before sleep. Yes, I have been asked during some of these sessions. You know, what can I do to make sure this nightmare doesn't recur on one of the reasons we're getting people to talk about. The nightmares is in Socialising. What's happened to them and socializing these images that have happened to them. They may start to have a greater control over them, in the sense that the world will become less uncontrollable. And so hopefully the dreams might become less. Terrible Although actually, you know, they may very well be terrible because they are there to tell us how we're genuinely feeling about the outside world. But one thing that we have found that interesting is people who are having quite positive dreams because although a lot of people are furloughed, there's other people. I'm afraid who who are dying on no people who are dying and a lot of health service. Staff who in very difficult circumstances, But there will also be people who they are affected, but they're relatively unaffected by the whole thing on def anything, it's a bit more holiday like the nurse who told us about dreaming of the outside world becoming unnatural, told us during the discussion about how the world is now divided between those who are being hit. Cove it on the work to do with it on DH, those who are at home drinking wine, and so she dreads off people in the party drinking wine and needing to tell them what the danger was on there, ignoring her. So we will also have people who are possibly having really quite positive dreams on DH for them. Maybe it helps to hear the more negative dreams from other people so that we can all gain some understanding of what's happening to each other. Mark. I'd love it. If you tell me a little bit about the special collaboration you have with Dr Julia.

Mark Blah Grove Dr Steven Eisenstat Deirdre Barrett Jonathan E. Pacifica Graduate Institute Carpinteria California founder Dr Julia UK Blah Grove
"graduate institute" Discussed on In Search of the New Compassionate Male

In Search of the New Compassionate Male

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"graduate institute" Discussed on In Search of the New Compassionate Male

"Also am on the faculty at on the Adjunct, faculty at Pacifica Graduate Institute, which is a school of mythology and depth psychology. So. It was a natural way for me to cultivate an audience that resonated with the people who are part of that community. It can stretch I mean in in. In America, we have a myth of frontiers. Myth of Opportunism, we have a myth of individuality. The end about individuality is this huge shadow that we have over our country right now You know whether you whether wear a mask or not I mean these kinds of things and I. Think. If you don't. Or are not aware of what you think of as being your myth dentist worth looking at because if you begin to reflect upon what your life is about and what your life circumstances happen to be. The mythic quality that you bring to it allows you to to feed what it is. If you think about. The things that are inside you that inhabit you. Think about a good wolf, a white wolf and a bad wolf, a black wolf. They're doing battle inside you and you may have heard this story. You know I, love it I. Love it because basically the things that are inside you which ones went out well, the ones that went out of the ones you feed. You take you take this this attitude. And if you've ever seen somebody who. Like everything rains on them and they get every red light and there's a problem every around every corner. This is manufactured myth. They believe that they they they. They're sure that there won't be a table at the restaurant and sure enough they show up at the restaurant and there's no table. You know. There's so much. Dana. I I. Agree. Well I was GONNA say. Of all I. Pick a parking space at whole foods on the upper deck. And I'm within one or two slots. Most of the time you know it's just what you do. I'm. I'm going to struggle with this just a little bit. This old book fell off my. Day He. says. Brown. You know. Nineteen, seventy four and not read it in years..

white wolf Pacifica Graduate Institute America Dana Brown
"graduate institute" Discussed on In Search of the New Compassionate Male

In Search of the New Compassionate Male

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"graduate institute" Discussed on In Search of the New Compassionate Male

"You know they have constructed a world that to me. There is A. Spiritual Quality about the nature of myth because it, it wants an expression outside of itself and whether you talk about it as divine archetypal or whatever it happens to be. It's the engine. The kind of works us in gets us through the day. The. I also am on the faculty at Amman Adjunct Faculty at Pacifica Graduate Institute which is a school of mythology and depth psychology. So. It was a natural way for me to cultivate an audience rejuvenated with the people who are part of that community. It can stretch I. mean in in. In America, we have a myth of frontiers. Have we have a myth of opportunism. We have a myth of individuality, the myth of. Individuality is this huge shadow that we have over our country right now You know whether you whether you wear a mask or not I mean these kinds of things and I think I think if you. Are Not aware of what you think Oh beds being your myth. Then it's worth looking at because. If you begin to reflect upon what your life is about and what your life circumstances happened to be. The mythic quality that you bring to it allows you to feed what it is if you if you think about. The things that are inside you that inhabit you. Think about a good wolf, a white will and a bad wolf, a black wolf. Out there doing battle inside you and you may have heard this story. You Know I. Love It. I love it because basically the things that are inside you which ones out while the ones that went out of the ones you feed. You you take. You take this this attitude. And if you've ever seen somebody who you know like everything rains on them and get every red light and there's a problem every around every corner. Manufactured Myth they believe that they they they. They're sure that there be a table at the restaurant and sure enough they show up at the restaurant and there's no table. Well You know. There's so much inbound. Dana I. Try. Well I was GONNA say first of all Think a parking space that whole foods on the upper deck. And I'm within one or two slots, most of the time you know it's just what you do. I'm. I'm. GonNa Struggle with this just a little bit. This old book fell off my. Day. This is Brown. One, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, four, and not read it in years..

Amman Adjunct Faculty Pacifica Graduate Institute America Brown Dana I.
"graduate institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"graduate institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To quickly find out breaks of the disease and contain them but the problem cropped up it was clear that you could not force countries to report and they didn't want to report countries didn't always want to report an outbreak of the disease because it could make them vulnerable to trade sanctions or to outside groups who might use them to make medical discoveries that they ban wouldn't share so the W. to make some changes it's set up a global network of labs and disease specialists that could respond to outbreaks in a coordinated way and it stopped relying solely on self reported information from countries human was on the front lines of these efforts in the early two thousands when this revamped system was put to the test it is already picked up an outbreak or the disease which is causing high mortality in China in November of two thousand two we're trying to continue to reply that they did not have any major outbreaks that major outbreak became known as severe acute respiratory syndrome for sars hearing on severe acute respiratory syndrome sars we have to be prepared for this to continue to spread and we are we're doing everything we can to address the public health experts agree that the sars crisis worsened because of China's secrecy so global representatives granted the WHL even more governing power now the W. H. O. can declare health emergency of international concern even if a country denies it suffering an outbreak this declaration can trigger a global response an activation of resources and more feet on the ground our full responsibility that the bachelor house Surrey moon is co director of the global health center at the graduate institute of Geneva the world really relies on the judgment one is discussing you know any particular outbreak as to how serious is it how much does the world need to wake up and mobilize save more coordinated international response with this new ability the W. H. O. can issue guidelines and protocols and how to best respond to health emergencies the W. H. O. has also been granted stronger diplomatic power can officially call out countries that aren't following the rules Thomas Blakey is director of the global health program at the council on foreign relations and he's been a technical adviser to the W. H. O. the World Health Organization has the authority to name and shame nations that aren't complying with the requirements on reporting outbreaks or in not enforcing human rights in the way that they go about restricting pandemics and name and shame they did in the aftermath of the sars crisis the W. H. O. publicly called out China for hiding the outbreak that was a big deal David Heyman was overseen communicable diseases at the W. H. O. at the time and he recalls a shift China started sharing information and better preparing for a future outbreak so the norm has been changed its are expected and respected to report all of these developments might seem great but the WHO's still can't make countries comply with its rules and it doesn't always make the right call when a crisis hits it was heavily criticized for not acting soon enough when the bowl outbreak swept through West Africa in twenty fourteen contagious.

Market panic after coronavirus spending stimulus packages

Between The Lines

07:09 min | 2 years ago

Market panic after coronavirus spending stimulus packages

"As crown avars cases Roy's across the country and industry shuts down hundreds of thousands of people. Losing jobs and businesses across the country lay going broke so is government spending enough or too much and how long can the Australian economy survive before we keep into irreparable damage? Are WE AS POOR. Kili asks in the Australian newspaper This Week. We burning the village to save it. Daniel would is budget policy and institutional reform program director at the Graduate Institute. And she's the incoming chief executive officer of the Graduate Institute and Salmon. Cowan is the research director at the Center for Independence Studies at Sydney. Think tank that I had up Danielle Salmon. Welcome both of you. Thank you come now. Danielle the in response to the government's big spending stimulus packages those a seventeen billion dollar package about a fortnight ago. Then another six billion dollar one earlier this week in response the markets panicked a full stampede trends indicate that the markets will continue their stampede lock fraught and capital is all this government largess justified. Look I think it is absolutely justified when you look at the style of health challenge. And what the government's trying to do to keep that contained in terms of effectively shutting down pretty significant sectors of our economy You know the hospitality industry is gone. anything that relies on social consumption so a lot of businesses headdresses petitions. The canucks very significant swipe at the economy. And so we need this government package in order to support the businesses during what is going to be a very shop. It comes down to it. Jonathan Freedland in the Guardian this week Sam and he says just as there are no atheists on a sinking ship. There are no free marketeers independent so manure relating free-market t doesn't this unprecedented cross justify unprecedented measures such as much bigger government. Well you've wrought remind frame rocketeer evening across as so. I guess that's a positive spun for from Mor perspective. I think there's an important distinction that we need to make I here. Which is the audio of stimulus as opposed to the broader concept of what government support government action in a pandemic? Cannon should be so the idea that what the government can or should do his prop up. Economic growth is in the short term. Which is what stimulus is. I think that that's a very mistaken idea. It's a mistake and concert. Not The least of which because what? We're actually trying to do here is Danielle roughtly. Daddy shutdown pots economy for health rights. So the the issue here is not so much. A case of should the government being involved in short term stimulus. It's what sort of support package. Should we give to cushion some economic impacts of this crisis in? What should we do on a health perspective? Now of an expert on the hill saw things. That's where the government's getting its health advice from an economic perspective. I think it's important to realize that we cannot prop every business in in the country. You know Macaroni France. Basically said we won't let a single business go bankrupt. That would be a stike. We're looking at a potentially protracted shut down in the economy with significant economic impacts. And we need to be smart in strategic about how we deploy our resources. The government doesn't have an unlimited budget. Econ prop up. Everyone and it shouldn't try and provide support to everyone. What it needs to do is target. It's assistance to the areas most in need to the people most in need and ensuring that when we come out the other side of this whereas applies to as we can be to get coming out on the other side of this means massive deficits as far as the. I can see and that would imply a substantial future tax increase crosses. Maybe as soon as next she wouldn't that retired the recovery. Daniel look really depends on how quickly you try to pay down the debt. And you're absolutely right when we will be wrecking up a substantial amount of with these reforms. There's absolutely no question about that So essentially we are asking future generations to pay for this response but given the importance of supporting business through this and I do agree with him. We will not say every business here. But we absolutely need to avoid. Is You know what will be preheated to economics and the economy becoming a permanent one if we lose a lot of productive capacity and the economy that has got to be the priority. Right now yes it waiting for that we go substantial debt to pay off the government will hopefully find a path to do that in a way that will not hit the the economy is coming out of the what happens if the pandemic lasts into the winter and early. Spring Salmon Cowan that the CLEM will be for another round and then another round of high levels of government spending. Is that really sustainable? Well it's an interesting question Australia's coming into these spots. A lot of people were not an is good spot as wearing two thousand night. But we're not coming into these crosses with government dead at one hundred percent of Jj pay a lot of the countries in Europe. The challenge I think here is and what the government You know it's difficult for the government to do this because it's been so reactive in such a short period of tall it but it is. How can we draw on the resources of society? More broadly so that we don't put the entire burden for these onto future generations. You know if you sort of think of it in these terms Government has its role to apply. It will take its level of debt individuals who have resources businesses who have resources we should encourage them to access those resources as well One good example. These we have caught a good deal of money in superannuation that could be used to support people in the short term. It's not going to be a complete substitute for an expanded welfare system in this cross but it could take some of the pressure off the system at a point in time where we don't know how long this will last Danielle. The government did announce that would allow Australians to access a superannuation. What's your position on that yet? Look wait we think unbalanced the good idea and clearly difficult decision for individuals to make to to draw down on the sweeper particularly the time when we hear the knock. It's onto forming. Particularly well sited the value of their investment might not be what they were but in a world in which the government is offering generous safety net but for many people that will not be enough if I have lost their jobs to keep up with their bills So we think allowing people to tap into those saving given the extraordinarily nightshirt. These crosses is a good idea to help people get

Danielle Government Daniel Graduate Institute And Salmon Danielle Salmon Danielle Roughtly Chief Executive Officer Jonathan Freedland Cowan Kili ROY Canucks Graduate Institute Program Director Research Director Center For Independence Studie Australia Sydney Macaroni France
"graduate institute" Discussed on RSS News I O Podcast de Not�cias para Podcasters

RSS News I O Podcast de Not�cias para Podcasters

11:26 min | 2 years ago

"graduate institute" Discussed on RSS News I O Podcast de Not�cias para Podcasters

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"graduate institute" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

05:56 min | 3 years ago

"graduate institute" Discussed on WCPT 820

"It is the Stephanie Miller some shred man okay I want to live in studio to yes Chris at the future Robert good or bad it's a meme about a better it's a okay the girl with it's it's Linda Carter all with his bare midriff yeah right because with a half shirt yeah and then and it's a bear with a guitar and bare midriffs get it red nose ha ha find all have you tweet that as well as I mean all right we all need some money okay Eric in New York City hello hello thank you for helping us get through these last couple years Haiti have been very interested in a survey that I read from this it's called the small arms survey from Geneva Switzerland the graduate institute of international and development studies and is this the the survey of him guy in the cell bise citizens around the world as best as they can do with that in the figures that justice done it's just me with US makes up four point four percent of the world's population and yet we own half of eight and a half million gun yeah we own half of those yeah and we're we rank ten in the world in death three spike guns and and and we're you know we're not in a war or not and I mean you have the in their homeland we're not dealing with the revolution or anything no well we may be soon you say you want a revolution right you're not the only one this is I I I I know what how can we live in a democracy were ninety seven percent of us want background checks and we I mean this is just Nancy Wilson Chuck Schumer released a statement in February the new democratic house Majority promptly this duty passed the bipartisan background checks active twenty nineteen which is supported by more than ninety percent of the American people are however Mitch McConnell has called himself the grim reaper refuses to act on this bipartisan legislation it is incumbent on the Senate to come back into session and pass this legislation immediately I'm telling you I just I don't I don't buy his injury I just don't I'm sorry difficult I just wanted to make the point that what Manson Chuck need to do is I need to come together come up with a plan to for gun control whether it's background checks capacities on the limits of the clip sizes things like that yeah get all the presidential candidates to sign off on it and then run this is what we will do as a party if you let us help control the house the Senate and the presidency okay guys just gets exhausting doesn't is having the same conversation every time that I just because honestly the best arguments are always the simplest right were you they have mental illness everywhere they have ready okay everywhere in the world it is the guns we're the only country that has this carnage because of the guns here he is with the video game okay we must stop the glorification of violence in our society like you encouraging people to each other yeah it was that are now commonplace it is too easy today for troubled use to surround themselves with a culture that celebrates violence we must stop for substantially reduce this and it has to begin immediately cultural change is hard sniff but each of us can choose to build a culture that celebrates the inherent worth and dignity of every human life that's what we have to do we can but you don't we must refocus I don't like I have I it even sounds human right he's so disconnected from he's just reading it I mean it's just it's in words were yes somber yeah those words okay any talks about mental health which is we said this is the very first thing he did he undid the Obama role that is stop mentally ill people from getting guns we got how do you okay we must reform mental health laws to better identify mentally disturbed individuals who may commit acts of violence and make sure those people not only get treatment but when necessary involuntary confined a little less and hatred pulls the trigger not the gun Annery talking point yeah it was a little disturbing that way round them up yeah yeah and again it's like the vast majority of mentally ill people are non violently that was scary right okay a lot of women are mentally ill and it's mainly men I was just gonna say Gavin nuisance a wire most shooters mail nuisances gender must be part of the national gun control apps this question well as I keep saying the sergeant he is the only one thing a even it'll whether it's that you hate Jews are you hate Muslims are you hate gays like or you hate black people or you hate Hispanics all of the shootings the one thing they all have in value is they all have some sort of domestic violence against women in their in their background what's going to Tony in Long Beach hello Tony how are you how are you Tony arm in fact you know offer you some Sleepy Hollow but stepped up Tony all right there's no problem what is happening one of the boys Hey and I don't hear your point about you know you need to provide a more hang on hang on hang on here we have a hard break and we'll get back to you right after.

Stephanie Miller Chris Robert ninety seven percent ninety percent four percent
"graduate institute" Discussed on STEM-Talk

STEM-Talk

14:07 min | 3 years ago

"graduate institute" Discussed on STEM-Talk

"Partisan, you one conventional way to make it partisan free with also kill all of the youthful providence, and blood? So is. Addenda factor. So without all of this details, which would come out in the review publication, it's very difficult for me to say that there is anything beneficial in the fluids that people are paying award to put on them. I know they had they had filed on the FDA site that they were going to do a clinical trial. But if you're going to clinical trial you would do a pilot. Let's say in the California in the bay area, you get the data that from that, and you would publish it and then say, well, it safe and, or maybe effective before you opened up clinics all around the country. And I, I understand that they, they went and opened up clinics in New York, or in Florida, that to me, seems more like a business model, not a not a scientific try and also that a bunch of review so interrupted a bunch of review papers from people who blood transfusions for really lifesaving reasons, for example, some Badillo of blood, and they need transfusion, and those of us mention numerous horrible side effects of blood transfusion. So, of course, infection adverse is rather partisans. In blood is only one of them. But the worst one is activating your immune systems to pretty much of graft versus holes or. Host versus graft were transfused blood, effectively adults, your own body, and that can cause no just Dala gist, but enough locked show can lung collapse, and have your some rumors that than fog could happen from this rejuvenate of or. And then once over the years later can develop uncurable multiple sclerosis or other Damien diseases because you're inappropriately triggered your immune system. But this procedure, as I mentioned in laboratory have Mars that are genetically identical each other summer young. Some are for people that is not the case. Right. So you just get somebody else's bodily fluids, which are different from yours in composition of many proteins, and you basically, injecting them. I think basically might my summer is that the study should be mortgage related or this whole approach would be more related to know that they do not do no harm. So if age of stem cells environment that is the key. Do you think your research and findings are going to discourage the use of celebrates therapies to treat disorders that are related to aging, that is one thing that we used to say in our scientific presentations, that of you pay for is that we cannot assume that if you make brand new cell? Be the cells neural original sales muscle cells and put them in old individual, people will get butter because the cells, which are in now. You'll find themselves environment of chronic inflation fibrosis, and by chemical did ignition dysregulation today, in my opinion might quickly parish just like original cells, unless we provide them with the protective layer of bio Martino, which will allow them to survive in this horrible old, by the environment. So it does not that we should stop cell transplantation, vicious more clever about, however conducted. So can you share with us? How you and your colleagues and the bioengineering department at Southern Cal are developing youthful Micronesia's for cell and tissue transplantation. So our colleagues are not really it. Southern call our kid Graduate Institute, and this is a brand. For more postal who now starting on laboratory Lindsey near Dr Kiana civic club numerous, numerous ideas that cannot really share with the notes simply because it's a secret that does not really a secret that this point it just simply in very early stages of development, but we are not focusing per se on sold transplantation, would v are working on is developing the new blood transfusion devices and exchange fluids were you don't have to get anybody else's blood, bundler, fluids, one with Hup UN's, if you have your own blood and the goes through the clever, devise were very move all of the age elevated, but mortals normalizing their levels, those of the young circulation and the. Add with ever as missing and then you'd get back your own blood. But now it is molecular rejuvinated. And so if you believe that, that will be much safer and because the procedures self is already, they are proved for other diseases, we could test are devices in wise and then scale them up, and perhaps allow for their use in people so that this kind of one of the ideas that is a little bit more developed. Interesting in twenty fourteen year group published a paper in nature communications showing that in mice oxytocin is necessary for muscle maintenance and regeneration in the, the lack of oxytocin leads to premature Sarko PINA old buys. They're given subcutaneous injections of oxytocin, improved muscle regeneration to an amazing degree in the images. Looked almost like young muscle further as noted by one of your co-authors, Wendy cousins, misses a quote, extra oxytocin boosts aged tissue stem cells. Without making muscle stem cells divide uncontrollably. Irene can you talk about this fascinating study in? It's possible implications in humans Sagan are not saying that there is nothing good in the young mouse, or young human that we lose age, the definitely are numerous moguls end. So oxytocin this, this juvenile hormone is one of so those known as love and trust hormone. And also what makes us think that little Keita's and dog is are so cute, they're so cute and our security this, because when we look down the start producing OSA doors and that makes us love them. So that's how those was described before this mobility has been known for his ninety years. But it was mostly known this birth to giving birth and on limitation, and born between modern the child sedan, what we discovered this the adore him that does not just have on the brain and perceive each other, but it also. Critically important for us being healthy for having healthy Mossel unhealthy born and even healthy metabolism and dangerous declines, so if you add a buck you than increase muscle, maintenance Burs, so it becomes younger Sadat's was the discovered, which would reach v may the net paper and also understanding of human aging, is that it has been known for while that if old people live in a loving family, or the half rance. They are the butter house, as compared to lonely people and increase every time that somebody tells you that all you're such a good person, or gives you hug, and perhaps, a lot of this, would you notice about society, and how people are healthier when they live together in old age, some that may be released the oxygen levels. So in the media piece associated with article Wendy cousins noted that oxytocin could become a viable alternative to hormone replacement therapy as a way to combat the symptoms of both female and male aging. And also for long term, health, could you elaborate a little bit on that possibility? Well, in all those in this downstream of estrogen, and estrogen could be used as the hormone replacement therapy. But the hubs are some side effects, and so being downstream of estrogen dourson, this more specific the maintenance of muslin will on and perhaps can offset than or still Perot says and muscle wasting and, and by the way is also have the proof dread. So I would suggest that the wetter March safe for alternative to go through maybe pilot clinical trials, and then Luke into off label use of those in compared to somebody else's undefined bodily fluid that number is doing. That work on oxytocin was published at went Wendy. Cousin is a first author on that paper. Her husband, Christian allowed is also co first author on that paper and Wendy and Christian. They've been working together since post doc kind of like us. Now, the first combo, baby. Right. And now they're they're back in the bay area's. I understand they're working for a start-up anti-aging startup called spring. So you're talking about awfully will use for international oxidants now widely used off label for a wide range of illness. No, there have been some human trials oxytocin associated with mental disorders such as autism schizophrenia, dementia, it would seem appropriate to have human trials aimed at the potential for citizen to prevent slow or ameliorate some of the undesirable consequences of aging, as we've been talking about do you have any studies that are underway looking oxidised and explicitly in the context of aging in humans now Daunte. And in these in the guard, I would like to plug in Allah recently issue spot. And so it's Lizzie should a couple of weeks ago. And it is besieged to on the combination of those with inhibitor of taji of by the one gold out, quite inhibitor again, as you mentioned couple of times, I don't think that one single mobile will be effective enough. If you tried to use long term to really of said, Varas in the types of. Aging, however, v now believe that if you combine both of our discovered trucks, such as authorities and jeer by dot nation. You might be successful, so VR fully committed to this thing. The clinical trials of there are any dedicated funding. I think that will be really good, too, because both of them oxidizing an outcry heaters are day approved for zone is's civil that are safe and a particular range of concentrations. And there are other numerous parameters that have been ordered detested into found to deceive. So up -solutely ran for looking into performing this clinical studies in your muscle paper dealing with oxytocin. It was injected in sub Q Cheney's fat, and the off label uses that one sees now pretty widespread are using internees. Alexi tocine, typically in your view would one expect to see. See any muscle effects from international oxytocin, or with the level, not be high enough at the muscle itself. I'm not such an expert on the on the administration of oxytocin probably MD person would know more about that. But it's my general understanding that doesn't really matter how you get the ox, does your body as far as how much of it ends up in the blood. I understand that if you administer oxytocin intern as early there's might be a better chance of getting some to the to the brain. And that's, that's why people administer that way. Whereas something, let's say Worley eating oxytocin may give the least amount, and that ends up in your brain. But yeah, I would imagine even intern as Loxton, and if it gets in the blood then gets the muscle, and then if you if your muscles trying to regenerate itself that will give a boost to the stem cells, yet, seems interesting, if people have looked at the blood levels that you get with internees Alexi dozen. But I don't know what, what blood level would be necessary to see the effect. Described will that's part of part of the studies that were doing now, in part of this patent that are gonna mentioned was by combining a positive signal or multiple positive signals. With inhibiting negative signal or several signals negative meaning something that's that's pro aging, those negative regeneration by hitting that. And adding something positive you can use a lot lower dose, and look shorter. And and, and short ministration of any of these compounds because the drugs are acting in a synergistic way. Bright on the on look stem cells. And I just want to add that this very important because you test, for example, Thorson and mice in the short timeframe just less than two weeks. And if you think about human locations, who wanted to be routine, and you wanted to better Pagetta, and you cannot really I think, work on one angle or use only one molecule to offset all of the as effects of aging and look to skew this important by game signals now. Instead of positive fact, you have disease because we can all just keep adding the same dog over number again, you'll hyperactive signaling, and that will induce more problems than benefits, however should know you'll civil angles than or several different molecules are activating, another heating, then each one is really mild suggestion to bike industry, instead of overpowering by chemistry and this way believe that you can offset aging, long-term, interestingly you found that administration of oxidation promoted stem cell activation and proliferation and muscle regeneration in aged mice by activating, the map k- your k- signaling pathway, and this is the same signaling pathway that one sees activated by the fasting, metabolite Acedo acetate in skeletal muscle. And folks have reported that it was sufficient to induce my Genesis Michael, perhaps there is more than. One way as arena was just saying sort of a multifaceted approach to skinny new aging cat. Any thoughts on that? Also, I think there's a multiple ways of approaching ageing and there's probably a lot of letter reason to think that combinatorial approaches the best specifically on seato acetate. Right. So CO acid had looked up one of the two main key tones that you get from burning fatty acids writes a long chain fatty acid, and then you break it down mabley into two carbon.

oxytocin Wendy cousins California Micronesia New York FDA Florida Martino kid Graduate Institute Thorson Sagan Keita Irene Sadat Alexi tocine intern
"graduate institute" Discussed on The Big 98

The Big 98

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"graduate institute" Discussed on The Big 98

"Or aero exterminators dot com. Let's come university or online programs are shaped by commitment to creating a better future in with multiple undergraduate Graduate Institute programs to choose from you can define with that future. Looks like and earn the same academically rigorous degree you get on our campus all the flexibility to fit your life. We know you're ready to leave with us pursue your goals and a better world at Lipscomb online. Visit Lipscomb dot EDU slash online to learn more. Experienced the all new panel games beautiful large porcelain, panels that looked like natural stone wood and courts with virtually no grout lines. Imagine a surface for your kitchen countertops. That's less porous and more sanitary than granite or marble. Now imagine this surface used on your stairs, fireplace floors, even outdoor kitchens and tabletops panel skates. You simply have to see it to believe it this new paint. Scape product is commercially rated and can be seen in our showroom, or online at panel. Gapes dot net large porcelain panels, for showers, countertops walls interior, or exterior, its uses are limitless. Unlike courts, granite or marble, it's virtually indestructible visit our new showroom just off by forty near the airport, or online at panels, gapes dot net. It simply outperforms every other surface and nothing can match. It's look of luxury punday has modernized the car shopping experience. Finally, hey, it's Bobby bones. Look, isn't it about time someone to car shopping to the first century like the Hyundai.

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"graduate institute" Discussed on Leadership Looks Like Podcast

Leadership Looks Like Podcast

03:13 min | 3 years ago

"graduate institute" Discussed on Leadership Looks Like Podcast

"But if you're in the mindfulness circles of course you know like i hear about it and see it and it's great. I love it. it's any time we can promote. Mindfulness were promoting self-awareness. And where we're being aware of our own wake so we can teach that to little kids. That's awesome yeah. Rhonda something good. Yeah yeah where did you go to school. I went to pacifica graduate institutes in santa barbara. Okay yeah it's a it's a small school and it's all psychology and humanities. So it's all a bunch of yeah philosophy people kind of psychology. Yeah what did you get your undergrad in marketing. Advertising and marketing. Yeah it's all related right mass communication. It really is. It's it's a. I think so at least So what brought to you to las vegas. So i lived in las vegas all all along and then i moved away to go to school for eight years so i well i mean. I wasn't born here. But i lived here. I went to. Unlv from undergrad and my parents live here my grand. My grandparents my grandmother. She's my grandfather's alive any anymore but anyway my grandmother and all my aunts live here so families here and i just left for whatever eight years nine years. Nine years back in santa barbara. Why did you leave santa pine. But it's kind of nice here. We have a pool in the backyard and we have a garage. Everything so small in santa barbara. So it's nice so you study. Mindfulness and compassion. This is what you're teaching. Tell me about you. how do you personally practice sure. That's a good question I do A meditators so. I try to meditate in the morning. But i'll meditate whenever whenever it works for me But i do try to get do my twenty minutes in the morning. Twenty or thirty minutes is using my thing. I have a couple..

pacifica graduate institutes santa barbara Rhonda las vegas santa pine
"graduate institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:25 min | 3 years ago

"graduate institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"He's professor at the Graduate Institute in Geneva. He's the author of a new book the globe upheaval moderating. The program is Markus. Kuhn lock us to hear this broadcast or any other world affairs program that you might have missed you can download our podcast on itunes channel or wherever you get your podcast search for world affairs. That's one word. And now back to our program we've seen what are referred to as the weakening of the nation state. Right. So if you have these international labor forces that do not allow for these institutions, whether they be labor institutions union institutions, or even manufacturing institutions that continued exist or to transform in some way that has disrupted the politics of this country, for example, most recently in the two thousand sixteen election and also done what I've suggested which is perhaps. Weaken aspects of the nation state itself. What you're saying is coming down the road seems to have a more profound reality because many of those workers are already operating on an international basis, or at least interacting on a national basis consciously. What then does that also mean perhaps for the politics of a country? So the second title second word in my title is up evil. Yes. So you're sort of alluding to the politics. I we do not know what's going to happen. This is the future and the future Noval. So, you know, I'm I'm just making it up. I say will. But you know, who knows this poker? There's certain possibilities in certain probabilities. And if you read some of the experts, it's going to be tens of millions of jobs spread over ten twenty years. No problem. Some of the experts say hundreds of millions of jobs over five years, then that's gonna be a problem. So we don't know which way. But my my feeling is that there will be a bit of an upheaval in domestic politics and in terms of the control of the. Denationalisation of thing. I think that will continue. But I'm wondering if you know in the book, I speculate what the backlash might look like, and we don't know if it's gonna happen. But not, but I think a good bet now is that big tech companies which are so easy to hate to start with. And I think that people may view this technology doing to them both Rotella migrants and through the automation. And that the real big problem is technology. So that might one it's not a popular thing to say in San Francisco, but I think that people are a little mad about different things. And that might be one backlash, and that's not really a national thing. But it could it could lead to a nationalist background is sort of circle the wagons kind of thing, and that might make the nation states stronger, but the general drift of of denationalising politics. I think that is that is a possibility on the other hand, you know, like you talked about Russia de connecting from the internet. And the European Union making it hard to move data and China doing its own thing. So it may also potentially lead to a more national thing on everything that's on the internet became more national. So all right. So you're on the one hand everything flows. A lot more easily and things open up or everybody reacts to this at a national level and says, you know, we really have to protect the few things that we can we think we can protect and build stronger borders. Hire firewalls or entirely disconnect from. You said firewall rather than wall? Yes. Because the low will not stop these Telhami grants. Yeah. Well, you know, you're you live in Europe. And one of the things that we observe here in Europe is that as a result of the first globalization transformation. There is a high level of youth unemployment, and maybe it's not just because of the globalisation maybe structural issues within Europe. And what you probably have witnessed is that. There are great not Telhami gradations, but actually physical migrations from some of the southern European countries into the northern European countries. Is that something that we will also see as a result of this service transformation will will the service unemployed start migrating both physically as well as via they're telling migration. Well, so I think it's hard to know what's going to happen in the very very short term. But basically, this is creating jobs for people stay at home, not people who are moving. So in some sense. This is an enormous export opportunity for. Or emerging markets. And I think the emerging market miracle will continue and spread. But it looked more. Like India success were they did it on services. Not China's success when they did it on goods. And so in principle, it's a good thing. There are a couple of countries Singapore and Japan, for instance, where I've been to very recently and the governments are intentionally using automation to avoid low low skilled immigration, they for instance, in Singapore, they've subsidize using tablets to order drinks. So they need fewer waitresses who tell where the room service was delivered by a robot. You know, like one of these ones they use hospital, and it was a I was in a restaurant where they had a robotic busboy picking up dishes and stuff like that. And that's explicitly to avoid migration. So I think there's some of that same in Japan. They they want to avoid getting migrants in. And so they're automating staff and using Taylor robots and. Tele- migration teaching English remotely rather than having English teacher's come in. So I do think there's a substitution ultimately. And if it does look look at India India with their export of services, they did it. And this wasn't Tele migration with India. We sent the work to them. And then he did it and they sent it back, but that growth that rapid growth of incomes created a rising middle class which created lots of jobs in India for Indians. So I think that ultimately, you know. As you create jobs for people in emerging markets. They would much rather stay home. So personally, I think they're substitutes. Right. So we tend to take questions here. I got a number of three by five cards from the audience and one is from a gentleman named David Kendall and sincere in economists you regularly study rates of growth in these other data driven issues. He asks do you see the rate of change, Intel migration, etc? As an exponential. And he explains exponential. One as a as posited by Ray kurzweil. So how do you when you sort of take it apart from an econometric perspective? How do you look at that rate of change? So you're talking about the singularity Ray. Okay. So he goes too far in economics. We know we have diminishing returns. Eventually you get the low hanging fruit. That's what's going on now. And eventually it starts to get difficult. And you slow is slows down just look with outsourcing and offshoring, but let's let's leave Ray out of this. So technically any constant growth rate curve becomes. Exponential. That's more or less the definition. The trouble is is we tend to gauge progress in increments we as human instinctively. We think that the increment of progress in the future will be like the increment of project progress in the past. And that means we're straight lining the future. But the progress doesn't work in a straight line. It works like this with the exponential curve. So that the answer is the exponential growth is constant will stay constant for at least five or ten years. But it's the same growth that's been going on since Richard Nixon was president this doubling every two years. So that growth rate is constant. It's just the increments tend to get explosively large. And people naturally think in increments rather than growth rates. Right. So I don't know if that's an answer. But at least I talked for a little while. And it also address what you said earlier, which is you actually perceived that it might have an effect on the twenty twenty election, which is only a year away. There's a there's a candidate named angrily Yang who's running on this platform is like a big tech companies are doing to it. Driverless cars are going to cause a revolution. And his big thing is putting in a value added tax to pay for universal basic income. Now, this guy's unelectable and probably just trying to sell books something I can understand. But I think people on the left in the United States will pick up some of these themes to channel the anger and fragility that people experience into something that isn't anti-migration, and isn't anti-foreign anti tech is what it is. So I am I I'm quite surprised if some of the left leaning candidates in the Democratic Party, don't embrace some of this anti tech, anti automation themes. Yes. In fact, we've had a couple of questions. Very good us about that. And it really is a question because what you're saying is that within all of these transformational moments, and you are looking at this as an inflection point, right? But but there's a period where you have to then reach a new equilibrium of some sort is that right? But that that interim moment, which we are currently living in a rare. So let me let me say it. It's the model is what happened when we moved from farms to factories from countryside to city and the locus evalu- moved from land capital. That was a very brutal difficult thing which involve the rise of fascism, communism and new deal democracy. It was hundreds of millions of people died at the hands of other humans trying to make industrialization work for the for the masses. We did eventually. But the next one was from factories to services started in the seventies. And that costs a lot of problems. Then it got going in the nineties with globalization and outsourcing factories, and we have. I've not had a resolution of that. Right. People are angry they feeling vulnerable. They're feeling attack this communities, not just in the United States, all those perhaps worst here. And there has been no resolution right now on top of that. We're going to have to go from service jobs. Too sheltered service jobs in other words jobs that robots can't take and tell him. I can't do now that will be involved lots of people changing jobs, and they will be very upset about that. So that's why I think we really looking at an upheaval that we have this base of anger. Just look at the yellow vest, for instance, where did that come from the yellow vests in France in France? And that that came up all of a sudden. And now we put in this extra part to that. That's what I'm I'm really worried about what this is an inflection point. When we haven't resolved the move from factories to offices, right? And you know, another word for upheaval is revolution. Well, it doesn't always go that revolution repression or. Let me see it revolution repression or resolution, so revolution repression or resolution one way or another it leads to backlashes so say in eighteen forty eight when when there was a big backlash against industrialization. There was very few revolutions lots and lots of violence, and then he suppress it and moved on right? Well, that's encouraging. And I had an interesting question here. Someone was saying, well, you know, since we're talking about these service jobs, and they are dependent upon highly skilled highly educated individuals, and so someone in the audience equates the question of what happens to those who are taking out significant amounts of money to build their skills. Right. The and they call it the student loan bubble. Right. Are we heading towards a student loan bubble popping as a result of this inability to actually fill these service sector jobs that these universities in these highly leveraged individuals are now betting on with their ability. It's a strong possiblity, and I like to reason by analogy and the clearest analogy here's in law, and the legal profession is flattening out the pyramid that used to build up to partnership. Is pretty much disappearing..

India Europe Ray kurzweil China United States Japan Geneva Kuhn Markus European Union France professor Russia David Kendall Graduate Institute India India Intel Richard Nixon Democratic Party San Francisco
"graduate institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:25 min | 3 years ago

"graduate institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"He's professor at the Graduate Institute in Geneva. He's the author of a new book the global upheaval moderating the program, Marcus. Lock us to hear this broadcast or any other world affairs program that you might have missed you can download our podcast on itunes channel or wherever you get your podcasts. Search for world affairs. That's one word. And now back to our program we've seen what are referred to as the weakening of the nation state. Right. So if you have these international labor forces that do not allow for these institutions, whether they be labor institutions union institutions, or even manufacturing institutions that continue to exist or to transform in some way that has disrupted the politics of this country, for example, most recently in the two thousand sixteen election and also done I've suggested which is perhaps we can aspects of the nation state itself. What you're saying is coming down the road seems to even have a more profound reality because many of those workers are already operating on an international basis, or at least interacting on an international basis. Consciously what then does that also mean perhaps for the politics of a country? So the second title second word in my title is upheaval. Yes. So you're sort of alluding to the politics. I we do not know what's going to happen. This is the future and the futures are Noval. So, you know, I'm I'm just making it up. I say will. But who knows this poker? There's certain possibilities and certain probabilities, and if you read some of the experts it's going to be tens of millions of jobs spread over ten twenty years. No problem. Some of the experts say hundreds of millions of jobs over five years, then that's going to be a problem. So we don't know which way, but my feeling is that there will be a bit of an upheaval in domestic politics and in terms of the control of the. Sort of denationalisation of thing. I think that will continue. But I'm wondering if you know in the book, I speculate what the backlash might look like, and we don't know if it's going to happen or not. But I think a good bet now is big tech companies which are so easy to hate to start with. And I think that people may view this technology doing to them both Rotella migrants and through the automation. And that the real big problem is technology. So that might one it's not a popular thing to say her in San Francisco, but I think that people are a little mad about different things. And that might be one backlash, and that's not really a national thing. But it could it could lead to a nationalist background is sort of circle wagons kind of thing and that might make the nation states stronger, but the general drift of denationalising politics. I think that is that is possibility on the other hand, you know, like you talked about Russia deconstructing from the internet. And the European Union making it hard to move data and China doing its own thing. So it may also potentially lead to a more national thing on everything that's on the internet becoming more national. So right. So either on the one hand everything flows. A lot more easily and things open up or everybody reacts to this at a national level and says, you know, we really have to protect the few things that we can we think we can protect and build stronger borders. Hire firewalls or entirely disconnect from. You said firewall rather than wall? Yes. Because the low will not stop these Telhami grants. Yeah. We know. You're you live in Europe. And one of the things that we observe here in Europe is that as a result of the first globalization transformation. There is a high level of youth unemployment, and maybe it's not just because of the globalisation maybe structural issues within Europe. And what you probably have witnessed that. There are great not Telhami gracious, but actually physical migrations from some of the southern European countries into the northern European countries. Is that something that we will also see as a result of this service transformation will will the. Service unemployed start migrating both physically as well as via they're telling migration. Well, so I think it's hard to know what's going to happen in the very very short term. But basically, this is creating jobs for people stay at home, not people who are moving. So in some sense. This is an enormous expert opportunity for emerging markets. And I think the emerging market miracle will continue and spread. But it looked more like India's success were they did it on services. Not China's success where they did it on goods. So in principle. It's a good thing. There are a couple of countries Singapore and Japan, for instance, where I've been to very recently and the governments are intentionally using automation to avoid low low skilled immigration, they for instance, in Singapore, they've subsidize using tablets to order, the drinks. So they need fewer waitresses who tell where the room, sir. Service was delivered by a robot. You know, like one of these ones they use hospital, and it was a I was in a restaurant where they had a robotic busboy picking up dishes and stuff like that. And that's explicitly to avoid migration. So I think there's some of that same in Japan. They they want to avoid getting migrants in and so they're automating stuff and using robots and Tele migration like teaching English remotely rather than having English teacher's come in. So I do think there's a substitution ultimately. And if it does look look at India, I mean, India with their export of services, they did it. And this wasn't Tele migration with India. It was like we sent the work to them. And then he did it and they sent it back, but that growth that rapid growth of incomes created a rising middle class which created lots of jobs in India for Indians. So I think that ultimately you create jobs for people in emerging markets. They would much rather stay home. So personally, I think there are substitutes. Right. So we tend to take questions here. No got a number of three by five cards from the audience and one is from a gentleman named David Kendall and sincere economists, you regularly study rates of growth in these other data driven issues, he asks do you see the rate of change in Telhami, Gration, etc. As an exponential. And he explains exponential. One as a as positive by Ray kurzweil. So how do you when you sort of take it apart from an econometric perspective? How do you look at that rate of change? So you're talking about the singularity Ray. Okay. So he goes too far in economics. We know we have diminishing returns. Eventually you get the low hanging fruit. That's what's going on now and eventually starts to get difficult. And you slow is slows down just look with the outsourcing and offshoring, but let's let's leave Ray out of this. So technically any constant growth rate curve becomes exponential. That's more or less. The definition. The trouble is we tend to. To gauge progress in increments, we human instinctively, we think that the increment of progress in the future will be like the increment of project progress in the past. And that means we're straight lining the future. But the progress doesn't work in a straight line. It works like this with the exponential curve. So that the answer is the exponential growth is constant will stay constant for at least five or ten years. But it's the same growth that's been going on since Richard Nixon was president this doubling every two years. So that growth rate is constant. It's just the increments tend to get explosively large. And people naturally think in increments rather than growth rates. Right. So I don't know if that's an answer. But at least I talked for a little while. And it also address what you said earlier, which is you actually perceive that it might have an effect on the twenty twenty election, which is only a year away. So there's a there's a candidate named angrily Yang who's running on this platform. Is like a big tech companies are doing to it. The driverless cars are going to cause a revolution. And his big thing is put in a value added tax to pay for universal basic income. Now, this guy is unelectable and probably just trying to sell books something I can understand. But I think people on the left in the United States will pick up some of these themes to channel the anger, and for Jilani that people experience into something that isn't anti-migration, and isn't anti-foreign anti tech is what it is. So I am I I'm quite surprised if some of the left leaning candidates in the Democratic Party, don't embrace some of this anti tech anti. Automation themes. Yes. In fact, we've had a couple of questions about that. And it really is a question because what you're saying is that within all of these transformational moments, and you are looking at this as an inflection point, right? But but there's a period where you have to then reach a new equilibrium of some sort is that right? But that that interim moment which we are currently living in a row. So let me let me say it. It's the model is what happened when we moved from farms to factories from countryside to city and the locus evalu- moved from land capital. That was a very brutal difficult thing which involve the rise of fascism, communism and new deal democracy. It was hundreds of millions of people died at the hands of other humans trying to make industrialization work for the for the masses. We did eventually. But the next one was from factories to services started in the seventies. And that costs a lot of problems. Then it got going in the nineties with globalization and outsourcing factories, and we have not had a resolution of that. Right. People are angry they feeling vulnerable. They're feeling attacked as communities not just in the United States all those perhaps worst here. And there was no resolution right now on top of that we're going to have to go from service jobs. Too sheltered service jobs in other words job. That robots can't take and tell him. I can't do now that will be involved lots of people changing jobs, and they will be very upset about that. So that's why I think we really looking at an upheaval that we have this base of anger. Just look at the yellow vest, for instance, where did that come from the yellow vests in France in France? And that came up all of a sudden. And now we put in this extra part to that. That's what I'm I'm really worried about. This is an inflection point. When we haven't resolved the move from factories to offices, right? And you know, another word for upheavals revolution. Yeah. Well, it doesn't always go that for his revolution repression or. Let me see it revolution. Refreshing or. Yeah. Resolution so revolution repression or resolution one way or another it leads to backlashes so like say in eighteen forty eight when when there was a big backlash against industrialization. There was very few revolutions lots and lots of violence, and then they suppress it and moved on right? Well, that's encouraging. And I had an interesting question here. Someone was saying, well, you know, since we're talking about these service jobs, and they are dependent upon highly skilled highly educated individuals, and so someone in the audience equates the question of what happens to those who are taking out significant amounts of money to build their skills. Right. The and they call it the student loan bubble. Right. Are we heading towards a student loan bubble popping as a result of this inability to actually fill the service sector jobs that these universities in these highly leveraged individuals are now betting on with their ability. It's a strong possibility, and I like to reason by malady and the clearest analogy here's in law, and the legal profession is flattening out the pyramid that used to build up to partnership. Is pretty much disappearing..

India Europe China United States Japan Ray kurzweil Geneva Marcus European Union professor Russia Graduate Institute David Kendall Telhami Richard Nixon Democratic Party France San Francisco Singapore
"graduate institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:25 min | 3 years ago

"graduate institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"He's professor at the Graduate Institute in Geneva. He's the author of a new book the global upheaval moderating. The program is Marcus going to lock us to hear this broadcast or any other world affairs program that you might have missed you can download our podcast on itunes channel or wherever you get your podcasts. Search for world affairs. That's one word. And now back to our program we've seen what are referred to as the weakening of the nation state. Right. So if you have these international labor forces that do not allow for these institutions, whether they be labor institutions union institutions, or even manufacturing institutions that continued exist or to transform in some way that has disrupted the politics of this country, for example, most recently in the two thousand sixteen election and also done I've suggested. Which is perhaps we can aspects of the nation state itself. What you're saying is coming down the road seems to even have a more profound reality because many of those workers are already operating on an international basis, or at least interacting on an international basis. Consciously what then does that also mean perhaps for the politics of a country? So the second title second word in my title is upheaval. Yes. So you alluding to the politics? I do not know what's going to happen. This is a future and the futures are noble. So, you know, I'm just making it up. I say will. But you know, who knows this poker? There's certain possibilities in certain probabilities. And if you read some of the experts, it's going to be tens of millions of jobs spread over ten twenty years. No problem. Some of the experts say hundreds of millions of jobs over five years, then that's going to be a problem. So we don't know which way, but my feeling is that there will be a bit of an upheaval in domestic politics and in terms of the control of the. Sort of denationalisation of thing. I think that will continue. But I'm wondering if you know in the book speculate what the backlash might look like, and we don't know if it's going to happen. But not. But I think a good bet now is big tech companies which are so easy to hate to start with. And I think that people may view this as technology doing to them both Rotella migrants. And through the real big problem is technology. So that might one it's not a popular thing to say in San Francisco, but I think that people are a little mad about different things. And that might be one backlash, and that's not really a national thing. But it could it could lead to a nationalist background is sort of circle the wagons kind of thing, and that might make the nation states stronger, but the general drift of of denationalising politics. I think that is that is a possibility on the other hand, you know, like, you talked about Russia deconstructing from the internet and the European Union making it hard to move data and China doing its own thing. So it may also potentially lead to a more national thing on everything that's on the internet. Can more national. So all right. So you're on the one hand everything flows. A lot more easily and things open up or everybody reacts to this at a national level and says, you know, we really have to protect the few things that we can we think we can protect and build stronger borders. Hire firewalls or entirely disconnect from. You said firewall rather than wall? Yes. Because the low will not stop these Telhami grants. Yeah. We know. You're you live in Europe. And one of the things that we observe here in Europe is that as a result of the first globalization transformation. There is a high level of youth unemployment, and maybe it's not just because of the globalisation maybe structural issues within Europe. And what you probably have witnessed is that. There are great not telling my gracious, but actually physical migrations from some of the southern European countries into the northern European countries. Is that something that we will also see as a result of this service transformation will will the service unemployed start migrating both physically as well as via their Telhami Gration. Well, so I think it's hard to know what's going to happen in the very very short term. But basically, this is creating jobs for people stay at home, not people who are moving. So in some sense. This is an enormous export opportunity. For emerging markets. And I think the emerging market miracle will continue and spread. But it looked more. Like India success were they did it on services. Not China's success where they did it on goods. So in principle. It's a good thing. There are a couple of countries Singapore and Japan, for instance, where I've been to very recently and the governments are intentionally using automation to avoid low low skilled immigration, they for instance, in Singapore, they've subsidize using tablets to order, the drinks. So they need fewer waitresses. And I was in who tell where the room service was delivered by a robot. You know, like one of these ones they use hospital, and it, and there was a I was in a restaurant where they had a robotic busboy picking up dishes and stuff like that. And that's explicitly to avoid migration. So I think there's some of that same in Japan. They they want to avoid getting migrants in. And so they're automating staff and using Taylor robots and. Telhami Gration teaching English remotely rather than having English teacher's come in. So I do think there's a substitution ultimately. And if it does look look at India, I mean, India with their export of services, they did it. And this wasn't Tele migration with India. It was like we sent the work to them. And then he did it and they sent it back, but that growth that rapid growth of incomes created a rising middle class which created lots of jobs in India for Indians. So I think that ultimately as you create jobs for people in emerging markets. They would much rather stay home. So personally, I think there are substitutes. Right. So we tend to take questions here got a number of three by five cards from the audience and one is from Germany named David Kendall and sincere economists, you regularly study rates of growth in these other data driven issues, he asks do you see the rate of change, Intel migration, etc? As an exponential. And he explains. Exponential one as as posited by Ray kurzweil. So how do you when you sort of take it apart from an econometric perspective? How do you look at that rate of change? So you're talking about the singularity Ray. Okay. So he goes too far. In economics. We know we have diminishing returns. Eventually you get the low hanging fruit. That's what's going on now. And eventually it starts to get difficult. And you slow is slows down just look with the outsourcing offshoring, but let's let's leave Ray out of this. So technically any constant growth rate curve becomes exponential. That's more or less the definition. The trouble is is we tend to gauge progress in increments. We human instinctively we think that the increment of progress in the future will be like the increment of project progress in the past. And that means we're straight lining the future. But the progress doesn't work in a straight line. It works like this with the exponential curve. So that the answer is the exponential growth is constant will stay constant for at least five or ten years. But it's the same growth that's been going on since Richard Nixon was president this doubling every two years. So that growth rate is constant. It's just the increments tend to get explosively large. And. People naturally think thinking increments rather than growth rates. Right. So I don't know if that's an answer. But at least I talked for a little while. And it also address what you said earlier, which is you actually perceived that it might have an effect on the twenty twenty election, which is only a year away. So there's a there's a candidate named angrily Yang who's running on this platform is like a big tech companies are doing to it. The driverless cars are going to cause a revolution. And his big thing is putting in a value added tax to pay for a universal basic income. Now, this guy is unelectable and probably just trying to sell books something I can understand. But I think people on the left in the United States will pick up some of these themes to channel the anger and fragility that people experience into something that isn't anti-migration, and isn't anti-foreign anti tech is what it is. So I am I I'm quite surprised if some of the left leaning candidates in the Democratic Party, don't embrace some of this anti tech, anti automation themes. Yes. In fact, we've had a couple of questions. Very good us about that. And it really is a question because what you're saying is that within all of these transformational moments, and you are looking at this as an inflection point, right? But but there's a period where you have to then reach new we'll Librium of some sort is that right? But that that interim moment, which we are currently living in a fair estimation. To let me let me say it. It's the model is what happened when we moved from farms to factories from countryside to city and the locus evalu- moved from land capital. That was a very brutal difficult thing which involve the rise of fascism, communism and new deal democracy. It was hundreds of millions of people died at the hands of other humans trying to make industrialization work for the for the masses. We did eventually. But the next one was from factories to services started in the seventies. And that costs a lot of problems. Then it got going in the nineties with globalization and outsourcing factories, and we have. I've not had a resolution of that. Right. People are angry. They feeling vulnerable feeling attacked as communities not just in the United States, all those perhaps worst here. And there has been no resolution right now on top of that. We're going to have to go from service jobs. Too sheltered service jobs in other words, jobs that robots can't take and tell them I can't do now that will be involved lots of people changing jobs, and they will be very upset about that. So that's why I think we really looking at an upheaval that we have this base of anger. Just look at the yellow vest, for instance, where did that come from the yellow vests in France in France? Yeah. And that that came up all of a sudden. And now we put in this extra part to that. That's what I'm I'm really worried about what this is an inflection point. When we haven't resolved the move from factories to offices, right and another word for upheavals revolution. Well, it doesn't always go that far revolution repression or. Let me see it revolution. Refreshing or. Yeah. Resolution so revolution repression or resolution one way or another it leads to backlashes so like say in in eighteen forty eight when when there was a big backlash against industrialization. There was very few revolutions lots and lots of violence, and then they suppress it and moved on right? Well, that's encouraging. And I had an interesting question here. Someone was saying, well, you know, since we're talking about these service jobs, and they are dependent upon highly skilled highly educated individuals, and so someone in the audience equates the question of what happens to those who are taking out significant amounts of money to build their skills. Right. The and they call it the student loan bubble. Right. Are we heading towards a student loan bubble popping as a result of this inability to actually fill the service sector jobs that these universities in these highly leveraged individuals are now betting on with their ability. It's a strong possiblity, and I like to reason by analogy and the clearest analogy here's in law, and the legal profession is flattening out the pyramid that used to build up the partnership. Is pretty much disappearing..

India Europe United States China Japan Ray kurzweil Geneva Marcus Telhami Gration professor Russia Graduate Institute European Union Richard Nixon Democratic Party Intel France San Francisco Germany Singapore
"graduate institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

14:01 min | 3 years ago

"graduate institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That's according to a new report by the McKinsey global institute. This is not the first time that technology is played this disruptive role. But this time is different. According to Richard Baldwin of the Graduate Institute in Geneva Baldwin is the author of the new book the global robotics upheaval, globalization, robotics, and the future of work. He'll discuss his thesis with my co host Marcus gonna lock us. This broadcast is made possible each week by the generous support of Chevron VM ware and the Draper Richards Kaplan foundation, and now to Marcus gonna lock Richard welcome. And it's good to see you. I'm I'm hoping that you do not scare us all tonight in the with what it is that you've presented. Richard has written a book that is quite anxiety inducing in particular for you in the audience tonight, because I'm assuming we don't have a whole lot of people who are either farming or working in the manufacturing sector and. I think he will bring to light a number of issues that are true of not just today, but of the immediate future, which are the future of work, the changes that we're witnessing both because of globalization and robotics, and as I say, this is quite anxiety inducing. So maybe you can tell us why you're trying to scare us, Richard. So well, actually, I read a book on public speaking. And it turns out when you scare people there. Alec facilities flare up like what's rustling in the back. So everybody starts listening when when you say, so, but that's actually not it. I seriously worried that globalization's coming faster than most people expect and it's coming to the service and professional jobs, not the manufacturing jobs, but most people are thinking the future is going to be like the past. So I believe that both automation and globalization will impact service workers big time, very fast. And these people are not. Ready for it? And they're not ready for it because they've never seen automation because computers couldn't think before and they've never seen globalization because face to face is so important, and so many services, and basically there was a technical barrier to arbitraging which differences in the service sector, but digital technology is changing both those realities computers are gaining cognitive capacities. They never have which are creating some substitutes for some professional like collar workers and globalisation of telecommuting is creating direct competition for some American workers also opportunities, but I think for many people it will be the competition. That's concerning them. Right. So what we've seen so far? Then in the globalization process has really been the question of goods rather than services the change in the status of workers, whether an primarily in the developed countries has been that in as you put it the arbitrage the the game. Naming of the differences of the cost of labor in a in another country versus the cost of labor and goods and capital in another country. So we've been gaming that essentially, and that's how people make money. And so in that game, we get cheaper goods from places where there are less expensive to produce. But what you're saying is we're moving from that model of goods to services. Absolutely. So I like the way you said, it was basically, my theory of globalization is that you should think about globalization as arbitrage. So if things cost different amounts in different countries, somebody exploits sacked by making it or buying it here and selling it there. And since it's the relative price. There's a two way deal to be had now much of those price differences have been taken off in goods, the prices aren't that different? And a lot of those big arbitrage and knowledge which I think's been going on with the global value chain, but the really really big price differences left in the world. The price of service sector workers where a nurse can cost one. Twentieth. Time in Kenya. Compared to say, Germany that's normal, and they're only barriers to arbitraging, those differences are technological. And what's I would also say regulatory in some instances some for some things like, lawyers and doctors and stuff, but but many many of them, let's say bookkeepers accountants assistance travel agents, those sorts of things are not regulatory. It's technical barriers, and what digital technology is tearing down those barriers at an incredible pace. And the you know that as those barriers come down companies will increasingly arbitrage the differences. So I'm not making this up. I mean, if you look at what does yes, I actually have been to the worksite other ways. It's quite a good site. It's sort of like, well, what would I compare it to? I guess you're really looking and searching like you do on Amazon. Jason sellers of even including strange things arranged the payment arrange shipment and underpin it with some sort of insurance thing and free up work, and there's a whole competition going on in the world freelancer, and all these and there are essentially doing the same for services, and you find higher pay manage you can fire quality checking all that stuff is done on up work and those services, although they are kind of going the growing at twenty thirty percent per year. And that means that the work being done across borders is is growing at that same pace. Right. So it's a match dot com. Where a, you know, a willing buyer willing seller and just putting together with this platform, but really disintermediating in many ways that process of how do you find somebody who so far flung in can do this accounting work as you suggest exactly? So let me tell you a story I hired I run. This website was mentioned vox dot org, which is research based policy. And analysis by economists four economists and we needed a new copy editor. So I went on up work, and I found this woman who sits in Bangkok, and she's Japanese national grew up in the United States speaks fluent English and is living in Bangkok, but can't work in Bangkok. So she used to be an administrator and now she's doing copy editing for fifteen dollars an hour. And it's it's tremendous. How would I have ever found this woman? Now, the thing you said about this animation. I think it's really important that a lot of globalization up to now was driven by large corporations and large organizations including services, but this is one tiny little website hiring one person in Bangkok paying I think it ends up. You know, maybe a fifty dollars a week at the most. So it's micro micro. And so it really is democratizing this kind of access, and I think that has some implications that will make it hard for people to know that it's actually going on because it kind of creeps in in such. A small small places. There's no factory that shuts down. And we know that it was China or robots that put them out of work is, you know, one little task at a time gradual. But I think eventually it will really transform the way we work in are you predicting when that will hit us, then when will we be conscious of it is. You know, if it's a death by thousand cuts, the service sector jobs when do we bleed so? When you do forecasting. You should give a number or a date, but never both. So I mean, let's put it this way. I would be surprised if this doesn't enter into the twenty twenty election as an issue of people losing jobs both to software robots and tell a migrant that is being replaced because one of the things is it will strike American workers as incredibly unfair. You know, they don't pay taxes. There's no labor laws. They don't ask for pear perks. No sick days. And that I think will feel very unfair both the robots and the software. So my feeling is that we'll start, but you can't predict these social backlash. But but I think it will come quickly in it's always worthwhile. Remembering that, these things are processes not events. And at some point, you know, it'd be like the LA riots when they finally struck back, but that was part of a process, and so that that it's hard to say, but faster than most people think well, this is concerning because as you say it's half. Opening with goods it's happening with factory workers. Whether it's the robotics reality of automobile, manufacturing lines, and and other areas where we're seeing a higher unemployment in various industries, but you're also saying that in parallel, and maybe even in a faster manner because of the real friction lists reality of the digital revolution. That we will also be having this. Well, educated highly compensated. Comfortable part of an electorate or over citizenry that is really going to have to worry about its jobs. Absolutely. So I would actually point to two things one look around you and see who's telecommuting to work and what they're doing. If you wanna know where this will come first, you found those people if your telecommuting and doing half, your job from remote, your company will eventually figure out and not too long that they can replace at least part of what you do with somebody who cost one tenth the price, and doesn't require pay leaves or six or or anything like that. And these are highly trained people the second thing I'd really like to stress this machine. Translation, and if you have not tried machine translation in the last six months or a year, you have to it's incredibly good, and it's getting incredibly good very very fast because of an enormous data set that the UN put online and other parliaments have put online, and then the genius trained these models to translate sentence by sentence. Word by word. So it's incredibly good. And when you think about that that means hundreds of millions of talented low-cost foreigners who were excluded from the service market are joining service market because now they speak good enough English or French or Spanish, so that I think in some sense, you could say the nineties was a story when low skilled workers from just say India and China hundreds of millions of them joined the workforce in manufacturing, and that transformed things in the ninety s now that's happening in service because digital technology is making remote people, less remote machine. Translations letting them speak English and the way in the wage differences is making it profitable to arbitrage these. So I think of this as a talent sue NAMI, and I think people in the rich countries who feel themselves very special will pretty soon feel themselves a lot less special because there's lots of other people who can do more. Or less the same thing for much less that as I said at the very outset is anxiety. And it really is a question because you're, you know, at this point in the United States a lot of the conversation is about labor and migrants. And and one of the things you said was telling my Gration and teleconferencing. And so you're talking about a type of migration that really is regardless of how you feel about physical barriers really impossible to stop. I guess I shouldn't say impossible in that. Russia recently announced that it was going to shut down its connections to the rest of the world from with the internet in order to test. Whether or not they say, what would happen under a cyberattack reality where how would their systems function in a closed system. But but there's a second part to that. Which is of course, testing whether or not they themselves should shut down those systems and. Really practice. Both. Information sovereignty and dependence on their own existing economic and informational system. Right. So let let me come back to little more anxiety. Just in case. I raise your anxiety enough. But let me say a good thing for them. Now, I see in this audience probably most of your winners, which means you're in the service sector and your globally competitive, and this will allow you to sell to a bigger client base. And so in this whole import export goes both ways. But globalisation always is more opportunities for nations most competitive citizens, but more competition for its least competitive citizens. So if you're up for competitive citizen, this is all good news and also for people in the emerging markets, but let me come come back to this can you control things. So I mean, one of the problems with this is governments have good technology to control people capital and goods crossing borders. They don't have very good. Tools for controlling services crossing borders. In fact, we have all the international governance. We need already let let me just give you an example of what I'm talking about here. So I have a friend in Switzerland who does websites very quickly, and he will set up. He gets online. Here's like four screens, and he has a programmer from Pakistan online for two days user experience person from Canada online for today's a designer from Uruguay and they work together individual office in two or three days..

Bangkok Richard Baldwin United States Marcus McKinsey global institute Draper Richards Kaplan foundat Amazon Geneva Baldwin Kenya Jason sellers Germany Graduate Institute Switzerland LA China copy editor administrator