35 Burst results for "Graduate College"

Morgan Zegers Is Concerned Over the Normalizing of 'Woke' Ideology

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:48 min | 1 d ago

Morgan Zegers Is Concerned Over the Normalizing of 'Woke' Ideology

"Little bit about your personal journey. So somebody who is a patriot whose father served this nation in uniform. What was that journey like for you at the beginning to educate yourself? What kinds of things did you learn that you were surprised at that you hadn't been taught? Tell us a little bit about that preparatory phase for you. Well, so for me, the most shocking has been looking back at how I was taught about a lot of really radical and pretty recent changes that have happened in our country. All things that have been normalized. So what I mean by that is, for example, think of the Department of Education. When I was in high school, we were taught that that's a very normal and fair concept, but in reality, it's unconstitutional and the federal government should not be having their heavy hand their boot over the next of parents and school children and the actual local school districts. That's what we're seeing now. So if you think about these little things that are happening on a day to today basis normalizing them. Now, what I always think about too is I graduated college in 2018, my first year that was 2015. That's not a time when this radical gender stuff was going on. But nowadays, everybody has pronouns in their bio. When I went to orientation and had my first semester of college, they actually taught us that, oh, what do you know? The science has changed, and it turns out we need to let you guys know. Sex and gender are actually completely different things. And it's important that you know this new finding that we have. And I remember sitting there in my classroom like, well, this is really different, and that's not what I thought. I mean, I thought they were interchangeable basically. And so they really re-educated us over the last ten years or so to a lot of this new woke ideology and they are normalizing it. That's the concerning thing to me.

Department Of Education Federal Government
Allen Moro: Big Issues Faced by Gen Zers

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

00:46 sec | 3 weeks ago

Allen Moro: Big Issues Faced by Gen Zers

"About Gen Z voters. The big question is, will they actually come out and vote today? That's been the big question. Alan, I'm curious, Liberty University. What are some of the big issues facing students there? So a liberty where Christian university and a lot of the things that really get people interested and excited about politics are the social issues pro life issues, family issues, education issues. But what I'm finding now, you know, I'm about to graduate college in May, and a lot of my peers are doing the same. And we're thinking about money really for the first time practically, and we see inflation and we see rising costs. We see rent and we see what it's gonna take for us to buy a house one day. And I think people my age are really starting to realize that elections are consequential for their wallet and their pocketbook and their futures. You see,

Liberty University Christian University Alan
Lies, Lies, And More Lies

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:44 min | Last month

Lies, Lies, And More Lies

"Do you know that what bothers me more than the fact that Biden lies? Almost every day is that the press doesn't report it. The American media are as likely to report this lie. As proud the would have reported a lie, spoken by brezhnev. Who was in office for God when I think about it, I have to explain who brezhnev was. It's very sad. What percentage of Harvard seniors could identify in at brezhnev? What do you think? It'd be very low. Very low. That's pretty important. No, no. Okay, what about Nikita Khrushchev? Any post Soviet, any post solemn leader. In other words, if I were to ask a Harvard senior, name two named one Soviet leader other than Lenin and Stalin. And you don't think I have a right to be upset that they couldn't name one? No, no, maybe I'm wrong. I'm totally okay with that. Yeah. You think it's too heavy a load. Okay, how about this? Should a Harvard senior be able to identify Pol Pot? I mean, that's if you can't name all the genocidal leaders, and they're like 5. Of the 20th century, that's a lacuna. I think, with the lacuna. Lacuna means hole for those of you who graduated college.

Brezhnev Harvard Biden Nikita Khrushchev Lenin Stalin Lacuna
"graduate college" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

08:42 min | 6 months ago

"graduate college" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

"Docker as well. But I think a veteran point guard solves a lot of that stuff. And we talked about this on our previous podcast that, you know, and I had mentioned a player I talked to. It was Jamal Crawford who later went on NBA radio and settled the same things. And so I realized, oh, okay, I didn't need to keep that conversation private. Jamal Crawford said, look, they need a Chauncey billups type. I don't know who the current Chauncey billups would be. But I think Jamal is onto something there. And it's not to say that Marcus smart can't do it. I do think that having a veteran hand so that smart's doing a little less or so that in crunch time, maybe he is shifting to off guard or they're sharing ball handling duties. You know, Jalen can play up at small forward and Jayson tanning can play up at power forward. There's a lot of versatility in this group that's part of the Celtics strength. I think having a veteran playmaker could only help, whether it's just a plant Marcus smart and nudge him over one or whether it's simply to come off the bench and provide stability at key moments. Whatever it may be. I would be shocked if the Celtics aren't at least looking around this summer. Well, you could look around for veteran backup help. I mean, good luck finding it. Players that you're describing don't exactly grow on trees. And I don't think the Celtics will nor do we think they should address anything about the point guard position. I think the point car position is perfectly fine. Yes. Hold on though. So do you want them to stand pat? Stand like that. Run it back. Across the board. Well, supplement, right? They've got three pretty big trade exceptions that they can use and they have the basic 6 and a half million mid level exception that they can use. I want them to use one or more of them to get themselves something of a wing score in that mix. I know internally they're pretty high on Sam Hauser, who's a terrific three point shooter. Was not seen except for those garbage time minutes late in games. But I would like to see them go out and get and find some kind of springy 6, 7 to 6 8 forward who can play multiple positions and who could fit this guy don't grow on trees either. You're right, you're right, but I think the Celtics would be in an advantageous position now because look, if you're a player out there that wants to win, you're looking at Boston saying that's a situation I would like to be and you've got a tough but a players coach in emea doco. He's got a lot of success with this team. A young core that knows its roles. And if you're like, they're not going to get him, but like a pat condon type. Like, if you're a pack Conan, you'd be like, all right, maybe they should go get peck on, by the way, because he's from the area, and might as well go take a shot at him. But like someone like that would make a lot of sense in this mix and would improve this team on the fringes. I think that's all they need. I am, I said this on Tuesday. I was highly critical of Marcus smart at the very beginning of the season. I was highly critical of the Celtics decision to anoint him as the playmaker, but this team is in the finals in large part because of Marcus smart because Marcus smart being the point guard means if you're the Celtics, you lead the league in, I'm going to run through this real quick because I wrote about it a little bit. It's going to be posted today on SI dot com. Defensive efficiency, opponent field goal percentage, pick and roll defense, defense on drives, opponents points per game in the paint and field goal percentage at the rim. Marcus smart is a big reason the Celtics are elite on the defensive end of the floor and if you replace him, you're not going to get a guy that defends like him. You're just not. And whoever steps on the floor without him, you're going to be a lesser defensive team because of that. They do need someone Howard. Like their clutch time minute production all season long was terrible, that's something that needs to be addressed, but I think Marcus smart is going to grow into this role. He's 28 years old, playing point guard for the first time full-time as a professional. You tell me he's not going to get better next season with another full off season to improve at playing that spot. I mean, not having to deal with the first two months of a season again where you're adjusting to new roles. I think Marcus smart's going to come back next year as a much more polished playmaker at that position. I would never want to sell a guy's short, especially someone who's worked as hard as he has to evolve his game. And to become a more complete player, right? So I'm never going to sit here and tell you he can't or that he won't. But I do disagree with you on part of the premise of, well, they're elite and all these defensive categories because Marcus smart is the point guard and anything you do to mess with that will possibly knock them down. Listen, Steph Curry was never considered a great defender. He's now becoming a good solid defender where he was once a minus defender, but the bottom line is like, and granted. It's a sliding scale, right? If you're as a lead offensively as Steph is, you can afford to not be as great defensively and have everybody else pick up the slack. But the bottom line is, if you slot in a new point guard for the Celtics, who is a offensive playmaking ball handling plus who will make everybody else better and get them better shots so that you are more efficient offensively as a team that should make up for whatever you might lose defensively, but you're not losing that much because Marcus smart's still out there and we're not talking about ejecting Marcus smart and sending him elsewhere. We're just saying shift them over to off guard and play everybody up a position. Or maybe he's coming off the bench as a 6th man, which wouldn't be a terrible role either. He's not, listen, he was defensive player of the year, Chris, a little controversial in some quarters of NBA Twitter. But he was not the sole reason that they're a great defensive team. Tatum and Brown had a lot to do with that. Robert Williams had a lot to do with that. Al Horford had a lot to do with that. I think this Celtics team is going to be elite defensively regardless of how you mix and match those guys because they have multiple plus defenders and it's them as a group that makes them a great defensive team. It's not any one guy who is responsible the way it is with say Rudy Gobert in Utah. No, it's not, but look, I've lived through different iterations of Celtics teams with minus defenders at point guard, whether it was either. Those were big minuses. Okay, well, I mean, but to the not gonna grow on trees argument, like you're not gonna find like an above average point guard who's also a better playmaker than Marcus smart. Like, I don't even know who that is. Rubio, the answer. We've talked about right, we've talked about Rubio like Rubio still like a good defender and an excellent passer, right? And he's a guy who will organize your offense. I'm trying to think of who else is like, I think dragach is a free agent again too, right? He's got a lot of miles on him and a minus minus defender. Look, that to me is not the issue for this team. I actually don't think this team has many issues. I think they need to grow together, get more experience, add something on the fringes and they'll be in a position next year to do the exact same thing. Let me ask you this then. They went 7 games against the bucks. And one, importantly, against the defending champs, granted without Chris Middleton. They went 7 games the next series against the heat, a team that best regular season record, but not exactly an offensive juggernaut, the heat. The Celtics were squeaking by. 7 games means you were kind of squeaking by. And then they got totally outclassed by the warriors. But there's going to be there's going to be organic improvements with this team. Like Tatum will be in the MVP conversation next year he's healthy. Like he will probably in that discussion. Jalen Brown will be back in the all star discussion, probably be an all star next year. Grant Williams took a huge leap this year. Non factor in the finals, but he's going to be a lot better. Robert Williams played on one leg, the entire playoffs came back from knee surgery after one month. He presumably is going to be better. There's just a lot of room for organic growth Howard with this team that I don't think that I don't think changing anything is going to help them. Fringe change. I'm not advocating dramatic changes. I'm not saying, and listen, if they just followed the Chris mannix plan of standing a couple minor things around the edges and just let them continue to grow because.

Marcus smart Celtics Jamal Crawford Chauncey billups Marcus Sam Hauser pat condon Docker Jalen NBA Jayson Jamal Steph Curry peck Rubio Conan pat Rudy Gobert Boston rim
The Joy of Graduation

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:36 min | 6 months ago

The Joy of Graduation

"God willing. That's that. So welcome, look, this stuff to talk about about the world in American life and all of that, but I got to say, I got you here now within 5 days of your graduating college. Yes. And so I just want people to know we don't rehearse this stuff. So I don't know what you'll say. So here's one to begin with. So you graduated Harvard last week, and the H bomb. We all know. You know H is an H bomb. We all know it. Okay, so having recognized the elephant in the room, we'll put it aside. Whether it's Harvard or wherever, what was your happiness level at your graduation, one to ten. Ten. I was thrilled. I was very proud of myself. I worked so hard to get into that university. I worked very hard at that school. And you know, I was so proud of myself because Larry back our president, he opened the commencement by saying, think of the person you were when you came into this yard on your first day of classes. We had, oh gosh, what's it called? Not commencement. Convocation. We had a convocation ceremony and we were freshmen sitting there. And the thing I thought of was, boy, now I'm graduating and I know Dennis and I have this podcast with him and I'm working for Salem and I've really developed intellectually. I've become conservative and that's why I was a ten because I'm so proud of the person that I've become.

Harvard Larry Dennis Salem
"graduate college" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:29 min | 6 months ago

"graduate college" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You so much Well with everything going on in the world I love love when our Bloomberg team draws our attention to innovation going on around the world And I definitely saw that last weekend of Panama some of the unicorn startups in Latin America Now it's Ashley Vance's turn in a story in this week's new upcoming issue of Bloomberg business week out later on this week To me is introducing us to a company that discuss its business with the news media Bloomberg for the first time Yeah I had never heard of it before reading this story The company's called meter It's founded by two brothers and it's got a new way to get workplaces online as well as some noteworthy backers as well Join us now is Ashley Vance features writer for Bloomberg businessweek Ashley's also the author of Elon Musk Tesla SpaceX and the quest for a fantastic future Ashley joins us on the phone from Palo Alto California Joel Weber is the editor of Bloomberg businessweek He's with us in the Bloomberg interactive brokers studio Joel is actually right a couple of brothers such as these could go off in the graduate college early They could go off and they could basically do anything They could go work at a crypto startup or start their own crypto company They choose to solve a problem that many people would say wait a second that's not necessarily the you know for lack of a better term sexy thing to be doing right now That's right Although maybe starting another crypto company wouldn't be the right call right now either Good point What I liked about the story was just when we think about the way the world works there are things that the world seems to maybe have forgotten and have you tried turning off that router You have bad Wi-Fi is one of them And I've done that at home many times I've turned it on to during the pandemic It worked sometimes The other place that that happens is in offices And it makes these brothers interesting is this whole startup is about bringing better Wi-Fi to the office which hey in these times of RTO anything counts right Ashley so where did this idea come from Yeah well these brothers are fascinating I mean to your point anneal and sunil vien sanni are their names and I mean they're kind of throwbacks to me They had this business in college and installing networking equipment at offices and they realized it was just too hard And so they decided to go fix the problem they'll all this new networking hardware and software at themselves but the big idea here is you're a company you move into a new office space You want to set up Internet It's still this kind of archaic process where you have to call about 5 different companies to make that happen And so they want it to be more like setting up your telephone or your water in your office where you essentially just kind of click a button or a button on a website and it appears And so it's one thing to for you and I to have this idea and I like to tell you were dating yourself there actually But they actually have an interesting rolodex and they were able to get some interesting backers Who did they call and who put money behind them Yeah the back is kind of like a who's who but that you can imagine And Silicon Valley you've got the Collison brothers who started stripe Diane Greene who started VA you got turban who runs silver Lake Sam Altman at OpenAI I mean the funny thing about this story is they list of investors is incredibly impressive but this company is operated for about 6 years It almost complete secrecy And so all these people somehow kept this a secret This is the first time the founders ever talked that anyone written a single story about this company called leader It's so interesting actually because these guys you know you could try to solve a problem from Silicon Valley or from Virginia or from New York City But these guys actually moved to Shenzhen because the hardware in this they really wanted to understand the hardware here Talk about what they did in order to really make it so they understood the ins and outs of the business Yeah I thought this was kind of when I started to think they were the real deal They had this previous networking business that they started in college and they took all that money and they just blew on a whim almost to Shenzhen and decided they were going to manufacture their own line of routers and switches and access points but they had to talk their way into it And so they lived in a hostel for 18 months and did manage to talk their way into a factory They would sleep on the factory floor and they had their beds They had no beds even in their hospital It was also of their networking gear And so these were two kids that you know they believed in themselves and then they wanted to know every little piece of how this works And so they funded before they got all these big name backers They funded all of that themselves and lived through it So I get it and I could see and as you report that a lot of companies they've already got a lot of clients out there some larger ones But is there success based on really lining up Massive companies who already have invested so much in their own networks at this point They want to get there but it's obviously a harder sell Traditionally what you do is you're in a building you've bought a ton of equipment probably for the Cisco you probably have people on staff who manage all that stuff You've invested millions of dollars to have the Internet working at your office And so to rip all of that out and bet on a startup is a little bit harder But if you're a company you could be a large company that's moving into a new office that you don't want to go through all that pain again with the idea as you call meter and they set everything up for you and Bill you per month And so I think that's the easier sell right now is startup companies moving to a new spot And once you're in the cloud everything goes great right That was good What else could go wrong here though Ashley I mean you know they've got serious challenges ahead of them which is like the network If your Wi-Fi not working at the office you're going to hear about it if there's some security disaster you're going to hear about that and possibly get egg on your face publicly And so it's a young company They have to prove that their networking gear is as good as they say it is So this is going to be it's going to be a long march that said they reminded me a lot of kind of like a young VMware Just if potentially this huge infrastructure play if they get it right And so it's a big deal Does a company like this Ashley in like I don't want to put the cart too much before the horse but it's got some big name backers and they're looking for an exit here Is this the type of company that IPOs or gets acquired by an established player Like a Cisco Yeah Exactly Yeah this is a concern because Cisco through the years has been a lot of the most acquisitive companies ever And what generally happens is as soon as you're doing well and networking Cisco buys you a Juniper by you and there's a tendency for the technology to languish Of course these founders as they always say you know probably they're not going to do that They're in this for the long haul They're going to be the ones who stick it out There will see if history is our guide Cisco tends to end up with this stuff but these brothers seem quite determined.

Bloomberg Ashley Vance Elon Musk Tesla SpaceX Ashley joins Palo Alto California Joel Weber Ashley sunil vien sanni Diane Greene Sam Altman Shenzhen Latin America Panama Joel Collison Silicon Valley Cisco New York City Virginia VMware
Caller: We Don't Expect Anybody to Pay Our Kid's College Debt

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:48 sec | 7 months ago

Caller: We Don't Expect Anybody to Pay Our Kid's College Debt

"Tell me what you think about what you just heard from Elizabeth Warren. Well, I've been a first responder for 32 years, and we saved up for my kid to go to college. And our deal with him was, you will pay for your four years and then anything after that, you'll take care of. And we don't expect anybody to pay our kids college debt. And if we start doing this, these smaller colleges like where my kid went to school, are going to go bankrupt. And now my kid decided to serve, he's going to he's serving the United States Air Force now. So he's actually serving his country after he graduated college. So I just think it's ridiculous. I don't want anybody to pay my loans for me. Hey, man, and USB so proud of your son. Yes, sir. I am very proud. Well, we're proud of him too. We're proud of you, and I thank you for your service all these years, Tammy, because you get the right perspective. It's infuriating. I mean,

Elizabeth Warren United States Air Force Tammy
Willy Mac Was a 14 Year Old Golf Burn Out

Fore The People

01:32 min | 10 months ago

Willy Mac Was a 14 Year Old Golf Burn Out

"Give me the Willie Matt from 25 years ago right out the shoot. Back when Willie Mack had nothing. Not two nickels to rub together. Give me that Willie Mack till now. Well, I mean, it's a long story, bud. But hey, we gotta start bro we'll just start with Clinton golf real early. At 14 because I burned out and I ended up playing other sports through high school. And then those four years, you know, graduated 18 high school, I was so far away from golf at that point that there was no chance I was ever going to play again. It was just, I was something else. I was a total different person. And so it led me to go out to Montana to go snowboard and sewed my seeds, so to speak, and fell in love with it. And it just time just hit. First little realization, 20 probably you party hard to hear about 20 to your graduating college, basically it was my college career. And then you're like, your dad, or whoever's like, son, you got a freaking step up and you got a figure out what the hell you're going to do. Yeah. And that was kind of what I was doing at that time. And mine went a little further. I was 25. I didn't start playing golf again until like right at my 25th birthday.

Willie Mack Willie Matt Golf BUD Clinton Montana
"graduate college" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"graduate college" Discussed on WTOP

"Can now complete more than 50 DMV services online and of course drivers licenses and vehicle registration renewals can be completed by mail At the beginning of the school year fort belvoir elementary and fairfax county had no substitute teachers not a one but a military spouse stationed at fort belvoir signed up for the job and she's recruited even more military spouses As she saw us move to fort belvoir and march and despite running a photography business she wanted to take on a little more and work at her kids new school Is there any jobs at the school even cafeteria anything to help And she was actually we really need subs On her first day she said every teacher wanted her phone number in case they couldn't make it to work I've literally done everything in the school that you can do As far as the teaching I love it She also posted a social media to recruit more subs from a military spouse Facebook group She was able to recruit 5 more in her first few months She says as a military spouse she has really connected with military kids Lots of moms and dads leave and you just you never know what they need Look Luke or WTO P news A lot of schools need subs out there Well this is normally this should not normally the time that school systems hire their new teachers they usually do that over the summer when teachers are coming from other schools and they've wrapped up their school year and when most new teachers graduate college but some education majors are graduating this month and they are fighting themselves in high demand Buoy state university has 21 education majors on track to graduate this month They're all employed already One two I asked Maya Jones of Charles county Three four 5 How many job offers she has She's been getting recruited by school systems for a while The majority of them are from PG county and I have one from Charles county We hear from people all over the country who are trying to recruit students from boy state university Doctor Ronda Jeter the dean of the college of education at buoy state says they get recruiters from as far away as Nevada California and Alaska We have to turn people away For new grads figuring out the right fit can be hard In Jones had a lot of things to take into account before she said yes The administrative side is something else you also have to consider when it comes to teaching not just the students and the county Also the commute John Doe and WTO P news Coming up in money news build a bear's transition to online has been very profitable It's 5 24 Waves group turn life insurance helps you secure your.

fort belvoir fort belvoir elementary fairfax county Buoy state university Charles county Maya Jones WTO PG county boy state university Ronda Jeter buoy state Luke Facebook college of education Nevada Alaska California Jones John Doe
Spilling Tea & Creating Diversity in Hollywood With Dino-Ray Ramos

First of All

02:29 min | 1 year ago

Spilling Tea & Creating Diversity in Hollywood With Dino-Ray Ramos

"Come dino. Very first of all. I just wanted to say that. I'm so happy with finally making this happen grave because i know how busy you are and how much you're out there running hollywood and so it's a big deal for you to make no. That's all fake news. I'm not doing anything. I'm just like in my doing that thing. I think it's just. Because we do. Because i i i i like boots on the ground stuff and i know that we do a lot of stuff behind our computers especially in the past year and a half or so. But it's like one of you're just in front of your computer feels like you're not doing much but i guess you are. You know what i mean. Truth will you've been doing a lot of important work the impact. I'll say 'cause. I love being your high woman. The impact of your word why we are here today to celebrate that and to spill the tian not a little bit because the work that you do from from as long as i've known you which has been several years iran. I actually know the exact number of years. I've known you now But we've been in this space you've been united in la for the exact same amount of time and time. Yeah yeah it is really important. It is incredibly impactful. It is a voice that's necessary to are just want like. How would you summarize nine and summarize like how would you introduce yourself of the work that you've done because i already do that in the sound bites of like you're deadline How would you switch it up. You know it's it's interesting. I've been a journalist for almost two decades of and i started off as a more of a fashion journalist of and also i started off when internet like online publications. Started to be a thing like so people were either confused or didn't believe in it or they were like. Oh what's this internet thing like. What is online publication. Everyone when i was coming up. Especially when i after i graduated college i think a lot of people wanted everything in print there. I remember when. I worked with the oakland boone. I was like oh we can't do it in print but we all know. We started a website and they would be all. I don't know about doing that but now like websites are like online. News is pretty much. All there is and print is practically dead right but that like got aside. I think my work is more of why You know. I just do it. And i don't realize what i'm doing. I just write what i like to write about.

Dino Hollywood Iran LA Oakland Boone
"graduate college" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"graduate college" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

"There. It is rob. You were you. Were singing it earlier. Oh yeah the. Oj's backstage as oj's maybe i'll right it is the couple wrap it up. Funky flashback friday in the heavy one deejay don. He was if iowa. Sam who was in for usc. Chris was in for dj. Alex tight shirt and a good job. Nice job you were in those crates heavy when you were in those crates and we are wrapping up. This flashback. friday coming to you live from the fox. Sports radio studios. Let's do it here. Rob the we all know about how name image and likeness is changing the landscape of college football. And good good for you right. We all think is fair for the kids. But here's a story that's interesting. So ohio state. Rob has the number one quarterback recruit in the class of. I guess it would be. What is this twenty. Twenty twenty two. I guess but so. He's he's got one year left of high schools. Names quinn you're yours from texas. He's going how state though and he's got companies ready to pay him. Big money on name imaging lightness. Because he's the best quarterback in the country. And i guess he's got a pretty decent social media. Following rob is thinking about skipping his senior year in high school now those were wondering he's only needs one english class to graduate high school. He can take that in the summer. So he's thinking about doing that graduate early and going to ohio state basically the senior high school plan. They're getting the money from the name image and likeness and You know getting start on his college career which obviously he hopes the mini think will end up being a pro career. What are your thoughts on this. I got no issues lowest people you know if they go to school not dropping out of school. He's gonna degree if he does that. So long. as you get your heizo blow right right. that's all. I think you need to get that other than that. Everybody can't go to college. Everybody doesn't have to graduate college to be a productive citizen and useful. Do you know what i mean. It's not for everybody. Oh there's not which. I'm cool with that but i have no issues. Now hug where you can make money out of it. Chris and he's happy. I'm good with it. Yeah i got to agree. I gotta now. My first thing was well. Is he gonna graduate. And he is going to get his diploma. And then he's free to do what he wants. And i got no problem. You know physically. You hope that the kids ready for that level. But he probably is. You know he's he's gonna be a senior in high school age wise he's probably eighteen and so he's probably as physically developed as he would be as a freshman or close if he graduated from high school or st four years. So i'm with you. And i always felt robbed the hypocrisy when people talk about world is these kids should go to college or graduate college and they really do that. A lot with african americans athletes all. They got to go to college. And i've always looked at it as hypocritical.

rob Rob ohio usc heizo Chris iowa Alex Sam quinn fox football texas
How Carlos Welch First Got in the Game

The Chip Race

02:11 min | 1 year ago

How Carlos Welch First Got in the Game

"I grew up like i said in the atlanta georgia area Grew up pretty. Poor am was a pretty good student in school. So i kinda like work my way up in Started you know. Having some moderate financial success for myself Eventually graduated college became a math teacher. And somewhere along the line along the way i found poker and i found poker because like i said grown up poor i was always looking for ways out of poverty and i used to mess around with these get rich quick schemes that you see the late night. Infomercials lost a lot of money. Going on certain days when i was probably seventeen eighteen years old and then one night i was watching and they said this guy named moneymaker won a bunch of money. And i'm thinking like who writes this shit like this is like. Obviously this one's a scam. I'm not falling for that. But i gave it. You know. I did a little research and i was like wait. This is real and sounds okay. This is going to be my quote unquote get risky scheme. That Starting me down that rabbit hole and so started playing a line around two thousand four and then singles primarily up until black friday Obviously that was like a disaster for a lot of us in the us. So i i was out for like a year and then these rogue. Us site started the pup. You can play on as so. I kinda got back in and at that time the sitting does are kinda dead so that started me on the tournaments and So this is around two thousand twelve and in two thousand thirteen I was a member of tournament. Poker edge and andrew brokers is one of the pros on that site. And so that's how i met andrew and Met him for the first time in person in vegas in twenty thirteen to get on the pie. And i think you pretty much. The rest is history from

Atlanta Moneymaker Georgia Andrew Brokers United States Andrew Vegas
"graduate college" Discussed on The Cave - A DC Universe Podcast

The Cave - A DC Universe Podcast

06:36 min | 1 year ago

"graduate college" Discussed on The Cave - A DC Universe Podcast

"You know your character better than they would know them. Yeah yeah i mean the great thing about we have amazing directors on the flash and i feel if they really trust is that gives us the ability to trust that and And you know because the flashes been on for so long. I feel like people have the chance to watch it. And really get to know our characters and get to know us and the good thing about the flash to is we bring back the same directors so even though i've only been on the show for a couple of seasons i've been able to work with the same directors over and over again sometimes multiple in the same season or sometimes from season to season and so Every time there welcome back to we just love seeing them again and we already have that report There's very few directors at this point that are brand new to us and so that's really great to have them be a part of the flash family and just come back and do multiple episodes for us. It's tough because they have to kind of maintain a certain continuity they can't it can't do like an episode very metaphorical or anything. You kind of have to stay within certain guidelines and Yeah i mean. It's a heightened reality. You know. I it's for you. I mean you're the only human all these meta humans around sometimes that's gotta be a little That's got again. You said it. It's good to be kind of grounding force in a series doesn't do that so it's interesting are you familiar with the flash and the speed force at all before you got the job. Gosh only very little My brother and my husband or huge comic book fans and obviously know about the flash. Because it's such a huge Conic the character Luckily for camilla she comes on the show and she doesn't know really anything about the flash about vibe or any of them. She just sees the sky. That's cute a bar. And they hit it off and it takes a few episodes in a few months for them to kind of reveal who everybody is to her. So i got to learn about the show and about the conical characters as committed and so i felt like that was a realistic bench But yeah i i wasn't. I wasn't like a comic book fan. But after i got on the show i actually binge watched all of the seasons. I watched season one through four. Probably a couple of months. So i became a fan afterward. Well that's amazing. Yeah that's a great way to approach your part is because you're you don't have a preconception of the character is and you're just as the it just grounded honesty to it when you're in your performance and you can't. It's hard to fake. That i would think or to or to act that. It's better that you don't know. Yeah i probably helped me out and school so well. You know they're they're they're wrapping up another one and you're going to come back for eight. That's pretty fantastic as far as personally career wise What what are your aspiration. You wanna you bid on the set you've been on fewer sets and i've seen your way around any aspirations to be behind the camera angle. Yeah i actually started by the camera. Your cinematographer the job. Yeah i i went to school for cinematography and i moved up to la to pursue that and then ended up acting instead. And i've been acting for the past ten years. But i really miss being behind the camera so right before the pandemic actually Filmed my first short film as director. I was a huge learning experience. I just so proud of You know all the work was done there and really caught that bug again. I would say so. I'm currently working on directing another short film documentary. This time And i don't know where that's going to go. I i'm just kind of pursuing whatever brings me joy for the current moment and that's directing while i'm still on the flash so i i'm not sure i don't think i'll ever kind of confined myself to one thing because they just love being on set and i love creating and i love storytelling so i hope that i get to kind of delve into multiple sides of the industry and for however long. My career goes cinematography. I've always looked at kind of like painting with light per fill. You know it really is how you lightest seen enforces. How scenes going to go. I mean you used a script. Obviously and if it's a if it's bright cheery funny scene. It's bright and cheery and if it's kind of tragic you have to kind of know moot which work with shadows and stuff it's It's very interesting. What has changed a lot probably is technology and even even the sets they like on a series built the lights into like the the the ceiling of the set. Mazing how it's all change. Yeah i mean it's chaim stomach. Even since i've been in school. I graduate school graduate college like ten years ago and we were the last class to learn on film and then after i graduated. They started learning on the new digital cameras. Which obviously everybody's using these days and now it's more rare to find someone here. She son film and so. I feel like my education. I mean obviously the basics are still the same. And i feel like learning on film actually helps give you better education. But i wouldn't even you know it's hard to know your way around some of these new cameras because they're just coming out with new ones. All the time and knowledge is changing all the time so the basics are the same. But you know the end out. I don't know if i would know my way around some of these new camera. You have the the one that keeps coming up. Is the red camera. People are bragging about it. It's like it's become almost a standard. It's pretty amazing. What it can do especially lights so definitely. We're sitting on rashidi my documentary on her red and i'm just like oh my gosh. It's so it's so compact and it's so you can do so much with it. It's just so easy so it's great. It's funny but you. You have kind of something in common with another actor. That's on a superhero. Show now in jack. Quaid employs one boys. Of course on the boy. The ad which i forgot was before. Yeah that was before the boys for the boys. And before the flash i think maybe i maybe i was shooting that when i was on the flash already but yeah we met before the boys And he's he's so lovely and so great. And i'm so happy that that show.

camilla la rashidi Quaid jack
Meet the Press' Chuck Todd Is Propaganda Operative for the Left

Mark Levin

01:52 min | 1 year ago

Meet the Press' Chuck Todd Is Propaganda Operative for the Left

"I am a constant And relentless critic of Chuck Todd on Meet the Press. The Sunday shows are propaganda operations for the left. And the Democrat Party. They typically have a rhino or some kind of Republican there to offset the host and two or three other guests. But it's obvious where they're coming from. And if you read on freedom of the press, you know that most of these people are Democrats or their family members are Democrats. Such as in the case of Chuck Todd. We've talked about this many times before he was a campaign operative for Tom Harkin and college. I don't know that he never graduated college and then also his wife. Is a very, very highly paid consultant. As we've talked about before, and she was also a consultant Bernie Sanders, among others. So Chuck Todd is a Democrat. Those are his instinct says there's beliefs that's his soul, and that's his mind. George Stephanopoulos is, you know, ran the war room for Bill Clinton. And viciously attacked women. Clinton efficiently attacked when they were there to come forward and criticize him. There's two Sunday shows right there. And they're not alone. There's many, many more Many more. Forget about Republicans. There are no real conservatives who are hosts on any network network inside cable network Sunday show. Checked out is the worst. Because he's the dumbest of the bunch. And is the worst because he's the most Aggressively aggressive. You've heard a passive aggressive He's the most aggressively aggressive. And he embraces every one of these American Marxist movements that have been spawned of the Karl Marx ideology, every one of them.

Chuck Todd Democrat Party Tom Harkin Bernie Sanders George Stephanopoulos Bill Clinton Clinton Karl Marx
Couple Leaves Their W2s (During COVID!) To Go Full Time in Real Estate

Real Estate Rookie

02:55 min | 1 year ago

Couple Leaves Their W2s (During COVID!) To Go Full Time in Real Estate

"Sale. The nick welcome to the digger pockets real estate rookie. Podcast super excited to have you both on here today. Thank you excited to be here. Thanks for having us little backstory seminar. Actually guests on my old podcast. The your first real estate investment podcast. I don't remember what number. But i think it was one of my top performing podcast super. Glad to have you guys back on to the real estate ricky show to kinda share your story to before begins the deal details and all that good stuff yourself a little bit about the two of you okay. Yeah so we have been investing for about three or four years. Now we've been together since we were like fourteen or fifteen years old and are now married. So nick was the catalyst of real estate investing in decided and he was like seventeen that he was gonna start planting. The seed takes a long time for me so that was really good and once we graduated college we moved into our parents. Basement started saving money in kind of took off our real estate investing career from there. That's gre- nick. I wanna hear from you as to why when you were seventeen. Did you think that you wanted to be in real estate. Investing i mean most seventeen year olds. Don't think that we have. It's an awesome question. I wish i had a great answer for it. I think i came from like my dad was self employed so i sort of came from that environment but never had anyone in my family that was into real estate. No we knew nothing about it. I think if i recall like probably all of us i started googling and then we found bigger pockets and so that was like kind of what got me hooked at that point but yeah no family connections or anything. I think i just always had the desire to like. Wanna do more than a w. two. I didn't want to be tied to her career again. I don't know why. I was thinking that at young age but i was and then it kind of drew me in. Can you guys give us an overview of your current business like where it stands today. How many deals have you done. How many units do you guys manage. Operate own yes. So our who are investing business. We have done three deals in. Its six doors total. Where in boston massachusetts okay. I wanna know you guys over. Were there any analysis paralysis. So you wanted to you. Start thinking about this when you were seventeen. How long until you actually bought that property. Yeah so it was. It was a wile again. We were young. We went to college but what we did was post college. We moved in with. My parents lived their basement to save up. So i don't think we had a ton of like your textbook analysis paralysis. I think it was a combination of like. We couldn't afford to get started right away. So we went through the savings sort of portion. I that took us. It took us two years to get our first deal but from the time we were ready until the time we were able to get under contract on something it wasn't super long

Nick Ricky Paralysis Massachusetts Boston
Jacob Thornton Has a   Drunk Driver Encounter

Drive with Us Podcast

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Jacob Thornton Has a Drunk Driver Encounter

"Welcome jake thanks so much for joining us today. Well i'm glad to be here more super excited to hear all your crazy driving stories. So let's start with what you would say is one of your most craziest driving experiences one of my most craziest driving experiences. What have to be the summer of twenty eighteen. This was right before i graduated college. I was going out with a couple of buddies of mine. And we just got back from penn stack and we are just driving down seventy five north just rocking out to music having fun windows down on all four sides and all of a sudden comes this random person it looked like they are driving a corvette day. Start tailgating me and my friend. We were literally the only ones out on the road. We're like the hey. Let's go mess with them. And i'm like heck. Yeah we're going. We're going to teach him a lesson. And of course i don't play nice when it comes to tailgaters. I really i really don't. I'm like the enforcer on the road. Because i teach them you know. Hey the closer you get the slower. I'm going to go. But i don't harm anyone. Of course. I just do that to tell them. Hey don't do this so anyway. We're like yeah. Let's let's mess with them for a bit. See what happens. Speed limits to seventy five on a highway. The guys tailgating me and my friend. The two other lanes are open. No excuse me. Three lanes were the only two cars on the highway. This point everywhere. Everyone else's six sixteen hundred feet back like way back there at this point. The car behind Switches lanes and we do the same thing we switch over to the right lane and he's tailgating us both keep switching lanes until we both go off the exit ramp. We go off the exit ramp and their tailgating and slowing down and we return to get off other road. We come face to face with the driver and it's not a guy but it's a woman so me and my friend at this point. Had the windows up in the music turned down to medium. We both realized we were just making a woman very upset and she was like in her

Jake
"graduate college" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"graduate college" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"The Highland Memorial Park in beautiful downtown Ocala. What a gorgeous property And we're here for a car show. Now you say yourself a car show at a memorial gardens. Well, of course we're doing this for the veterans today. That have given their lives for our freedom and our safety, and we're gonna have a great show here today as well as a lot of other things going on. So we're in Ocala, Florida for the Highland Memorial Park show that starts at 10 o'clock and goes until two. I'm here on the property right now taking care of the show and talking with you. Phone lines are open at 4 10 wcbm 6 80. That's for 1092266 80 outside of Baltimore. Call us toll free at 1 800. Wcbm 6 80 Bone lines are open. Come on, Join me. Let's go to John and Glen Arm. Good morning, John. Morning, Dave, thanks for working on Memorial Day weekend. No problem. My pleasure, sir. My son just graduated college and he's looking to pick up a vehicle and I just wanted to bounce off you. They a little economics. How what? What could revive it with not not hurt him too bad when he wants to go buy a house, which which is a feeling. A little while. Sure total cost of ownership. It's the total cost of ownership questions. Hey, needs the front wheel drive vehicle because he likes to go skiing. Okay, that's about it. What are we talking new or used? Either way, he's not a mechanic. Okay? Well, they're a couple vehicles that I like. Okay, the I think are great for a starter vehicles As far as you know, different types of Reliability Plus also ownership costs and things like that. I got a letter and I gotta tell you about this. I got a letter in the mail and I'm gonna be honest with you. It's almost unintelligible. I could barely understand it's a scribble. And it took four months to get from the person that sent it to me to the station because I don't think the post office could read the outside of the envelope. All right, and everything. Yeah, well, baby, but the guy yelled and screamed at me in unintelligible English. That he's upset because I never recommend American cars and and that's not true. First of all, he would be surprised that 80% of the cars I own Our domestic brand. Okay?.

80% Dave 1 800 10 o'clock Baltimore four months 1092266 80 today John First Highland Memorial Park English 4 10 wcbm Ocala, Florida 6 80 Memorial Day two Wcbm 6 80 weekend couple vehicles
How A Tiny Dog Helped Me Find My Way

Does This Happen to You

02:16 min | 1 year ago

How A Tiny Dog Helped Me Find My Way

"My dog's name is pepper. And i got him in the spring of two thousand six which is also the year. Both my parents had cancer. I was almost old enough to rent a car. But not quite. I lived at home with my parents. Well i lived with my dad most of that year because my mom was receiving cancer care out of state but more on that later. My dad also had parkinson's disease. I had graduated college three years before and in the inbetween time. I'm not sure exactly what i did. Other than quitting law school after six weeks checking out books from the library and surfing the internet which must have been boring. Because i probably had a super slow connection and there was no twitter. I also started working at a tennis club. Maybe ten to twelve hours a week. I was existing. But i didn't have anything close to a clear direction. Then my mom got diagnosed with a serious type of cancer. My dad got diagnosed with a less serious type and everything suddenly felt super dark. Like hell the florida skies become ferociously black when the massive summer thunderstorms descend. I don't remember what was going through my head during that time. I didn't keep a journal. And the only thing i'm good at remembering is random sports stuff but it seems likely. I felt scared and isolated while my mom was away undergoing multiple surgeries my dad and i- cohabitated in our traditional fashion. We mostly kept to our respective of the house and bumped into each other at mealtimes and when he wanted me to drive him to lows or the driving range so maybe. It's not so surprising that i decided i needed a dog to keep me. Company the chihuahua. All my parents got me. When i was five had died three or four years before so naturally the only type of dog i considered getting was a chihuahua

Parkinson's Disease Cancer Tennis Twitter Florida
"graduate college" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"graduate college" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Indian American communities, but also on a larger scale. Shot. Pandey leads the American India Foundation, part of a coalition of philanthropic groups. So far we have commitments off $20 million In the last three or four days, We have placed orders for 7500 oxygen concentrators, both from the U. S. And from China. Off course the need is much greater. Pandey says he's worried that the crisis in India won't be over soon. After what he saw last winter. I decided to travel to India to be with my team and toe to show some solidarity. Back in December January, 20 says. He must have let his guard down because he caught Cove. It So did his mother in a city 2000 miles away. Back then, India's numbers were still pretty low, and they had space in hospitals. So you know what I noticed because I was in the hospital to hospitals and to different cities, which are like 2000 miles apart. I noticed that because the cases were so low at that time. Ah, hospitals have built this capacity, which would they were trying to wind down. He and his mother both recovered, but Pandey says the attitude at the hospitals made him worry. The country was complacent after doing better than expected during the first year. The pandemic. The word is getting out. Dr. Nalini. Sally Graham is part of the same philanthropic coalition, she says It's not just Indian Americans donating. It's not just the Indian community, but it's also you know deeper into the American community that we're reaching. She's inspired by the generosity, but it's in everyone's interest, letting Covitz spike and mutate in India. Could reverse progress worldwide. I hope this crisis will be solved. I hope vaccination rates will increase on India will conquer this and because it is a very big must for the whole world that India solves this problem. Quill Lawrence NPR NEWS New York Rhode Island is one of at least 17 states that offer free community college high school graduates can pursue a two year degree at the Community College of Rhode Island. Tuition free and that is why Talia Thibodeau enrolled. It being free and being part of that promise for him absolutely played a huge role. And so it was kind of an easy choice to make. It's called the Promise Program tell you still in her first year, but she's thinking about the future. My Dream. I guess you could say is to do something in sports communications, maybe sports marketing Just because I love of all things sports. She plans to transfer to the University of Rhode Island after she gets her associates. I've been able to work. I've been able to accumulate some money. So when I do go to your eye, I will be in a good place financially, and I'm getting a degree for ultimately nothing. Now President Biden's plan to help working class families includes free community college vice president Kamila Harris will travel to Rhode Island today to promote that plan. I talked to CCR eyes president Megan Hughes. It's been an outstanding success prior to promise the college had about a 6% to your graduation rate. And where we have since then achieved an 18% and similarly, prior to promise we had a three year rate of 15%, which we've now doubled to 30%. That kind of rapid improvement is rarely achieved in the higher education space. The graduation rates overall while they have gone up They don't seem as high as I would think. 18% a considerable achievement over 6%. But still not even one in five students graduating in two years. Why do you think that is what's going on? Sure, I would say Look 30% for a three year rate. I would agree with you. We shouldn't Russell laurels. What I would offer is it is now. At the very top of three year graduating rates for New England community colleges, So we're proud of the improvement and we no, like so many other colleges across America, we've got work to continue to do. The Biden administration is proposing to three years of community college in the American family plan. What would that actually mean for Rhode Island? As much as we love our promise program. It's been hard to know that we have not been able to extend that opportunity to working adults to Rhode Islanders who need to come back and get retraining in order to be competitive in today's job market. So what we know about the American families plan is that it will broaden access and will create much more opportunity. Is what President Biden is proposing enough. I listened to President Biden's address when he unveiled this plan on I agree with every sentence of what he said. You know, this is no longer the country that my grandfather grew up in where you could have in his case in eighth grade degree and make a living to support your family. Those days are gone and they're not coming back. And I know looking in Rhode Island and frankly looking all over the United States. We need to invest in our future workforce. If we want to be globally competitive, and if we want to retain the country, I think we hope to leave to our Children and grandchildren. Megan Hughes, the president of CCR, I thank you so much for being with us. We appreciate your time. Thank you so much, nohow. Thank you for listening to assign your local member station. You can keep the conversation going with us on social media. I'm Noel King. You can reach me on Twitter at Noel King Rachel Martin is at Rachel.

Talia Thibodeau Sally Graham Noel King American India Foundation Nalini Rhode Island $20 million two years 15% United States 30% America India China 18% 2000 miles Kamila Harris Pandey U. S. 7500 oxygen concentrators
"graduate college" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"graduate college" Discussed on WBUR

"Air. Let's get back to my interview with Nicole in Lewis. Her new memoir, Pregnant Girl is about getting pregnant in high school. All the difficulties she faced is a single teenage mother. And has she managed to put herself through college and grad school. She's the founder and CEO of Generation Hope, which helps motivated teen parents and their Children with financial resource is and mentoring to help the parents live in college and their Children. Drive in kindergarten. And I should probably ask you here. Is this mostly for the Washington, DC area, or are you working nationally with with teenage parents? We actually work nationally as well. And we've broadened our scope from from including not only teen parents in college but also student parents of any age. You know those who those students who are our care givers, sometimes of a child, sometimes of their sibling, depending on you know, kind of their journeys and making sure that we're advocating for their needs to make sure that they complete college all across the country. Let's get back to your story. You find you graduated college with honors? Yes, and with how much student debt. My undergrad was about $35,000. By today's standards. That's not terrible, unfortunately, Isn't that sad? Yeah. Isn't that sad? And you rather black students with Children carry the most student that Yes, Why is that? Well, we know that you know the there's so many things that contribute to that from the racial wealth gap that black families have in terms of. How do you afford college In the first place?.

Nicole Generation Hope Washington, DC about $35,000 today first single mother Lewis
Tom Grennan on New Album - Evering Road

Inside the Studio

02:14 min | 1 year ago

Tom Grennan on New Album - Evering Road

"My guest today originally had plans to be a soccer player in his native. uk then he has some drinks at a party saying some karaoke and his musical gifts revealed themselves. Perhaps the best thing that come of drunk karaoke in human history. He signed a record deal soon after graduating college. Kickstarting rapid ride to the top of the charts. His sophomore album ever in rhode debuted at number one in england. When it was released in march the record takes its name from the street where he once lived with. Now ex girlfriend. Their breakup is the theme of the album. But as he emphatically says this is not a break up album there are no maudlin moments or rule recriminations to be heard no instead he turns is critical. Eye on himself is past mistakes in ways that he wasn't always a good partner. Much of the music is about owning up to his failings and trying to be better rather than an album. Bitter animosity and vengeance road is packed with soulful songs of redemption and hope it comes through on his albums recent single little bit of love a song about unconditional acceptance of both himself and others in his new song. L. a. henderson. Let's go home together suggests a happy ending. I'm so thrilled to welcome tom. Brennan thank you. Obviously you're crazy for me is so crazy. A homily like the sun is kind of working in america on. My dream is to crack america sites. depths. Judy minors is the main ticket back. A little bit. You new album ever in rhode. It's about it's about a break-up but it's not a break up album in fact in a lot of ways it's a. It's an anti break up album you. You're taking this really compassionate view of your ex partner in a really thoughtful view of yourself and your time together. Can you give me a little background on this record. Like what would down at ever in rhode so everyone was. It was kind of espace. Love heartbreak credential. I'm really for me. It was kind of holding. My hat is holding hands up and say listen. I've done some bad in his relationship. I needed to love myself before. I could love anybody else. Unfortunately like During that time. But like i say i needed to binds happiness in muscles couldn't get that to anybody else did not till i had that myself so sold about. That really is a break-up our but like you say it's not listed bring up

Rhode Judy Minors Soccer UK England America Brennan Henderson TOM
Gender On The Trail And Ultra Scene

Running Realized

02:15 min | 1 year ago

Gender On The Trail And Ultra Scene

"I'm so belisario. i a queer. Non binary trail runner ultra runner. I started running. Shortly after. I graduated college back in two thousand eight where i was unemployed looking for a job and in the middle of me semitic resumes. I decided i needed to do something else. Besides that to like keep my mental health up And so i trained for a local five k. And i've trained as hard as i could sign up for it and i don't know this is kind of like the moment that i realized me. Being a non binary person. affects the way that i move in the running space because back then elliot's in that iran with there really wasn't Space for non binary people to exist what that meant like in the professional world and my social life in the running space and so just like checking off the box for female. Which is how i was born. Felt wrong to me But then you know thinking back to the other option like mail. That also didn't feel right to me either. So it makes me feel unseen and like i m not conflicted about who. I am Because i i feel very strongly about how i identify as non binary person but i just wish for race directors and race managing incoming whoever like ads the box two genders. I wish for them to just see people like me that we don't identify as either gender

Belisario Elliot Iran
What the Second Amendment really meant to the Founders

Frontlines of Freedom

04:15 min | 1 year ago

What the Second Amendment really meant to the Founders

"You know, in my intro and then earlier segment early in the show I was talking about The primary purpose of the Second Amendment, according to the founding fathers, and I said My piece told listeners what I thought that the primary purpose of the Second Amendment, according to people like George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, What is in Mark Walters Mind the primary purpose. Of the Second Amendment. According to the phone and fathers. I love this because it's so provocative and I love to be provocative, and I'm gonna answer that with a question. Here's my question to you. We just talked about what Biden wants to do. Virginia the first time the Democrats took power in Virginia, for example, in 25 years. What's the first thing they did They chucked 12 Gun control bills down there. People throw up. Eight of them passing was signed into law. Joe Biden's first deal is gun control. I'm gonna answer the purpose of our founding fathers in the second Amendment with this question to you. What is it about their communist Marxist socialist masquerading his former Democrat agenda that requires you to be disarmed? Yeah. Very good point. And it would appear that great minds think alike because well, you know, we are way have Yeah, Me and George were in the world. Good company together. Way. Agree with each other. Martha. I guess the question is You know what is going to happen now? I mean, I look at it. It's like Texas that are actively talking about succession. Oh, yeah. You know, California's got bills by others, three different deals. They want to split that stable. You know, he was a really simple, quick Virginia. You know, I spent many a graduated college in Virginia. Lots of friends there lived in three different cities in Virginia know it well. It's a gun toting gun, love and freedom, love and bright red State. You've got two counties up there that control everything included with Richmond. The rest of the state is bright red. Why don't we have any electoral college at the state level? Okay? Yeah, Which would be which would kind of solve these problems. Where you New York State's a prime example. You get rid of that cess pool in Manhattan in the boroughs and New York State is a freedom loving, bright red state. Upstate New York's bright red Yep. Okay? Absolutely, you know, and you get rid of I mean term limits. Term limits scared me a little bit on Lee, because, well, what happens with term limits is you get the next term. Someone knows that's there. They could do anything they want. They're no longer held accountable to the voters that they don't have to hope if voters are hold them accountable. You know that old So what We do have term limits. We have elections. That's true, But they turn out the way they do in states like New York and California. Because we've got to a point. We have two or three cities controlling the rest of the state that needs to be looked at. Yeah, Georgia just gave you two of the worst senators in this country's history. And this is a bright red state. That isn't gonna be blue anytime soon. You look at the legislative makeup in the state and their redistricting coming up in July after this legislative session, you want to see Democrat controlled the state level the state Don't think of the rest of my life. And yet we just handed you too. The bluest worst of the worst senators, not because any red counties flipped blue. Nothing did They were able to siphon off more votes in two counties not being the cabin Fulton County And their six swing states. Basically, that have to fix their election systems of the way they do things in Michigan and Georgia. There's two of them right there, but nobody knew George was one of these states until that, you know, action. You see, that's why that's why people George, I would have never Guest. I wish Now, I will say this that we've been watching Stacey Abrams here for the last two years. Prior to the election in November. We all knew what she was up to. And here's the thing. I watched her vote on local news that night. Now here she is a resident of Atlanta. Hmm. And here she is. Dropping off an absentee ballot in a little mailbox been in downtown Atlanta. What? Why are you standing in line like the rest of us? Okay. That's where fraud comes from. Yeah, no signature verifications. Everybody gets mailed about it and they could go drop it in. No, no, no. No. Where I come from absentee ballots are for people like you who are serving their country overseas that need an absentee ballot Kids in college that can't make it back to their district to vote. My mom and dad who might be in Florida, and they're Georgia residents because they're they're from that's an absentee ballot. So those those issues are being addressed. Those issues are being addressed. They cut all ties to our gun rights, By the way, Yeah, and we'll have to address them on a different show because we are of time here, Mark.

Virginia Mark Walters Thomas Jefferson George Washington Joe Biden New York Biden George California Martha Upstate Georgia Richmond New York State Manhattan Texas Stacey Abrams LEE Fulton County Atlanta
"graduate college" Discussed on Adventures with Grammy

Adventures with Grammy

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"graduate college" Discussed on Adventures with Grammy

"The student has to write the essay. And if they don't care that's gonna come through in the essay give your kids and your grandkids opportunities during middle school to find their passion. For example there are a lot of opportunities for parents and grandparents to observe their children grandchildren. You know anytime there with them. What is it that they seem to like or not like there are interest surveys online that they can take as well but some of it be just attending summer camps of a variety many summer camps are free or very very inexpensive for example. I sent my children to pretty much every free summer camp. That could drive them to. They all have different theme a different idea. Whatever obviously they're gonna be with different people. It may even be with different churches. It doesn't matter. There was one summer. I think my son might have been about twelve years old. And i had him signed up for five camps that summer five week long camps we get to the fifth one on the first day and he says so. Tell me again why am going to this camp. This is the answer because my job is to give you opportunities. Your job is to find your passion. That last camp happened to be at nasa. They had a summer camp for children. It was an hour and a half drive. So i found some other parents that i could carpool with. Didn't have to drive everyday or we got to the last day in a bout to walk my child to the parking lot to the car. I stopped on the sidewalk. And i said son. You haven't talked much about this camp all week long because he's a boy and they don't talk to you very much. Just what most of them do so. I asked him. What did you like or not like about this camp. His response was cool. I liked the robots and then he paused and said no. What i really liked was programming. The robots a said son. I have a degree in computer programming. We can do that. It took me a couple of years. But i finally found a program online with very inexpensive that homeschool parents can order and purchase their kids and teach them how to do. Some computer program was very very easy. So that's what he did when he was a high school freshman. I believe then fast forward college. He decided to major in mechanical engineering. His favorite thing in the entire curriculum is doing the computer. Aided design for every project that is the part that he did for any team project that he was assigned to. He ended up graduating with the degree in mechanical engineering and a minor an aerospace engineering. And today he works for military contractor his dream job..

today five camps five week an hour and a half one summer first day fifth one about twelve years old nasa of years last
"graduate college" Discussed on Adventures with Grammy

Adventures with Grammy

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"graduate college" Discussed on Adventures with Grammy

"But she was offered many scholarships for many colleges because they could see the focus of where where where her heart lies right where her passion lies and they knew where she fit into the college campus community. Who it's not all about. You know like i said we want to valedictorians. There is a place for that but that's not a requirement. I think what parents need to realize grandparents who are helping to assist getting their grandchildren in college and financially with that is that there are some colleges that will give academic scholarships and need based scholarship. Financial need meaning family's income. There are some colleges that have absolutely zero academic scholarships in other words. Perhaps they have a lot of students. Applying who have four point. Oh gpa or higher. Right or Maybe they are the valedictorians and they got perfect or near perfect. Sat scores but they don't give money for that because the vast majority of people who are applying have those kinds of statistics parents and grandparents need to understand why colleges offer money or discounts as it really visit very rarely actual cash. Come into play. They offer scholarships as an incentive for that student to go to that school because that students statistics their gpa and test scores will raise the colleges rankings college rankings are based on different factors but one of the major factors is average test scores and gpa of incoming freshman so a college who's average gpa. And test score is the top ninety five percent right the top five percent of school of children. They don't have an incentive to offer scholarships for academics. They've already got those people applying for example harvard. Harvard doesn't give any academic scholarships at all. They only give need bay scholarships so if your income is let's say middle middle america in there's a really good chance you'll get some type of offer for financial aid based on the family's finances but i don't care how good those test scores are..

Harvard harvard five percent one zero academic scholarships ninety five percent four point america
"graduate college" Discussed on Adventures with Grammy

Adventures with Grammy

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"graduate college" Discussed on Adventures with Grammy

"Children and to my students i'm now retired. Teacher is that it's really important to look at career exploration from a young age and on your website. You say that parents should contact you when their children are in sixth to eighth grade. And i know as a high school teacher a having knowledge coming into high school impacts the courses that you take and a child attitude toward great. So is that part of your. Your promotion is to tell middle school students. How important is to pick the right classes absolutely and it's not just the right classes. Also the right activities both school activities and extracurricular activities outside of the school. One of the things that i think parents have been told and and children have been told for. Years is don't start looking at colleges or anything related to college even taking college entrance exams until junior or senior year. But the problem with waiting is that the student may not have had the right college course. I'm sorry high. School courses that colleges are gonna value for college admissions. They may not have done the right acttivities that are going to promote again. College admissions and scholarships so if a parent contact me in that middle school timeframe then they can get started on the right foot. They've had time to as you said assess what their children might really be interested in for career choice and sounds early. It's really not it's mostly with parents. It's mostly being aware of your child's What is it that they enjoy doing. What are their the things that that really you know. Floats their boat so to speak. Had parents say well you know my kid has been playing baseball or football or some other sport since they were three years old. And that's awesome so my question to parents at that point is okay. So is johnny gonna play college ball. The answer is almost always will. I don't know he's twelve. Okay and here's the problem. Their children who who really have the skill set the talent to play college ball or basically picked out at age. Eight nine yes. There are some late bloomers but it is so obvious. I've seen it myself in children. That were eight nine years old. They're gonna play college ball. They may even play professional ball. And i'm not telling parents will then. Johnny has to quit and we have to ask a different. The next question is will. Does johnny love it or is he only doing this. Because mom's been dropping him off twice a week since he was three years old. Because that's what we do. That's a very important question that parents need to assess if he loves it now. We can work with that because then we can start talking about right. What if he really loves it then. Maybe when he's in high school he can do some assistant coaching or even hold weekend or summer workshops for other kids. This put something on their college in scholarship. Applications that is leadership very very important to start looking at those types of things early in their high school career because today those college applications are going out.

eight johnny twelve sixth today Eight nine Johnny johnny gon twice a week three years old nine years old both school eighth grade One of things
"graduate college" Discussed on Adventures with Grammy

Adventures with Grammy

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"graduate college" Discussed on Adventures with Grammy

"Fairly close to what i would consider a career and technical education opportunity. One of the places. I took my grandkids was at the nasa wallops over in the eastern shore and one at the activities that the children did was launched bottle rock and they used a bicycle pump to help build the pressure and then watch these two liter bottles of water. It was fascinating and it reminds me of the movie october. Sky about mr hickam. Who just want it to be an astronaut and wound up fulfilling his dream. And i keep thinking that it is so important that we expose kids to all kinds of opportunities so the fact that dahlgren is working with your elementary school to do that. Just is just delightful. I'm just really happy to hear. That is very exciting. The gentleman that was willing to come and do this more than willing even purchased all the items for our students. So i do love that. Our community has people that are so interested in so willing to support our students and learning. That is key. Is you have to have community support to literally and and we just are extra fortunate to have the base right here. The bank comes when we're in person. Obviously not right nail but nsw say santa the table at our school once a week and they do banking with the children. And that's pretty neat. They're teaching them the banking system so they come in and a mate deposits and. They're here to greet them to do that. And that's a really exciting community opportunity. There still benefits from just some up our conversation. How can grandparents helped launch their grandchildren on paths that will lead to satisfying careers. So use the network. Get out there and go to the places that you can Win travel as possible. I think travel is amazing opportunity for students to see children to see things stay connected with the school maybe navy. Some of these parents or grandparents would be willing to share some air experiences with their child's classroom and expose that opportunity to a lot more children. Also i think it's important that we talk about the vocabulary. We use the words so that the first time students are hearing about career or language that we use not coming from school that maybe it's coming from home that would be an advantage for young people will so important that they understand what what brings them some joy and happiness is is ultimately what.

dahlgren One two liter bottles once a week first time one hickam Sky october nasa
"graduate college" Discussed on Adventures with Grammy

Adventures with Grammy

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"graduate college" Discussed on Adventures with Grammy

"To the adventures with grammy podcast. I am your host carolyn. Barey this podcast is for grandparents on the go with their grandchildren and for parents who went to ensure loving relationships across the generations. I welcome your feedback and your input on every episode of the podcast. We produce please send me an email. Caroline at adventures with grammy dot com. Now sit back with your favorite beverage and enjoy today's episode. What do you want to be when you grow up. It's a favourite question adults often as children a question. Today's guest encourage you to ask your children and grandchildren and then discuss with them. The thousands of career options available this episode of the adventures with grammy. Podcasts will focus on the importance of early career exploration and how to graduate from college debt. Free my guest are robin mitchell. An elementary counselor. Who works for king. George county public schools in virginia and denise thomas international bestselling author ted ex speaker creator of cracking.

"graduate college" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"graduate college" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Be the first in their family to graduate college Explorer career. That leaves a legacy You can be proud of. Teach, learn more and receive free support at teach dot or g'kar. If a natural disaster comes knocking. How prepared is your family? You can't just close the door on earthquakes, floods or hurricanes and hope they go away. That's why it's important to make a plan. Now ready. Dog of Slash Plan has the tools and tips you need to prepare your family for an emergency. So if disaster shows up at your doorstep, you'll be ready. Is it ready? Dot com slash plan and make a plan today brought to you by FEMA and the Ad Council W B S M. Six. David.

Samantha Tomaszewski, social strategy leader, BuzzFeed, on career in social media audience engagement

Journalism.co.uk podcast

08:09 min | 2 years ago

Samantha Tomaszewski, social strategy leader, BuzzFeed, on career in social media audience engagement

"Today. We're gonna talk about audience work samantha. I think maybe a useful place to start might be with you. You're of course the social strategists of commerce for buzzfeed. He told me exactly what that means. Yeah so i. Focused specifically on buzzfeed has an entire shopping and commerce. Vertical on that helps generate revenue for the site so i focus on the Social strategy that has to do specifically with. Yeah our shopping. Vertical commerce that we have different facebook and instagram account We should affiliations through the app. Trying to get people to view and hopefully convert and shop from buzzfeed shopping's content and you'll training is actually journalism. Right yes yeah. I went to lehigh. University and i studied journalism political science. So how'd you go from as journalists to to what you do now because they seem slightly not far apart but they of course. Different skills and disciplines. Yeah an. I honestly think this is why i enjoy doing a lot of like student. Mentorship conversations is something that i do in my spare time because i love to talk to students about how i went from my studies university to Where i am now and the kind of important middle pieces. I also worked for huffpost for about three years as an audience editor. That was definitely more than new space before. I made the transition to commerce but it was definitely my treating from school. That got me there where i did study. You know a lot of social media. And i worked for my student newspaper editor-in-chief so i think a lot of practical experience that i get in college was able to help me leverage interviews and opportunities that they did come up after i graduated. This is going to be useful for more. We're about to about to talk about what i don't understand is where does your journalistic thread really still help you today. yeah i think in conversations with students are being active on twitter. And i think yeah. It's definitely helped me again. Even though i am in the commerce face now that i do approach it from maybe a different perspective somebody who has a marketing background or a different sort of training. And i think that's helped me sort of succeed in that role in yet. Maybe look at marketing ecommerce from a different lens at a different angle that kind of that journalistic training and news is still kind of always been like my passionate. My background yes. It's been cool to kind of approach. A new different challenge in like a slightly different discipline. With that lens. so samantha at the stop december. You had a twitter thread which seemed to go on a quite a bit of attention and just gonna take a few moments to read through that for our audience who may not seen it. You say i was on the mentoring cool with a student about to graduate college and she told me that a member of a fairly popular journalism organization gave her some discouraging advice. This person told her not to go into audience work. she was taught. That should be better off working in a reporter all covering political committee even if no one read her work. I was shocked. And that's really the main part of the the tweet you to talk about the kind of skills that you acquire through working in social and how that might help to make you a better journalist editor in chief had of audience etc and basically saying the audience. Work is a valid career path for me. What kind of stuck out with this. And what seemed to be the main thrust of the compensation that audience roles in journalism at least are perhaps not taking seriously as some of the more traditional roles still existent in the newsroom. So can you recap on. Wherever where this threat came from the impetus for that was sure. Yeah i expected to take off as much as it did but obviously it was very encouraging to see that so many people have strong reactions to it. And we're coming out in support of what. I was saying that that was great and i think it was just that i had spoken to the student and i had such like a you know on one hand infuriating but on the other hand like poignant sort of anecdote from her about somebody telling her that she shouldn't go into audience work in that she would be better off being a reporter doing work that nobody was even reading which doesn't really make sense to me. That was just. She clearly had been so affected by being told that even though her passion was an audience. I just wanted to try and you know in my conversation with her. I tried to tell her that. That certainly wasn't true. I've been able to find a path for it myself. But i just wanted to speak to that to the journalism community at large in some way Because i was so shocked that someone would tell like a growing journalists that I'm not asking you to to name drop of course but can you be more specific about the type of news organization. That had sort discouraged her in this way. And i don't even she didn't even name. I don't know the individual who it was and that's obvious he never would. It was about but you know a fairly large digital mu organization in one that does promote journalism and digital media yagi Specific affiliation with the organization. Or anything like that. You know what. I'm trying to get a picture of where that kind of attitude has come from. We're talking about you said digital media company based in the us deny yes legacy your print media. That's what was interesting is that it was coming from somewhere that i wouldn't have expected this sort of advice navy to come from interest and in your experiences this like an isolated event. You hear this a lot. Yeah i mean. I think i've also experienced a lot. Even you know by career so far in you know. Both of the newsroom's i've worked in and buzzfeed Post there obviously. The vast majority of people are incredibly supportive of the audience team. But i do think it is sometimes struggle to get your foot in the door in certain meetings or to get your opinions out by certain journalists. Who may be you know are entrenched in some of these older schools of thought about what even is audience worker. Why is it important. So i think i've seen that. There is still a learning process. Even when i've been in newsrooms trying to do the work that i do cleaning they'll put you off. No no because. I think it is. It is important so i think it's really rewarding when you do maybe get through to somebody who didn't understand how you can help them in. Their story goes viral on twitter. Because you mockup a tweet thread. That does really well. Then they see the value of it. I think there's constantly a need for audience enters to try to prove and show results and data for what they're doing and i do you know have found that rewarding as well to be able to show people like. Here's what we can do to elevate your work like look at works that it's really exciting. So i mean the thrust of that conversation. Was it very much. That audience roles are just not as integral to the newsroom. Or was it that they just kind of look down on a as i said from the beginning like not taking seriously. What was called the main bone of contention like disgust here. Yeah i mean. I think all of those things are potentially depending yet. I think who you're talking to. I think obviously. I was speaking to the student as like a career conversation. She was about to graduate and she was trying to figure out what she should pursue. So i think it was. You know maybe they aren't as integral to newsroom so she shouldn't do it because maybe they're not stability there but again i know i shared with her. You know it's just one experience. But i have. I've experienced stability in far in my career. you know. obviously they're always layoffs in media yet. I think against you that if you wanted to have a future in journalism she was getting told that maybe this wasn't the right path for her. Because i think that was another point in my thread is she has an interest in politics. She was getting told. You know if you wanna go into political journalism you have to be like a beat reporter and that's the only way you can get there but again i don't really think that's true and something else. I tried to outline in my throat is how many great skills you do learn being an audience that can transfer to being reported. You know people who have moved into production or product or any sort of area in media and beyond so. I think i was really just trying to emphasize that it is a valid career path. We shouldn't be telling young journalists that it's not

Samantha Twitter Instagram Lehigh Facebook Navy United States
"graduate college" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

06:32 min | 2 years ago

"graduate college" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"With large financial institutions so you could take action on our advice. I think that's a really big differentiator that other people are not doing. The target audience is people that are in their twenties. You were saying We've all been there before. Right? You your first your second job out of college. You're budgeting for the first time. Have to pay your rent. You realize you have tol belongings, right? Taxes, taxes, You pay taxes for the first time you guys have your paycheck goes, you know, or whatever it is. And for the first time you deal with these things and We don't have that feeling, And that's really the moment. We're, um we're building a product for that moment where you first paid your taxes first lived in, you know, left left home and you have some money on your own. And exactly. You're an adult. You feel like an adult the first time you have adult responsibilities. Albert helps you navigate those water. How'd you come up with Albert, though? I mean, it's a great concept. A lot of times, people come on the show, and they have a business that was created out of the desire and the need to solve a problem. Their own life. Was that the case for you when you graduated college did you have these struggles and wish there was an Albert app out there for yourself? I think it takes a long time to realize the scope of the problem. So sure I had these problems, you know, 10 11 years ago, When I graduated from college, I realized that a nap Don't think there were APS e Did I realize in 2000 and five that That something could have helped me with the process. Perhaps. I mean, I don't think I was that precocious. But you know, over 10 years of hearing, you know, my sister go through my younger brother. Go. Everybody go through the same thing. Having spent a career sort of in the financial services you start to triangulate around the need. And I've used basically every app in the store that in the APP store, and the guys in this space tries to solve elements of these problems. And so I don't think there was a real life palm Aha Moment writes a problem that a lot of people have talked about and their various solutions to. I think the light blue one for us is can we make this really easy for people and that took a long time to realize for us a place that that's what we think is the problem. I think over last few years, we've had a variety of life work experiences. It made us realize that the difficulty was a problem. And that is something that technology in relationships we had could actually saw. Okay, So is Albert your first business, Or is this something that you've been building up to? You had multiple companies, and this is something that's finally going to be a home run. I don't know about the ladder. It would be lovely if it's a home run. But this is my second business. So I built another consumer financial services businesses. Before this in prior to that spent my twenties working at an asset manager in the financial services in New York. How did you go from doing asked management into creating an out I was so my background is I studied computer science and economics and college. And prior to that, I would say I've been a tinker my entire life. I think I've been writing code since about the age of 10 and always been tinkering and I think it was a matter of time for me when I would go into going to the maybe not at buildings, Facebook, the tinkering space building something, and, yeah, about 3.5 years ago left the asset management gig and I think all my bosses looked at me like I was a little crazy, but they realized I was happy and went off. I went off the deep end and then went out and You know, there's it takes some wild to get, you know you think you get into it. Okay, I'm gonna go and build the startup. I have all the tools and you realize about 2.5 years and you have no tools and over and over time, just like anything else. You get good at it, And you know, we're 3.5 times four years deep into the mission we're here to inspire, inform and connect a community of entrepreneurs. I'm mark lack in. This is business rock stars again. He non reviewed is joining us right now. So a 10 years old, you were doing coding and programming you were saying, so take it back to that. That's not something A lot of 10 year olds were doing, at least definitely not myself. So what was that? Like a 10 years old being in that type of the mindset, Brother simply. I think I built a Web page on the Web page. But that was 10 years old. So you did it, And I think a lot of adults nowadays don't even know how to build a Web page. But 10 years old, you were doing that way back in the day, and it's easier now than it's ever been. It's a lot easier now. But now you can build more so back then was a lot of work to build a Web page and make it click. And, you know, I don't even remember what was on it right. It was I vote. We take her and, you know, take her back. Did you always wanna be an entrepreneur? Or was that was around 10 years old when you realize that you had this capability of creating Web pages and doing things a little bit different than most people your age. I don't know that the entrepreneur I don't know if the goal's always been the entrepreneur, right? I don't think of it that way. I liked building things I got to build. Things follows. Yes, manager and I got to build things afterwards. And I've always sort of gotten to build things and I like building so The goal and Think that gold Each point is in my career and before is just being a position, right? Build something, whether it's just part of our organization or not, I mean, It's best to be part of an organization, so I just want to be off the deep end by yourself, but be part of an organization and build something to me. That was always the goal. Okay, so building things is a passion of yours being creative. And you've been involved in a handful of different companies now over the last decade as an entrepreneur. So what do you think for the aspiring entrepreneurs are for the entrepreneurs just getting started? What do you think, or three things that every beginning Entrepreneur needs to know before they get into business. I think more than anything else realizing that going to start a business or being an entrepreneur, however, you want to describe it. Really the 10,000 hours. Adage applies, okay. And it takes time. And what do you wish? What do you think? Those three things are that you wish you could have gone back to the first is, um it's not going back. But how did this self awareness to know? So the first one is knowing that I'd be That you're really behind the curve when you start that there are other people that have put in those 10,000 hours, and you're competing with them right in their building. Similar businesses air there, Billy photo ops. It doesn't matter. They're They're They're so that's one On, but I think you know I'll focus on that one because everything sort of comes from that. Really. It's all about wearing something where it's all about the work, right and everything comes from the work. I don't think they're They're three specific things of You know, I wish I were blue every day, right? It Z. It's the self awareness of the work you have to put in and something we didn't put in the work but knowing on that journey where you are in the work Knowing based on the work that you've put in where is really realistic for you to be.

Albert Facebook New York
"graduate college" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

08:05 min | 2 years ago

"graduate college" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Look, I made it 5.5 day. I mean, that's pretty good. Come on. My body is a lot better. I'm detail foreseen calamity That's gonna cause you to drink exactly. Detox. Five days is fine. I'd drink a lot of water doing all these detox things. I'm fine. My body can start screaming and yelling, Megan, No! Don't you know I'm back at it. All right, uh, This is kind of funny in a completely in completely bizarre news. Dennis Network D. R. Has launched a new Children Syriza about a man with a Penis so enormous he can barely control it. Now this is again. This is a kid's show is a kid show. Yeah, it's called John John Dillaman, John Dillaman. Follows a man who put his record setting Penis to good use and rescue operations, money making schemes and cooking demonstrations. In order to teach kids the importance of overcoming hardship. Pun intended, arch. I would imagine And celebrating diverse bodies because, you know, apparently watching a TV show about a man with giant song is the best way to get those lessons across. There you go. This is Danish television. Str I wonder if I get that a direct TV you are going to now. Ah, you know that Netflix actually thinking it. Uh, you know, you've been ostracized for the opposite. I know. So there are people so you know, you think? Wow. I wish I really had a huge member and see what happens here, John. It's that careful What you ask for? Exactly. It's by the way, Dillaman that the reason why they named it That is Dillard. The I l l E R means Penis and Danish. And Delmon, uh, translates to Penis man. So, dillaman Iso John Penis man. So if it was in America, but we call it dick, Man. Yes, Something like that. Yeah, well, it sounds like Ah. Anyway, there you go there trying to teach kids that just because you have this thing this thing doesn't mean you can't. So how big is his, Uh, dangerous. Look here. Gonna look here, remember? Did we have that? Maybe it was just the story. I don't think we had the guy on. We might have had the guy. Remember the guy that went to San Francisco International Airport and and they thought he had something in his pants. And it wasn't something that shift this huge. Yeah, it wasn't coming. Now. We just talked about it. I don't think we have the guy on I think we're trying to get him on and we never got him on. But anyway, uh, yeah. There's that story. So anyway. Yeah. Parents, obviously. Are not really happy about it. But it's supposed to celebrate diverse bodies on again teaching kids to overcome hardship and celebrate diverse bodies. So there you go. Okay, either, so we're trying for a noble reason. Just an interesting way to do it. It's a little different because anybody ever complained of that. You know, there are people Like, you know, women have, you know breast reductions? Because they're back. And you that batch? Terrible practice? Yeah. No guy would. Does anybody ever had a Penis not enlargement, but Yeah. Text line, please. I've used this term before, but I just don't think a guy would go into the dock and go. Yeah, This is a problem like you know, some women to wear. Yeah, outfit just started. They don't find it attractive. I could see that. I mean, if you had a how big is gentleman is my question E mean, I mean, could you you know He uses. The thing is a jump rope in one of the one of the episodes, so I'm probably just something double Dutch. You know, you could use it as a necktie whenever you could tie. Look, Uh yeah. Skin color Tiger. We're not there. That's dilemma to exactly Friend, But, yeah, Like I said, I just I can't envision a guy walking into the dock and saying, Hey, Doc, this is just a problem. Just, uh if you just leave the tip, there would be a good shape. Take me down a couple of yards. Get up off sides over the neutral zone all day. Some problems so encroachment. Kellerman just haven't seen it, but But there you go. I told you about scientists. They are it says atomic clock. Scientists suggest shortening a minute the 59 seconds. Now Look, I could see that or else we're gonna be off. I could see you. You're not on board with It kind of sounds like daylight savings. I could could we quit messing with it? But if we don't do that shot in many, many years, we're gonna be way off. And you're gonna be starting a show it like 10. 12. What time is it Should have taken that 2nd 2020 reason to do that. We've got much better. I just want, you know, just management's listening. I mean, much better, your degree trying. Well, you think you were not That's the one thing is is on TV. You got to get it right to the second right on radio. We're gonna happen whenever again. Latest throws to break right, They'll just cut you guys off right on TV. Just didn't say they were doing that. I remember they would play like music or little sounder than just chop us off. And we went too long. Yeah. Sorry. What was it then? Yeah. So what's the reason for this? The way the earth is spinning or so Yeah, yeah, yeah, I guess I'm bored. You know, I just It's not that the you know the movement of the clocks, Whatever daylight savings, All those things doesn't bother me. But it's just it seems like the cries have gotten louder. That people have had it. I don't I don't really find because most of the clocks in your house now unless you have, you know a basic one, but Your phone all the different your electronic sale change. I mean, what's the big deal? People get mad. They're slightly off. You know if it's just a You know when the sun comes up, and there's a bigger issue here for science to bring it in, which leads to My son was just talking about the metric system the other day, he didn't even know that much about Fahrenheit and Celsius. So like, what are they teaching? You went to private school all the way through your graduate college in a couple of months, and he never knew what But he was just learning itself. Celsius is better than Fahrenheit because Celsius you know, freezing a zero and boiling is 100. And I grew up in Buffalo. So I know you know, I know Celsius, you know zero. It's times. 00.18 multiple, plus 32 to go from Celsius. Different it. I know it quickly anyway. Um The one thing that's always kind of thrown me off and doing games and Would we ever want to go to a minute? As 100. So with your theory. If we went, they want to go to 59 seconds. That wouldn't quite work. But if you went down to 50 seconds And then we made a second, actually half a second. And we went to 100 of these units. Don't you get thrown off sometimes. By, you know quickly. How many seconds is three minutes fast, fast, fast. 1 80. We'll say you're smart. You're your side, virtually mathematical genes that just throw me I like what? I'm doing a game and there's like 40 to play in the game. I will, I will often say 100 seconds to go. Yeah, you know, like that. A man and a half And there are the Chan Yard line. I'll often say they're gonna drive 90 yards and 90 seconds. But they were based things on 100, right or tens or based on Yeah, we ever see us getting the point where An hour or a minute would be based on Sixties interval of 100. So if you went to half of a second, Yeah, that makes sense. Would you ever know? Would you be on board If we could do that? Because that's a lot of president would have to go back to 50 for that to work to make two units. You'd have to have a whole generation of people who have thought this way their lives. But if, but you're right, I wonder when they originally did this because you go 59 60. We'll come to that when you just $99 because 60 seconds here in a minute and then 60 minutes to the hour and then 24 hours. Was in the day it all works. But if you're just slightly off the way these earth is rotating, then you have to go down to 59 seconds. Right For makes sense. That's the whole point. What if we just cut it back to 50.

John John Dillaman John Penis Netflix Megan Dennis Network D. R. San Francisco International Ai America Delmon president Chan Yard Kellerman Dillard Buffalo
"graduate college" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:23 min | 2 years ago

"graduate college" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Answer that question for me listeners out there in radio land We got Will calling us right now. Go ahead, will Yes. Hi. I'm a fan of your show. And I have unusual question for you Have a son who graduated college. A few years back and is kicking around the idea of becoming a financial adviser. So, um, we looked into some schools and some programs because there's a lot of things out there, and one of the schools is the college for financial planning. Um And I wanted to know what would you suggest a young man who wants to go out and conquer the world, so to speak and get into financial planning? And what would you What path would you suggest? Would suggest apprenticeship. With somebody who is a great adviser. So we have an internship program if he wants to. Apply for that sent me an email. You could call her office sedated 89 today, Josh, I would suggest he goes and works for free with somebody really good at the industry for six months to a year. Getting your C F P, although it's like lowest common denominator stuff. There's so much Grunt work that he may not be. He may thinking it's glamorous and stock picking and You know, so I would suggest him to eat dirt for a year. With somebody great in the industry. Me Joshua Brown somebody that Will really hone him and realizing that if he gets his C F P from some school in Colorado will be worthless. You know to that person getting the degree Is like a lowest common denominator thing. Does that make sense? So I had Chris Meyer, who I've honed over the last 10 years. Chris's An advisor at our firm. He started with me. I know he was like 21. He is a great financial advisor, in my opinion, because he did a lot of the grunt work for years. And now he's exceptional. And has been exceptional for quite some time. So I would I would. I would want him to meet Chris and our team but realized like getting a degree from you know, there's a bunch of programs is Colorado There's Boston University. It's nice, so he's converse in in the terms. But what you learn in class does not prepare you for what you will experience in real life. Does that make sense? Absolutely so and there are there are great people in our industry. They One of the brightest minds and the most successful advisers really did not have their degrees in financial planning. They Then they had their bachelor's. They had their masters and then they got There were serious 7 66 63 all that stuff 65. So there's a lot of designations he would need. On DSA. Certainly the degree would be helpful, so he's converse in in terms. But I would recommend an apprenticeship. And someone who and the reason why I suggest for free Is Then that person will You know? You're really not worth someone's time who's very successful. So by doing things, I mean, that's how I mean Chris, Chris, really, He started work with me. I was like, Why is this guy here? And then he just showed up. And somebody said, Oh, well, you could use somebody to help. And he helped me And then all the sudden he became my right hand man. So that would be my recommendation for your son. Also do do You know, I would take accounting courses. If I were to do it all over again. I think accounting Is a discipline that most financial advisor's really have. No, they don't understand numbers, which is funny. Uh most financial advisors air glorified sales people. So I would I would recommend that even more than anything else, or one of our designations that we we really value is the chartered financial analyst Designation that that would have been something that if I were to do it all over again, I would have picked out one. Paul Murphy is the CFC FP works with us. I think accounting, though, is It's tough when you're doing undergrad, but it would be It's probably been what I would have done if I could do it all over again. So, uh, that's my recipe for your son will take her final breaking the hour and folks call us sedated 89 today, Josh be among the first three who call us And he got Joshua Brown's book How I Invest My Money. Waited 8988, Josh 889885674 88 108. Josh. Hey, me out on the first tee. Yeah, I'll be right there. Just reading this article on what New bill? Congress passed. Looks like it's going to affect the value of all retirement savings plans. My financial guy didn't tell me about this when I saw him the other day. Well, my guy did. And we made a plan. You may have heard of him. Just Zelinski. Josh Alinsky is your guy. Listen, if you're 10 years or less from retirement, which I am Josh will give you a Free economic plan, which includes retirement planning a 27 point checklist to make sure your income last as long as you live, he'll even help you navigate the current tax code. I'm definitely gonna call Josh. Cool. But first, can we play some golf called Josh Kolinsky, host of the popular financial quarterback radio program for your Free Economic Plan? 888988, Josh 888988, Josh 888988, Josh I'll just let you walk away. What is your top.

Josh 888988 Chris Meyer financial analyst Designation Josh Alinsky Josh Kolinsky Josh Joshua Brown advisor Colorado Grunt Boston University Paul Murphy Congress
What If 2020 Was Just One Big MMORPG?

Kottke Ride Home

04:37 min | 2 years ago

What If 2020 Was Just One Big MMORPG?

"Earlier. This year i stumbled on a very intriguing sub reddit called simply outside by its name alone would have thought maybe it was photos of nature or a group for outdoorsy people trading tips about hiking. But no this is red it so of course. The true purpose of the group was much more creative and a bit ironic. The are outside sub. Reddit is one of many in character. Kind of role playing breads and in this one all the posts are pretending that our actual reality is in fact quoting the community description. A free to play. Mmorpg's with seven billion plus active players and quotes. the sub. reddit. Itself has almost six hundred fifty thousand players with a decent chunk of those joining this year. Although the sub reddit has been around technically since two thousand nine so basically people post and comment on real world events either of public interest or day today occurrences in their personal lives in the vernacular of a video game. As if this were just some game they were playing and this is the board where you go to discuss. Tips and tricks game updates and complain about the developers. Here are a few recent posts to give you an idea. Hey did any faction finished successfully. The democracy storyline with full rights achievements. Is it even possible anyone else. Have the bug where putting two sock items in the dryer. object occasionally deletes sock item. What happened to legendary user super underscore obama three seven three. I haven't heard from him in a while. He was an amazing guild leader. I would like to know what's up with him as with other in character sub reddit. It's like one of my old favorites are stuck ten years behind where you're only allowed to post as if it's twenty. Ten are outside is a light hearted way to share personal victories. Or talk to others about your thoughts and struggles but in a shared language that can make it a bit. Easier to be a little vulnerable quoting. The washington post part of the appeal suggested sarah lynn bowmen and academic studies role. Playing games is the shared. Language understood by all participants ages are referred to as levels events. Are quests or many games. One user who recently came out as bisexual wrote at level eighteen. My confidence stat has increased enough to remove the closet de buff for other users to comment. They must. I know that a doba refers to affects in games. That damage a main characters stats. This is the way. Social groups tend to function. They create their own jargon. Thrown in references are symbols of belonging. Bowman said world is full of anxieties. Right now some people might find comfort in discharging that through humor with people who can understand language and where they can find a sense of belonging and quotes and some people do talk about some serious things like fearing the uncertainty of death by referring to it as a data wipe that can happen at any time and unlocking new levels when graduating college or power leveling new players when having kids covid nineteen has been a regular topic of discussion this year as a world event that the developers chose to do in which has not been popular with any players. I'll read a little from the currently pinned post about the vaccine written by a real world medical professional quote high philo gamers longtime raid healer. Checking in. I wanted to say hello and give some insights about the much anticipated in game item covid vaccine. There's a lot of controversy around this item. The devs really eft up. When they created the covid nineteen world events players have been reporting crippling to buffs. That seem to last for ages. Summed buffs are permanent. It's made the game. Unplayable for lots of people and most players are sheltering in their starting area to avoid the enemies. Some players have even uninstalled due to how crippling dot's in buffs are so the devs have patched the game with the vaccine item. I in several of the healers in my guild. Got the item crafted by pfizer. About ten days ago. They've already released to the public test. Realm or p. Our notes. And it's looking like this is the answer to finally end this shitty world events in the pr using the item. Even one time resulted in your character. Getting around seventy five to eighty five percent immunity to all damage from the covid class enemies and using it a second time got ninety five percent immunity. We may even see a day when we won't need enchanted armor like the cloth masks anymore though that's still recommended for now.

Reddit Sarah Lynn Bowmen The Washington Post Bowman Barack Obama Philo Pfizer
800 Miles (MM #3560)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 years ago

800 Miles (MM #3560)

"The with kevin mason ovid has been tough on everyone. And it's tough when you've got elderly parents especially when you're not nearby i've talked to my parents more during the pandemic than i normally would. We still hear from every week and my mom's letter but we want to make sure to check into that they're doing okay because we're not so close eight hundred miles away right now. And what's funny is eight hundred. Miles is like what eleven hours by car a little over eleven hours by car. It's actually the second closest. I've ever lived my parents since i graduated college. I've always lived far away from my parents. It's just the way our lives worked closest. We ever lived three hundred seventy five miles and that was for the two years i lived in bloomington illinois when they were still living in springfield missouri. They've been in florida for most of the nineties during that time. I was in indiana and ohio. Now tennessee some about eight hundred miles away right now. Hopefully i won't have to worry about putting that into action. They're doing good and today mom celebrates birthday number. Eighty one special day. And i'll check in again as i always do checking in just a couple of times month just to make sure they're okay especially when you're not nearby.

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