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Solving hard problems and pursuing your passions.

The CyberWire

05:08 min | Last week

Solving hard problems and pursuing your passions.

"My name is Matt Devo. And the CEO of Buddha LLC. I was writing a lot of my own programs I grew up in a very rural area, so you know it didn't have exposure to some of the early BS systems, and actually with my first computer did not have a disk drive or any storage medium, so I would spend all my time programming, know all of the available memory on that commodore sixty four with different applications and had written menu application that would kinda. Let me jump between the different sections, and then I would cry every time we lost power, which was quite frequently because I. had you know would lose everything that I had coded into the device minute was powered off. I was lucky again. I was in a very rural area. There are nineteen people in my graduating class, and there is nothing offered from a computer science perspective. But when I expressed interest, my high school math teacher actually go in the summer to learn how to teach computer science, and then would come back and teach me. In the interest of adapted over time when I got to college focused on not only computer science, but also national security studies became very interested in how things work and taking them apart, and you know that was kind of my early entree into Kinda true hacking, an looking at other people's programs and other people's systems, and I happened to see this convergence between the two topics that I love, and if you think back to the early nineties, really the combination of political science. Science and computer science was all around statistics and analysis, and I saw this new career field, or at least I hoped based on what I saw was increasing use of computer technology in critical things so critical infrastructure, society, finance, etc, and then the inherent vulnerability of those systems, because I was capable of hacking them. The friends that I was meeting were capable of hacking them and then if you combine that with my National Security Focus, I saw this as a new national security. Bull boats I started writing on that topic back in Nineteen, Ninety two, and attracted a tremendous amount of attention to myself, because as one of the early people to highlight the risks of what would become information warfare cyber war, so I was viewed a little bit by some of the folks in the national security circles and intelligence community as well as kind of the equivalent of the KID building an atomic weapon in his garage I was coming to the same conclusions and researching the same things that they had identified at the same time as this key national security risk that they were trying to keep under wraps for the most part. There was quite a bit of friction at the time you know for example in nineteen, ninety three I graduated from Undergrad and win straight into Grad School, and got a masters, or was pursuing a master's in national security studies in political science and the political science team at my graduate school basically told me that the topic of information warfare was not. Not Valid from a thesis perspective, so it would have been easy to give up at that point, but I was persistent, and I had folks who were advocating for me and telling me look at issues of command and control warfare, or look at this, or we're kind of giving me pointers to kind of redirect my research. It also gave me some great. I. I built a red team that that emulated the adversary during classified coalition military exercises, and during that red team was the first person to hack into systems on an aircraft carrier. While it was at sea, we did that with a nuclear submarine or these very headline, invoking the work we're doing at the time wasn't covered in the press, but internally at the classified level within Dod, these wars significant wakeup calls. My favorite part is solving hard problems I like being in the room when we're confronting something that seems almost unconfrontational. And working through the process of how to we adequately addressed that. So I really thrive on that. Kinda read teamer perspective of give me something that you think is one of your most difficult things to achieve most difficult realities that you face, and let's build some approaches for how you do are able to take advantage of. You have the interest and the passion. By all means we have the need within the community. We have a workforce that just doesn't have the numbers by way of the professionals in it so I would encourage folks. You have the interest get involved. You have to engage in self learning. certifications are great. It's great to get on the job experience, but I always like to look at the folks who built basement lab, or set up their own aws cloud infrastructure, and we're hacking against that, so I would encourage them to take advantage of the opportunities that exist for that self directed learning as well.

Matt Devo CEO Buddha Llc Grad School
Firefighters

PODSHIP EARTH

07:28 min | 2 weeks ago

Firefighters

"This week we talk about fighting fires twice a week. A firefighter dies in the line of duty. Heroes sense of the word firefighters spend their lives, doing gritty dangerous work, wearing down their lungs and their bodies, so that the rest of us can have safer lives the biggest fire in recent San Francisco history began with just a few wisps of smoke from the top story of the building right here within a half hour, the entire structure was engulfed. Here's how it happened beginning with the first call to fire dispatch. Construction. East of Los Angeles more than fifteen hundred firefighters are facing walls of fire, eighty feet, tall, hot, dry gusts, or whipping up fire tornadoes across brush, Brittle from drought. Firefighters a frontline responders in the battle against climate change whether it's fighting raging wildfires or helping urban dwellers overcome extreme heat or rescuing victims of rising seas, firefighters, a who we call on. What is less well known that? are being exposed to toxic soup of chemicals from melting screen TV's and nylon carpets each time they respond to a residential fire. I talk with Tom O'Connor. Battalion Chief in San. Francisco's five. The poppin as well as one of the directors of the San Francisco Cancer Prevention Foundation about how firefighters a leading the charge to clean up. One Community at the time. I stopped by asking Battalion Chief O. Connor how long he's been with the San Francisco Fire Department. Had Been a firefighter in San Francisco for roughly twenty seven years until one attracted you in the first place to becoming a firefighter. ability to help others and engage in some sort of civic duty that I wanted to serve the community and as well as a kind of drifting between jobs. At that point in my life I thought I was going to be a college professor and I was in Grad. School Davis and this job came up in San Francisco, and I thought well. Maybe I'll do this and make our way through Grad. School before I get my Phd and twenty seven years later and all but dissertation, but one day I'll go back and finish up. What what was on Tom. Science that's pretty amazing that you made that switch of that time that you thought about being firefighter before and the first and the family come from a family of new. York cops and ironically enough My mother's an identical twin, and both sisters gave birth at roughly the same time, and my cousin is in New York firemen and I'm San Francisco firefighter. So yeah, we both kind of follows similar career paths in life. We're in an interesting time as it relates to public service and firefight is still revered, and you'll everyone's local hero, whereas the police are going through a rough time in terms of public perception, and and frankly the behavior firefighters are very fortunate in that. Every time were called. Were there to help? We don't give out tickets. We don't arrest people like there's no. Negative outcome of a visit from a firefighter. We know that the public call us at their absolute worst moment, so we make sure that they have absolute trust in us if they call and they want us, there were at their lowest of low. We WanNA. Make sure that's a very non-intrusive private visit and we WANNA. Maintain that trust so if they opened their doors stranger to. To come in and help we WANNA make sure that they always feel welcome to open that door, so we're always in the community talking to people and we make sure we follow up on the clients that we do visit for Medical Paul or fire call I mean we really nurture the relationship with the community, so it's sort of an oral tradition that's been handed down. With virtually every fire department in the nation, that's you maintain that that level of trust in that relationship with the public and one of the things that's unique about firefighters is you'll live together I mean it's more like a family. You're going back to your family of firefighters. How does that shift even work at one twenty four hour shift, and usually you're off for forty eight hours, and it comes to forty eight or fifty six hour workweek. But yeah, it is kind of a unique social experiment where you put all these people together for twenty four hours. We have meals together and us. You know live and fight and work together, and it's like any family. You'll have fights. You have disagreements and you make up and you come together, and there's high points and low points, but. You make it all work. Some people say we put the fun and dysfunction, but Like it, it's a it's a great experiment and is really an enjoyable profession especially when you put that family aspect together, and where's your battalion Tom I'm battalion one which goes from downtown, San Francisco Chinatown North. Beach all you over to the wharf, so it's a big busy battalion. How many? Do, you have We have roughly seventy firefighters this battalion every day, so it's five stations and I get about six thousand runs a year so I don't know how many would get with all the engines and trucks put together probably in excess of ninety thousand calls a year amazing. It's huge. Yeah, we keep busy. It's really slowed down now with the pandemic because downtown is emptied. So, there's nobody to call nine one one anymore. They're all sheltering in place somewhere

San Francisco Battalion San Francisco Fire Department San Francisco Cancer Preventio Battalion Chief O. Connor Francisco Tom O'connor Los Angeles TOM Professor York Davis Tom I Medical Paul New York
How Are we Going to Solve the Behavioral Health Crisis with Lisa Henderson

Outcomes Rocket

05:50 min | Last month

How Are we Going to Solve the Behavioral Health Crisis with Lisa Henderson

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saw Marquez's here and that I had the privilege of hosting Lisa Henderson. She is the CO founder and Chief Operating Officer at synchronous health. Her previous experience includes experience as an adjunct faculty at the Vanderbilt Cup. Periodic College chair the Southern Region at the American Counseling Association and also pass President Tennessee Counseling Association among other leadership roles. Her focus has always been on health and also mental health of communities and individuals, and with her work at synchronous health, the impact that they're making at a broader scale in. In Times of great need is just extraordinary, so I'm I'm excited to to dive into the conversation with Lisa and in the work that she and her team are are up to, but before that Lisa at one welcome you to the gas much for having me absolutely, it's a true pleasure, so you know before we dive into what you guys do. At synchronous health I want to understand better. What inspires your work in healthcare sir? So I started my career when I was planning my career and I was in Undergrad. In went straight into Grad school after that I actually got a masters in health education promotion, and so it was really focused on helping people live healthier lives and part of that research experience in that masters program was to be a health coach when police officers. It was really fine. had some great sessions where you know, I would have to kind of barter with them. So if I wanted the person who was leading the SWAT team, his stress levels were incredibly high humans and sleeping well and so I wanted him to do yoga in order for him to agree to do Yoga I had to meet him at the shooting range and. Learn how to shoot a pissed off, so you know being able to kind of meet people where they are and help them learn. New Skills was really fun, but the same time. It was so clear to me that. Those officers were living with so much more than just obesity and trouble sleeping. They were living with anxiety and depression and worry and guilt and. All the things that humans experience and it was just kind of sitting there and my training as a health coach really didn't give me the tools to address those things so I went back to school, and got a masters in counseling, so that I could get into those deeper sorts of issues with folks, and it's been just so rewarding percents to be able to kind of take both sides of health What are you doing on the behavioral side? In terms of lifestyle choices and out. Adherent to your treatment plans in taking your medication and things like that, but also why in what? What is the underlying factor of? Depression or anxiety or family conflict? Are you know other things going on that lead to the decisions that affect your health? Yeah so cool, so you got this this masters in public health education and you said this doesn't really do it i. want to dig deeper help. These people more their stressed. There's there's a lot here and you went to go. Get Your Masters and mental health, and it unlocked a lot of things and you know I. It looks and sounds like you did the right thing lease I mean now you're you're you're part of this this really unique company addressing a lot of these issues at scale. Tell me about how it happened and and folks Leeson. We're having some fun connecting before the podcast that I shared my story with their vow had a couple offers the people wanting to buy outcomes rocket before it was, it was it was a business profitable business and the pressures that I got at home, saying no to those offers. Lisa I. WanNa Hear Your Story. We were saving it here for for us to share it with the listeners to tell me how synchronous help happened and and what exactly you guys are doing. The add value to the healthcare ecosystem sure. So similar to your experience, so one of my co are three of us. Co Founders of synchronised Health Katie, Moore. Guy Barnard, Myself Katie and I are both mental health. Clinicians report together for about ten years and several years ago, we started a treatment center and the first sort of level of programming that we provided as. Intensive outpatient, so we had people with us in our services in our program for nine hours a week and we would have them for. One to four months, and even folks who had been with us for nine hours a week would still come in and say I forgot or I was too stressed or I was triggered to use the skills that we're learning while we're here and then have them show up when I meet them in real life, and so we were thinking okay. They don't need clinical criteria for a higher level of care. We're. We're not seeing the improvement that we WANNA see. We could keep doing more of the everything we were doing. Was Evidence based and supported by research? So it's not like you know what we were doing was in any way deficient. It just wasn't heading them at the right time and place when they really needed it,

Lisa Henderson Lisa Grad School Lisa I. Wan American Counseling Associatio Vanderbilt Cup Marquez President Tennessee Counseling Depression Chief Operating Officer Leeson Moore Guy Barnard Katie
Robustness to Unforeseen Adversarial Attacks

Data Skeptic

04:31 min | Last month

Robustness to Unforeseen Adversarial Attacks

"I'm I'm Daniel Daniel King King Credit Graduate Student at Stanford University in the Computer Science Department Pad. I am or the Stanford on lab where we work on. Deploying machine learning efficiently Easily also for this particular. I was also volunteered. Open I for some time and tell me a little bit about your specific areas of research. What's most of your time in Grad School? Spent looking at considering. Yeah so Grad School. What I've been focusing on is trying to understand a how to actually deploy machine learning efficiently reliably and effectively. What we've noticed that one machine learning researchers have created these amazing machine learning models that do really well under certain circumstances let the real world is really complicated. There's a lot of issues that crop up. When actually deploying machinery models ranging from Michigan being expensive to deploy ranging from Trinidad of being noisy all the way down to worrying about attacks from adversaries. I've been focusing on trying to understand those issues when it comes to deploy the amazing technology that many machine learning researchers have been making. Yeah the paper I invited you on to talk about his title testing robustness against unforeseen adversaries. And it's interesting you frame that as a deployment issue because in my mind when I think of deploying male I'm thinking of how there's no perfect system in my opinion you know we have onyx files and different stuff like that. You can try but for some reason it's not as easy as it seems like it should be. Do you have any thoughts about why the I guess what I picture is? More lower level aspects of that are still kind of challenging for a lot of people that deploy absolutely so machine. Learning is very different than essentially all software so a lot of software comes into play when applying machine learning. But I don't think there's been a lot of understanding the community both the Research Committee and the industry community and what the difference between deploying standard software underplaying machine. Learning are so as you say. There's a lot of low level. Things for example like onyx files or actually taking a towards wallace say or while and converting to runtime engine. But that's actually being smoothed out. I think in the next year so we're GONNA be seeing a lot more of that. So for example serving has released some stuff but I think at a higher level. There's a lot of issues regarding how to combine data and Code that. We don't really know the answers to yet. And that's part of what my research deals with. A lot of other folks are thinking about as well. Yeah these adversarial attacks if I think about standing up my M. L. Model and exposing it via API. Just give that away where anyone can post to it. Or maybe someone's very clever and figures out how to get to my API for some reason they're going to post. What could be a sizable thing? An image file or something like that that has a ton of data and while that machine learning model it's a function it maps from the full input space to output space. Still we have these challenges. You think this is some sort of temporary thing where this adversarial game is going to eventually be solved or are we just dealing with a very hard problem. That will always be sort of cat and mouse. It's hard for me to predict the future but if you look at standard security ignoring machine learning there's been a cat and mouse game. Basically since computers have been invented sixty seventy years so if I had to guess I would say that. We're unlikely to solve the problem exactly. But I'm hoping that we can at least make it much much harder to attack. Machine learning systems in broadly. Speaking what are these adversarial attacks for anyone? Who hasn't heard of him yet? An adversary attack is think of it. As a procedure to generate an input that will fool machine learning model often for some nefarious mean so to give an extreme example. You might imagine posting a sticker on a stop sign that changes a perception system friction and accelerating car from stop sign to say sixty mile per hour speed limit sign which would cause erroneous behavior in a vehicle and might even cause physical harm now. I've looked into a number of these different techniques and there seemed to be more coming out by the hour. Some of them need the model and some of them need the day to set and some of them need not require too much of anything. What do you see sort of the garden or the taxonomy of these different kinds of attacks? And how much a little bit access helps or hinders. Yes as you say. There's a wide spectrum of attacks. I'll roughly them down. But these categorisations very rough and the tax can span different categorisations as well a high level. There's what I'll call white box and black box. Attacks White box attacks assume access to the MODEL AND BLACKBOX ATTACKS. Don't assume exits the model but assume you can query the model for example in a white box attack you'll have the weights and basically everything a blackbox tax. You might just have. Api access so for example Google's image classification API as an example of where he can query. But you don't have access to the model weights themselves. That's on the model side. There's also as you say a tax on the data side and here the threat model is slightly different. Typically the third as soon as you can tamper with some fraction of the data and by tampering with a small fraction of the data. This will cause the model to have eroneous outputs on typically specific patterns or be in general.

Grad School Daniel Daniel King Stanford University Google Graduate Student Michigan Trinidad Research Committee Wallace
Hacking Our Way to Innovation with Rebecca Love, RN, MSN

The WoMed

05:21 min | Last month

Hacking Our Way to Innovation with Rebecca Love, RN, MSN

"So here. The woman we really love to dig into wine. Nurses decided on that sealed in particular. So what made you want to be nurse so nursing was a second career choice for me? I had gone for Undergrad in a degree in international relations and a minor in Spanish and I thought that I was going to be a lawyer to be honest and I was working on a presidential campaign at the time when healthcare was a big issue. I remember being these rallies and everybody was talking about healthcare and there were no nurses in the audience or a lot of Ernie's or a lot of lobbyists or a whole bunch of people that know nurses and I don't know about you Daniel but my mom's nurse. Do you have any family members who are nurses in your family? My Grandmother was okay and so that was my piddle movement. My mom came out and we went to dinner and she said we really think you should be a nurse and I remember her. It was an interesting time the politics going on and I remember thinking you know what? How can you be a member of? How can you speak to the choir if you're not a member of it and if everybody's talking about healthcare but nobody a nurse here? How do we really know what needs to change? And what the problem. Yeah and that was where my life turns recognizing that to really impact change in healthcare. I probably had join healthcare Do that and that's where my journey began. That's amazing it's topic. I've talked to a couple of friends about we've talked about on here to how there isn't representation in Congress in government of nurses like what we're actually going through what we face on a daily basis. I think that's fascinating at that. Made you change your career path. That's amazing well. It's funny that you say that because the statement that made me change my career path was at my I want you know. I said I wanted to be a lawyer and my mom said to me she said you know there's plenty of strong lawyers out there in the world and she said but I can tell you is being a nurse. There's not enough strong nurses out there. I need more strong nurses on there to change. What nursing looks like to the world and and you to become a nurse and at that time? I didn't know what that meant. I I remember. It felt really importance. But it's now ten fifteen years later that I look back and I recognize those words shaped everything that I've done in nursing every step of the way and I know your own story about how hard times it was for you to be a nurse and how it's challenges we faced how you didn't always feel like you fit in are you also didn't feel like you had a voice and that was hard for me and I'm and how to learn how to navigate. What sometimes feels like a very disempowered profession to become more voicemail and more recognized but more importantly that necessarily placated she but really just given a seat at the table is. Hey you got this. You know what you're talking about and I respect your opinion as much as I respect. Everybody else is around the table. Not so much. Hey I'm just giving it placeholder for a nurse to have at the table. It's really sit there and say we want them here. Because we we get that you guys have value add. That's been really interesting place to come from and I don't know you know in your own personal With your conversation if you guys have felt the same kind of challenges at times yes One hundred percent. And that's something that I think just Added onto years of being like repressed as a nurse that led to ultimately me burning out at the bedside. And that's something that you've been really trying to champion a lot for to in that you know there's this fear like aren't nurses are burning out after two years we're reporting out all these new grads but they're burning out so quickly yeah two hundred fifty thousand nurses. We graduate a year in this country and we lose over fifty percent of them by the bedside within spheres a practice the largest exodus of a profession that nobody talks about and I like you left the bedside as a as an rn. Within two years. I went back to Grad. School became a nurse practitioner for that exact feeling of feeling so like I didn't have that voice and every time I stepped in and I felt like there were so many near misses where I begged you know for changes to happen or orders to be changed or medications to begin our interventions to happen literally knowing that things were going wrong but not having the ability to make those decisions to change. There's outcomes depending on other people to make those decisions and only be given. The toolbox is a nurse to sit there and say well I really think I really believe are really feel that we got to make this big this change or get medication and not giving the tools to actually effectively voice. Why I had the you know the knowledge in the expertise to make those decisions at everything I always did had to be signed off by somebody else because as I was considered for lack of a better world credible enough or had the license or the intelligence to be able to recognize that what we were seeing. Mary made sense it. We should be able to take initiatives to save patient's lives because that was always really hard place for me to citizens to sit there and beg other people and then sometimes it literally and I'm sure you face it if you felt like you were burnt out so often begging to make the changes that we did an often being told. Hey stay in your lane like if you see problems but your job is to be a nurse and to do those things. Your job is not to challenge the way that things are being done and under mentally. That always sat wrong with me Fundamentally because you probably nursing school told hey you're you're the advocate of the patient where you really get on but when we got out in practice man it was tough

Undergrad Ernie Daniel Congress Mary
Pregnancy & Postpartum Body Image

Nutrition Matters

05:39 min | Last month

Pregnancy & Postpartum Body Image

"Matters. Podcast thanks so much for joining me. I am so excited to be here. Really appreciate getting asked to join you. Yeah well we've connected online and you talk about some really important things just from from the perspective of being a therapist and also a human and I thought okay. Let's let's get together and talk about body image and the postpartum period because that is very much on your mind right now is that right. Yes definitely yeah. I am ten weeks outright now with my new baby and also have a two year old so I still kind of feel like I'm in the postpartum period with her to even though some people might disagree with that But I still feel very much like a new mother to both of them. Yeah Yeah Okay so talk about who you are in your background what you do professionally and then we'll dive in topic. Sounds good so I am a licensed clinical social worker and used to say I was a licensed scalzo worker in Louisiana but I just moved Tennessee But for the last almost ten years I've been in New Orleans Louisiana and that's where I got my graduate degree and just moved to Chattanooga Tennessee to be closer to my family. Meanwhile I raised these. Two girls My husband moved. We're altogether but My family lives here and so right now. I'm not working a whole lot. I'm seeing a few clients like in Tele therapy capacity from home So that's what's happening right now. But what like led me to this? Work in journey I around the age. Fourteen fifteen started struggling with OCD related issues and started going to therapy and loved therapy. Knew that it was probably going to be calling passion for me and it has been and so I went to college studied technology. Ocd got better for the most part And then when I went to Grad school I started becoming really interested in addictions and still anxiety and depression and related issues and once I started you know once I graduated Grad School and started my first jobs. I started really obsessively restricting and wants. Take yes food and once. I started that that lasted for about three years. And I mean after that I started to run a started to get help for it and once I went into. I didn't do a an impatient program but I did. Iop stuff and that led me like recovery myself has led me to be really really interested in eating disorder recovery and body image recovery for everybody and then out in a broader topic just disordered eating end health in general Because I think somebody that everybody faces even if they're not clinically struggling with the eating disorder of some kind And also my eating disorder weld in with OCD A lot. So that's what led me to place And still passionate about working in that area especially with having maybe girls. Yeah Okay so you have your own history and and then you've had years of studying in school and then working as a therapist and then Becoming a new mom Taco anything relevant in your story as far as like. What's it been like to be in recovery or recovered? I'm not sure what wording you like to use it From an eating disorder and then kind of going into new phases of life like like motherhood and the end postpartum. So heart of my story has been that I knew that I wanted to be a mom but I also knew I couldn't be a mom unless I was recovered from my eating disorder. And so that is what led me to seeking out. How because they knew at some point I wanted to have children in so basically after I got married I decided to. I realize that it wasn't just an. I want to be thin for my wedding issue. It was a bigger issue for me and decided than our would've been twenty sixteen so three and a half years. I decided that I wanted to make this better for myself that I don't pass on like really toxic ways of thinking to children and so that is what led me to kind of kind of the catalyst that threw me into recovery and so I got really lucky. I do identify as recovered struggle. Sometimes but I don't utilize behaviours in the slightest any longer and most of my thoughts able to Kinda Zap pretty quickly when they come up once. I did get help. I got pregnant pretty quickly after that so abou A year it wasn't very long about a year after I started feeling much more normal and better pregnant and obviously you know. Weight gain is a huge component of getting pregnant in the postpartum period. And while that was hard for me it also felt

OCD Grad School Tennessee New Orleans Louisiana Chattanooga Louisiana Taco
reCAPTCHA and Duolingo: Luis von Ahn

How I Built This

07:01 min | Last month

reCAPTCHA and Duolingo: Luis von Ahn

"Think about the small moments or decisions in your life that actually had a huge impact on how your life turned out. Maybe it was a conversation. You struck up with the person next to you on an airplane. Maybe it was a party. You reluctantly went to only to meet the person you'd eventually marry or maybe it was a decision to stay on vacation an extra day that sparked a new idea for Kevin System. It was a random remark from his girlfriend that made him decide to use filters on instagram for Blake. Majkowski was a chance meeting with a group of young Argentinian who took him to the countryside where he saw kids with no shoes. That one day inspired him to create. Tom's and for Louis Fun on it was a free lecture at Carnegie Mellon University in two thousand. We'll get deeper into the story in a few minutes but that single lecture would lead him to invent to ingenious new tools the I was capture. Yes captures those annoying twisted and blurred letters. You have to type into a website to prove your human and the second one was duo lingo now. The biggest language learning APP in the world which is now getting even more popular because people are looking for new things to do now that they're stuck at home but was captured and duo. Lingo were designed to harness the power of crowdsourcing to solve problems. And I'M GONNA blow your mind here if you have ever typed in a capture or reused dueling go. There's a good chance you've taken part in a massive online collaboration that you probably weren't even aware of and it's amazing. How Louis came up with all this but let's start at the beginning. Lewis was born in Guatemala in late. Nineteen Seventy S. Both as parents were doctors and though he was surrounded by poverty violence in Guatemala City. Louis screw up in comparative privilege and as a kid. He spent a lot of time hanging out at the family business. My Mother's family actually had a candy. Factory everybody is always a Mesa. The fact that I grew up with a candy factory they think it was like Willy. Wonka or something. I was not all that much into the candidate. Self I was into the machines because basically the candies made by these gigantic machines. That bump out I don't know how many thousands of pieces of candy per hour and basically all my weekends. I spent playing at the Candy Factory and I would They the machines apart and put them back together they would be some extra pieces after. I put him back together on that. That would be a problem but what? What kind of student were you were? You were school pretty easy for you. Yeah I was pretty nerdy basically. That was really good at math. Math was just easy to me. I what I would do during the summers is basically get either next year or you know. Couple YEARS LATER. Math books on all the sizes. Wow it kind of came easy but the way I really got good ideas by doing hundreds and hundreds exercises. That's what you do in. The summertime was bored. I mean I was an only child I is. I didn't have that much to do. This is remember this is also pre Internet pre everything. So what was I going to do? Man That's what I did was putting playing cards in the spokes of my bicycle and by jolly ranchers seven. Eleven should math books. So you were. Did you just love math? I mean it sounds like kids. Don't think about their future. They're not like I'm going to study math so I can be in tech one day like unless I've really enjoyed it. I I enjoyed it was it was like a puzzle for me by the way this is not the only thing I did. I mean I I also played a lot of video games Pirated Video Games in my commodore sixty four like floppy disks. Floppy Disk loppy discs. That's right I wanted a Nintendo. When I was eight my mother would not get many intendo. She instead got me computer. Commodore Sixty Four. And I couldn't figure out how to use it but eventually I read like the manual stuff and I figured out how to use it more than I figured out. I could buy other people's video games. And so I became a little hub in my in my little neighbourhood but these were not other kids adults or kind of basically young adults who had a computer and they would come to my house and I would take their games and give them my games exchange so then. I collected a pretty large number of video games but sh- mentioned right that I mean because your childhood sounds pretty nice but but like as a kid I guess or even as a teenager there was a civil war in Guatemala right. I mean we know that today. There's a a lot of violence there. Obviously violence in the US and other countries to but Guatemala's has been particularly hard hit. I mean did it feel dangerous when you're a kid yes it did. There was a civil war pretty much since I was born in seventy nine to nineteen ninety-six. There was a civil war going on the whole time. It always felt dangerous when I was fifteen or so. My aunt was kidnapped for ransom. I mean she was gone for seven or eight days. Wow People's cars would be stolen. I don't every couple of months. Somebody's car would be stolen in my family. Going past seven thirty PM was rare games. You needed to go out in a large group. If you're going to go up at seven thirty PM and I did my house had walls and barbed wire yeah. It felt dangerous. I mean this is one of just one of the reasons I came to the US. Actually I mean I was. After my aunt was kidnapped I thought to myself. I don't WanNa live here. Yeah and I guess you did end up leaving Guatemala for college because you went to Duke in North Carolina and you describe yourself as a like a math nerd in school and and is that what you intended to do like to do something in math. That's what I wanted to become an economic math professor. I was pretty certain. I wanted to become a math professor at the time. I thought the best thing that I can do is really learn a lot of math and I really it and I thought it was futile to learn how to deal with other people. It is interesting because my job. These days is one hundred percent just dealing with other people's problems. I'm just trying to understand the so so by becoming math professor. You thought. Hey I wouldn't have to deal with people I would just deal with facts. Data and numbers. Yes yes and you know I. I'll do math research all day long. And every now and then after class of but whatever that's like a tax That's that's what I thought so all right so you are She gets your degree and you this path to go into academia and you go into a PhD program at Carnegie Mellon Correct and I guess you go into computer science right yes. I changed from math computer science because I visited a math Grad school and what people were saying the professor was saying. Oh I'm working on this open problem that nobody's been able to solve for the last three hundred years and I thought I don't think I'm smart enough if you haven't done it and nobody's done it in three hundred years that's Kinda not for me whereas when you visit in computer science I mean this is crazy thing before like. Oh Yeah I still have an open program yesterday. Well it's a much younger field yet so that I thought that was much more exciting for me. At

Guatemala Professor Louis Fun Math Grad School Candy Factory United States Guatemala City Carnegie Mellon University Instagram Majkowski Kevin System Carnegie Mellon Blake Nintendo TOM Wonka Mesa
The Longleaf Alliance Speaks for the Trees

In Defense of Plants Podcast

06:46 min | 2 months ago

The Longleaf Alliance Speaks for the Trees

"Am a plane ecologist and I've been working with Ground cover in Langley ecosystems for a long time so ever since graduate school. Back in the day I've worked in and around Longleaf Pine Habitat S- Focusing on a lot of the flowering ground cover species that you find in these systems so whether it's with pitcher plant species to wire grass and other upland species. I have been working in it since since Grad school like I said And after Grad School did some work down in central Florida and then move back up and was a A technician at the Jones Research Center and southwest Georgia where really took a deep dive into ground cover ecology on the ecosystem of Longleaf and after the Johnson are worked with the Atlanta Botanical Garden and then finally came back around to Longleaf alliance and said it started with the LONGLEAF alliance back in two thousand eleven as the ground cover specialists so I was the under story coordinator with the Alliance until just this past November where I took over as president of the organization so have been with a pro while my my role has evolved. But I'm really excited to be leading the group. Now that's fantastic would agree journey end from one under story person to another. Let's give a big shoutout to the less woody species that make these ecosystems what they are just as much as the trees do themselves. Yes the little guys on the ground floor. Yeah absolutely among my favorites not to take away from the trees at all but You know was this always about plans for you. When did you really realize that plants? We're going to be your focus. And what brought you guess to deciding to study them in Grad school and make a career out of it? What you know. Oddly enough. I I've always. I started out as a biology major in college but I started out as premed which is strange. I was I was convinced I wanted to be neurosurgeon or which is really really very different from what I'm doing now who's the little. But then I took a field. Botany course and I was lost after that point down the road. Without looking at at plant species growing in the ditches on the sides I was basically lost two plants at that point so No no turning back so it's been. It's been a great journey. Let's fascinating learn. I mean I think that is probably a whole of people. Start OUT IN BIOLOGY IS KIDS. At least for me in my cohort. It was oh you wanna make money in biology. Got To be a doctor. You're GONNA grow up. You're going to be a doctor. Oh you're so smart. You should be a doctor in. It's it's really beat into you that that's the only route for biologists to take but sometimes all it is being introduced to something outdoors at. You never paid attention to before suddenly The world of biology expanse to oh all living things are biology absolutely absolutely. I think I made a decision. Yeah Yeah and so thinking about where you're at today. You're the president of the long alliance and I'm a huge fan of everything your organization has going on but all of it is centered around as the name suggests the idea of the long leaf pine which is a really important in North America. Not just from a cultural perspective. But from an ecological perspective it forms such unimportant community for biodiversity of this continent. So let's talk a little bit about like history. What is the long leaf pine? And why is it? The center of your focus at the LONGLEAF alliance well lovely. Pine ecosystem played such an important role in just the southeastern United States. I mean taking it in its in its original range in. Its coverage originally This species basically occurred on around ninety million acres in the southeast from Virginia South to Florida than West to the Piney Woods Texas. So it conferred incredible range. So that's ninety million acres of that ninety million about sixty million that was dominated by Longleaf. An amazing thought to think about how much of our region was covered by this tree. Species and the ecosystem that it lives in and of course when European settlers came into this area they saw these strays and it was an obvious part of the landscape. And it's a very strong sturdy tree and that can be used for a number of different purposes for human human use so it says superior building product so we. We cut a lot of these trays to basically build the south and actually further than the south as well. The problem is is. We didn't really do as sustainably. We didn't harvest a lot of that sustainably. And so over the course of a century the long leaf basically was nearly eliminated from the southeast so from the estimated ninety million acres originally. We got down to around three million acres pine. And so that's dramatic. You hear a lot about the rainforest rainforest disappearing but you're not brought up learning out this ecosystem that was so native to this area and how it is nearly gone and so the Longleaf alliance was created in nineteen ninety five to really work at bringing back Longleaf None of us believe that will ever get to ninety million acres. There's just not enough land coverage or not enough area for long lead to be established in that amount of space anymore just because most of southeast is developed but we didn't want to see it continue to decline and so the founders of the LONGLEAF alliance Red Johnson ending gear. Dad said we need to get together. We need to bring in our partners with three commissions other nonprofits other agencies. To really try to reverse that downward trend of long leaf. And so there's been a lot of work done since nineteen ninety five. There are a lot of really great partners that we work with Across the southeast to increase acreage and and protect habitats of Longleaf.

Longleaf Alliance Longleaf Grad School Red Johnson President Trump Florida Langley Atlanta Botanical Garden United States Jones Research Center Technician Coordinator North America Georgia DAD Virginia Piney Woods Texas
Whole Family Wellness

All My Relations Podcast

08:13 min | 2 months ago

Whole Family Wellness

"Let's start by having you introduce yourselves the way you would to a large group of people So I was born and raised in the area. That is now known as North Dakota. I'm from the Turtle Mountain Band of my Mom's side of the family. So I'm initial Bay and I'm Papa Lakota from the Standing Rock on my Dad's side of the family I lived on the East Coast for a number of years where I went to college at Dartmouth and I went to Grad School at Columbia University for Journalism and I am now the mom to a one year old and the partner to fashion. We live together in Phoenix Arizona where we run our our initiative called while for Culture. So wellness is my passion. I'm also a writer and a journalist but pretty much everything I do. Now is like health and family related Well softball scoop dodged everyone to the both of you and for those. That had a chance to me on. Yep Suga cash on knock to damage over jude are Choon. I'm from the Salt River. People around this area right here and Just happy to be here sup without the ATHOL AENA. Happy to be sitting here to be speaking with both of you. And it's awesome and you guys are one of our favorite podcasts and so we are just honored to be here and wanted to say thank you to the for the awesome work that you're doing with this in just around native country and the individual work you know we worked together. Matija in the past and I worked a little bit with us well at college horizon. So it's awesome to be here in this space to be able to be discussing more of these so very happy with that also work with the native Wellness Institute. I'm a board member there and I've been working with them now for about ten years now and Chelsea said one of the CO founders in our initiative that we call wealth for culture and and as Chelsea had said as well. Wellness is something. That's definitely my passion and the wellness that's rooted within our people and sexual ways. Yeah something that. I'm very passionate about and Just very Excited to try to share what little we know in this area of health and wellness as it pertains to family as you said and we know that that's a big part of of our communities you know it's it's the strong communities are built by our strong families and that's really the root of healing in the root of preserving and maintaining evolving. Our indigene are families and I think that's one of the most beautiful things we can put our energy and effort to especially in Mike this. You know when it's just we have so much going on and on world you know so my heart is full and I'm happy I you know I think the other thing. That's really cool. Is that you know you're a photographer. And you danced for years right with your work with Rohan long on the street. Dance B boy crews and stuff Yeah I didn't think about that what I think about this work. You do too because it's kind of like you know this evolution of becoming these. These people like Chelsea talks about you know going to Dartmouth and Columbia and becoming a journalist and and then you yourself. It's like being a photographer and working in industry and it takes so many different skills to put out content on a regular basis. And you know you to have been developing those skills for a really long time so maybe we could start just having you talk a little about the origins of welfare culture. And and your purpose and what that means to you individually. Well we founded in twenty fourteen shortly after I met. Actually we both were on our own individual healing and wellness journeys And we came together as friends and we did this cool photo. Shoot Auch Photograph me as it was at the time we were calling it like an urban warrior kind of thing but it was just this really cool fitness that we did in your city but meanwhile we were having all these conversations talking about how you know healthy. Lifestyles really are congruent. With our ancestral ways. Both of us were raised in ceremony. But both of us also kind of went the wayside with that a little bit You know during our teens and twenties and you know moving away both both of us moving away from our reservoirs and into cities and kind of just exploring the world and but eventually coming full circle back to that and so it was really cool because I connected as friends through that shared passion for connecting wellness with with our culture. At the time. We realized that there wasn't a lot of imagery of healthy active strong native people and we wanted to change that and so we co founded while for culture and it started as a website and an instagram and facebook page and then it quickly grew into basically this consulting business in Marietta. Other things that we do as well. Yeah we got together because like Jesse had said she was doing journalism. And as you'd mentioned I was doing photography and I after a while. I really wanted to start to kind of help. Help help with the movement that that you're contributing to your work is just to help to portray this our image. You know what I mean that we do have in our communities that often doesn't portrayed in so we started really like she said delve into that and we started really looking at it. And you know I was coming from a perspective of coming. From my community where diabetes obesity cardiovascular heart disease is really super high high in comparison to the non native people that are live on the border. Just a couple miles away you know. The life expectancy is just the gap between is is insane and so I was coming from from that perspective. That how we need to we need to really reclaim our health. And we need to put our health for first and foremost in our diginity to continue on and for me it was it was it was moved my body exercising and training and Alice really trying to draw those connections between that in and being a part of the community and We share a lot. Two of my personal observation is that I watched the the the the the community. I guess involvement and ceremonial things that bring wellness and love and happiness declined because of poor health. People can't show up so I just got really driven on this. This thing like you know we need to. We need to reclaim our health. In whatever way that is for people you know for me was exercising and know trend to really strengthen my relationship to food and so we got together and we start man this is. There's so much more than just you know putting out an image of somebody working out and trying to encourage and motivate people. That's a big part of it. You know but there's certainly a lot more to it so you know. We delved into it to try to create more of a wellness model. That was kind of rooted in in a lot of our cultural values and just kind of going around native country with my work. With Native Wellness Institute the Focus was always on on for sure was pinpointing historic trauma was healing but we didn't see the inclusion a lot of bringing a healthy lifestyle once again. It's as far as physical health. Bring our foods right back into the conversation healing or bringing movement and into the conversation. We're really seeing that so much too and I think that that's sort of like our generations contribution like it's what we're doing this all of us living here now so we really kind of just tried to go forward with that and develop it over the years and later on we became a family and and we realized that everything we were we were coming up with in creating and learning about and putting into practice and sharing about and doing workshops and trainings on was. We're things that we have this opportunity now to live that into model that and to to show that and I think that that's one of the most powerful things we can do is just model that you know model that that that wellness of that. Good life for all of our families to see you know. We're we're strengthening that spirit of wellness step brings families together increase healing once again to you know when when anyone participates in that and so and so you know. That's that's how we got to where we are with it today and as you said now we are really you know as a young family moving forward with that

Native Wellness Institute Chelsea Dartmouth North Dakota Turtle Mountain Phoenix Arizona Salt River Papa Lakota Athol Aena Writer Jude East Coast Partner Rohan Columbia University For Journa Grad School Columbia Mike Instagram Jesse
Printing 3D Facemasks for Frontline workers with Madison Bondoc, e-NABLE D.C. Chapter Lead

$6.99 Per Pound

04:13 min | 2 months ago

Printing 3D Facemasks for Frontline workers with Madison Bondoc, e-NABLE D.C. Chapter Lead

"What's happening in older. They're like so you're stationed over with you know your your job is that you're a biomedical. Engineer consultant. How how big is this particular row and is it like? Are you part of a like a giant team? All medical engineers like yourself or is there like a small contact movements right so so. How does this breaking down? We're all in one building so we have the army navy and then the air force so with the biomedical engineers and the Navy and actually just a small group of maybe eight members including myself and we were the ones that focus on making sure you know all the medical equipment requests for the navy and clinics are Fulfiled got so as a clinical engineer. What would what does that mean? You know what I'm saying like how like okay. So you fix these machines yourself like you. You meet vendors that create these machines and these contractors than you just kind of like sign off something as solid or not like. What does that mean right? Yeah so yeah because I also had to learn about this going into the job I had no idea what does clinical engineer for the navy for the government means and unlike the typical engineer jobs where they're more hands on you know building or fixing or more on the contracting side and consulting so you know my day job is. I kinda correspond with the hospital personnel as well as vendors that sell the medical equipments and I kind of worked together with our contracting shop in the Navy division to set up contracts men to procure you know. Mri scanners CD's scanners all whatever equipment. You know. That is the need for the specific hospital in clinic so it's lot email corresponding Sometimes there's vendors sites and site visits where we go to the hospital just to check you know what they have in their inventory or what they need and we're also kind of the middleman between the hospital and the vendors you know just making so. It's it's a lot of paperwork. It's a lot of email is not you don't you. Don't get get your hands dirty as much. Yeah no yeah no no hands dirty for me. More of just typing away. The computer phone calls emails so but I mean I'm sure when you what you studied in school was in like I like you need to know how to communicate with a vendor who specializes in making. Mri Scans you know what I'm saying. Like what like. What are they teach you in school to prepare for his role or is there not even a preparation stage in school? Like you just study all the theories and you know what I mean and then you have this degree so now you figure it out right because actually you know when I was in Grad School for Biomedical Engineering. You know the the job description of clinical engineering and you know the roles and responsibilities were in even you know known of until I applied for the job Yeah like you said for Education we're more or more taught to be more design oriented in terms of engineering so prototyping designing physically working with medical devices and machines. So that's kind of how were taught in school and then you know once we're out you know that's that's that and there's jobs just like the clinical cheer that don't require per se you know us having to be in that design oriented mind There's like office jobs as I am doing right now and more logistics school didn't prepare me for this by you know as

Engineer Army Navy Navy Grad School For Biomedical Eng Consultant Fulfiled
What We're Missing, By Missing Strangers Now

Short Wave

05:17 min | 2 months ago

What We're Missing, By Missing Strangers Now

"So you're way to find out why you were feeling high. After talking to random people you delved into the science of strangers. Yeah I I started looking into it and it turns out. There's this Newish Line of research examining this very question. When is the last time you yourself talk to a stranger? Who Gosh usually that would be so easy to answer this. Is Elizabeth done a psychology professor who studies happiness at the University of British Columbia? So done I started thinking about the importance of strangers when she noticed something odd happening with her boyfriend. Back in Grad School. Benjamin was a lovely person but Benjamin happened to be in a little bit of a bad mood. He would act a bit cranky grumpy around me longtime girlfriend now that that was okay and I would. I would stuff with it. We are crankiest around the ones. We Love True True. But but then they'd run into a stranger on their way to dinner or something and her boyfriend would perk right up like he would suddenly become pleasant and cheerful and he'd often stay that way being a better mood even after the running Like a little stranger boost. Yeah and wanted to know why. So she conducted a study. She got a bunch of couples together in a lab and she asked everyone to predict if they'd feel happier interacting with their own beloved partner or complete stranger from one of the other couples. I'm guessing they chose their own partner. Like that feels like the safest choice. That's definitely what they chose but with done found was that people actually ended up reporting feeling just as good after interacting with a total stranger as they did after interacting with their own partner. Ooh Drama Drama Ya. I know it was also surprising because for a long time. Researchers had mainly focused on the effects of spending time with intimates like our friends and family not complete randoms. You know I think we consider these interactions to be trivial. They happen quickly and spontaneously most of the time. We don't really give them a second thought so don't want it to know like what is up with. These stranger interactions and over the next decade she conducted a few more studies looking at how these interactions affect our wellbeing including the study at a coffee shop in Vancouver where she got people to either have a conversation with a Barista or to just get their coffee and get out. Be Totally Utilitarian about it. Which by the way is how done usually likes to roll. I really like efficiency. This is a woman after my own heart. Yeah me too but what done founded that just. Having brief interactions with the BARISTA would on a scale of one to five make people feel happier like six tenths of a point better in terms of positive affect and a half. A point might not sound like that big a difference but actually compared to a lot of other findings in our field. It's pretty solid given how minimal the intervention that we're using here is do we know why your way well. There's only been a handful of studies so far so researchers don't really know what's happening just yet but Dunne's theory. Is that when you talk to a stranger? You generally try to be friendly and cheerful. Because that's the social norm in a lot of places right and so just by acting more cheerful. That can shape how you feel and I imagine like you know bumping into a stranger kind of jerks you out of the routine of daily life maybe makes you feel like. I don't know I feel like a little more awake after I have a nice interaction with a stranger And I think when these interactions go well it can also affirm your existence There's this study that showed when participants were given I contact by stranger passing them on the street. They reported feeling more socially connected than when a stranger looked through them. As if they weren't there are such fleeting moments in our daily lives and yet be really powerful and just making people feel you know I am seen. I'm connected people around me notice my presence but what about people who? Maybe don't like talking to strangers. Yeah I looked into it. And there's this interesting study. By behavioral scientists Nicholas Julia Schroeder that found that commuters on trains and buses routinely reported a more positive experience when they talk to strangers even when they said they preferred writing alone in solitude. Oh yes I remember this study. There was this like big gap between how they thought interacting with a stranger would make them feel and what actually happened. Which Kinda loved. Yeah I mean I think it's also kind of tragic because it means that there are people who think they don't like talking to strangers and so don Even though it would probably make them happier in the moment and then the cycle just goes on and

Benjamin Partner Elizabeth Nicholas Julia Schroeder Grad School University Of British Columbia Don Even Vancouver Dunne Professor
When Friendships Change

Therapy for Black Girls

04:20 min | 2 months ago

When Friendships Change

"Hey y'all thanks so much for joining me for session. One fifty four of the therapy for black girls podcast today. You WanNA spend some time chatting about what to do when we find ourselves in friendships. That are changing. When we're young and life is less complicated. Friendships are maintained by things. Like play dates sitting together at lunch and late night. Gav sessions until someone falls asleep as we get older and they're more demands on our time and energy friendships become a little more difficult to maintain we move get partnered. Become parents. Life continues to happen. I think that the thing that's most important to remember about the life cycle of a friendship is that it's normal for things to shift as we change so do the relationships where a part of but often when we send things changing instead of it alerting us that we need to shift with it. It results in US feeling like something is irreparably damaged and should be discarded. You heard Dr Oriole Woah. I discussed the importance of having difficult conversations on session. One fifty one of the podcast a couple of weeks ago and that's often the first step that needs to happen when we noticed a change in our friendships many times the changes in our friendships are ones. We can foresee things like moving becoming apparent etc. I'll give you a little bit of headway. So you know they're coming and you know that things are likely going to change if this is the case. It's a good idea to acknowledge that things will be different and to allow space for both of you to grief. I'd encourage you to have an honest conversation about your worries as you're both moving into this new phase of life carve out some time to just actually talk through your fears. That doesn't have to be a plan for alleviating them just yet. It's okay to just acknowledge that the exist at some point after the conversation has happened. Consider making a plan for how you'll be intentional about creating new experiences for your friendship. Now the time distance and other things will be different. What kinds of things can you do to make an effort to stay connected just like we schedule? Date nights for romantic relationships date nights for friendships are also really important. Consider building in your friend. Time around certain activities. You know. You're likely to participate in. So maybe you do something like scheduling a thirty minute chat on Thursday nights after you watch how to get away with murder or maybe you have a group me where you're popping in regularly about every day Monday in kinds of things the gestures that you make to stay connected don't have to be gray into effective but it's helpful if they're consistent and finally. I want you to get comfortable with asking specifically what you can do to support your friend in this new phase of life and be open to how this might change if they're moving for Grad school. Can you help them? Virtually search for places to live if they're becoming apparent perhaps you can help by organizing a baby shower. Sometimes it's easier to show up for others if we know exactly how we can be helpful in the moment so be sure to ask now. Please don't hear me say that. The brunt of maintaining their friendship is on the person not experiencing life change. That's not what I'm saying at all. It's absolutely also important for the fringe experiencing. The life changed to be sure that they are checking in and making efforts to connect as well. When we don't take these tips or at least make an effort we can see a real breakdown in the friendship in ways that might have been able to be avoided. It's also important to note however that even with the best of intentions sometimes friendships just in the doesn't have to be anyone at fault. There may not have been a big blow up. Sometimes they just in. And that's definitely a topic will exploring in another episode of the podcast soon to navigate when a friendship ends

United States Dr Oriole Woah Grad School Murder
Neural Architecture Search and Googles New AutoML Zero with Quoc Le

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

09:02 min | 3 months ago

Neural Architecture Search and Googles New AutoML Zero with Quoc Le

"Welcome to the PODCAST. Hi Everyone. It's great to have you on the show I've followed research for Your work for quite some time and I'm looking forward to digging into some of the new things that you're working on but before we do that I'd love to have you share a little bit about your background and how you got started working in machine learning okay so I was born in Vietnam. I did my Undergrad in Australia. And in my second year. My undergrad I started some project doing machine London with Alex. Mola a back in Australia and back. Then I was played with. Kodo methods Then I Did my PhD AT STANFORD. A on a lot of deep learning back in the day when deployed in whispers or very cool. And that's the route two thousand seven and around two thousand eleven I did a summer internship at Google and that was when Google Brin project was founded so when I was there that was a long and Jackie Naan Greco data was there and I. It was the sun so we started out small. That sounds cool. Yeah and then I did some of the Scaling Up Neuro networks with Google Britain folks and then You know at the end Up to two years did some work on machine translation with the media and Oreo VR. He's now did mine. Owner of Ilya is now at opening I and we develop sold end to end. Solution methods and Around two thousand sixteen. I started looking into more like You Know Auto. Mau Architecture search and more recently are looking to Malacca together with Otto may also look into Sent me supervised learning and it's awesome awesome now. You mentioned early on doing work with Alex. Mullah was he was this before he was at Carnegie Mellon was visiting in Australia. He was a professor in Australia. Yeah I I went to a university. In a small air. In the capital city Austrailia go Kendra. He was yeah camera and he was Professor Edward Research. So I thought I had. I have along Very interested in AI and machine learning and took me for that. I took a class data mining and so on and talk a little bit boring but the ability to actually learn. It's actually a super fascinating so I contacted him and he was moonlight co methods machine learning and we worked together for maybe a few years before he went to he went to America then. Cmu and Amazon. Okay okay so a lot of your. Recent work has been focused on this idea of You know automating machine learning and neural architecture surge to allow machines to find the best deep learning architectures in like. It's a little bit about how you arrived at working in that area. What some of the motivations were for getting started digging into that problem so I've been Along interested in this idea of self improvement machine should be self improving itself a machine learning and even and when I started doing co methods with Alex. I always ask him. You know how the Dakota bandwith and so on how some of the HYPOC Ramat does include methods decided and apparently they decided by using things like Cross validation on then where I work on. Koroma two narrow networks. My hope is to make the hype. Affirmative go away. But that's how is the opposite so if you look at the a Kabul Lucien neural networks at has a lot of hype privatised right like how many how many layers you want it to be and how many channels you wanted to be. And what are the some of the high assize apprentice since on a Coulda with all the training parameters? Yeah all learning. Dry and as researcher develop more and more techniques FAW EURONET. There's more decisions that you have to make. That feel like. This is like a problem that can be helped by a little bit of automation so So I I observe a lot of my colleagues who will when designing networks and I asked him about the principles of design. Your neural networks. And you started are having some really solid principles like Skip CONNECTION SO. The gradient can flow through the network concern. But as you tune the network Karen Hata do no longer have the principal is around. You know trial and error right you you try this a little bit and simply with better so you try that more so. I think that that is something that may be ready for automation so even during my Grad School. I already talked about trying this but I thought you know. Maybe we didn't have enough compute because training net already takes took me days so when I saw that new control. Units are are in thirty minutes. Something like that on on safer I thought. Oh maybe this is the right time to try this. So that's when I started doing this. Newer architecture search in two thousand sixteen. It's interesting that you know. Even with all of the compute resources of Google. You had to wait until the time was compressed. Enough in order to be able to tackle the problem. Yeah to get really good results. You want the networks will be really big and that will take a long time to train. Yeah and it's it's It's funny coming from me that we have so much resources that will go train in EURONET still taking a long time And so maybe talk about the the first steps in In that area. Did you jump right into neural architecture? Search or was that the you know a a an end stage or end result of this work where I I on some of the related ideas on and off since two thousand twelve like playing around with how to do. Better hyper profitable tuning and none of that. It's really published. Because I didn't have good results have pugh and so on so so I tried it on and off over the time you know every year I would set out some time to try this idea for a few months and you know and it didn't work very well because like a procurement song and then Two Thousand Sixteen. I met Barrett's off would as my colleague now at Google and he's very talented. So we say oh. Let's let's try at the idea of Jews in like a reinforcement learning to generate and network like a little layer in an network for for a ceasefire model. Seafoam motto. Is already at the time you could say that you know enough of you depends on how where you want to be but you from thirty minutes to a few hours and the seems like about the right amount of time to get this going and my prediction is that you have to train. Maybe either between from one thousand to ten thousand bottles and I did a backup our calculation and thought. Oh this might be the right time to do it but you know I have tried this some of these related ideas in much before

Google Austrailia Alex Mola Vietnam Stanford London Mau Architecture CMU Jackie Naan Greco Carnegie Mellon Faw Euronet Professor Edward Research Ilya Hypoc Ramat America Euronet Professor Mullah
You Cant Read The Label When Youre Stuck In The Jar with Charlie Gilkey

Enterprise NOW! Podcast

08:25 min | 3 months ago

You Cant Read The Label When Youre Stuck In The Jar with Charlie Gilkey

"Perfect. Perfect first of all Charlie. Thank you so much for taking the time out to talk with us. I know you very busy so The fact that you're giving us a little bit of your time is much appreciate it. Thanks for having me second thing I like to do is to ask you to tell us about yourself When I say that I feel free to go all the way back to when Charlie I began or you can start more current day. Tell us about yourself. I'm GonNa meet you somewhere in the middle there so Well actually I grew up in Arkansas. So I grew up. I'm multiracial black though. I have multiple restaurants me but identify as black and You know grew up poor in the south and so that gave me sort of a lot of different perspective especially about the idea of like what we create in this world as is largely built upon what we create ourselves and so. I'm a new for very early age. If I was going to be successful it was going to be on me because neck. Society wasn't give it to me And so you know that sort of went with Minnesota from a military family so ended up after a little detour. The United States Military Academy at West Point. I mean in the beginning my civilian education getting deployed Iraqi Freedom And then when I came back from that I was completing my PhD in philosophy and also still doing like a three quarter full time job in the Army National Guard as an army joint military logistics coordinator which is a mouthful. But it's basically the people who make sure the Army Air Force Navy are on the same sheet of music comes to their operation and it seems so sophomore now but at that time I was like man I gotta get it together. I'm just not. I'm not getting it done. I'm not being productive. You know and because I had the dual careers had their different ways of being. And what really got me at the time. Lj like how? Can I move and plan and lead lead the movement of thousands of troops and the equipment but this five thousand word essay is kicking my butt like just doesn't make sense to me And what I realized is that I had been taught how to do the former but no one sits down and teaches you how to be productive no went sits down and teaches you how to do this stuff especially when it comes to creative knowledge work and so. I did like any good officer. Scholar would do is. I started looking to see what other solution to people have found and I kept having to re translate and synthesize and pull things together enough that you know that became the basis of productive flourishing in. I've been really in the deep cut of that works since two thousand seven and it's basically the same question of like. Why is it that when it comes to things that we most want to do? We struggle the most. I'm not so much interested in the questions of why we don't do the things that we don't want to do. I'm more interested in why we don't do the things we do want to do. And so yeah I I kind of joke with my wife that had. I probably call gone to Grad School. Three or four years later. I would be a behavioral economist. But it wasn't really known at the time but larger largely the questions that behavioral economics ecomomic ask in what I asked. They largely convert. I have so many questions but I'm GonNa take a step to the left and ask a little bit more about you. What's What's your favorite thing to do? I'm terrible and acting answering one favorite thing. So if you ask me my favorite music you'd get three so I'm gonNA. I'm GonNa do that the same. I love Playing Guitar Singer Songwriter. Kind of like if Jackson Lee had a baby. I'll talk about I love playing video games. Have to actually meter that You know be careful about how much ado and I love being physically active in the sense of like hiking and you know exercise and things like that. I like being there. I don't like going there if you know what I mean getting off. The couch is hard but want them off the couch. I love it That's correct all right. I'll start with the ladder because that's a little bit. Easier Lynch so being productive is really about doing things that help you become your best version of yourself and so if the things you're doing are not helping you do that then you're not being productive and that's a somewhat different take from what the way we understand productivity and and being productive in sort of the mainstream way we're talking about which tends to be about getting more stuff done but honestly bro like many of us. Kinda got more covered. We don't have the right stuff covered like we do more stuff. But we're not necessarily focused on the right stuff and so you know to really pull it all together. Mine is much more. You may have heard that conversation about the difference between efficiency and effectiveness effectiveness. Doing the right thing and efficiency is doing things right. I'm much more in the doing the right things camp and so I want us to really be focused on those types of projects that type of work that one is going to lead to the best version of ourselves but to you know when we really look back at the end of a decade or five years or a year. I know we're recording this around the end of the year so people may be hearing this mid later in the year but a lot of us are asking. What did I do with this last year? What really did I accomplish? And some are asking. What did this last decade mean for me? What did I create this year? So being productive is really looking at the actions. You're doing it a daily weekly monthly level and seeing and making sure that they tied to this broader purpose. That you're here to do and that your broader purpose is actually turned into things that you can do so. It's kind of a two way street there. Are you focused on the right things? That's stuff if you had to to give us one. I guess the best way to do that. Right because In my mind you. Kinda work backwards right. You have a goal or a thing that you want to achieve and then you say okay. What do I need to do every quarter every month every week every day to get to that goal so I guess give us some some tips on how to number one identify the right things to do and steps to work toward that. You get a real natural way to do that. A lot of us. Our goal focused and so we can work backwards from the goal There's a more subtle and sometimes more powerful way that we can look at it as like who want to be. Or how do I want to be And then I can work backwards to like. What do I need to change in my life more so that I can be that way so You know I think of like goal of being more mindful or being you know more charitable than that does much more being that don't turn into. They don't seem to turn into a project nearly as much right. But that's another way that we can do I think Working backwards is a is a great way to go. I'm what I what say though. Is that You know it. It's been really fascinating to me. A lot of people come to me. They know what they WANNA do. And the struggle with how to do it but there are a significant amount of US. Who Don't actually know what we want and it can be really challenging force and so you know. I I do executive coaching and I and I work with entrepreneurs as well and one of the hardest questions to answer for them to answer is what do you really want. And it's not just what you want. But what do you like really walked people struggle with that one can really really start with that one in this morning that you would ask me that. I might struggle with it too And so I think that's where sometimes that second question can come in handy is like if you don't know really like what you really want you can think about the ways that you're being now and the ways that you might want to be a little bit different and focused on those intermediate steps and and really you know talk about projects so much one because I think that's where so many of us fall down but more importantly it's because finish projects are the bridge between our current reality and the life. We want to live in the work we want to do. And if you're not finishing the right types of projects you're staying stuck in your current world in your current life and so that's why I really want people to be thinking like okay. This goal that I have to take that take or this way I wanna be. What are the the projects that would get me there? What would bridge the gap between where I am and where where I want to

Charlie Arkansas United States Army Air Force Navy United States Military Academy Army National Guard Minnesota Grad School West Point Officer Jackson Lee Executive Lynch Coordinator
Kathryn Sophia Belle

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

08:30 min | 3 months ago

Kathryn Sophia Belle

"I'm India Lorrie Wilmot. And you're listening to the PODCAST TALKING. Journeys out belonging to blackness. Joining us today is Dr Catherine Sophia Bell. Catherine is associate professor of philosophy at Penn State with research and teaching interests in African American Afrikaner Philosophy African American Studies African Diaspora studies lack feminist philosophy and critical philosophy of race. She's an author. Co Founding Editor of the Journal Critical Philosophy of race a certified Yoga instructor in founding director in owner of La Belle. Be Coaching which Offers Executive Academic coaching workshops and retreats for administrators faculty and Graduate Students. Catherine also offers services specifically under happily unmarried and erotic empowerment that provide individual and Week Group. Coaching workshops and retreats designed to support the social emotional and physical wellbeing of her clients. Thank you for having me Katherine. Let me tell you. I just love the way. You're able to demonstrate for so many folks out there. How one in academic can be multifaceted in dynamic right. Don't sit at a desk. Let's read in on this thing right and then also to how as an African descended person and woman how he can truly embrace and live in your truth when it comes to your personal relationships and partnerships and even with yourself as it is the case with happily unmarried and then I love this and open to the sixty nine ways to embrace ecstasy. Yeah I mean there's more but sixty nine such a fun number and then I'm also my son. Signed his cancer and sign kind of looks like a sixty nine so I like playing with things like Bat. I love that. And so all of this falls under your business tagline philosophical purposeful and practical approaches to La Shelby. The good life. All of that fantastic. I'm so excited to have you here. Because you are such a brilliant scholar and you also have this really great. Entrepreneurial Mindset as well. I think our audience here will just enjoy listening to your journey as to how you've been able to combine these two passions. It seems to me I love it will fall right into our first segment. If you don't mind because I have so many different kinds of questions and thoughts act one call to adventure so for our listening audience. Who may not know you changed your last name from Gyns. Yes to bell and bell spelled with an extra e honor your maternal grandmother and and as I understand your maternal grandmother named herself. And Yeah and you see this active. Changing your name as a way to honor that power and legacies. Yes well first let me say I absolutely love my name. I mean every time I see it written down Catherine Sophia Bell like I get excited at the sight of my own name. So in terms of motivations oftentimes our names are patrilineal right. So many not necessarily all women are given the name of your father in. May Take on the name of their husband and that was my experience. So my initial given name was Catherine Theresa Johnson. My mother wanted the name Catherine after her mother my father wanted to name you theresa and then Johnson was his name. So that was my maiden name I got married in. Nineteen Ninety nine at the age of twenty one between my first and second semesters in Grad School and at that point I changed my last name to guidelines which was the name of the former husband I got legally divorced in twenty seventeen and I'm now berry happily unmarried. And rather than returning somebody that patrilineal name I mate name. I decided to go with a match. Lineal named honor my maternal grandmother so her initial given name was Katherine Smallwood. Which was my great grandmother's last name. Smallwood. But by the time she got the high school she changed her name's Katherine L. B. E. L. L. Now I have no idea how she went about changing it or even if she went through some legal process to do that but my mother got me a copy of her high school yearbook class of Nineteen Fifty two where in that yearbook so by the time. She got her senior in high school. Her name is listed as Catherine Bell. And so there's something really powerful to me about this black woman in the nineteen young black woman in the nineteen fifties by her senior in high school Made her name Kathryn Bell. And that's the name that she's recognized as you know later in life she. She went on to model. She showed up in jet magazine a few times and her name is Catherine Bell knows faces as well. You know that was just a powerful legacy to me and it was important Tap into in connect to that legacy empower naming oneself Have a match lineal name as hopes to patrilineal name. I'm so I changed my name Catherine. I actually dropped the middle name. Interestingly my mother when I was changing my last name she was like. Oh well I never really liked Teresa anyway. That was your father's toys. That would choice so she got a chance to rename me. My Middle Name Sophia. She recommended because she said you're Lhasa. In philosophy us so you can be Sophia. My Mother's middle initial is S. My two daughters have the middle initial s so we were able to share that s middle initial further sophia in the bell It's still sounds the same as the way. My maternal grandmother founded by added the extra e. Just a little bit of self friendship over the meaning of beauty. I think evidence that there was so much thoughtfulness and care. Yeah even your process to say okay. How do I go about changing my name because even when we go through relationships such as marriage? And you're going through the divorce there is a lot of conscious thought around. Do People keep their names Ryan or even when you're getting married forget about even when you're getting divorced but like when you're getting married some people choose to keep their name drop the name in my case I hyphenated. I've even attended a wedding where the husband and the wife decided to both hyphenate their names just so that it would on paper as well as the presentation of this new joined. Family Union Unit. That it wasn't that someone was giving up but they were just more so adding naming oneself is so powerful. I mean I can't help but to even reflect on scene in routes where yes lavar. Burton is as as Coon to Kim. Tae Is being whipped. He ends. It's you know this holder of active submission. That's trying to happen with him being beaten because he refused the naming Tober right and he's like Kota Day trying to be broken. Think about that example. I also think about the example with Muhammed Ali. Right where he's like. You know. Say My name. Say My name right before the destiny's child came out with it up. You know what I mean and so yeah. I'm not GonNa say that that you know the cultural model my mind that I figured I'd put that out there. Once I said it I was like okay. This is GonNa be the connection that comes up celebrities name that too. But that's not quite what I have in mind right. There is something and I think we have more examples of men doing that than or the example of men don't eat more celebrated than examples of women during that but definitely for me like I look forward to dropping the maiden name when I took on the Mary name but I also very much look forward to dropping the Mary name and renaming my for me. It was another beginning for me. Like who am I in this new chapter this new iteration of our life? And how can this naming process a reflection of that kind of a launching point for me for that? So that's been beautiful. Young kids is all about identity. And the all these different phases and stages just you know what does our about us and then our names judge. We're judged by our names whether we're applying for different jobs or positions. I mean their scores and You know them very well. Also but their scores of research studies and the employment field that talked about racial bias and discrimination based on candidates nate. I think that's a fantastic way to pay homage to her legacy. Thank you

Dr Catherine Sophia Bell African American Afrikaner Phi Catherine Theresa Johnson Lorrie Wilmot Katherine Smallwood Katherine Bell Kathryn Bell Associate Professor Of Philoso India Journal Critical Philosophy Co Founding Editor Executive Week Group La Belle La Shelby Lhasa Katherine L. B. E. L. L. Muhammed Ali
Food Myths

PODSHIP EARTH

06:42 min | 4 months ago

Food Myths

"I stopped by ousting Anna. If her family is originally from France. I thought when I was a kid for the longest time of course I thought it was French which seemed really exciting but I learned learning about my family history that we were actually Russian Jewish radicals. And you're still pretty radical. Yes yes I would say. I'm still pretty radical and I feel like I do come from a pretty radical lineage. Both to me. The definition of radical is that you are curious to go to the roots of the crises. That face us and not only do you go to those routes but then when you discover what those roots are you try to do something to change them so. My parents were both very radical and grandparents. Great grandparents. Yeah. We were sitting here with two books. One is your mom's Diet for a small planet and we'll talk about your Diet Fra Hot Planet. Your Mom Francis was right here in Berkeley. In the early seventies became kind of obsessed with looking at protein and she went to the library and basically came out with this entire theory. That blew away. You know years and years decades of thinking about that. There wasn't enough food on the planet and she was like No. There's plenty of food. There's just not enough democracy in distribution they growing up in that environment. Do you remember those times what I always take away from? My mother's story is both the need for all of us to keep asking those deep questions of why. Why is this happening? And and how do we actually fix it from its roots but also I think a lesson about the power of What Buddhists call the beginner's mind I think about in the story of Jane Goodall there? She was actually discovering what the experts literally couldn't see because they had the blinders of their expertise. And I think the story of my mother is the same thing she was this young woman. Who was discovering these answers to these deep questions by looking at the evidence? And she didn't have the blinders of any expertise around her. And I think that is a really powerful lesson to be. Learned no matter what you care about. The apple didn't for that far from the tree. That was having a conversation with someone who also is doing very similar work to his parents and he said he put it this way he was like. There is so much in the world to rebel against. I didn't need to rebel against the politics of my parents. And I feel that way as well But I will say personally this. This work wasn't what I thought I would do when I was younger. We were almost upon the thirtieth anniversary year of my mother's bestselling book this book diet for a small planet and like a lot of children. I had a really clear sense of what my mother should do with her life. And maybe not such a clear sense about my own and I sat her down New York City and said mom you have to write the sequel to this book. You touched so many lives but you really laughed and unanswered question. Which is that if your core thesis was that the problem of hunger is a problem of democracy then you left open this question of then what is democracy. And what is real democracy? Look like and how do we build communities? Whether is the kind of democratic engagement that will actually create healthy communities where people are not hungry and they get access to good healthy food so we said you should write a sequel exploring that question into that. I'll do this book if you will be my research assistant so I was in Grad school at the time and ended up signing on to work on this book with her and I went from research assistant to then be the CO author of this book together Co Authoring. This book together was for me. The life changing experience that made me realize that I wanted to work for food systems. Transformation for the rest of my life. So what were those powerful like? What was the realization sitting there working on the book with your mom so for that book. We traveled together to India Poland France Brazil Bangladesh and several places in the US and we remain friends to this day. Everywhere we went and everybody we met would have been a life changing moment. Put it all together even more so in the course of a year have this intimate close up view of both the potential around the world to really actually grow food and ways. That's good for communities in good for people but also to see the incredible global reach and impact of US based food companies food and chemical companies to see it all so clearly. You see the spread of a really highly processed diet. That's been terrible for our health that is going global. The other thing we really saw was the impact of US policies trade policies aid policies and develop policies. I know those in between books but the Diet for planet reading it after. Your Mom's book feels very much also like a sequel. I wanted to name it. Di- ever for a hot planet to be very explicit about the lineage of the work and what I talk about in Diet for a hot planet is fundamentally that in addition to the social and economic costs that my mother described Diet for a small planet of a very industrialized food system that's dependent on chemical inputs depending on synthetic fertilizer. That's about extracting resources from nature not working with nature that in addition to those costs that she described almost fifty years ago that there is this other cost which is the climate impact and I started writing diaper planet because I read a study. That blew my mind. It was the first global assessment of emissions related to livestock. It was called livestocks. Long Shadow was done by the United Nations. It found that livestock related emissions. Were responsible for more of the climate impact than all transportation combined and what we see in the food system are the kinds of solutions that would reduce food sector. Emissions are also that are better for farmer health better for our health better for biodiversity better for all the things that we also care about and that by talking about food as part of the climate conversation. We're really have an opportunity to showcase food as a really a key solution beyond have any recipes at the end. Your mom had a lot of recipes. I was I was thinking like I wonder why am I didn't put recipes so funny yes now. There is big debate to the recipes. Go into the not go in and in between these books that we've already talked about. I actually wrote a cookbook with a colleague. Bryant Terry and that has recipes. It's called

United States Mom Francis France Research Assistant Jane Goodall Anna Bryant Terry New York City India Poland France Brazil Ban United Nations Apple Berkeley DI
How To Use Fear To Your Advantage

The Marie Forleo Podcast

04:41 min | 4 months ago

How To Use Fear To Your Advantage

"Healer relationship. Grow Business Master your money or even solve world hunger the three words you need our way for it. Everything is figure out a ball. I gotta say that little phrase has changed my life and it's the title of my new book which is about to change yours. It's available now so go get your copy at everything is dot com and useful. Thank you so much. I have a question about business and fear. I'm twenty five and recently finished Grad school and have been trying to launch a freelance writing career. I have small jobs here and there but nothing as substantial as I've lost and I know I can handle I know. Part of it is simply fear of getting started and wrapped up in that fear of failing even a little fear of succeeding interesting. How can I either get over this fear and start building my business successfully or use the fear to my advantage. This is so juicy juicy juicy juicy like a ripe peach. Here's why it's so juicy. It's not about getting over your fear it's about getting into your fear no seriously it really is about getting into your favorite. So here's the whole thing about fear and my man. Josh pice taught me this brilliant brilliant brilliant man. Fear is nothing but fuel fear. If you really break it down is a sensation in your body and unfortunately our society has conditioned most of us out of experiencing it so. It's something that we push against. We resist we. Don't even want to look at it when in reality that fear is incredible fuel. That can just jet blast you towards your dreams. Here's what I mean once. A mentor taught me this. That fear is excitement with the brakes on and the whole secret to using fear to your advantage is to learn how to what Josh Calls. Party with your fear. What does that mean? It means experience fear as a sensation in your body without going into the mental drama about. Oh my God am I gonNa fail or all my God. Am I going to succeed and put all of your attention on feeling what those sensations feel like? Is it champagne bubbles? Do you feel a little bit like when you're going on a roller coaster and you're going up the hill and you're like. Oh my God my stomach's getting butterfly is but then what happens right? If you got stuck at the top of that roller coaster ride it would be terrifying. You'd be frozen in that one spot if you just stopped and you didn't experience all of it but if you actually let yourself go and you ride the fear all of a sudden it turns into exhilaration and it's like the best freaking time ever. That is what's possible when you party with your fever. We all do. It's called the ridiculous activating system. Your reticulose activate exists. Yes it sounds more complicated than it actually is in reality. It's quite simple. It's this tiny tiny like the size of your fingernail little piece of your brain stem. That's responsible for filtering in and filtering out information as you know it would be impossible for us to take in the millions and millions and millions of pieces of information of sensory data. That's coming all over us so the particular activating system helps you narrow in on what's most important for you. It tells your brain what to focus on. So if you have ultimate clarity about your business fantasy right. What kind of publications do you WANNA write for? How much money you want to make. What are the people that you want to associate with like really crystal clear picture of this dream career that you're creating your brain will help you bring your dreams into reality at actually becomes a partner in you having everything he wants? So it's really easy doesn't require anything else. Besides you having clarity so the next thing I recommend for you is getting yourself. What's known as a power posse when you're first starting out and you want to launch something big? You're creating something from nothing. You need other awesome people to hang out with and more specifically people that are instigating and initiating their own success. Here's why it's important for any of us who on somewhat of an entrepreneurial path we need other people to hang out with need to share notes with people. We need to be able to talk about our disappointments to talk about our wins and to keep each other going. This is hugely important. I know in my life. When I first started most

Josh Pice Grad School Josh Calls Partner
Election forecaster Rachel Bitecofer explains "the reason Joe Biden is the nominee"

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

08:05 min | 4 months ago

Election forecaster Rachel Bitecofer explains "the reason Joe Biden is the nominee"

"Rachel Bitta coffer. Thank you very much for coming on the podcast on the pleasures. All mind. Jonathan. Thank you okay. So five years ago. Nobody knew who you were two years ago. Almost two years this come July. You did something that put you on them. Map what you do out. Two years ago and July I came out and on twitter where a grand total of six hundred sixty twitter followers and nice started. Trolling the big election forecasters and They were having serious conversations as to whether the Democrats could pick up the twenty three seats they needed to flip the house and I introduced my new theory and model which was Arguing no no no because her way undercutting us it's going to be about forty seats and the reason why is because the electorate is going to be reshaped by backlash to Donald Trump. Now you said in July is July twenty eighteen. You put out a forecast that said initially forty two seats and folks thought you were nuts. They did they thought I was nuts and Took real umbrage to the certainty number one that I was talking about Especially because I was pointing out a specific districts. Some of them were Obviously not controversial. They were agreed upon really competitive districts. They've released as toss ups by others. But and I was saying. No these are one hundred percent to flip but really Especially things like Virginia's seventh district which were not even on other people's radar at the time is that That's down in the Richmond area of the suburbs of Richmond. And I said not districts GONNA flip. I don't care if it has played host to one of the House Freedom Caucus most ideological members and David Brat. It is going to be a democratic seat after these elections. And and that's what happened. Is that one okay. So why were you so certain? I was so certain number one because I had already developed the theory and watched it play out and win election cycle actually in two thousand seventeen election cycle in Virginia. Where I happened to be based I Had said to my colleague as we entered that polling season. We did polling state. Polling there in Virginia You know this is my expectation. I think we're GONNA see an electorate. That's much more democratically In a democratically comprise. We're GONNA see more young voters more voters of color more women more college educated voters in these voters are going to be breaking much more strongly for. Democrats than what you've been seeing under the Obama years and we need to account in this In our likely voter modeling because otherwise our polling is going to underestimate the Democrats support or Ralph Northam support in the election. And you know My colleague was certainly In agreeance that there was going to be Advantage for Democrats but the size and the shape of it. I think you know he was a little skeptical of until we saw it manifest in that virgin the election and the election night I was coming up to DC to do some local radio on whammy with coach. Mandy and I was literally yelling in the car. Oh my gosh I should have modeled this. I should have put something out I. I knew this was going to happen. Was a nine point. Route and Democrats picked up fifteen seats in the house of delegates. And so I committed right then and there I was gonNA find a way to model my theory and I was going to do something for two thousand eighteen and that's what I did. Okay so you sort of talked to round your theory. What is the theory? The theory is for the last eight years of you know for eight years. Basically of the Obama Administration. You know we had this Obama. Coalition emerge right two thousand and six. You see the Democrats. Pick up control of the House of Representatives and Then you see them. You know flipping the presidency in two thousand eight. I mean think people forget how big of a mandate that Obama election was picking up You know states like Missouri and North Carolina in that process and then all of a sudden. It's just disappeared right. Twenty ten they go from from that huge Obama win in two thousand eight to just getting shellacked with sixty three seats in the House of Representatives. And you know the narrative that was set on the Cable News. Chagos was Oh. The Democrats have reached with Obamacare and independence turned against them. And that's the story of the and and you know sitting at home and working on my PhD. Just getting started in Grad School to get to this point where I am now and I remember looking at the election data and just being like that is not what the data says. The data says turnout collapsed. And when it did it collapsed were heavily amongst Democratic voters. People who cast ballots either as Democrats are independence but cast them for Democratic candidates. And I just couldn't understand why the media narrative missed that important component So you know when I was looking at You know the elections of twenty fourteen and twenty ten. I was thinking about who didn't show up to vote more than anything else. And you know that's really what drives my research. Is this argument that. In the polarized era where we do have such little bit of Crossover Voting Republicans Voting for Democrats and vice versa. What matters at the end of the day in a competitive race is the is the composition of the electorate demographically Because that will determine the partisan composition and if the partisan composition doesn't good for Democrats are GONNA lose the race only looks good. Apparently when Democrats are freaked out. And they're only tout when they're not in power so never crafts. All ways freaked out even when they are empowered. Sabih like an inherent trait. You would think now you you said that. Turn out collapsed in two thousand ten but also in two thousand fourteen and a lot of the media the chatter. The cable chatter then was it collapsed because of disappointment in in Obama at both in Tan and in fourteen is it as granular as that or is it that the the Democratic Party and the candidates didn't do enough to maintain the enthusiasm from Eight and twelve so glad that you asked because Anybody that follows me on twitter will know that. I put a lot of the onus on Democrats the Democratic Party The D. Trip The DNC the SEC and the way that they approach electioneering as compared to the way that the Republican Party approaches electioneering. You know in in terms of what happened Democrats do not do an effective job getting their voters excited to show up to vote They liked to have cerebral Conversations voters that overestimate no offense to voters the Basically the intelligence of the electorate think income search for exactly. I think everybody's on Morning Joe Panel and whereas the Republicans are talking to the gut always and it's always about stakes right. If you don't show up to vote everything you love will fall apart. Die Right I mean that's that's a message right and they make people care about things that are are things people don't care about people don't care about state and local politics. It's unfortunate it's not fair. It's actually rational given the amount of influence that state and local politics has over one's life but it's a fact right and so the way that Republicans deal with that is they tie. They nationalize state and local officials to national politics or to national issues like abortion and guns and that way the voters like okay. I don't care about John Smith but he supports trump and I love trumps. So I'M GONNA show up to vote right. Democrats really fail to tap into that nationalized messaging. You'll hear them all the time. Say we'll all politics is local right like it's like one thousand nine hundred eighty tip. O'neill thing and if that was ever true. It's certainly not true now. All politics is national. The Republican Party gets that they get that voters will only show up in a high stakes environment and so they make that high stakes environment for them.

Barack Obama Virginia Twitter Republican Party Democratic Party Obama Administration Rachel Bitta House Of Representatives Donald Trump Jonathan House Freedom Caucus Richmond Ralph Northam Mandy O'neill David Brat John Smith Chagos Grad School
"grad school" Discussed on Modern Figures Podcast

Modern Figures Podcast

04:32 min | 5 months ago

"grad school" Discussed on Modern Figures Podcast

"I have all of the folks on research but then on the other side you bring your users and they can't see you. It was like one of those like one way window. Yeah and so it was awesome and so I switched to be on a research team and so I was like recruiting participants and you know Who helping do data for for those. Those lovely interviews. We used to do all the stuff you doing a PhD. Oh Yeah Yep. I must've so anyway moving on moving right along the PhD dream. I had no kidding So yeah so that's what I did Towards the mark. That was my last role that I had the company And it was interesting. I mean I made a lot of friends are had a lot of Several chats with different Black folks at at Apple and I was part of what was in African American Employees Association. Apparently now it's called something else like black set up. I think to just kind of like being involved. I had relationships with executives. Because I'm just you know that person there's your email them like hey What the secret. You're the secret though. If you're a corporate company you want to get on their calendars email. They're sending email directly to the person and they never thought Adleman boom boom. So that's what I did. I did that as an intern So my last day I had a meeting with the head of HR KNOWS. Like let me tell you stuff that's happening Because overall mine my experience apple was great but there was a some little things that I was just kind of like. You know I just don't think Training like unconscious bias diversity. Training is trickled down enough to like middle managers and things of that sort. So I struggle with that And just trying to advocate while I was doing the advocacy work to getting more students of color in Tech. And just kind of like. What do you mean around you and just kind of you know push through push through? That wasn't the isolation itself it was just like certain things accumulating time that. Yeah I've told you you know the work that I do. External Company is more significant to me ultimately will be more significant to our society. Yes exactly ooh. That's why I'm no longer at Apple full-time doing intake camp for girls. We should mention in tech camp for girls. Something started while you were in school. Yes in Grad School. So NC wit again shuttled to them They have the spire. It grant. And so I wrote wrote the grant along stars competing core Charlotte and we offer event. August two thousand fourteen And literally like a never intended to start my own organization that was Michael And I had never really thought of a vision beyond that day right just like everything we got into this day in a not even our after the event I get an email from a parent. Like you've changed my life in eight hours we're cooking you dinner and I was like okay. Girl and the crazy thing is like that that parent ended up becoming a mentor to me and her daughter is still involved in. I'm a mentor. And actually stay with him one of my semesters and grasp also yeah But yeah so the magic is what I call in the energy from the parents to students and the volunteers from that day told me like we have to keep doing this. And so that's how index is still alive today. Yeah so tell us more about what INTECH DOES. And maybe even like why. This logo was chosen. Oh that's a good question So I'll talk about the logo really quickly So it is like a little light bulb with A. I don't know the little symbol on the inside that means women One of my friends from NC state created it and he literally created like all of the design specs. Send it to me and I was like yes it was. I was like that's it right there. it did take me a while to come up with in Texas a month but then like our three pillars are inspire. Inform inspire innovate. And so you have that in in getting girls in tech. Yeah so as we bring working side okay. But our mission for tickets to increase Excuse me FBI. Here's freezing. I.

Apple NC FBI intern HR Grad School External Company African American Employees Ass Charlotte Michael INTECH Texas
"grad school" Discussed on The Tiny Meat Gang Podcast

The Tiny Meat Gang Podcast

01:40 min | 6 months ago

"grad school" Discussed on The Tiny Meat Gang Podcast

"Of them in the bad but they shut up man like music telling jokes such a fucking mouth and oh yeah my bed and we bring him down with some like Dr. Yeah so I think you're dude the like coming off of that right where you kind of talking and the music happens and you're talking more music heavens. To the first time it is stand up to get on stage and there's there's no backing track and when when the joke book and eight. Everyone's sitting there like all right. What else you got? I'm like. Oh you gotta that like Gone Roth Place but that's how you learn. Do not everybody knows is brutal but it's So the cameo thing Oh yeah. Let's talk about that and let's talk about the big brother to I thought man. That was the most obvious mother fucker. Here's the thing about Cameo I get a lot of cameos and a lot of them are like you know stupid and I won't do some you know I I'll do this one. I'll do it completely straight this person it for those that don't know they asked if I would break up with their Grad school boyfriend. Yeah now we all know although Sugar Grad school fans out there so immediately yeah I was like Oh this is bullshit would have me break up with their girlfriend boyfriend. During during exam we was so I'm going to do this do it straight and I'll I'll make my little five dollars or whatever. La Make a cameo one hundred and code. By the time.

Sugar Grad school
"grad school" Discussed on Phil's Philosophies

Phil's Philosophies

03:25 min | 6 months ago

"grad school" Discussed on Phil's Philosophies

"Value to my life because I've gotten to the place in my self confidence and self esteem where I realized exactly what my value the US which has been such such a shift for me. I'm amazing I'm pretty dull the way that my brain works is really we cool. The way that my work ethic is is really cool. Though the way that I value growth is really really cool and I need somebody else who can value that. It meets you you a high. I almost want to end it right there. Man I'm sitting here wanting to type all kinds of knows that that's amazing. Not only for people who you are single but in general loving yourself and of the day. You're loving yourself for who you are. There's something I like to do with every single guests and that's to ask them if they've been reading a book recently that they would love to recommend to everybody typing on your mind So I have been super into any Graham lately so any agreement for those of you don't know There's a theory that there are nine personality types and all of them have a basic fear. Fear all of them have a basic motivation etc and we learn about any Graham in particular. It talks about what you look like when you're healthy and when you're unhealthy which is really why I like that tool Other personality tests are behavioral based. So they really look at your behaviors. The ideogram looks at why you do do do what you do. So I would look into a couple of books about the program There's one called the path between us which talks about the different types of any grams and how to get along with people who are different than you and then there's also a book that's hawks about so I'm trying to remember the name of it but it's the book that's a precursor to the path between I think it's the path t to you think it's what it's called. That really goes into depth. It really goes in depth into each type so you can learn more about yourself in y you do what you do. And while it may not describe describe you perfectly you can definitely draw what what matches for you from the book. Use it to become a healthier person. I love that. Ah Thank you so much for your time me. I feel like people are going to be really inspired because I am. I'm sitting here on the couch with you. And I'm like man I really need a level up. You gotTA gotTa get better than I am here to encourage a definitely keep up with me. You'll be hearing more for me Just about how to help other people live their lives. You know I'm learning as you can tell and want to help other people learn to. How can people find you to learn and watch you as you attorney for? Sure you can follow me on instagram. At Nia. Nia Flower blossom again that's at Nia flower. tongue twister tongue-twister tongue twister at Nia flower blossom on instagram. Also go to my website. I blog occasionally NIA DARVILLE DOT ORG or right knows Leonardo DOT com. Actually I think it is dot com. Yeah sorry guys. It is NIA DARVILLE DOT com. I think I'll be able to put those in the description. The people can check that out. Thanks again so much NIA and as of this As of today it is Dr Martin Luther.

"grad school" Discussed on Phil's Philosophies

Phil's Philosophies

11:48 min | 6 months ago

"grad school" Discussed on Phil's Philosophies

"But I feel like that's something that I would if I were a girl and I am more hair than the little will awesome something here at something. I'd feel like I wanNA control. Yeah that's kind of what we do so I kind of want to check way right back. This is a little random I don't want to go back to your speech pathology. Yes so I wanna see what you can teach me okay. I have a hard time with saying my else. So the the word H. L. D. I have a hard time saying okay hold but it doesn't sound like whole to some people. Yeah sounds like I don't know how to describe but I can't say it okay. Would you got so speech. Pathology was such a long time ago session a special longtime ago but a lot of chosen have difficult times with their else and if it wasn't corrected when you were a child it's much more difficult to correct it when you're adult. There is no who for me there. There could potentially be hope for you. It just would require a whole lot of time and effort for you as an adult because your brain isn't as plastic as a kid in your brain. It's a lot easier to fix habits and things like that as a child than it is as an adult. So your brain you work on it. I would suggest going to Swiss speech therapists. Who actually knows what she's talking about and can give you? I learned the name for that at one point. I don't remember it anymore but speech therapist. Good definitely help with that for sure. All right this became Niyaz podcasts. Everybody I came to her actually for advice on how to say my else. Listen and I didn't help you very much but I'm who will always say if I don't know I will refer you to someone who's head well. That's that's good about leadership. Yes for speaking about leadership. You did a couple of things in college one of the things I want to talk about though was you. Did this thing called a right of passage ceremony after college Can you describe what that was. This was a big deal for sure for sure Before I talk about I think one thing that's really important to know about me is A lot of the the things that I do I do it because I need it so i Never Willie start something saying Oh people would love this or people need this. I usually start with. I need this or I'm working on X Y and Z and that's kind of how the rite of passage started as well. I knew that I wanted to wear tasteful like like I told you earlier I went to a historically black college and university and they war can taste. Souls comes from Africa it actually symbolizes a lot of Phenomenal things and I wanted to wear it as a part of my heritage during my graduation but when I got to Andrews Andrews People told me that I couldn't wear it and that it wasn't a official academic graduation Regalia and I said that's crazy said that's insane. No I'M GONNA change that people said Oh. No you can't change it. It's been like that forever. People have been trying to get around it forever. I said No. No no this. That's not gonNA work for me. Watch me I S. It doesn't work for me so I went about learning. What are the proper channels to get the change in? How do I How do I work to make it happen? And I actually ended up going through the leadership department making it what you call a change project so basically you had to pick something that was in within your sphere of influence that you could change on your campus and your community or in the broader sense the world I chose our Eurocentric graduation policies and along with that as I did more research about the Kim Tae Stolz I realized a lot of pw is predominantly white institutions actually had these ceremonies these rite of passage ceremonies. Where they actually taught the importance of the tasteful so that students knew what they were wearing and why there were wearing it so they could really Be taken take advantage of and be happy about what they were wearing So as I started planning it I presented. It's the powers that be told told them you know why was important. I had a couple of mentors who helped me during that time and it was really really. It was a great experience. I got to learn how. How did change policy from the inside out? That's something really special. Yeah I remember watching that seeing your your post on instagram and things like that and I was like man. That's that's something really inspiring. That's something that should be done everywhere and I did do my own little trial with it. Unfortunately my university is cited. Did Not do that yet. And you know that takes work on their side of things but I was really really amazed to see the kind of work that you're able to do and really honored that you're like Phil. Let me share the stuff with you so that you can do what you gotTa do over there for sure for sure and I wanna say I think I was also in the right place at the right time. It was the right time in Andrews history for something like that to happen is definitely the right time So I cannot take credit for honestly any of it. I believe that God used me while I was there for a specific reason I'm still learning about why was doing speech. Language pathology about why was Andreas about you. Know a lot of different phases phases that we've talked about in our journey in my journey But godsman revealing things slowly to me over time saying I had you here for this reason. You hadn't than this so and so wouldn't have known about this and things like that so it's it's been cool to listen and watch and go when I'm not sure what's going on. I love that especially sometimes I get so caught up in my own journey. I'll look back and think man. If I would've just picked this everything would have worked out okay instead I've been trying to retrain my brain to say okay. Fill this did happen so because it did happen. Here's what you've learned. Here's how you can apply this and help somebody in need. Here's how that might come to play in the future. Who knows? I really appreciate the way that you have a positive outlook on life. Yeah I really do. I mean it's it's come from learning trust independence so from dropping out of college to college dropping out of Grad school to getting a job. There was is a six week period where I had to make money as a learn how to adult really really quick and apply for jobs in all those things in it taught me dependence. Thank God I have never had to be dependent like that ever ever. You know my parents. We were not in a place where I had to worry about where my next smeal was gonNA come from. I didn't have to learn dependence there. I was good at school. Even though I didn't necessarily love what I was studying I was good at it. I didn't have to learn dependence. It's there it took me being out of school. Not sure where I was supposed to be doing and not sure where my money was gonNA come from your to be completely and totally dependent on God and once I started seeing him move once. I saw him put random amounts of money in my bank account when I needed it once I literally saw. Oh him paying my bills. Oh you've got me like no you really care. I told school and I left school. And you got me so so learning being that. Trust learning that dependence Allows you to have this positive outlook when you haven't had to go through anything. It's Kinda hard to understand. It's hard to understand that God's got you because he has had the opportunity to get you that make sense so so meet me dropping out gave gave God the opportunity to go. Hey you let go so here I am in look. I've got you. You're right. I'm right here with you And and literally gave me the opportunity to see him work the way that he works And that gives you the opportunity to trust. I don't think trusting God is normal. I don't think trusting God is something that we naturally liked to do where we're humans. We were built in said like most of the things things that we need to be healthy. We naturally want to do. It's just it's against our nature so sometimes we have to be taken out of our comfort zone. We have to be taken out of you so you know what feels right to learn what is right. Wow You droppin dimes today. So now that's kind of permeated throughout the rest of your life. Now when I watcher instagram's stories you're talking about going to the gym. It's like five o'clock in the morning. I see you go in this whole eighty twenty Vegan and raw diet thing. What is going on over there? Yeah I mean it's it's really all about health for me. Twenty Twenty Year of health. That's health in you know a physical sense mental emotional Over the past the last quarter of Twenty Nineteen Ninety days is twenty nine thousand nine. I embarked on another journey Because because if you let me backtrack and say what you think about Maslow's hierarchy of needs in the bottom there things like food water shelter safety things like that At the top is emotional intelligence in learning when all those other things are not in place. You don't have time. You don't have the mental capacity to really we get into the emotional piece for sure so along my journey you've heard about where my emotional state was but I didn't have you know oh safety or I didn't have you know a couple of different things So I wasn't able to really dive into my emotional state. You know I'm out of out of school what I'm trying to work so I need to make sure my foods employees you know. I'm in survival mode. Finally when I got to about October of this year I was was able to do some introspection in realize that my The way that I saw myself was not okay. I realized that there were some fundamental on mental lies that I was really believing myself Believing about myself as truth and there were some truths that I should be believing about myself off. That wasn't wow and so I realized that something had to give and something had to change started. This journey of being intentionally healthy and I started a journey of truth based self-discovery. I'm the type of person who likes research. I like Fax Six. I don't like platitudes. If you tell me Oh your beautiful or oh you're smart. I'm going to say okay cool but you don't know that you have nothing to base that on like that Is Not evidence based so for me when it was about you know trying to build myself esteem. Build myself confidence. It was about what is is. What is evidence? Based why. Why am I using if I if I'm amazing? Why is it so for me? I started doing using self-discovery tools. I started doing things like Myers Briggs in any at Graham and things that gave me some evidence base things to look about the. We're GONNA pause right affair. What is your what is why did I really just Yup? I gave away my own. Okay well what is your Myers Briggs and actually an is f breath J. A.. Wow Yeah used to be very very close. Run the Myers Briggs in the Miami type six hundred phobic type six. Wow Yeah now I'm going to go back and look at all these things meaning as it gets lost up. You'RE GONNA look so so from that. I was able to say okay. People with vs personality types are typically good at X Y and Z..

Myers Briggs Andrews Andrews H. L. D. Africa Grad school Kim Tae Stolz Willie Phil Andreas official Miami Maslow Graham
"grad school" Discussed on Phil's Philosophies

Phil's Philosophies

12:24 min | 6 months ago

"grad school" Discussed on Phil's Philosophies

"It's costing you emotionally absolutely lusting you spiritually. It's costing you physically not healthy. It was costing me my health so so it's really not free. What was what was the number? Two people are GonNa are GonNa say that I quit do people. We'll have to do this for you. Do people have to do the work that you're doing. Do people have to pay the costs that you're paying right now. It's not now is not they live so I a about seven o'clock in the morning at this point so I knew my mom was up and I called her and said Mom GonNa drop out and she said I was waiting for you to say. Yeah that wow and I was like what she said. You didn't listen to yourself over the break you hate it and I was just waiting for you to come to that conclusion because if I had said anything you would have said. No no no no. That's not I got it I got it I can do it I'm hardheaded like that. She said I couldn't have said anything. But I was waiting for you to come to that conclusion. Wow so she said What are you going to do so yes? She was supportive of me dropping out. But what's next. What's next because at this point you know I'm on my own and I really imp- route of where I am in terms of independence like I said I'm one of five so there are three other people who are coming behind me he At that point my brother was still at home too and he was pretty independent but he wasn't fully out like I was so I didn't want to continue to be a financial chill burden on my parents. I wanted to be financially responsible and leave enough resources for everybody else. And that's not how my parents are necessarily thinking about it. But but that's how I am as one of the children like I need to. I need to go on and do my own thing. Now that I'm old enough to go on and do my own thing and leave the resources for everybody body else. Sure some moms like okay. So what are you gonNA do. Rent was doing five days and I knew that because I was dropping out. I couldn't use any of the loan money. They had just dispersed for that semester. Because this January says new dispersal and I knew I was going to pay it back so I don't WanNA use any of that low money and so I was like Okay God and what you do is do is do so. In five days I came up with rent and you know. I BABYSAT BABYSAT Uber. I did what I had to do and I came up with rent. Wow and dot got me through January and then I started applying for jobs so my mom and I kind of talked to deal so I was like. I'm GonNa do this this this this and this and I was like my goal is to get a job as soon as possible if I need to try to move in with the family member here here in Atlanta if I can't find a job etcetera I'm just going to do what I need to do. And that's a story high draft out. He just I applied. I applied. I applied applied and six weeks later. I found a job. Wow grinding though ladder. Grinding a lot of grinding yeah yeah that's something else. I remember when I was doing education and people who listen to the PA. They know the stores. I'M NOT GONNA keep retelling it but I remember also working on my lesson plans and going into teach. Those sixth graders and sixth graders. Were little monsters. I loved him they they were good little kids but I I kept looking at my computer every morning every night. Being like I hate this what else can I do. My family is a bunch of teachers and preachers choose. It's almost like we don't know. In some cases that other things exists. Yeah so I thought well again another minor and yeah. I have four miners where miners. I am ridiculous definitely and graduated graduated five years with four miners and a major. Because just like going to different conferences. I was going to different departments while still in school trying to figure out. You know the job things are are coming. Which one do I pick right? And I settled on intercultural communication. It's my last minor and it was great. I was exhausted. I was really really busy. Just it's like you described in college and is slept and that was my enjoyment and I'd wake up and be like I'm liking this. The research is cool but then graduation can happened and I sat in a dorm room and I was like so. I didn't really think much about how I can really use this right now so soon. And and what else what other trainings I can get and so yeah. Welcome to Phil's philosophy is we're still figuring that still figuring it out but that's okay I think life is about figuring it out. Are you on a journey. And every step of the journey is on the path to something good on the path to something yet. I I talk about all the time that the essence of God is good and he orchestrates everything in our life to be good. You know he says all things work together for the good of those who love him and who are called according to his purpose or every every step on the journey every step on the path is on on the path to good. Yeah everything is on about even though it may not feel good even though is this season a struggle etc.. It's on the path to good. So that's what my parents have always taught me. My parents have always been very vocal about their very circuitous journey as well And I'm not GonNa go on and tell their stories because I love giving them the opportunity to tell their stories but everybody has this circuitous journey that just you know it loops in. It doesn't necessarily make makes sense until you get to the end and say okay and understand that I understand that you mentioned earlier that I felt called to ministry. Yeah now that I I can look back on it. I don't think I was called necessarily to vocational ministry but I am called to to live a life of ministry and live a life that leads others to God and I think I eventually will do that. Ah in part vocationally But I'm starting to realize that passion in calling invocation don't always have to align. Wow yeah they they really don't always have to align. You had to have a vocation because you have to make money Ryan. A Workman is worthy of his wages. You gotTa make money needs to be a burden on society. You gotta be able able to pay your bills but then you also have this thing called passion and calling which oftentimes or they should coexist right. Because God cares about what you like. Yeah got cares about what you're passionate about. And he gave you your desires for a reason So so he can figure out how to had you live out that calling and I believe and I'm still learning. I'm not there yet. I I don't know if I ever will be at a place where I say this is exactly it but I am willing to follow and I am listening and watching For ways to live out ministry in my life still doing yes. You're falling you're calling however ever. You're still doing what you're passionate about at the same time. You're just supporting yourself home yourself. Yeah for sure I heard in the Bible dude named Paul. Yeah Yeah apparently the greatest missionary of all time but was also a tent maker. I don't really feel like he loved making ten. Yeah I don't know if that's anybody's passion to make ten. We sure he had to make a living right. We gotta do the same things. But I think we've been told way too many times. That your passion and your vocation to one in the same. We're honestly I feel like if you're passionate your vocation. I went in the same lattice times. You could end up earned out that. Yeah Yeah you definitely can definitely can. You can sure it out and lose everything that you're called to do as your health too so I wanted to talk a little bit about faith. You've mentioned faith a little bit before and Oliver all over online. What I see from Darville sticky note? Faith yeah what is that. Yes a sticking out. Fate is actually a tool that are developed by sophomore. More Year of college was New Year's resolution of mine to get to know God more and get to know God a little bit better in little. Did I know that that would start. Start this whole journey of really trying to follow guide but for me I realized that I had never really been taught how to read the Bible. My parents are people the faith my grandparents are people faith You know sometimes I like to think about us like the Levi. It's in the Bible says family of preachers in and and it goes way way way back. However I don't remember being taught exactly how to read the Bible? I remember being told to read the Bible. Oh I remember reading the Bible for you know my my Sabbath school lessons and things like that but I don't remember learning exactly how I'm I and the type of person I am is like tools and I like creating tools and so I created a tool for myself to learn how to study the Bible. I'm so what I would do. Is I would read a chapter of the Bible and then I would write down the verse that stuck out to me on a sticky note and I created this thing called faith wall so in the in the in my dorm room. I'll have a wall of sticky notes all these verses that admit something Simi- as I was reading the Bible and whenever I didn't feel like like reading the Bible or struggling or upset I could just look at my face wall and get the ounce of faith that I needed to make make it through. It's the next day that's powerful. Yeah so I started using this tool and I started posting my sticky notes on my I was on snapped at that time on my snapchat on my instagram and I start sharing them and then some people started reaching out to me and saying hey sometimes this is the only Bible I get a day. Sometimes this is the only time I hear what God has to say to me so I wanted to teach other people how to read the Bible too and that's when I created a website for it. I started blogging about the different insights. That I was receiving from God as I was reading and it started growing people started using it and to this day some people still reach out and tell me hey. Hey this is how I studied the Bible. This is how it works for me. This is how I'm getting closer to God so it was really cool. It's really cool. Seeing it spread the way that it did for sure and once again living Out a little piece of your passion even if it wasn't your fulltime job sharing something about your faith with the rest of the world. That's really something special so right right now as I'm looking at you I see you've got a new hairstyle. Adeel got a little something going on. And there's a reason why asking you this because through the years I've seen on instagram program. Your hair has changed. Maybe you've cut it sometimes running out a little bit longer for a lot of young women especially those who are African descent Hair means something away for. You doesn't mean anything. Oh Yeah for sure for sure I tell people all the time when my hair changes something changed in my life or I needed something to change in my life. I needed something to control so my hair change usually. It's it'll be a cut. It'll be a color. My hair has changed at least six or seven times since my college career and you heard how tumultuous my college career was so my hair reflected that right before I went to Andrew. Take it all off when I started my faith dirty my sophomore year. I cut it in colored it My junior year I colored it congruent out my senior year it looked a little bit different and then when I came here for Grad School I cut it again so when I dropped out of Grad School I color. They were just every time that I've done something different. There's been something going on in my life sure But it just for some reason it helps me helps helps you feel a sense of control when I know life oftentimes is out of my control just gives me something I can I can touch. I can definitely understand stand that I haven't been fully diagnosed as Adhd or add yet..

Bible instagram Adhd Grad School PA Atlanta Adeel Phil Andrew Ryan Darville Paul Oliver Simi
"grad school" Discussed on Phil's Philosophies

Phil's Philosophies

11:31 min | 6 months ago

"grad school" Discussed on Phil's Philosophies

"Present And so I just went on in and did it. I did what I had to do. Wow so talk to me about that. Plunge you've gone now from Oakwood University. Which is an Alabama Alabama gone up to now Michigan And excuse me. And now. You're trying to be a speech pathologist. So what else were you involved in at school. School really kept you going because that's a lot of stress. Do you have any creative outlets. So I actually didn't have any creative outlets while I was there. What kept me? It wasn't terribly mostly healthy at the time in my life Yes I was stressed. Yes I was probably depressed at at several points in that journey however I did not take enough time to sit with that what I did instead was. I made myself busy. Eighty the busier. I felt the less I could feel the busier. I was the less I could feel so I was so busy that I literally take time to sleep. I didn't have time to think about how lonely I was. I didn't have time to think about how I wasn't really enjoying what I was studying and I wasn't wasn't really sure what the rest of my life was going to look like but I was busy and I was doing good things so nobody could question my business. Yeah but I still wasn't being unhealthy. You're preaching to the choir today. I hope you know that. Wow that's something because I felt like even in my own life. I've done all these things you know. It's now twenty twenty and I think back to twenty ten to twenty twenty and I think of all the things that I tried to do to say to myself. Okay so you do matter number one and two. You're doing good things you should be busy. Be Working on fast and now I've gotten to the point where I'm kind of sitting at home going. Wait a minute. Did I get a degree in something. That actually like Did I think about much in the future that kind of thing. Yeah wow that's something else right here so tell me about maybe a little bit more of your emotional health. How did you move from well number one? You Know Sunshine so I'm sure you already struggling. Yeah Yeah and the number to you change in your major number three. You're only going to bed for enjoyment much. So how is your emotional health of kind of I don't WanNa say evaporating but moving forward from then and now today Like I said I think God calls each specific things is at specific times guy called me to Andrew for a specific reason And I think part of it was isolation wow I needed that time of isolation. I needed that time of Struggle And I did accomplish a lot of things that I think. Were really helpful for the school but for me particularly I needed that time away because I developed in a way that I wouldn't have developed when I was in my my place of comfort when I was I learned how to be alone and how to be okay with being alone I learned how to get closer to God even when I was struggling even though I didn't take the time to really understand understand the extent of my emotional state. I knew that I wasn't happy and I was able to turn to God and I was able to as you journal more and I was able to. You know just to sit and be still a bit like I just talked about being busy right So it's a little oxymoronic but When I wasn't busy I was completely still and it was like how am I going to be? Okay Hey with myself in this still state. I don't have a bunch of friends to go hang out with and I don't have all these things. So how am I going to be okay being alone so so yeah. That's that's what life was like at that stage you know. We'll talk a little bit about my emotional health later in life but at that stage I didn't necessarily have language language to attach to what I was going through. I just knew that it was important. Whatever that season was that it wasn't for no reason and that I needed to make the most of it and so in that moment you went there and you finished your degree? This incredible things on the way and then I got to meet you you too that we did not meet in person for a couple of months yes social media is a great thing it is it is I learned from you. I was inspired Harry by you. I tried to do some similar things even at my own university. And then you move to Atlanta Dad. You went to Grad School. I went to Grad School. And I'm sitting with you right now. Yes and you're in Grad school and that in Grad school was going so continued on that speech. Language pathology track I was actually really successful with it. I got into several Grad schools. But I actually was accepted to Georgia State University here in Atlanta for free so I was on school for free. I didn't have to pay for anything. I was taking out loans to live but in terms of tuition and things like that it was completely free. So that's what brought me here to Atlanta. And that's why I say that I think God calls he to specific things at specific times. Because if I wasn't in Grad school there really wouldn't have been another reason reason for me to come to Atlanta. I came because it was free I really wanted to be in the DMV area. I thought that was going to be really cool but Howard. It wasn't offering me enough money so I said okay. I'm GonNa go where it's free and I stay there for two years and then I'll go to the DNV area. But that has not been the case I am here uh of and I was in Grad School. I was working I was actually working underneath one of my mentors. In speech language pathology. I was really excited about that. I was interested in African American Englishman accurately and we call it botox go. Oh Yeah Aka. OVONIC's was interested in for sure and Dr Julie. Washington is one of the lead researchers in studying being the grammatical the grammatical What we're looking for the grammatical now just the Grammatical Structure Chore of African African American English macular and kind of legitimizing it as a dialect? You're right and that's exactly what it is so learning about that researching that and actually trying to affirm the usage of the dialect. It was really cool research but what I realized while I was in school was that I really didn't enjoy the practice of speech therapy. The research was cool because I am naturally learner and what I found myself doing and was trying to pick something that I liked within speech. Language Pathology I was I was picking from a closed set of options right so I was going to these conferences. Trying to figure out. Okay okay. This might be interesting. This might be interesting or maybe this but nothing really interested me and I didn't see beyond on the closed set. Wow see close set so I had chosen. This people had seen me choose. This people already probably thought I was a flake because I went from Oakwood to Andrews and I went from education to speech therapy so if I make another major decision that changes that people people are really going to think. I have no idea what I'm doing. which in fact I had no idea what I was doing but I did not want to be perceived that way show? I'm in Grad at school. I'm doing the best with where I am. which I firmly believe that you're supposed to bloom where you're planted right but sometimes you can uproot yourself you? You know we when it's not the right fit and you've been told to do something else. You could uproot yourself something that a lot of people don't know was towards the end of my first semester actually felt called to ministry. Wow actually yeah I actually felt called to ministry is actions. Were in Grad school the first semester in Grad school so I have always been A person of faith and I've always been very vocal about my faith and I've always his Shared my faith whenever I have the opportunity to but I actually felt called soon ministry towards November October November of my I E semester of Grad School and I actually went on applied for a job in ministry actually was offered it and decided now. I don't WanNa do this. This is too much is too much I'm GONNA stay in Grad School. I'm GonNa Finish what I started going to say no to this particular opportunity because I already. This is too much too soon. Wow so I went back to Grad School. I continue Grad School And I went home for for for Christmas break and I was so I was in such a bad place. Certain in such a bad place part of me was like well. You know I disobey God because I felt called to ministry and I did it go through with it. So maybe maybe that's why I hate school so much or I really don't enjoy what I'm doing. I really don't enjoy what I'm doing and I kept saying that so my mom like I really hate school like no. I really hate school but wasn't allowing myself to consider the fact that hey you chose to be in school. And never I didn't take responsibility instability for my choices at didn't realize that choices can be undone you can make new choices. Of course so I went went back to school in January and I was in school for about two weeks and I actually just looked at it instagram story. I posted a look back at my archives on January nineteen nineteen. I hit posted a picture of a lesson plan that I was working on and my caption for the lesson plan was wow. I really hate doing this. And at that point it's still had not even dawned on me that it was an option to not do that. Yeah it it. It blew my mind when I realized. Oh I don't have to do this in your margins I I have options. I'm a person who likes to finish what she starts. Of course so the fact that there was an option for me to not finish. It didn't even even occurred to me. Didn't even occur to you probably felt like failure to go somewhere to up your life to move in a place where all you had to do is take out loans just to live. Yeah yeah which are as big as school loan so you know not too bad not too bad right in free education free now. That was one of the biggest draws for me. You just say you degree it was free but what I started realizing I woke up the next Friday January twenty fifth. I woke up and I was working on a lesson planet. Five five o'clock in the morning because I work hard even if I hate it do what I need to do. A five o'clock in the morning working as texting some my my friends and I was like you. I really hate this and they said Oh we really hate this to a certain. So why are we here. And that was the first time I asked myself self that question. Yeah so why am I here. I started answering. 'cause it's free will. Is it free. You taking out loans to live. It's.

Grad School Oakwood University Atlanta Alabama OVONIC DNV Georgia State University Michigan Washington Andrew Harry DMV Howard Oakwood Dr Julie Andrews
"grad school" Discussed on Phil's Philosophies

Phil's Philosophies

11:09 min | 6 months ago

"grad school" Discussed on Phil's Philosophies

"Today's guest Nia Darville. So near Ni- we became friends over social media few years ago and I've been able to watch her journey ever since with instagram and her blog she shares her faith journey Ernie and live journey and recently she dropped out of Grad School. Thank you for being on the show. Ya Thank you for having me Phil here in Sunny Atlanta. Something like that not quite a a little bit chilly today. But it's okay. Cold weather only lasts for a maximum of five days. You're right I got here. Maybe a few weeks ago and it was seventy degrees. Yeah yeah that's it's the south. I'm a southern girl. I will always live in the south. Hopefully you know I try not to make my plans to far out but the south has my heart because it will always always be warm at some point and a two week span you know especially. I'm sure that comes from someone who came from a university in Michigan okay. Those were probably two of the hardest years of my life. I didn't see the sign like that's actually a real thing that people struggle with and I had no idea that it would be a factor tear in my happiness while I was at college. You know So being in a place where there wasn't the sign and where it was cloudy where it was great it was actually extremely difficult and that for me actually probably would have been amazing really. I don't like sunshine. Let's yeah you're in an interesting place right now. Because Atlanta the sun shines probably eighty percent of the time I really. I didn't hear that that's not good. Sorry hopefully the send warm your heart Phil. Hopefully it'll it'll change your mind a little bit. I'll come to the dark side eventually. Hello well well for everyone visiting who's ever visited Atlanta Atlanta. What would you recommend them to do? I and why so I think it really depends on the person but my favorite place in Atlanta is Piedmont Park Piedmont Park about that. So Piedmont Park is a huge park in the middle of Atlanta. It has a lake it has sunshine fine has trees in a lot of people running around. It's really busy and I honestly just like to go and sit and breathe I I like to People Watch. I like to journal and I'll usually just take a blanket. I keep a blanket in my car. I take a blanket out and stretch out and it's a moment for me to would be still be still. I can breathe and I can relax. Honestly that is a blessing for all of you out there who just want a place to relax not looking looking for city life. Necessarily you just want to come and drive through hurt the horrendous traffic of Atlanta just to find a spot to sit I hate driving being out. Here it's something else but I like that Piedmont Park. Let's get into it. I WanNa know just a little bit about who you are. How would you describe yourself the hard question? How would I describe myself? I think I would describe myself as a young adult. Who's just trying to figure life out I really leash. Strive to be healthy in all areas of my life I'm striving for health. I'm striving to grow I'm learning I'm a learner. I think I'll always be lifelong learner. and I really tried to apply the knowledge that I that I you know obtain. I'm learning just for the sake of learning. I'm learning to be better. I'm learning to be healthy. I'm learning to grow so I think that's how I describe myself. I think that's a good place to be and welcome to Phil's philosophies Auspey is where I'm a young adult figure it all out so anything that you can learn. I'm going to try and learn to how about that. Let's say hop on board. So what's your what's your background. What kind of family do you come from all that? Good stuff right for sure I love talking about my family because I really believe that The families that we grow up in and release shape who we are as people. I talk about birth order all the time on the second oldest of kids a five five five of us. Wow Yeah Yeah I knew that there is there's a lot The oldest is a boy so I always say I'm the oldest because girls always mature faster than boys etc etc on flux six. Do you worry about it. But so growing up as the second oldest of five I had to become a leader. Early Liane right. I'm towards the beginning of the birth order. There're many behind me The youngest kid is nine years younger than I am. Wow So I had to learn how to lead and wasn't really successful at that growing up. I was very bossy. Ask them they didn't really like following uh-huh that age but that really helped me to start to learn how to home leadership So I come from a family like I said I'm from down south. have a fantastic phenomenal mom and dad. They've taught me so much and it's been cool to watch character traits that I saw in them come out in me as as I get older A lot of people talk about. Oh I don't WanNa be just like my mom and dad but that's opposite for me like my parents are dope. My parents are incredible and they've always really challenged me and empowered me to live my own life and to question things and to Give me this space. The safe space to really explore which I know a lot of people don't necessarily have that safe space for so it's kind of my background academically. I studied speech. Language pathology and audiology and went to Oakwood University. Oh hold on said speech language Palate in audiology and audio all here is a lot of. Yes hawks stuff. Yes so speech. Language pathology and audiology. That's a fancy word for or speech. Therapy or the hearing Dr. So and Undergrad. A lot of people call it communication sciences and disorders so speech therapy therapy the the easiest way for people to think about it. Is that person who helps you. Correct your lists in your stutter. And he can't see a proper sound. It's so so much deeper than that and I won't go into all of it but basically it's helping people communicate. And so that's what I studied. Undergrad what brought you to that happen. You know that's a pretty for me. That seems like a pretty specific niche. I'm going to grow up and I'M GONNA help people with their lists. Yeah that's not where I started actually started started in in education. I've been there. Yes I started there and I realized that I did not like being in a classroom full of twenty kids at a time it. Oh Yeah it was exhausting. I really admire teachers I really affirm the work that they do it super important work but I just know I was not cut Out For it so for me. It was a natural jump from education. Speech pathology because in speech pathology. I could use a little bit more science which I was interested listed in and still teach. It was a perfect marriage between between science and teaching and I was able to marry the two with one on kit at a time. I didn't have to work with twenty kids right. I could do one therapy session at a time and for me it kind of aligned with my purpose which. I'm sure we'll talk about later but I always felt called to help people overcome. Things never prevented them from being fully themselves. Wow so I did that in education in and then I did that in speech. Language pathology as well. So did you go from one major to the next. Yes so I actually went from one school to the next. Oh okay I started off at Oakwood University diversity in Huntsville. Alabama was a historically black college university and I loved my experience there But I decided to go to Andrews University just just because I felt like I needed to be challenged a little bit more In a particular department that I was in I did it feel like I was challenged. I felt very comfortable. uh-huh and I've learned that growth doesn't come from comfortable places right so I felt called to go to a school where I didn't know anybody. Sorry I think I knew one or two people and when I got there While I was there literally a weekend I had this panic moment because I realized education was not what what I wanted to do right so I was panicking. I was praying. You know it was like Oh my goodness I transferred up here for education and people are GonNa think I was crazy. People are GONNA say why would she do this. She doesn't know what she's doing etc etc but I felt led to Actually study speech language pathology and audiology while it was there. Wow now can you describe what that process looks like because for many people you know as pastors and teachers nurses doctors etc.. They're just like you know. I felt all called to the ministry so for you. What was that calling process like So number one. I don't think that God called me to be a speech language pathologist ultimately. I believe he called me to that field for that portion of my life so I don't think that callings are necessarily lifelong. I think that God calls you to specific things during specific periods of your life. How so during that time I think when you're talking to God and and you developed a relationship for him I mean the developed a relationship with him? He'll actually speak to you other people he'll speak to you in in in your gut gut feeling that she'd get a lot of times people think that's your conscience But for me I've realized a lot of times. If if I'm studying my word if communing with God daily that's actually the Holy Spirit talking to me so that process look like me sitting down one day and and working on my mission statement as a teacher and realizing that my mission statement did not match the vocation that had picked and you know so earlier I had actually had a spiritual mentor in my life. who had told me? Hey you should be a speech pathologist like a year before and I just hadn't even ha ha ha. I'm going to be a teacher. You know just hadn't even crossed my mind and did not cross my mind again until that moment where I said okay. I'm not going to be a teacher. Sure so what's next and literally speech pathology came to my head and I went to a speech pathology office got up from class and went to the speech pathology the office. It was actually located in the same building and awkward. Yes and I made an appointment with an adviser and they were able to talk to me this that same day day and it all worked out fasted and prayed and I talked to my parents about it and they were very supportive. There have always been very supportive when and I go through one of these major life transitions and It made sense. I think I think God's calling is a little crazy but it also makes sense. There's there's that balance between it's crazy but it's feasible so both of.

Atlanta Phil Oakwood University Piedmont Park Piedmont Park Piedmont Park Nia Darville instagram Michigan Ni Grad School Ernie Liane Alabama Andrews University hawks Huntsville Auspey
"grad school" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

15:09 min | 10 months ago

"grad school" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Beat because you want to go to law school or Med school or because you want access domain that requires you to have a related degree. You may be headed back to the classroom after Grad Grad school probably be a much better student than you were before and your motivation for studying and for completing the degree will be much greater at this juncture in today's episode will be talking with Tomorrow Luke and hearing about how she decided to study law after her masters degree and how she navigated her way in the position she occupies today before we go on and because this is episode ten I want to make a special announcement. I'm officially launching the PAPA. PhD Patriarch Page if you want to contribute and if you'd like to actually participate in the show you can go to patriots dot com slash Papa Peach St and become a patrons starting today you'll contribution will allow me to continue producing better and better content and interviewing great guests. Thank you for your support and welcome to the show so today we'll be talking post Grad school careers with Tamara Merrill Luke. Tamara is a former scientist who left the lab bench for the law after a master's degree in neuroscience she went to law school to become a patent as lawyer but on away there she took unique and exciting opportunities that led her down a completely different paths. She's now director of legal affairs at an entertainment taint production company in Toronto. Welcome to the show tomorrow. I thank you for having me my pleasure so tell us a little bit more about yourself. Often about what you do in your current position sure so you know like you mentioned I Lee met when we were at McGill. did my master's a a nurse science the A A head. I'm sure we'll get into this sort of realized as going really masters that I wasn't hasn't really cut out for bench working at work in I wasn't really enjoying the research aspect of it and I found myself struggling on what to do. Outside of the academic we searched a career on in my professor was doing my masters masters with Tim Kennedy. He was the one who suggested to this area log. Halls intellectual property. You know is upset upset that patent laundry. It's basically you can still be involved in science. You still get to learn. We still get involved. See other people's experience in all all the cool stuff is going on science but you don't have to the bench work and I thought Oh that sounds really good because it's not that I really love science who will unsexy stuff that happens science but I just didn't love doing bench so I said that sounds really cool. I started to into saying so I decided I would not transition. Hei with Spanish masters can go to take the time out loss which I did in my hundred percent lions going into loss was I was going to do. I am intellectual. Property knows where at which I started to both you're on I some in article at intellectual property firm in Toronto in out in part of their biotechnology of technology. Life Sciences had group so spent some time doing that. It happened to be just when I picked up what usually happens when you're out of your imperfect move. Sometimes you'll do rotations depending on firm but a lot of time partners will send out emails to the students say got file or Arctic that I need help on does anyone at times and I I happen to get One went out to our students from partner. Sue is in hard earned that does marketing advertising and it was related to pharmaceutical advertising was far she needed research on for that. She's going to choose presenting and and it sounded really cool. I mean like was all about direct consumer advertising in all the different types of pharmacy flat reciting. Doing it's really interesting so I jumped on to any of the opportunity to partner with her quite a bit on these murphy advocates lead to more projects coming my way from her started working together closely when I got hired by the as a full-blown lawyer it was with her and that turned into me doing biotech patents to me marketing advertising which is really cool. I mean you know very current. I will see I reunited then see it on TV next day which was something thing I kind of struggled with with research aspect that I was doing. Was You know a lot of I realized it would maybe make a sentence sentence. In a in a big picture of you know. There wasn't a lot of immediacy to the work I was doing so I liked that. Martino marketing advertise that I liked was immediacy of seeing a was going so I stayed there for a few years in the switch to join a media company doing their marketing in advertising sales contrast so then I was there for a few years and I made transition from bear basically because that was part of the entertainment industry of all the things that go along with that lay boxin talent rights. I think I'm the just recently made Swish to me in Trauma Ohio where he has seen house so that's that's again coming back to what you're saying. It's very interesting so what I'm very curious about is how was a finishing your master's and and then doing the the leap to go to law school. How did that happen? was it simple. Did you have any worries so how was that experience of of saying okay. I'm finishing these studies Anon- going into other studies Sarah. I'm hanging my hat and laptop. Basically you sure it was a very uncertain Heads at was taking was a complete one one eighty getting into law school itself wasn't vetted. Oh Oh me coming masters. I guess you know that's right a bit. I didn't get into all schools. I went. I did also say in but I got into the night on university which I'm so th related and but I would say once I guys once in las only was a hardest thing is in science for research trained so that part wasn't heard what it was difficult was volume readings instantly resum s Turk but a volume of the you you know arts kids in political science liberal arts feels bear used to eating volumes of of ages in one night for a work whereas science a little worried isn't or when you're being assigned a a science textbook every single word is or is not alive slough or context you can get speed you can't speed reading that was always the biggest adjust as I was reading every single word trying to make sense of it which is hard to do when you hundred pieces. The reading for you know. Five class is to do each night. That was probably the hardest part of the transition as one of those things like you. No you skill stood up in and figure note that's a very specific difficulty that I had but all those things that I learned in brats on science frugal thinking discipline dedication all of that he incredibly handy end was I think is rental in my ability initiative ice successive law school in end in artists or the legal world writing also I guess row for sure writing to absolutely writing for Sir and juries sleet up once he autism when you have two presentations presentations as well you know we're used in especially at in research get up and present your findings by often presenting is something that often you're acting in my area and one of the things that also houses in the science fields. I'm powerpoint side. We don't flatter it with a whole bunch of everything's kind of brief in its that makes so much easier is less of a difficulty for you to make powerpoint slide than it is out out with other people in the legal guilty just a powerpoint site with texting you're you're just reading and then and then the loser loser their audience so all those things eastern way you know pick up about having your research yourself all Human Mary in Meister Post House Fred School light excellent end and once you had you know you said you talked with your Supervisor Reserve he he told you about about Intellectual Property Law. How how did you deal emotionally with okay you know what I'm actually writing my my masters and not following through like my colleagues that are around me to my phd etc how was that and the was it easy to find the motivation to finish android up Oh yes by partially because I hadn't basically enrolled to start out in law school in September? I finished up my bench work in December before that so I basically had you know nine months in which frank this thesis so I had to be motivated to do it as I didn't want. I knew once I got started school again in her writing would take back a hard deadline line that you needed to basically so you know I had that motivation to get done you hard and and did you go through any doubts you know 'cause I imagine even from other people. I've talked to that. There's kind of a kind of a mourning the process that you can go through of you know what I'm I'm leaving Grad school earlier than I thought but it feels to me that once you found this objective that somehow you didn't have these notes anymore yeah. That's that's right. I was just thinking voted. I mean maybe there was a little bit of warning like well John just finishing earlier than I want in that most people do your most people transition to PhD's Peachy but I think once you know once things became clear that there could be a future for me in this he'll than once I got aw written Yeltsin on Allen plays those doubts in those that scientists warning Kinda just fell away in a whole new part of my life. That was really exciting. yeah a terrifying because you really don't know what lies ahead but it was always been a big proponent of just taking things on step at a time out this next step ahead of in house all right. This is the exciting it's got sort of some kind of clear path ahead of me on and I I really just started at motivated about holy chapter my wife out of place excellent and then so you finished your master's you you did your thesis. Yes and you went onto to law school so you went onto study again and I imagine that you know you. You had habits that you had gained throughout Grad school that that served you once you're in law school but probably other habits that came afterwards what main attitudes over principles have accompanied you throughout your your study path because I am thinking some people might might want no really quickly. I want to get a job. I WANNA get into real life and you decided you chose a path that meant studying for X. More years and I imagine somehow you know in growing into that that that path that you chose the the lessons that you learned that they were habits that you gain that have helped you yeah well. I think part of it I mean in terms of that transition. I know a lot of people are or snake. You don't make some money and I was lucky enough to have a unbound that one and I think the other part of it is you know taking deciding to study order as a mature student I didn't because I was a three to four years older than everybody else in my last night I guess most people in my law school as thinks that too I took took Ford in now. I'm you know for the same reason three or four years older than a lot of people in my senior all that I don't sweat small also is much more mature student. You have had the benefit of extra experience so you know that there's you no no not as a small supplemental worry about you don't you don't you don't really waste time on the stuff. That doesn't doesn't matter anymore at the House Komo any carry through through especially Moslem Tucson to yeah I don't I don't.

Grad Grad school Grad school Toronto Tamara Merrill Luke Med school partner director Life Sciences Ohio House Komo Tim Kennedy Intellectual Property Law scientist Fred School Lee professor Sue Sarah
"grad school" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

The Ken Coleman Show

02:06 min | 11 months ago

"grad school" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

"Actually has already kind of translated into other things like them speaking engagements and also by some how much how much money are you making right now off this rideshare thing. Give me give give me a ballpark average throughout the high throughout the low. Give me a number <hes>. Let's see like on the high week with maybe like two hundred on a good week <hes> so like naughty like i would really stretch to make a thousand a month okay and and so. I look at ways to say all right if i'm trying to do a thousand in a month. It just feels like there's other ways to try to do that either. You can further constrict your expenses and you probably have done that is as his deep as you can or you know d start selling stuff. You know what i mean like finding stuff but i'm saying i'll say they all the ways to make a thousand dollars you driving around with limited time it's just i just don't think it's worth it. I think there's going to feel the same thing i almost kind of. I kinda needed somebody else to kind of. Walk me through getting at is go with all your friends and family and they wanna get rid of stuff say hey. I'm gonna start selling stuff on the weekend or on amazon or on ebay or whatever and that way. You're at home with the family. You know what i mean. You're not driving around and i just think there's better ways to make extra money without you having to be gone from the family family. I was just giving you one crazy idea. Trust me yeah. No everybody's got junked. They need to sell or get rid of right but they don't have time to do it. My point is what are some creative ways for you to keep bringing an extra money but you're not away from the family. I don't know and here's the deal you know. You only have so much time and you're on path. You're on the right path. You're going to get out of this thing <hes> i. It's almost like i'm trying to think of one more idea. Oh what about teaching online line again at least here at home. Maybe you do that after the kids are in bed. You teach a course <hes>. I've got my one of my wife's. Good friends makes really good side money teaching spanish online yeah. She's in her home office doing that..

amazon ebay thousand dollars
"grad school" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

The Ken Coleman Show

02:50 min | 11 months ago

"grad school" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

"A campus setting in virginia or get a degree on your timeline online liberty has over seven hundred unique degree programs studying online can help you broaden your career opportunities journeys become a leader in your field or increase your skill set without interrupting your current work or family schedule. Check liberty university out right now liberty dot e._d._u. Slash kin. That's liberty dot e._d._u. Slash ken now no more excuses. Change your future today. I'm so excited about what are three free resources that ken coleman dot com. It's about helping you get the job that you're looking for. Here are the three resources how to write the perfect. Resume five ways to fix your resume and land your dream job this guy it helps you understand that a resume without a relationship is worthless. We're gonna teach you how to flip the resume with an actual template so oh you lead with who you know then you're going to get a phone call or an email and this takes you to the next step how to win the interview five strategies on standing out in the hiring in process folks you have to win the interview and we walk you through the five things you need to prepare for so you can perform and get the job and finally you get cans touch point timeline five steps for following up after the interview. These steps are so often left out by so many on the hiring path and it's important to follow up and finished strong. Now you can get all three get hired resources for free at ken coleman dot com. Don't wait a second go to ken coleman dot com and get hired. Welcome back the ken coleman. Show america thrilled to have you with us. This is where we help you discover what you were created to do and then come up with a plan to make that a reality the dream job is no longer the fancy it's there. It's possible it's doable and we're here to help you eight four four seven four seven two five seven seven the number we get back to your calls in a moment but i ah i i've been on this thing here. I've been beating the drum last couple of weeks about this perfect storm that is on the horizon and it's coming and i'm trying to let as many people as possible no watch out you got the skyrocketing cost of higher education and thus the loans the student loans to be able to pay those off or going up. It's a massive massive problem. People are in debt over their eyeballs for years and years and and years and years and years after they get out they can't even make enough to pay the principal and interest on their student loans so another article out from on business insider how grad schools became the hidden culprit behind america student debt crisis according to some data from the council of graduate schools schools.

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"grad school" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

The Ken Coleman Show

03:27 min | 11 months ago

"grad school" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

"I don't think there's an illustrator position but i did contact them and i thought it was just funny. I was cracking up with my wife. I mean yes so your answer's. Yes you wanna benko. Uh-huh what would you do at the tattoo business the cool part good they can be done on the side. It doesn't have to be <hes> okay so during the idea would be go to fulltime illustrating in an office with a team environment that feed your soul and then you can do the tattoo stuff on the side totally bro come on man is a guys good as you are in dallas texas. I mean this is just using the proximity principle. You need to find out where illustrators hanging out online facebook walker. Chat groups are idle. No lincoln and these are people. You may not know but you have a connection to get to know you need to use the proximity principle what says in order to do it. Mark wants to do illustrative talking. That position can't around people that are doing it in places where it is happening. Come all mark listen in dallas. There's gonna be a lot of opportunity for you to do that kind of our work and be a part of a team and then those are all all creative types and they're all going to end up going and market heavy on the team what you do i do suicide. Can i come on your house friday night. I wanna get a dolphin in the middle of my back there you go. Nobody ever says that do they. Does anybody ever say i want a dolphin in the middle of my back. Call them and they've they've done at all bet. You've seen it all my oh goodness gracious. Hey mark tatum. This is doable for you. It really is and you got me excited. Well hang on the line. I'm going to give you a copy of my brand a new number one bestselling book the proximity principle. It's gonna walk you right down the clear path the people you need to meet the places. I'm just gonna give you an action plan. Okay and you got to follow this and get intentional and before you know it. You're going to step into that work. I love it fantastic. You know it really is a shame that <hes> this skin that i have is not meant to have a tattoo on it. It never will but but if it did i would. The go-to seed mark and dallas and i'd get like the ken coleman show on my shoulder blade or something like that yeah now. You don't like that idea now to to <hes> <hes> you. You can't tattoo your own show on yourself. Oh okay madison said no see. This is the whole point. I'm so not tattoo guide that. I don't even know what i would do jody. You have a tattoo by the way joe doesn't even like bumper stickers all right very good so joe and i do not have tattoos news. I'll let the audience decide whether or not madison does or not. It's none of my business to tell you but joe and i do not that's all i can say hey don't go anywhere when we come back very interesting information new data about grad schools and student loan debt and your calls. This is the ken coleman show folks. Life is too short to be stuck in a boring job. That's where my alma mater comes in. Liberty university has been showing not telling their students how to contribute and find their passion for over forty years. Here's they believe that if it's christian it ought to be better really think about what it is. It makes you come alive. Liberty can help you get.

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"grad school" Discussed on Bookish Expats

Bookish Expats

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"grad school" Discussed on Bookish Expats

"Always felt that way about math or statistics or science or so. I have a very good math teacher going I didn't you have good matches going up. Because I get math like I used my dad would have to sit me down by table and you know I mean to do my assignment and I remember about through tears. Me Translate do busy problems but I love sci- science as a that was justified going to college. I have to take like just preparing for the institute. Also stick like you know <hes> brimming. Let you have had a lesson teacher a good good to help me and my goodness definitely like it was I said well. It's touched by an angel in a very non molested wait. He opened my brain and for the first time in my life I understood my life and it was used to keep their math and I was so moved that year that I had applied to study chemical engineering 'cause it was going to be math and science so yes I love that it's in Grad School Act more than my share of wasn't meant for me UH graduates every every every semester articulate one or two stackhouse's to balance that historical part of it and that's a lot of work. You know I love the I love numbers. I love this. It's exciting to me. I get excited by. The numbers I su- as very strongly about that I love it. I love it. I love it. I love it. I love hearing women's Ahah too because I have too many too. Many female friends like I'm not good with math. I forget in love math. I actually yeah I wasn't I didn't understand that I liked mouth for a long time because it was easy for me until a certain until I got above a certain level but up until that point it was so easy I was just like it's it's like breathing but then when it got too hard and then I came back to the stuff that I could do. I was like I started to feel the rhythm of it and I started to see the logic in it and I started to really like it. I don't know that I have the same relationship with the statistical sign of it but the in half and the logic of it and being able to quantify things and being able to go okay. We think this are is there. Are there numbers I can play with to prove or disprove this idea like yeah. That's very satisfying to me. I think those bolt onto having like the rights issues. I felt like you know the mid seem so bad if wearing masks grain up and sometimes it wasn't about a student who was about a teacher like wearing teaching math nic because I'm very visual. I'm a visual learner like you can. Just tell me something that now. Why is it that way like I need to know the logic behind it? I think it has actually went to get a P._M.. I have questions and answers. Allow my life on me and so they'll teach you just stick it that way on. I'm like why are we doing it out this way like <unk> me and I think that was goggles museum through my formative years until I met that joint for the life of me I remember his face but I don't remember his name and he changed my life and yeah you know. I wish I could remember his name. His changed my life so much so many ways that I don't understand that sometimes you need to day tiller teaching skills to students 'cause it might while grain up Niger. Everybody thought the same way without consideration for what kind of learning you are good at <unk> visual lending semi like semi visual learners some other lender some tactile learners whenever even try to find out by your own learning it was just one on one side was rehired. When I grow up in the seventies it was it was similar to the it was very very like there's a lot of classrooms globally? I've noticed where the norm is for the teacher to stand at the front of the room and talk about the subject. Even if it's a language even if it's math it's just to talk about it. They might raise them on the board but they're just talking at the students and it just it frustrates me to no end and I I want to say it's one place and we can just change that culture and then everybody will be released accessible but the norm globally seems to be that really archaic model and you can't talk to students about a subject they have to experience that topic that scale yeah yeah but things are changing slowly slowly for that. I think the things that are available online. I think students realizing how much they can learn outside of their classroom. Today I know I know I know so the Internet Internet was was probably GONNA assume all an end of the day I hope the people don't like spend too much time on social media before it does I I love how Mo- talks about math and learning math and how she was inspired.

goggles museum Grad School Niger stackhouse Mo
"grad school" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"grad school" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"I should do maybe a fifty fifty looking at going to grad school when I get back and I've been accepted to a program that is affordable for me, but I was just looking to fehb out the more money for while I'm living down there and such. So the can. Can you if you are debt free when you get back, can you pay cash for grad school as you go. That would be kinda the based the hope for I, I don't. I don't do math. I don't do hope. I do math. Right. At twelve months. Our we have a thousand. I mean, that'll be about twelve thousand dollars, grad school. I mean, I still have six thousand dollars left of student loans to pay off was what I was saying. Yeah. Wanna be able to pay off all of the student loans before I get back. Okay. And when you go into grad school, you can put them on hold again if you need to order to pay in order to cash flow grad school, can you cash flow grad school. Yeah, I believe I can talking with the admissions. I have enough coming in scholarships and Krantz from grad school, and then there are. What are you studying or it'll be for languages. I graduated with I German and classics major in. What are you going to do? What are you going to do with the languages in your masters? I wanna I wanna teach university. Okay. So you're going all you're going on with HD program? Correct? Goods would be on the way to a PHD program in the masters is out pretty well recognized and well regarded masters program on the way to a PHD. And also you can. You could teach probably in that field with a master's, but to have a long term career in college as a college professor you'll need to do the PHD am my correct? Correct. And that in the plan. Good. Good. Okay, that's cool. You got a good path. You felt that part through critically. Obviously what I'm gonna want you do. I'm gonna want you get out of debt as much as possible. Is there any chance of picking any extra income up and finishing this debt while you're in Germany? I kind of looking into it. I've got my contract with the Lutheran church in German, so that's where my main income is like, and I'm hoping to tutor some more and teach at a local high school while I'm there as well. Yeah, you do that. You could finish off that other six thousand or talking about that. Be a really cool place to be going into masters program. Wouldn't it. Yes, it would. Yeah, that would be. My goal is just really bared down. Let's use this. This boarding school time, this cool trip to Germany and all that as an adventure. And while we're there, we're gonna come up with eighteen grand and come back. Start the masters program debt free. That sounds like a ideal plan that's optimal right there. And that's what aim at man. I mean, if you're asking me what to do because it's going to give you a lot of peace and a lot more margin lot more wiggle room in your life. Thank you for calling in interesting deal. Very interesting. That puts this hour of the Dave Ramsey show in the books. We'll be back with you before you know it. In the meantime, remember there's only one way to financial peace and that's to walk day with.

grad school Germany Dave Ramsey Krantz professor twelve thousand dollars six thousand dollars twelve months
"grad school" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"grad school" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"There were people around the industry that were supporting the you know the the large animal which is what he was doing in his case you're dealing with a large animal to a human so you know but the you know i'm gonna poke around i'm gonna find some other ways through the the hospital corporations that are out there the met the drug companies that are out there and the pharmacy companies that are out there and and keep poking around until i find something that enables me to go through this because that's just an untenable amount of that i work with these people all the time and here's the thing you know that not everybody that goes to pharmacy school graduates and not everybody that goes to school passes or boards not everybody and so you're just not guaranteed that that this is all going to turn out rosie if it worked out where you make what that industry makes and you live on nothing when you come out for several years yeah you can work your way through it but that's only if everything works out which is by the way the only time that debt works is when everything works out and in life everything seldom works out i talked to a lady ago who just finished her md and had a ton of debt in regarding that and her first child has special needs and she really felt strongly that she should come home and be with that child but she sitting there with two hundred fifty thousand dollars in debt to become an md because that's the only way you can do it you can't go to grad school without which gets people in a world of hurt on and so i can't recommend you do that i i'm going to recommend a third option regardless of which direction you go the third option takes you to.

two hundred fifty thousand dol
"grad school" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"grad school" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"Hi good good what's up i am wondering so i'm thinking of i've already gotten accepted to pharmacy school putting my thousand dollars seat deposit but i'm starting to get cold feet because of the tuition which is fifty two thousand dollars a year it's a three year program and then to work at a hospital it's a one year minimum residency so where where it's half pay so i'll be graduating with a minimum of a hundred sixty thousand dollars in debt my i'm debating maybe of just pulling pulling out and switching career paths because of the debt i'm thinking maybe physician's assistants i think i would like both careers pharmacists get paid more but i'm thinking physician assistant there too it's a two and a half you're twenty seven months roughly it's about seventy one hundred thousand dollars for the two years two and a half years they make less money but they don't have a residency and it's less time in school what would you recommend well i don't recall in borrowing money so that's kind of my baseline go to grad school like i don't have well that well it's not as absurd as sounds at leaves you with the option of looking with some of the pharmacy companies out there the cvs and the walgreens and seeing if they have any programs because they are always in recruiting mode and since recruiting motiva have anything where they pick up part of or all of the cost and in return you agree to serve them for so many years the same thing with pa's are there some hospital companies and drug companies that have scholarships available i'll talk to a guy the last week who got his veterinarian degree deviant which is just as expensive and pays about the same coming out and basically did that all of industries collar ships.

pa seventy one hundred thousand d hundred sixty thousand dollars fifty two thousand dollars twenty seven months thousand dollars three year two years one year
"grad school" Discussed on The Brutal Truth About Sales and Selling

The Brutal Truth About Sales and Selling

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"grad school" Discussed on The Brutal Truth About Sales and Selling

"Grad school and it takes you through you don't even have to be in sales i'll walk you through the whole process you'll have access to it for year doesn't mean it takes a year it means you have access to it for a year it could take you a couple of weeks or it could take you a year right we all need help we all need a coach someone to bounce ideas off of a little community to see what's working for other people and that's what i'm trying to build with these courses and office hours in the office hours are there for us to get on onto zoom do a screen share cover both a lesson some feedback some questions and be able to share experiences about what working and what's not working for us so please make sure you're checking out that also check out the show notes for all the connections to everybody who's partner with me on this journey with the b brutal truth podcast network hey we got a network i also have a podcast called career advice because what's happened is most of your questions are career oriented questions you know a lot of you have great sales skills some of you feel they're good enough and you just want better career advice i've started that podcast it's not just for sales people's for people anybody in the careers to talk about strategy when i seen work mistakes i've made and i've seen other people make and how to prevent them so the idea of the podcast just a fun riff and chat with people on career topics that matter to you because let's face it if you pick the wrong industry.

Grad school partner
"grad school" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"grad school" Discussed on KOIL

"The last the tailender grad school just finish that up here in may on anything you could imagine though like i had a buddy mind franc he basically bought my guns off of me that i ended up buying them back 'cause i've either bunny that badly um so yeah as furniture i'm saying the debt though the fit that guns were the guns that well in a sense because i had every of buying them back i say you ponder your body igf ugh i again so that's kind of a debt that you had to get back to get your guns bagra not straight cool all right fun so um a little bit of everything yes so what started the process of getting out of debt while you were dating what brought the subject up how did you decide to do this i think we both wanted to be debt free and weird i was probably more familiar with you at that time and she had loosely heard about the dave ramsey plan but just knowing that we wanted to know we're getting into so we talked about it and then kinda put it out there and then slowly were going towards the of the goal of being that free and then when we were down here nashville last year that's when we pretty much looked at each other so we need to do this a lot more seriously and go more to the goodsell intense instead of wandering towards the sun and then once you're married you just lena and get get it done then to the first year of your marriages beans and rice rice and beans and knock out debt yes and just completely on it so what are you tell people the key to getting out of debt is and i would say patients with each other and aggressive let that and not the other area that's good skip the aggression pointed that the proper things i bet that was hard sometimes it was.

tailender grad school dave ramsey nashville lena