35 Burst results for "Grad School"

Woman who had abortion grateful it was an option

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last week

Woman who had abortion grateful it was an option

"A a a a woman woman woman woman who who who who now now now now fights fights fights fights for for for for the the the the rights rights rights rights of of of of other other other other women women women women to to to to access access access access abortions abortions abortions abortions through through through through the the the the organization organization organization organization we we we we testify testify testify testify knows knows knows knows exactly exactly exactly exactly what what what what it's it's it's it's like like like like to to to to be be be be in in in in their their their their place place place place amber amber amber amber Hernandez Hernandez Hernandez Hernandez was was was was a a a a twenty twenty twenty twenty one one one one year year year year old old old old college college college college student student student student working working working working full full full full time time time time helping helping helping helping supporters supporters supporters supporters sister's sister's sister's sister's kids kids kids kids as as as as well well well well as as as as some some some some younger younger younger younger siblings siblings siblings siblings when when when when she she she she found found found found herself herself herself herself pregnant pregnant pregnant pregnant where where where where Shane Shane Shane Shane has has has has so so so so much much much much to to to to do do do do with with with with an an an an individual individual individual individual saying saying saying saying I'm I'm I'm I'm not not not not ready ready ready ready in in in in this this this this moment moment moment moment and and and and she she she she actually actually actually actually proceed proceed proceed proceed with with with with this this this this pregnancy pregnancy pregnancy pregnancy you're you're you're you're ventrally ventrally ventrally ventrally wants wants wants wants children children children children there's there's there's there's a a a a whole whole whole whole host host host host of of of of things things things things that that that that I've I've I've I've been been been been able able able able to to to to accomplish accomplish accomplish accomplish and and and and in in in in the the the the years years years years since since since since and and and and my my my my abortion abortion abortion abortion that that that that would would would would not not not not have have have have been been been been possible possible possible possible and and and and without without without without making making making making that that that that decision decision decision decision Hernandez Hernandez Hernandez Hernandez says says says says like like like like getting getting getting getting a a a a full full full full ride ride ride ride scholarship scholarship scholarship scholarship to to to to college college college college graduating graduating graduating graduating in in in in four four four four years years years years and and and and now now now now being being being being in in in in grad grad grad grad school school school school I'm I'm I'm I'm Julie Julie Julie Julie Walker Walker Walker Walker

Organization Organization Orga Amber Amber Amber Amber Hernan Shane Shane Shane Shane Hernandez Hernandez Hernandez College College College Colleg Grad Grad Grad Grad School Sch Julie Julie Julie Julie Walker Walker Walker Walker
Sebastian and Charlie Kirk Discuss the Latest on Ukraine

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:10 min | 3 months ago

Sebastian and Charlie Kirk Discuss the Latest on Ukraine

"He is the founder of the president of one of the most influential and important organizations in America turning point USA taking back our nation one high school one college campus at a time. Charlie, welcome. Doctor gorka great to be here. Thank you. So we had a kind of two minute grad school session in the break about my take on what's happening in Ukraine. I'm going to take my life in my hands and get your opinion about what should happen. You asked me what we should do. I'm actually just curious. I'm not an expert in that part of my advice that I doubt the senile old man in The White House will take, but if 1776 in masses, guess what? Ukrainians are also made in the image of God and they should be fighting. We should support them in their fight for liberty, not deploy the 82nd airborne, not our job. But NATO should be providing lethal assistance, meaning weapons and ammunitions to Ukraine so they can fight for themselves instead of the Taliban. Second thing NATO could do because of the PLS intelligence capability we have is provide intelligence to Ukraine on how to hurt Russia the most. So the next country invaded is a Poland or the LAT or Latvia or Lithuania. That's my concrete certificate advice. So I'm so busy running all over this place and I'm not like caught up to date. So I saw the map you showed me. What is the latest? I think your listeners would be interested to hear this. It seems like a full fledged invasion. So most commentators were expecting a small incremental increase beyond donets in Luhansk in the east. That's not what happened. For some reason, this man has gone totally for a full bore invasion, strategic bombers, strike attack aircraft taking out Ukrainian runways, even this shows you that the dementia of the cycle that's running the Kremlin. He has taken Chernobyl, which I understand is a Soviet symbol, but it's also a radioactive hunk of concrete. So capturing Chernobyl is not exactly strategic. It's kind of mythical, but it's not strategic. So no, this is a full scale

Gorka Ukraine America Nato Charlie White House Luhansk Taliban Latvia Lithuania Poland Russia Dementia Kremlin
"grad school" Discussed on Money Rehab with Nicole Lapin

Money Rehab with Nicole Lapin

07:27 min | 3 months ago

"grad school" Discussed on Money Rehab with Nicole Lapin

"Best way to get out of said rot is. To go back to school. Sound familiar? This is a really common conundrum, and it's one that money rehabber Caroline is facing right now. Here she is. Hey Nicole, my name is Caroline and I work in strategic partnerships for a media company. I feel like I've plateaued in my corporate job and I'm thinking it might be helpful for me to go to business school. Do you think that's a good idea? Caroline, Caroline, Caroline. I have heard this question a lot throughout the course of my career, and even more so during the start of the pandemic. When folks were laid off and wondering, what should I do next? Here's my take. Deciding to go back to school is not the right decision if it stems from a place of avoidance as in avoiding any life and career problems you're having. Of all the business decisions you will have to make in your life as the CEO of you, the one about whether or not to invest in going back to school is one of the biggies. That's because it can be one of the biggest time sucks and money drains. But I need an advanced degree to get ahead. You might be thinking. Sure, it might be tempting if you're going through a pause in your career to go back to school. But do you need it? Maybe, but likely not. Really ask yourself what career benefits you'll get out of it and if those are worth the time and money. Look, I'm a numbers girl. So let's crunch a few of them. It has been said that by getting an advanced degree, you can make $800,000 more over your lifetime versus a counterpart who doesn't have your wicked graduate degree brain. With the average cost of your extra schooling at around a $100,000, the $800,000 return sounds tempting, and maybe even too good to be true. That's because most of the time it is. If you're interested in this additional schooling, purely from a money making perspective, and yes, yes, I know you're all so meeting fabulous people and reading fabulous books over on that fabulous grassy Knoll. Well, then I have an even better option for you. Let's say, instead of going back to school, you take that $100,000 and invest it over the next 50 years at 5%, which isn't even an aggressive assumption because in the investment world, it's assumed on average, you make 10% over time. Well, with that, you'll end up with around $1 million 150,000. That is a full $350,000 more than you would be making with your fancy ass degree. And let's be honest, that $800,000 figure is purely optimistic in today's economy, where there is much less of a job premium for people who have their MS versus their BS. And those little letters basically sum up how I feel about the it's an investment argument for grad school. It's BS. More important than the money you'll spend is the time it takes to earn the degree. A year or more of your life is that worth it? Depending on what you want to study and where you want to go with that degree, the answer could be yes. For example, getting your masters in engineering in today's tech world is a pretty solid investment, especially if you're a woman, and sure, specific industries require advanced degrees. Like it's pretty difficult to sit for the bar exam and become a lawyer without going to law school. And you're probably not going to get a job as a brain surgeon without a medical degree. At least, I surely hope not. All I'm asking is that before you pony up the time and tons of paper for while another piece of paper, make sure you can really justify the debt monkey you're putting on your back. If you can, then great. But really, really try to prove it to yourself, not just with anecdotes, but with numbers. Money rehabbers don't need a classroom to get an education. In fact, investing in yourself in alternative ways might just provide better real world learning than you would ever get at grad school anyway. I'll dig into specific tips for this when I talk about networking in other episodes. But if you want to meet smart people who could help you in your career, you have tons of other options before spending major time and money on a fancy degree. Get the degree of life instead. That's really what employers care about. As an employer myself, I can say that what I look for in job candidates I meet is experience. Not the letters after their name. I don't care if you got your education at an Ivy League school or instead by busting your ass as a Gopher for someone cool. In fact, I prefer the scrappy nature of the latter myself. My father's favorite quote on this subject was one from Mark Twain. Don't let your schooling interfere with your education. One of mine is from my favorite movie, good will hunting. You dropped a 150 grand on a fucking education you could have got for a dollar 50 in late fees at the public library. I can't do it with a Boston accent, but I tried. I'll say this. Moxie and street smarts are the most killer MS combination, I think, is out there. For today's tip you can take straight to the bank if after taking a hard think on the case I laid out today, you still feel like grad school is the right move for you. See if your job would sponsor some continuing education costs. This is the ultimate win win. You can continue to get the real world education from your workplace and get the grad school education for a reduced cost or even more free. See what I mean? When? Bad. Back the cap. How do you like them apples? Money money rehab is a production of iHeartRadio. I'm your host, Nicole lapin, our producers are Morgan levoy, and Mike coscarelli. Executive producers are Nicki and will pierce it. Our mascots are penny and mimsy. Huge thanks to OG money rehab team Michelle lands for her development work, Catherine law for her production and writing magic and Brandon dicker for his editing engineering and sound design. And as always, thanks to you. For finally investing in yourself so that you can get it together and get it all. This summer, I want to go to Melbourne camp accomplish. My Friends say we can swim, play sports, craft, ride horses, and have new adventures every day. Mel's camp accomplish is for kids ages 5 to 18 with and without disabilities, with ten weeks of day camp and overnight camp options to choose from. It's all located in southern Maryland with paddle boats, ropes courses and outdoor stage and tons of space to run around and have fun. Sign me up at melwin dot org slash camp. Hey, it's Bobby bones from the Bobby cast. We are Nashville's most listened to music.

Caroline Hey Nicole grad school Ivy League Nicole lapin Morgan levoy Mark Twain Mike coscarelli Michelle lands Brandon dicker Boston Melbourne camp Nicki pierce
UCLA student Brianna Kupfer's alleged killer arrested in Pasadena

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 4 months ago

UCLA student Brianna Kupfer's alleged killer arrested in Pasadena

"Hi hi hi hi Mike Mike Mike Mike Rossi Rossi Rossi Rossi a a a a reporting reporting reporting reporting Los Los Los Los Angeles Angeles Angeles Angeles police police police police say say say say a a a a man man man man has has has has been been been been arrested arrested arrested arrested in in in in the the the the slaying slaying slaying slaying of of of of a a a a twenty twenty twenty twenty four four four four year year year year old old old old woman woman woman woman last last last last week week week week a a a a suspect suspect suspect suspect in in in in the the the the fatal fatal fatal fatal stabbing stabbing stabbing stabbing of of of of the the the the UCLA UCLA UCLA UCLA grad grad grad grad school school school school student student student student was was was was arrested arrested arrested arrested Wednesday Wednesday Wednesday Wednesday in in in in Pasadena Pasadena Pasadena Pasadena California California California California officers officers officers officers with with with with the the the the Los Los Los Los Angeles Angeles Angeles Angeles police police police police department department department department arrested arrested arrested arrested thirty thirty thirty thirty one one one one year year year year old old old old Shamba Shamba Shamba Shamba ball ball ball ball Smith Smith Smith Smith shortly shortly shortly shortly before before before before noon noon noon noon someone someone someone someone recognized recognized recognized recognized Smith Smith Smith Smith from from from from photos photos photos photos distributed distributed distributed distributed by by by by LAPD LAPD LAPD LAPD as as as as he he he he was was was was using using using using a a a a restroom restroom restroom restroom inside inside inside inside a a a a restaurant restaurant restaurant restaurant investigators investigators investigators investigators had had had had offered offered offered offered a a a a two two two two hundred hundred hundred hundred fifty fifty fifty fifty thousand thousand thousand thousand dollar dollar dollar dollar reward reward reward reward for for for for information information information information leading leading leading leading to to to to Smith's Smith's Smith's Smith's identity identity identity identity arrest arrest arrest arrest and and and and conviction conviction conviction conviction in in in in the the the the fatal fatal fatal fatal stabbing stabbing stabbing stabbing of of of of twenty twenty twenty twenty four four four four year year year year old old old old Breanna Breanna Breanna Breanna Cup Cup Cup Cup for for for for police police police police say say say say copper copper copper copper was was was was alone alone alone alone in in in in the the the the Crofton Crofton Crofton Crofton house house house house in in in in the the the the Hancock Hancock Hancock Hancock park park park park neighborhood neighborhood neighborhood neighborhood last last last last Thursday Thursday Thursday Thursday when when when when she she she she was was was was stabbed stabbed stabbed stabbed hi hi hi hi Mike Mike Mike Mike Rossio Rossio Rossio Rossio hi hi hi hi Mike Mike Mike Mike Rossi Rossi Rossi Rossi a a a a reporting reporting reporting reporting Los Los Los Los Angeles Angeles Angeles Angeles police police police police say say say say a a a a man man man man has has has has been been been been arrested arrested arrested arrested in in in in the the the the slaying slaying slaying slaying of of of of a a a a twenty twenty twenty twenty four four four four year year year year old old old old woman woman woman woman last last last last week week week week a a a a

Pasadena Smith Smith Smith Smith Mike Mike Mike Mike Rossi Ross Ucla Los Los Los Los Angeles Angele California Los Los Los Los Angeles Angele Shamba Shamba Shamba Shamba Lapd Lapd Smith's Smith Breanna Breanna Breanna Lapd Cup Cup Cup Cup Smith Crofton Crofton Crofton Crofto Hancock Hancock Hancock Hancoc Mike Mike Mike Mike Rossio Rossio Rossio Rossio
"grad school" Discussed on Raw Talk Podcast

Raw Talk Podcast

03:44 min | 8 months ago

"grad school" Discussed on Raw Talk Podcast

"I think one of the biggest things that slowed me down during might early experimentation was that i would be so terrified of doing like an actual experiment that i would spend so much time preparing time. During practice experiments that it wasted so much time Like one of my first experiments i did. I think eight prior practice experiments before doing the actual one. And when i did the actual one it was like flawless and i feel like i probably could have done that. Like four practice experiments earlier. So don't be afraid. Have confidence in in what you do in your work. Yeah thanks for saying that. Because i was definitely like that as well. Beginning of grad school. I was always scared to like. Put money into something like lab resources into something that i thought i was going to mess up. But you know if you don't do it nobody else is gonna do it. And nor what advice would you give to young nor from a year ago pre grad school like a year ago i was working on my very first research poster which was kind of scary but also exciting and i think one piece of advice i would give myself as to just ask for help part of it as you're responsible for your own research poster in you kind of Put things together all of the figures and do all the analysis yourself but at some point i did feel like i was a bit lost and how to do things because they've never done something like this before and it was hard to reach out for help because it wasn't like i can go into the office and just kind of be like. Hey can you take a look at this or take a look at that and i think is really important to know that you can ask for help from more experienced students or from your supervisor or even just kind of like reach out to people who have done similar things to what you're doing before i think that's really really important..

"grad school" Discussed on Raw Talk Podcast

Raw Talk Podcast

04:18 min | 8 months ago

"grad school" Discussed on Raw Talk Podcast

"I don't know if it's because we're having professional meetings and the comforts of our pajamas at home or maybe speaking through a virtual platform is that layer of an empty. But i do think this past year has created a new space for more open honest conversations about different barriers in struggles uneven growth that people have had whether that being pandemic were not pandemic related experiences. And that's something that i'm hoping we'll carry through and translate into maybe action base changes in whatever reality will look like in a quote unquote post pandemic world. If we get there. here's kroft anyone else. Have anything to add here. I mean adding onto what everybody else said. I think for myself. I've had a lot more free time to do the things that i've enjoyed doing that. In the past. I've started reading a lot more. I think i've read more books in my in my one year of grad school than i have in my past. Four years of undergrad but asserted biking lot more been doing yoga's well and you know these are all things that i didn't do before and i feel better off now that i had a little bit more time nowadays. Yeah yeah thanks for that okay and then if you could go back and speak to your path cell from last year what would you say and i want everyone to this question. So we will start Jesse and go back through the years of grad school. This matter purview. It was very painful. There is a lot of data that got extracted. That didn't end up in the paper. And so i think it's relevant to systematic review but potentially also to some other tech research wishes writing the result section basically with like placeholder values for like every thing you're actually gonna put in the paper..

kroft Jesse
"grad school" Discussed on Raw Talk Podcast

Raw Talk Podcast

04:13 min | 8 months ago

"grad school" Discussed on Raw Talk Podcast

"This really brings us the financial aspects of grad school which is pretty important discussion to have on this actually know. A great person can call help us. Impact the more samantha estimates. She was the founder of the graduate representation committee or the a group dedicated advocacy work on graduate student finances. Call her no yeah..

graduate representation commit samantha
"grad school" Discussed on Raw Talk Podcast

Raw Talk Podcast

05:41 min | 8 months ago

"grad school" Discussed on Raw Talk Podcast

"And no what you have to offer solid advice here and i think you just had maybe something dad here. What i kind of want to say right now is also provide advice from maybe undergrad students or potentially thinking about this for the future is to really out there on. Expose yourself to breath of research experiences. I think another component is just luck like all of us are interested in are super passionate about what we're doing. But it's not something beak maybe perhaps consciously knew going in and so put yourself in positions where you will be exposed user experiences. I know for me and undergrad. I did a lot of different. Projects wasn't one continuous research experience. I had no idea what my preference was. I had tried out one project and mathematical modeling. One basic science clinical one. And for one i even went to bc to do ecology fielder project and spend my summer fishing along because the british columbia which is really different from about. I'm currently doing and looking back. I think about all these experiences very fondly because it allowed me to make a more informed decision going into grad school and of course take this with a grain of salt because i know a lot of people undergrad. Who are incredibly self aware going into a had already had research experience and new from the gut go while they wanted wanted to do. When if that's you go for it learn got publications. And i think that's gonna work out amazing as well but what i'm also saying is if you don't know what your preferences don't be afraid to explore. Don't be afraid to take your time. Don't put yourself on a time line and feel like you figure things out for yourself immediately. Give yourself processing time to explore in experiment. Yeah i love that. And i just wanna add here. I think maybe two things that you're saying is one. I think a lot of people get really tied up with timelines like when i graduate my undergrad..

british columbia
"grad school" Discussed on Raw Talk Podcast

Raw Talk Podcast

05:40 min | 8 months ago

"grad school" Discussed on Raw Talk Podcast

"I would see like most of the application process whisk fairly the same in terms of requirements. It was mostly just like that feeling of isolation and not being around people to like reach out to for help or even blake. You mentioned take people out for coffee and like talk to them. That was kind of the biggest challenge. I would say during the application process but it really did help to find. Mentors were willing to richly. Help me out. There's the program called the community of support they have a really great mentorship program for students from underrepresented backgrounds interested in research and stem and i was paired up with a mentor was a graduate student herself and she kind of went through the application process with me went over my essays. We kind of had like brainstorming sessions. Vote supervisors in what research i was interested in and it was mostly just like the reassurance that i got from her that was really really important that everything would out eventually because it was at that time like very unpredictable. We weren't sure if grad school was going to be like fully virtual or like a hybrid in-person virtual type of model. So that that mentorship was really really important. And i really encourage people to find those kinds of mentors. Yes i love that. Because it's very i said. Use your resources but also some people if you've never worked in a lab before or if you maybe don't have connections if you have worked in a lab before but you don't reach out to those people. The community support is awesome when at ut specifically. I think they do like medical swap locations as well but they have a whole series dedicated to Applications for grad students. I'm so we'll definitely link that in our resources for the episode. And how did everyone a plot Find the actual application process like meeting deadlines. Was it easy to. Did you apply to.

blake ut
"grad school" Discussed on Raw Talk Podcast

Raw Talk Podcast

04:33 min | 8 months ago

"grad school" Discussed on Raw Talk Podcast

"If ahead to describe my grad school in three words i would say it's been busy rewarding and third word i would just say it's debugging awesome and okay and then i'll just quickly introduce myself as well again so again. My name is melissa. I have just finished my sixth and final year my phd. So i'm hashtag peach done which has been great just offended in june. And i for my thesis. I studied and i'm still studying cancer. Genetics at sick kids. I'm so i work in the brain tumor research center there and that was awesome and i really enjoyed it and three words that would describe but my grad school experience would be long because six years Ser a little bit circuitous But really really fun so looking forward to the conversation in today's episode as well to see how other people's experiences where along the way. Okay so i think the best place for us to start off as a group is back to the beginning when everybody was applying to graduate school Sort of wanna talk about what the application process was like for. Everyone here Civil talk about how likely. We chose our labs and our supervisor's beginning. Does anybody wanna start or anybody have a specific story or was their supervisor like their one and only choice when they were starting graduate school. I think maybe. I wanna start off by saying that. Everyone has a different learning a decision making style so my biggest advice to take a step back and think about this. Is your first priorities understanding what that process looks like for you. And what will make all of this a less stressful process for you for me for example. I knew that i'm someone who needs lists. I need systematic steps. And i like color coding. So how. I approached it for some most was conceptualizing. What my higher of priorities were which will be different for. Everyone and for me happened that my i already was the research method. I was interested in learning about and then was the research area..

melissa cancer
"grad school" Discussed on Raw Talk Podcast

Raw Talk Podcast

05:26 min | 8 months ago

"grad school" Discussed on Raw Talk Podcast

"So what is something and everyone. I want everyone to answer the question. What is something you should never say to a grad student. So like what percentage done would you say. You are honestly. I can't answer that question. What did reviewer tuesday about your paper. And i can assure you the answers usually something very soul-crushing and makes me question everything moving. What you doing after grad school most people are so focused on just defending writing that thesis and defending that they haven't given it much ought and they're already to stress to think about it so don't ask them liberal ask. When was less you had to pack them any meeting. Hello hello and welcome to the ninety seventh episode of raw talk and the first episode of season. Six as you probably guessed from what you've already heard today is all about life in grad school. I'm one of your hosts. Melissa but before we begin we wish technology the land on which the university of toronto and our podcast operates for thousands of years. It has been the traditional territory of the huron.

Melissa university of toronto
The Importance of Boundaries With Therapist Nedra Glover Tawwab

The Ultimate Health Podcast

02:17 min | 9 months ago

The Importance of Boundaries With Therapist Nedra Glover Tawwab

"We're going to go deep into boundaries and as somebody who's written about boundaries your expert in the field. You've talked about how this has actually been something. That's been a challenge for you for nearly all your life. And you share the story in your book of when you're in grad school you went and saw therapist and the therapist gave the book boundaries. So talk about how that was a pivotal moment and how that change things. Yes so my serapis recommended of caught where you end. And i began in is the first time that i ever read about boundaries and i was like. Oh my gosh. This is life changing information. Why aren't people talking about this is. Why isn't this like require reading. And i have a friend and she's like remember that time. That therapist gave that bulk. And how much you talked about boundaries So for me. It was life changing. Because i didn't know that. I was struggling with boundary issues. I thought it was some other issue in really. It was an issue of fang now and sticking to it issues around Allowing people to have a reaction to your boundaries without trying to change your opinion or forcing them to understand you. I didn't necessarily have a challenge with setting the boundary. My issue was dealing with the reception after as set the boundaries. Okay so you're able to you know confronts probably the wrong word but express yourself with the person that you needed to you know instill boundary but then was it more just when they would push back. You weren't able to hold strong adsell absolutely terrible terrible and then i'll be like okay. Maybe i don't need his battery anymore. Maybe it's just me guys. And i would either renege on the boundary or i were hold the boundaries. Sometimes but i just felt that doing it because no one you know at least not the unhealthy folks in my circle baited agree with the daylight. Now you should absolutely give someone your last and you should absolutely help people when you cannot. That's actually healthy. And i was like really bow

Dr. Craig Stanfill Defines Artificial Intelligence

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:47 min | 9 months ago

Dr. Craig Stanfill Defines Artificial Intelligence

"Welcome day frames to very special discussion here. In america i with the man who knows about things that people discuss. But i think they don't know what they're talking about. It see sexy concept of summits a concept. It is artificial intelligence. He is dr. Craig stanfield the author of a new fictional work. That has i think iran a factual message if not more than one. That's called terms of service subject to change without notice stock stanfield. Welcome to america. I well thank you for having me on. Dr gorka a pleasure to be here. So can i just start with the basics. I'm not a techie guy. This is a science fiction kind of dystopia in future. I am a science fiction. Guy loved science fiction. Philip k dick bladerunner all that stuff star wars you name it. But let's start with the factual state of the art. What is the truth about artificial intelligence. What does it mean and right now. Twenty twenty one where all we in terms of artificial intelligence. What is going on right now. Is that artificial. Intelligence is being used by technology. The start the beginning. What is artificial intelligence for lehman. Can you define the term. What what is it is it is that you know thinking machines. What is that artificial intelligence. A professor of mine in grad school settings whatever the artificial intelligence says and that's always historically had a rather flexible definition in the present day. What mostly means is what i would call data science database artificial intelligence which is an area of research that are acted in the early nineties late eighties and the basic idea is this. You've got a routine decision that needs to be made and the way you get a computer to make it. Is you get a human. To look at a bunch of data and transcribe the data into what you want the to do. And so very powerful machine. Learning algorithms have been developed that will across a wide variety of topics replicate what that person would have done. And so we all know that that alexa and so forth and other services can transcribe voice and very good job of it and the way they did that was. They took a bunch of people speaking. And then somebody would transcribe it at eventually. The ai learns what it what it is that you said the same thing with translation from english to german whatever that some of the automatic translators do and it's all based on a monkey. See monkey

Craig Stanfield Dr Gorka Philip K Dick Bladerunner America Stanfield Iran Lehman Grad School
Why Do We Lose It, Even Though We Know How We Should Respond?

Mindful Mama - Parenting with Mindfulness

02:13 min | 9 months ago

Why Do We Lose It, Even Though We Know How We Should Respond?

"It's an incredibly frustrating experience because for a lot of us where you know you're pud cast listener podcast. Listeners tend to be. we tend to be highly educated. Like at least for me. I'll speak for myself. You know like. I got the good grades. I got on a roll in high school. I got a good gpa. In college. I went to grad school. I could do a lot of things. And then when i was those physician with my child where i knew how i wanted to respond. I just couldn't do. It was so so frustrating. And i've worked with people in the mindful parenting members of people who are like who are early childhood educators. You know they may teach preschool. And they're so frustrated because they really really know how they should respond uneven. They can do it. They're having all this frustration. So in the years of study and trainings. i've had since then and there's a lot let me tell you. I learned this really really vital piece of information. And that is this hour. Stress response starts in our magdala which is like they're like these little almond shaped clusters in our brain in mid brain and our brain stem which they are like the alarm bells of the brain. So when you're losing it. It is that stress responses starts in the magdala. And so even though you know how you should respond and what you should say. The amid delilah literally according literally cuts off access bypasses the prefrontal cortex. Which is the area of your brain behind your forehead the area where all your problem solving ability your higher order thinking your verbal ability your empathy originate like so all of those things that you need and want to draw on in these difficult moments with your kids. All these things are originally in the prefrontal cortex area of the brain and the amiga. The stress response literate. It's like they call it in migdal hijack because it literally bypasses you're thinking brain when you're losing it and when you're in the stress response

Constraint Active Search for Human-in-the-Loop Optimization

The TWIML AI Podcast

01:50 min | 10 months ago

Constraint Active Search for Human-in-the-Loop Optimization

"I'm here with gustavo. Malcolm's gustavo is a research engineer at intel by way of their recent acquisition of signups gustavo woke up to the tuomo. Ai podcast thank you very much for having me in the show. Hey i'm really looking forward to digging into our interview. But of course i'd like to have you share a little bit about your background and give our audience and opportunity to get to know you better tell us a little bit about your journey to machine learning and ai awesome. Absolutely well i. I'm originally from brazil. I'm a computer science by training. When i did my undergrad. I went to a very good school in my region but she wasn't strong topic but fortunately the internet was very generous with machine learning. We had the opportunity to basically watch professor. Ngo angie to talk about machine learning on youtube twelve years ago. I think tilt my friends and i created a steady group to study machine learning in. Maybe i can say that. He was my first instructor to the topic. After that i pursue. I worked in many michigan projects. I decided to do peachy in the us. I remember checking all the faculties that work with that worked with machine learning in county. How many publications they had on aisamul in newark. I don't recommend this to be a metric to consider when choosing between grad school led seven years ago or something. I was super excited about working with people who actually did machine learning in. And that's one of the things that i actually employed syllogisms now. And then that's how. I begun white majority into the field.

Gustavo Ngo Angie Malcolm Intel Brazil Youtube Michigan Newark United States
Interview With Sagar Indurkhya, Head of NLP at Virtualitics

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

02:04 min | 11 months ago

Interview With Sagar Indurkhya, Head of NLP at Virtualitics

"So our guest today is saga endure. Who is at virtual lyrics and we really want to thank him so much for joining us here. So let's Thank you so much for joining today. Podcast wonderful today. Yeah thanks so much for joining us today. You know at a today podcast. We're always excited when we have interviews. Because we get to see what's really happening. You know today in industry with artificial intelligence. So i'm excited for this podcast. I want to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners and tell them a little bit about your background and your current role at virtual addicts. Thank you yes. So name is saga and on the head of natural language processing at birch lyrics so a little bit of How i got your Prior to joining virtual i was completing my phd in computer science. With a focus on computational linguistics at mit Where i studied under my adviser. Professor robert berwick so while i was there I had time to focus on studying outta develop cognitively faithful models of language acquisition. And i also had a chance to really dive into a a developing methods for black box analysis of penalty models. I during my time in grad school. I had the opportunity to actually both intern and eventually a con Do some contract work or various dod interfacing companies and That caught me a little bit excited. working on these different defense projects. So i saw that virtually nixon that's base and that's what got me excited to join them so i joined last year and since then i've been having fun working on both a couple of interesting. Dod projects involving natural language processing And i also had the development the functionality for our flagship product product of Immersive platform or vip.

Professor Robert Berwick Grad School Nixon
Vector Quantization for NN Compression With Julieta Martinez

The TWIML AI Podcast

01:46 min | 11 months ago

Vector Quantization for NN Compression With Julieta Martinez

"Welcome to the podcast. You thanks for having me. I am really looking forward to diving into our conversation. We're gonna talk all about some of your research into computer vision to get started. Wanna share a little bit about your background and how you came to work in the field. Yeah of course. I was born and raised in mexico and around two thousand eleven thousand twelve. I finished my undergrad. There and i really wanted to go somewhere else for my for grad school so i applied to a bunch of universities in canada. Then i got accepted into the uber. See the university of british columbia. And then i started doing my masters there then eventually went onto a phd. With the same students supervisors and then in two thousand eighteen. I was grabbing my pitch. Like i just had to defend so i started looking for jobs and i ended up moving to toronto to Overnight g. arduous this elaborate had just been founded in south driving then in earlier this year that shut and a few weeks later fuel a little bit later after that i joined wabi. Which is when. I'm working out right. L. awesome awesome. Tell us a little bit about lobby. What is bobby doing. So why is a company dedicated to build an explanation of south reagan and so but but b believe is that celebrating is the most and exciting technological innovation. We will see in the next two years. And why is that's why we deal is trying to build upon the lessons of the last year's and tried to build an approach that he's a i. I saw not just something that is hand engineer and then we tried to put ai to make it better but something that right from the get go can really put a centerstage

University Of British Columbia Mexico South Reagan Canada Toronto Bobby
Deep Unsupervised Learning for Climate Informatics With Claire Monteleoni

The TWIML AI Podcast

01:57 min | 11 months ago

Deep Unsupervised Learning for Climate Informatics With Claire Monteleoni

"Claire welcome to the podcast thanks. I'm excited to be here Super excited to have you on a show and looking forward to our conversation we are. Of course gonna dig into all the amazing work you've been doing in the client mitts informatics field but to get us started. Wanna you share a little bit about your background and how you came to work at this confluence of data science machine learning and climate change. Yeah so actually. I grew up in new york city and was involved in environmental activism in high school. We organized the first environmental awareness day at our high school. You know this is in the late nineties. Mayor dinkins act came and spoke. This was in new york city. And i remember. We served lunch on frisbees. You know so that they would be reusable so some fun images there and then i came to college with science interests. There were major such as environmental science and public policy which i dabbled in but then i did earth and planetary sciences and i really wanted to understand climate change you know their issues of acid rain ozone hole and certainly a global warming even back then but i got more fascinated by the math of computer science. I had to take computer science to understand how these climate models worked but really got hooked in by things like logic and recurs and all the theoretical topics that fascinated me. So i studied. Ai machine learning for my phd and really environmentalism was on the back burner as more of an activist area and not an area of research for many years. But then when. I was finishing my post doc and applying for jobs i wrote about this idea of climate informatics. Because during grad school i had seen bioinformatics emerge as really revolutionizing various areas of biology by bringing in machine learning

Mayor Dinkins New York City Claire
Author Chat With David Yoon

Books and Boba

01:46 min | 11 months ago

Author Chat With David Yoon

"Hey we're hearing with david author and guess now publisher dvd. I'll stick thanks for joining us on books and boba. Thanks for hopping looking forward to this. Yeah we are here to talk about what we're talking to david about all his great accomplishments but also about his newest book version zero But before he gets that we always like to start because this is a book club about asian american authors. We always like to hear how did you. How did you end up becoming an author like what was your journey as a writer was always something that was part of your life or something that you discovered later on. It's definitely it's. I mean i love this question. 'cause for me. It's definitely been something i've always wanted to do Ever since i was in third grade. I wrote a story in the class and they loved it. They're cracking up. And i was feeling and then a another story interested in it was crickets. Okay okay good feedback gonna try them better. And since then. My favorite classes have been english. I major was in english. I went to grad school for fiction. That's where i met Nikola wife Yeah and yeah and we learned about writing but we didn't learn about the publishing industry so we spent a lot of years just working our day jobs because they paid really well and writing in the mornings or at night and Really the are grad school contacts for members in college was the way we got to be agents and people like that was that was mainly networking. And the the more you write the more you can make your own luck. So when the agent when you friendly do need an agent now i will assume your stuff budgets to sean

David Nikola Sean
The Lowdown on LinkedIn Marketing Solutions With Gyanda Sachdeva

AdExchanger Talks

01:44 min | 1 year ago

The Lowdown on LinkedIn Marketing Solutions With Gyanda Sachdeva

"Ganda welcome. Hi alison thank you for having me so to start off. Let's talk a little bit about your career. This is lincoln so it seems appropriate. What what's been your professional journey from studying I learned this from looking at your lincoln profile from studying electrical and computer engineering at cornell. To where you sit now yeah. It's a great question. it's it takes me back to a really good time in my life as well. I started my career in engineering Studying electrical and computer science and and the net shifted gears and management science ended grad school but throughout i I thought i would end up very much. The technical space and i was very much looking forward to building products. As that was a team that existed even back then but when i graduated it was in the middle of the housing crisis and i recall finding a job as being one of the hardest things i did and i think now looking back having link tin was enormously helpful and another work on the product. Of course i have more insight into how works but even back then i was so grateful that it existed but i found my job Through a norwegian after people on lincoln my first job and it was in financial services. I did investment banking Time when it can imagine when the economy is going through so much At the same time those not much happening there were there. Were not many companies going public not much in terms of mea and so being an investment banking analyst at the time fed Kind of exhausting. Because you make all these books foot really no deals get done

Lincoln Ganda Alison Cornell
Causal Models in Practice at Lyft With Sean Taylor

The TWIML AI Podcast

01:38 min | 1 year ago

Causal Models in Practice at Lyft With Sean Taylor

"Shown. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks sam happy to be here. I'm super excited to chat with you. It's been a long time in the works and really looking forward to our conversation. I like to get these interviews. Started by having you share a bit about your background and introduce yourself to our community. How'd you get started working in data science yet thrilled to be here. Always fun to like reminisce about how you ended up where you got. Sometimes when i think about the journey to being data scientist it goes all the way back to like college working on real estate research. The professor to work with a pen and getting into geospatial data there. There's a long process since then. And probably the most pivotal thing was working. In grad school on arch gal experimentation. Markle program was studying is studying to be a social scientists. Study helped people influence their friends online. Really around this era of big data and people getting really interested in the dupin hive running. Large-scale experiments and. I got very lucky and got an internship at facebook thirty year. Old internist is folks this sort of like that movie the interns and i got a great sediments whereas facebook denied goals and anytime box were awesome and taught me everything i needed to know about being data scientist at facebook and then decided to stick around stay so it was a disa- facebook for about seven years and then about two years ago switched over to lift where i started working on marketplace experimentation and other stuff that lifted very different set of problems in the facebook you can trace that journey all the way back twenty years if you want to or maybe just ten but it's still ending up to be a lot of time with this feeling

Facebook SAM
Podcast Episode 017: Moya Bailey www.yndialorickwilmot.com

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

03:00 min | 1 year ago

Podcast Episode 017: Moya Bailey www.yndialorickwilmot.com

"B esides the fact that i cannot go anywhere. I can't watch or read anything with the critical lance without thinking about or employing. your term misogynoir very fluidly as it is now very much a part of mainstream lexicon and i'm sure you're probably like well so and so also used the term. I can imagine how that must feel. It's an interesting feeling. Actually if i if i may elaborate you know it's one exciting that people find the term useful and then also really disheartening. That it has to be used so much. I'm both excited and also troubled. That makes it a double edge sword. Absolutely. I 've been intrigued by your public scholarship for some time, in the ways y ou've examined intersectional issues of B lackness, gender, and sexuality, queerness, ability and disability in a very accessible way. I'm eager to learn more about your journey and i'm sure my listeners are. so are you ready? all right. Let's get into it. Act 1, call to adventure. M oya as a writer and public scholar there are paths we take, processes w e engage in to get us to where we are today. How did you become interested in doing the work. That's such a great question. I would say it started when i was young. I was a kid that had to go to the doctor a lot. And so i knew that i was going to be a medical doctor. I just knew it. Then i went to Sp elman for undergrad and at S pelman, I fell in love with women's studies and that feel like woke something up in me. And what did it awaken? As a woman studies scholar. I started to think about how ideas and stereotypes about black women circulate in medicine and then have an impact on how black women are treated when they do go to the doctor. Those are very large and robust but important issues to contend with when considering your own career trajectory. i was just trying to think about like if there is a way that representations actually inform societal treatment for Black women. We need a better way to talk about it. And so as i was writing my dissertation in grad school. That's what i was trying to get to with the term misogynoir; w hat is it about h ow black women are treated in medicine t hat is informed by t he s ocietal representations of black women that are so damaging and how does that transfers happened? How did those representations actually then impact what happens in medicine or other societal institutions. It seem like during graduate school particularly while you were writing your dissertation. Those were the moments in which you realize we need lexicon. We need frameworks to understand Black women's experiences. W as there another moment or experience at this time t hat informed your work? I was thinking about this as a grad

#Misogynoir #Spelmancollege #Profyndia #Transformmisogynoir Talkingjourneysofbelonging2bla Grad School
Interview With Paul Davison and Rohan Seth of Clubhouse

How I Built This

02:10 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Paul Davison and Rohan Seth of Clubhouse

"So today. We're releasing a special live episode of the show. It's my conversation with paul davison and rohan. Seth co founders of the social media app clubhouse. I spoke with pawn rohan back in april for a how i built. This live event that we did on clubhouse now. If you don't know a clubhouse is that may be because you choose to ignore news and that's okay no judgment but basically it's a social media app but in audio format clubhouse allows people to an audio chat rooms to discuss anything from sports to politics to networking and currently the app has over ten million users clubhouse launched in march of twenty twenty just as the pandemic began shutting things down. The timing couldn't have been better since there was a newfound demand for people to connect. Virtually paul ro haunt of started working on what would eventually become clubhouse a year earlier in two thousand nineteen. It was the first business they ever worked on together which is surprising because before that they kind of lived. Parallel lives both attended stanford for undergrad and grad school. Both spend time working at google and both started social media apps that were eventually acquired the first place paths could have crossed was at stanford row. Han came to the. Us from india and was getting his undergraduate degree in computer. Science and paul was trying to break into the startup world while he was at stanford graduate school of business and honestly. It's probably generous to claim that. I that i knew what i was doing. I was just really interested. In getting involved in the start up world and so i like the idea of going back to stanford and just immersing myself in that so it was a great experience. I went back to school there and spent most of my time just working on independent research projects working with local startups and entrepreneurs doing small group dinners and faculty lunches and and thinking about start-up ideas and business school. I think is kind of what you make of it

Paul Davison Seth Co Pawn Rohan Paul Ro Rohan Stanford For Undergrad And Gra Stanford Graduate School Of Bu HAN Stanford Google India Paul United States
IGI Researchers Are Using CRISPR to Reduce Cyanide in Cassava

CRISPR Cuts

02:09 min | 1 year ago

IGI Researchers Are Using CRISPR to Reduce Cyanide in Cassava

"Like everyone took wrestler guts. Today's episode we're not covering medicine or science communication. It's something different but also equally important will covering chris boden agricultural. So today with us. We have jessica lions and michael gomez and they're going to talk about their work gain casella so when come guys please introduce yourself stewart audience. Hi i'm just. lions staff. scientists. In dan rockstars lab at uc berkeley and the pi of our project at the innovative genomics institute to use crisper to engineer. Cassava without sign wants michael gomez. I'm a postdoctoral scholar in the fast food lab. At the innovative john institute also working jess on cassava and other crops for disease resistance. Thank thanks can you talk a little bit about how you got into this space off. You know either being interested in agriculture and also getting into crisper in agriculture. Now maybe tied with the shirt. I come at this from the end of genomic so i i'd morning on cassava listens twenty twelve and twenty fifteen or something some really interested in using modern genetic approaches to facilitate the improvement of africa crops so As christopher became more of a a more of an option for sava thousand certified segue on into collaborating with golden brian. On using chris burton december. I entered grad school in dozen twelve really strong interest in diseases. How they work how that plays host and at that time crisper urge and it has been a roller coaster. seeing how this technology has been applied. It's been a lot of fun. And i'm excited to apply for disease resistance but also poor consumer safety space.

Michael Gomez Chris Boden Jessica Lions Dan Rockstars Uc Berkeley Innovative Genomics Institute John Institute Disease Resistance Casella Lions Stewart Jess Golden Brian Chris Burton Christopher Africa
Interview With Kate and Jes From the Seltzer Squad Podcast

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Kate and Jes From the Seltzer Squad Podcast

"Hello my friends. I know you are going to be so super stoked about this episode. I am so freaking excited. You guys love these guys. And i have been waiting to record this episode for weeks. I'm so excited you guys. We have seltzer squad on addiction. Unlimited bringing to awesome podcast together. I love a good collaboration. So kate and jess welcome to the show. Thank you so much for doing this with me. Why don't you guys take a minute. Introduce yourselves and tell my listeners. A little bit about you and what you do all right. Well i'm just. Valentine and i am a tattoo artist. I live in brooklyn new york. And i am half of seltzer squad. Podcast a podcast about staying sober in the city and just trying to Stay cool and not boring guest kate you. He's over having us on. We're very excited. I'm kate the other half of social squad. I am a freelance our director. I am a grad school. Hopefully grad school student for her to become a therapist. one day what else. I'm a cat. Mom introverts pace. I guess that really sums it up. Yeah. i'm a pisces. Work in school consume most of my life these days. So i don't really have any other slashes data on right now plus we've been quarantine i remember out of the. Yeah i remember those days. Well when work in school took over my life but i was already old. I didn't even go to college until i was thirty seven. I think or thirty eight something like that. So both of you ladies are in new york. I'm thursay technically. But i'm right across the river so we act i buy as a new yorker. We're very close. We're very closely two miles away from one another. But yeah

Kate Jess Brooklyn New York
The Fashion of the 90s, With Colleen Hill

Dressed: The History of Fashion

02:21 min | 1 year ago

The Fashion of the 90s, With Colleen Hill

"We are so close to be joined to discuss all of the above with our friend and one of my mentors actually from grad school colleen hill colleen is a curator of costume and accessories at the museum. Fit and her book fashioned in the nineties is the exhibition catalogue for forthcoming exhibition of the same name at the museum at fit calling. We are so thrilled to welcome you to the show today. Welcome to trust colleen. Welcome to journalists. This is very much overdue. Some of our fashion historian. Listeners will probably know that you and i r- very dear friends but we've been trying to get you on forever and ever so. I'm so excited to talk to you today about your new project. Thank you. i'm really happy to be here. Yeah so some time ago you shared with me. I was like what. What are you working on now. And you said that your new project on fashion and the ninety s. And i was like ooh like hell ambitious and the reason i say this is ninety s. Fashion is very tricky period of time to tackle. It's not all that long ago. It's not like it's forgotten. And you and i were actually both teenagers in the ninety s. I think a little bit older than you. So i was early nineties. You're kind of late ninety s but we lived these close firsthand so it's not like we don't know anything about them and that's really interesting in and of itself because it's a bit of a rarity oftentimes that s fashion stories. We're working on periods where we actually wore those fashions. So the reason i'm saying it's tricky is because the nineties. The styles in fashion is exceedingly resistant to categorization. Would you agree with that. Oh yes that was one of the biggest houses with project. And you have this wonderful quote early on in the book and you're quoting a fashion journalist. Marion hume who wrote in harper's bazaar and the december nineteen ninety nine issue. You know like we're right on the edge of like going to the next millennium. And she said quote. We have lurched from modern to retro from glitz glamour from puritan pretty from military to minimal. Only to max. Out at the finale with an opulent flourish of beating and a rash of irony.

Colleen Hill Colleen Grad School Colleen Marion Hume Harper
"grad school" Discussed on My Gothic Dissertation

My Gothic Dissertation

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"grad school" Discussed on My Gothic Dissertation

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> Mike <Speech_Music_Female> Dissertation <Speech_Music_Female> was written reported <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and produced <Speech_Music_Female> by me Anna <Speech_Music_Female> Williams. <Speech_Music_Female> To <Speech_Music_Female> hear episodes, <Speech_Music_Female> read transcripts and <Speech_Music_Female> see footnotes <Speech_Female> head over to my GOTHIC <Speech_Music_Female> DISSERTATION DOT COM, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you can subscribe <Speech_Music_Female> to my Gothic dissertation <Speech_Music_Female> wherever <Speech_Music_Female> you get your podcasts <Speech_Music_Female> including <Speech_Music_Female> Lyceum, <Speech_Music_Female> an new <Speech_Music_Female> platform that brings <Speech_Music_Female> together the most inspiring <Speech_Music_Female> ideas, <Speech_Music_Female> discussions and <Speech_Music_Female> people in the world's <Speech_Music_Female> first audio learning <Speech_Music_Female> community. <Speech_Music_Female> LYCEUM <Speech_Music_Female> offers a unique <Speech_Music_Female> online forum <Speech_Music_Female> so if you'd like to <Speech_Music_Female> engage directly <Speech_Music_Female> with me about what you've heard, <Speech_Music_Female> download <Speech_Music_Female> the LYCEUM APP <Speech_Music_Female> search for <Speech_Music_Female> my Gothic dissertation <Speech_Music_Female> and leave <Speech_Music_Female> me a comment in the discussion <Speech_Music_Female> room <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> the theme Song For <Speech_Music_Female> my Gothic Dissertation <Speech_Music_Female> is stop <Speech_Music_Female> running written <Speech_Music_Female> and performed <Speech_Music_Female> by Adam Ben Ezra. <Speech_Music_Female> A <Speech_Music_Female> big thanks to him <Speech_Music_Female> for allowing me to use <Speech_Music_Female> it. <Speech_Music_Female> The website <Speech_Music_Female> and Logo for my <Speech_Music_Female> Gothic dissertation <Speech_Music_Female> designed by Brett <Speech_Music_Female> Forsyth of <Speech_Music_Female> yellowhammer creative. <Speech_Music_Female> Consultants <Speech_Female> were Ginger Marshall <Speech_Music_Female> Michael Garoppolo <Speech_Music_Female> and of course <Speech_Music_Female> my dissertation committee <Speech_Music_Female> who lifted <Speech_Music_Female> the gate and allowed <Speech_Music_Female> me to do this project <Speech_Music_Female> in the first place. <Speech_Music_Female> Thanks <Speech_Music_Female> to everyone who let <Speech_Music_Female> me interview them, <Speech_Music_Female> they are. Sherry Toughen <Speech_Music_Female> Kevin Birmingham <Speech_Music_Female> deirdre <Speech_Music_Female> Egan Virginia. <Speech_Music_Female> CRISCO <Speech_Music_Female> Meredith Elsie <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Isabel Scotney <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Elon <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Lou <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Elizabeth. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Judith Pasco <Speech_Music_Female> Susan <Speech_Music_Female> Dingy David <Speech_Music_Female> Lar- <Speech_Music_Female> Palmisano <Speech_Music_Female> Timothy Burke <Speech_Music_Female> Joe Livingston <Speech_Music_Female> Kristen <Speech_Music_Female> Nap Janelle <Speech_Music_Female> Schwartz that <Speech_Music_Female> Barton <Speech_Music_Female> Rene. Do <Speech_Music_Female> Amy Polyps <Speech_Music_Female> Kathy Meguro? <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> And Sand <Speech_Music_Female> Jenny Ben, Wa <Speech_Music_Female> and my <Speech_Music_Female> peers Laura Lydia <Speech_Music_Female> Angela Lulu <Speech_Music_Female> Caitlin Jamie <Speech_Music_Female> Kathleen <Speech_Music_Female> Pedro Philip. Maheen <Speech_Female> Jen <Speech_Music_Female> Jillian and Marie <Speech_Music_Female> Margaret Tori. <Speech_Music_Female> Mattie Ian <Speech_Music_Female> Brady Rachel and Carl. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Finally <Speech_Music_Female> I'd like to give a shoutout <Speech_Music_Female> to the Iowa public <Speech_Music_Female> radio talk show team <Speech_Music_Female> who were my engaged <Speech_Music_Female> radio pedagogues <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> back in two, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> thousand, sixteen and <Speech_Music_Female> Seventeen. <Speech_Music_Female> Their Catherine Perkins <Speech_Music_Female> Charity Nebi, <Speech_Music_Female> then <Speech_Music_Female> Keefer Lindsey. <Speech_Music_Female> Moon Emily <Speech_Music_Female> Woodbury <Speech_Music_Female> Clare Roth <Speech_Music_Female> and Dennis Reece. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Thanks for listening <Speech_Music_Female> and <SpeakerChange> be sure to tune <Music>

"grad school" Discussed on My Gothic Dissertation

My Gothic Dissertation

05:58 min | 2 years ago

"grad school" Discussed on My Gothic Dissertation

"As we near the end of this first volume of the Grad School Gothic. The truth of the heroine situation has begun to dawn on her. Despite her isolation, she's found a way to attain this knowledge by making allies of sympathetic, serving or two. or in the modern world, a growing body of her Grad school comrades emboldened to speak out on social media by movements like me to. Through her narrow window, she can see the castle ramparts tumbling down slowly stone by stone. And yet the fortress still stands seemingly held together by the sheer will of its towering overlord. Or maybe it's held together by what in the schoolhouse Gothic Sherry Trough in refers to as episode violence. There's a kind of violence in the way that we know or the way that we choose to know. Or the way that we more generally defined to define is to create boundaries around what something is and what it isn't to know. Something is true is to deny the truth of something else. Thus, says Trevon our entire way of knowing. The foundation of Western epistemology, upon which the Grad School Gothic is built. Is itself violent, because if we define scholarship as knowledge creation, as it's typically understood, but you also think of teaching as the construction of the educated student. Or the process of creating the educated mind. It's also sort of doing violence to that mind by how we define and circumscribe and limit creating and disseminating knowledge involves privileging certain ideas or experiences and denying others. When we decide what counts as knowledge? We tell certain people that we believe them and certain others that we don't. This argument about the insidious relationship between knowledge and power is derived from the work of highly influential philosopher and theorist. Michelle SUCO. Normally, we think that knowledge gives one power Co., said no, no, no, no well. He I mean he didn't say that was true, but he said. Power gives you knowledge because power is knowledge. He's really innocent. Saying that the teacher invents a student. The teacher defines the student and invents the student and creates the student. And and so you can see that in and of itself, perhaps as a kind of violent in this way, truffles, notion of violence is similar to what higher Ed Advocate Beth God be has referred to as episode injustice. Or denying someone their fundamental right to experiential knowledge. Rather than recognizing that their students already possessed valid and valuable knowledge that they do not. Much of which is gleaned from their unique life, experiences episodically, violent or unjust, teachers decide that they in their academic equals are the only ones who have the right to think. They know anything. In some cases, maybe it's yet another vestige of the academic star system that refuses to lay down and be buried. In others though it's purely accidental, you know being a college professor. Is You know about becoming certified as an expert in your field? It's not you know you don't really learn how to teach. Researchers of the doctoral training process have concluded the same thing that often the so-called violence occurs out of pedagogical ignorance. The product of PhD advisers themselves being trained to be scholars not teachers. As Bell Hook says academics are often the opposite of engaged pedagogues. During my twenty years of teaching, I have witnessed a grave sense of disease among professors irrespective of their politics, when students want us to see them as whole human beings with complex lives and experiences, rather than simply as seekers after compartmentalized bits of knowledge, even though they almost always mean well, PhD advisors often don't recognize how much power they have over. There advises self esteem and future careers. And, thus how much their roles as teachers and mentors matter. But as Leonard, Cassuto says. We've we've got to do things differently because we're wrecking people's lives? And does it's just unacceptable..

power Co. Grad School Gothic Grad school Bell Hook Michelle SUCO Trevon professor Leonard Ed Cassuto
"grad school" Discussed on My Gothic Dissertation

My Gothic Dissertation

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"grad school" Discussed on My Gothic Dissertation

"And for good reason..

"grad school" Discussed on My Gothic Dissertation

My Gothic Dissertation

07:22 min | 2 years ago

"grad school" Discussed on My Gothic Dissertation

"A highly competitive system in which a single person has the power to make or break someone else's career. Whether it's the crowded greasy pole of Hollywood or flooded pipeline. You will have abuse. Sure enough according to Reitman's account. Ronel had all, but promised him. She would get him an academic job when he finished his PhD so when? He did not have the option to withdraw affections because he essentially in the simplest fit which would be feeling upset and perhaps making his life? Of them. To marry the job of their Grad school dreams in other words. The heroin needs to find a way to give her gothic villain what he wants. At this point in Grad school gothic novel, some readers will be rolling their eyes. Hyperbole at its finest, they may be saying. The Renault cases one extreme isolated example of abuse that cannot and should not be generalized to describe any kind of universal experience of Grad School. Maybe so? Maybe, it's true that the majority of graduate students have an experienced sexual abuse at the hands of their advisors. But maybe where there's smoke, there's fire. Maybe as Cory Robbins said in an article for the chronicle of Higher Ed. The RENNELL Reitman. Scandal tells us more about quote. HOW INTENSE! How abusive the pervasive imbalance of power and academe really is than it does about sexual harassment. As? He says that imbalance of power is quote. One that many graduate students have had to negotiate. And should not have to negotiate. Or maybe that response of the eye rollers is itself part of what makes Grad. School, feel so gothic. The ease with which the experiences and identification of the persecuted heroine are disregarded and trivialized. When she says to authorities, figures I see that kind of thing happening on a smaller scale around me to. And Authority figures teller. She's overreacting or just plain wrong. It feels like the signature power move of the GOTHIC. Maybe that's why so many of the ivory towers most powerless are beginning to assert their right to say me too in the astounding if under. Metoo, movement, and academia. Maybe once rolling their eyes should consider what or who it is, they're trying to protect. Now back to our imperilled heroin. As if the villain wasn't enough to deal with, there's off another even greater threat haunting her in every corner of the castle. Literally? Is always been to do with ghosts phantoms. which comes back that which cannot be laid to rest? As, David Punter points out here. There's another defining feature of the trials and tribulations that gothic heroine undergo. And that's the relation between the present and the past. The notion of inheritance has always been interesting in Gothic because always the possibility of a very troubled inheritance. One term that is often used to think about these things facing is the old biblical notion of the the sins of the fathers, the way in which things which your forefathers may have dumb. And about which you may never about or not know about maybe the visited upon new. So that you'll quest in the gothic novel is sometimes to find out what is it? That's been done in the past, which means that I? have to suffer like this independent. Another reason the abuse between Nelin. Reitman is so indicative of the Broader Power Dynamics of doctoral advising. Is it does deal with powerful past that haunts us in the present. What we've inherited in the modern academic humanities according to Timothy Burke. Is something he calls? The Academic Star System the academic star, system. As nineteen nineties humanities. Created a group of people who believed they were better than everyone else. A group of people who are invested in believing the stars better than everyone else. This is done lasting damage to the humanities. Burke is a professor of history at swarthmore and after the Renault, reitman scandal broke. He went on a bit of a tear about it on twitter. Part of which you just heard. Back when humanities departments were more flush with university cash, he says they could, and did actively court fashionable intellectuals to join their ranks in particular people who are responsible for importing the radical and provocative European theory that would change the way scholars thought read and studied texts in the American humanities. Stars were recruited such prestigious positions. Burke says they were given a lot of leeway. and. They're becoming kind of almost cultish Lee successful figures within on a sad of academic disciplines in African system. Because in a way they have those connections. They're bringing something new to get more money. You get autonomy on a on a scale that other people don't get. you get freedom from some forms of responsibility on the name of the thought that you were thinking deep thoughts that no one else is thinking. And you have worked to do that. You need to be free to do. And at the same time, a kind of heedlessness about. the little people think. So how is this power of the past making us suffer in the present? For one thing, many of the stars from the eighties and nineties do still exist and are academic universe, despite the general downturn in the humanities influence judging by her CV, Renault would certainly seem to fit the bill. And because graduate students are well aware of this powerful constellation of stars. They're afraid to speak out when duiker. Here's Joe again so I could hud. Expanding nothing ever seems like a room when you hear it. But I had had people talking out Avatar in my time. And what you? Until Yeah I had had that she was this like. Pasta with very intense emotional relationships that has students. Asta Law. Although the nyu sexual harassment case didn't become public knowledge until August of two thousand eighteen. Reynolds abuses of power were already an open secret among Grad students. Whenever. Joe would express any kind of disappointment to her friends and colleagues about her own advisor. She says and people saying like, but you could have someone who was. Way into your life like I. So, that's how I heard about it kind of organically, although Grad students it why you knew in other words, nobody wanted to speak out against such a renowned..

Reitman Grad school gothic Timothy Burke heroin harassment Grad School Renault Ronel Joe Cory Robbins David Punter chronicle of Higher Ed twitter nyu Asta Law Reynolds swarthmore Lee advisor professor of history
"grad school" Discussed on My Gothic Dissertation

My Gothic Dissertation

07:32 min | 2 years ago

"grad school" Discussed on My Gothic Dissertation

"As Gary Kelly describes it in his study of the female Gothic the heroin will now be subjected to quote. Minister, by unknown forces, the mackin, nations of individuals with obscure inscrutable motives and or persecution by mysterious institutions or secret organizations. A far cry from the engaged pedagogy she's grown used to. This new monolithic. Holds the heroine hostage in his labyrinth like house to use her in some secret self-serving plot. Marrying her off to a detestable count or robbing her inheritance would be dowry for his own personal gain. He keeps her isolated through neglect, surveilling her constantly with a network of spies to ensure. She remains ignorant about his plans for her. If she does get too close to the truth, he'll throw her off the path with elaborate mind games that make her doubt. Her perceptions in her sanity. While readers can clearly see that, she's endanger. The heroine herself only since his it. And in the ensuing volumes will clutch are pearls as we witnessed her undergo trial after trial. An exhausting series of close calls from which you'll barely escape. In Grad School Gothic. Things aren't quite as blatantly diabolical. But the heroin does find herself in a daunting new educational environment that Leonard Cassuto of the book the Graduate School Mess Calls Quote Careless and short-sighted teacher, centered and neglectful. And I'm not the only person to note the similarity between these pedagogical unsound settings and the Gothic. Sherry Deafen associate professor of English at Campbell University identifies this trend in twentieth century, American Gothic novels in her two thousand eight book, the Schoolhouse Gothic even though we like to think of American schools as meritocracy that and vehicles for social advancement. Quite, likely to function in ways that re replicate existing power hierarchies rather than challenge them and you know I. This is why she wrote. The book says Truckin. To understand why teachers were cropping up as Gothic villains and all of these twentieth century American Novels Fair Not. Count Dracula and there is a monk and they're not. And yet I started to realize that there's a kinship there. There's the appearance of benevolence. And Assumption of benevolence that actually can serve as cover for something a lot darker. Locked away in dark damp office in the dungeon of some campus building. The Grad School. GOTHIC heroine will be subjected not to forced marriage, but to dark menaces and other forms including the exploitation of Labor mentioned earlier by Sydney Smith and forcefully condemned by Kevin. Birmingham If you. tenured. Or Tenure Track Faculty member in a she envies department. With. P. H. E. Candidates you are both the instrument and the direct beneficiary of exploitation. Girls as teacher. Adviser and committee member generate cultivate and export young people's. Devotion, to literature. This is the Great Shane. As I'll discuss more leader chapter. Birmingham statement comes from a bold and provocative speech. He gave right here on my own campus. But, for now I just want to point out that his comments gesture toward what many researchers have doctoral training have found to be the greatest menace of all graduate students whether they mean to be are not. The PhD adviser. I. Don't know how you feel about your advisors, but they. Really become like. These giants in your head. US like Avocados of your being. In the Grad School, Gothic the PhD advisor, or the Graduate Faculty member more generally. Holds enormous power over the graduate student. And if they're not careful, they can end up looking a lot like the diabolical villain of your. In their roles as teachers, mentors and writers of the all important letters of recommendation for jobs. Doctoral advisors truly do seem as Josephine Livingston, says here. Like arbiters of your being. Livingston, who goes by Joe? Earned her PhD in English from Nyu and now works as a staff writer for the New Republic. So in a story broke about an nyu graduate student. Nimrod reitman being abused by his PhD advisor the noted feminist scholar and professor of German and comparative. Lit Avatar now. Joe was well positioned to write an article about it. The case represents the very worst of what can happen when PhD advisors abused their power. A real life Grad school gothic tale. She was a kind of intimacy land with which he was not comfortable and she didn't realize things. Right so this the extended to Staying the night together, demanding attentions, making him onto phone calls You know it was at a party and onto defying and couldn't answer chronicle. She would get angry right inches. She claimed he had very strong clear. Rennell imposed herself in every aspect of her advises life out of a supposed need to serve her emotional health. She stalked him cornered and isolated him playing mind games by telling him. He was quote in denial when he resisted her advances, and that her therapist agreed he should go along with their intimate relationship. Hearing this one might wonder why. Reitman didn't just report his adviser on the spot for such an appropriate behavior. One reason as Sherry trofim points out because academe via is a place of power you know, and that makes it create. That creates conditions reviews because Howard is knowledge, power is the the power to create knowledge and be believed in academia. Power is the power to create knowledge and be believed. Rennell held more of that power than Reitman. He was in her castle her institution where she was protected. And as in the Gothic, the structure of that castle supports the abuse. Just on a pragmatic level. If, you're graduate advisers abusing you. You simply don't have much recourse. There's no HR department overseeing these working relationships. Only other faculty members who often have a vested interest in maintaining collegial relationships with their permanent peers over transient graduate students. Another reason right didn't come. Forward lies in the outsized role that PhD Advisors Play and the Pinnacle of their advisors educational journeys. Securing A job. As former PhD turned writing consulted K. Amion puts it in a chronicle of Higher Ed article that went viral back in two thousand seventeen, just after the news about Harvey Weinstein broke. Anytime, you have.

PhD advisor Nimrod reitman graduate student Grad School Gothic Grad School heroin Birmingham PhD Advisors Rennell PhD adviser Joe Schoolhouse Gothic Josephine Livingston Gary Kelly PhD Tenure Track Faculty nyu Sherry Deafen US Graduate Faculty member
"grad school" Discussed on My Gothic Dissertation

My Gothic Dissertation

05:36 min | 2 years ago

"grad school" Discussed on My Gothic Dissertation

"Our special thing together..

"grad school" Discussed on My Gothic Dissertation

My Gothic Dissertation

07:42 min | 2 years ago

"grad school" Discussed on My Gothic Dissertation

"In, Normal Gothic dissertation, this is where I would make some astute observation about their generous social commentary, and then state my intervention. Something like for decades now scholars have studied the Gothic in its original context, the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. But I argue that the genre is a useful tool for illuminating problematic power moves made by outmoded institutions in any context. I would then define the scope of my dissertation by stating that I plan to examine one modern institution particular that many consider to be losing cultural power. The academic humanities. I then Linda Authority to that claim by bringing in the voices of noted commentators like former President Sidney Smith. In these times, everything seems to be lined up against humanities. Our enrollments are shrinking. Our majors are funding is decreasing as a result of corporate is assessment in value setting our motive. Scholarly communication is in unsettling transition. Are Fields are becoming feminist with a large proportion of contingent faculty. The humanity threatens to become as last year's MLA President Russell Berman noted a service provider within the academy. If this was a normal gothic dissertation, I might bring in the work of. Or historians here to trace the roots of the modern American, Academy, back, to the European Medieval University. An institution with strong ties to both the Catholic Church and Feudal Aristocracy I might suggest that considering these historical ties, it seems only natural that academia could be third target of the gothics criticism. If this was a normal dissertation. Thus laid out the beginnings of my critical framework and the average reader might be lost or bored by now. But. This isn't a normal Gothic dissertation. My gothic dissertation is more like a Gothic novel. A multi volume one that tells the story of protagonists struggling against traditional forces, cleaning desperately to life in the modern world, threatening as Gothic scholar Chris Baltic tells us. To fix their dead hands upon us. As in the tradition of the buildings, remind the protagonist in the gothic novel are on an Educational Journey and the traditional forces they work against are outdated modes of doctoral training like the dissertation itself. Only unlike a novel, which fiction. This story takes place in real life crusade about three miles to US sixty one. In the novels of Ann Radcliffe and her imitators, a tradition known since the nineteen seventies the female gothic. The heroine starts her life in some idyllic provincial place that's far removed from the hustle and bustle of big city life. Yeah, we're about to go. We're on. The outskirts of national were about to go downtown? Or some of the older stuff is for four year. Old Me Natch is was that place? Propped on the bluffs of the Mississippi River two hours from Jackson and three from New Orleans. It's right out of the pages of its own kind of gothic novel. The Southern Gothic But that's a story for another time. In her country idol, the gothic heroine is typically raised by doting caregivers who nurture her gifts and cherish her talents. My caregivers mingas are the reason for this trip, which I took about a month after my prospectus defense with my parents, sister and two nephews who you just heard. My nephews still seem a little bit confused by this. Are the main keys Ameinias were our old neighbors when I was growing up, and we were very very close with them, and we're going to see them and made them tomorrow. They're very special to. They're real family, but they're like family. Until we moved from Nashes to Birmingham when I was for my family lives in a tiny house on roselawn drive next to Bob and Barbara Ann mingay and their three young adult daughters esther, Suzanne and Peggy Ann. The middle daughter Susie was the nurture of my young talents, my doting caregiver. She was fresh out of college, a brand new first grade teacher, but I didn't know that at the time. To me, she was just a kind person who I always wanted to be around. All these years later. When I visit her notches, she still that way. Well! I don't know if you remember. Anna, and it really wasn't put on the door for you. It was more for Kadian. You inherited it, but my daddy when you would come knocking on the back door daylight on Saturday mornings. To come in the on you ready I. Mean you've got that, but no, it was hilarious i. mean you know that that's why y'all are family to us, but BOB ended up putting. A spoil from a wooden spill from bipeds thread and he attached to the lower part of the screen door because when you were coming, the handle was. Half for you to reach and so many Saturday Morni- we would be. You would come over early and we'd still be in bed. Are Rating and you would want your own book and it didn't matter that it was a picture book. Be Any book that you wanted. And you pick up your own Harlequin romance and just lie right there on rages like a grownup ordering. I should say that back in those days. I couldn't actually read the Harlequin. Romances I was just pretending to read them with no idea what kind of swashbuckling was going down on those pages. But later when I would come back for week long summer visits. Suzy got me reading for real and she also got me writing. When. We were together. You and I in the summer, and you needed something today. It was like okay. Let's read this book now. Draw pictures to go with it, and then as you aged you. went through those different levels of development with your writing, and I think that's when. You and I started writing stories. Of course you weren't riding on. You were telling them and you? You came up with all kinds of stories as you have been reminded and this visit together you would even pick up Kentucky Fried Chicken coupons and make up stories about the coupons, so you always have had the imagination. You just needed some help. Right at first writing down your thoughts, and and then you would ill stripe those one of those stories cinnamon alone one became the basis for my personal statement, one of the documents I submitted when applying for Grad School in English. I referred to cinnamon alone. One to demonstrate to admissions committees, my lifelong devotion to reading and writing. And it worked. Among other things it got me accepted to my master's program. And later, it got me here to the PhD. I'd venture to say that nearly everyone else in Grad school has a suzy to. There's nothing better for a child than for somebody to take time with them and enter nurture something that that they're good at and. and make them feel good about themselves and you know, and these days and times especially Not, too, many children get a lot of one on one time with one adult who they love and he loves them and so. That's that's.

BOB Grad School President Russell Berman US Ann Radcliffe President Sidney Smith Linda Authority Catholic Church Mississippi River Chris Baltic European Medieval University first grade teacher Suzy New Orleans Susie Kadian Anna Jackson Barbara Ann mingay Nashes
"grad school" Discussed on My Gothic Dissertation

My Gothic Dissertation

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"grad school" Discussed on My Gothic Dissertation

"If this was a normal dissertation on Gothic fiction. I'd start with a witty compelling hook to draw you in. Probably, some bold or surprising statement about the Gothic or person associated with it. The Hook would lead to interesting anecdote I don't covered in my research something about the Quirky, antiquarian ISM, of course, Walpole, maybe or how an radcliffe was thought by all. Victorian England to be a reclusive madwoman. You'd be charmed by this knowledge, the vivid image in your brain that illustrated historical time and place I wanted to transport you to. But then. Once, I had you. My voice would suddenly become less conversational more authoritative. And you find yourself buried alive in a formidable scholarly paragraph. It would almost includes some statement about the origins of the Gothic like this one from David putter. The origins of Gothic. Very difficult to pin down. It just conventionally said the Gothic really begins. Fiction Moody begins with this will pose accustomed to in the seventeen sixty S, and that was indeed the first of the GOTHIC novels. They've actually succeeded by the famous classic novels by and that cliff. Published in the seventeen hundred and Seventeen Ninety S. So that is the heyday of gothic fiction but. All the subjects vision. Who continually seemed to have an often life to refuse to lie down and be bedded, then gothic fiction keeps coming up again throughout the nineteenth century. Here's where I would tell you that since the publication of his book, the literature of Terror in nineteen eighty. Punters been widely credited with exhuming the Gothic from the critical crypt where literary giants like William, Wordsworth wished it would lie down and be buried. I would say that critics have historically maligns the GOTHIC for being too over the top, too provocative of base emotions to black and white and its portrayals of good versus evil. And those things by the way indicate the presence of footnotes, citations are extra commentary that can be found by the more scholarly inclined on the podcast website. In a normal introduction to a normal Gothic dissertation hero position myself among the more generous critics such as punter. And say there's actually some pretty nuance social commentary going on in this body of literature. And that the novel's typical settings for boating medieval castles or spooky monasteries speak volumes about the targets of their criticism. Commercials, being a visit you of a futile on. Post and ministries or In some way. Catholic religion and some kind of opposition to see in British culture was the comparative casualty of the politicians religion at a social level. They mean the persistence of the past which we'd wished out does off from the duty to be long since dead, but that postal seems to go on. Once held rigidly in place by the unquestioning obedience of the lower orders. These societal institutions and their corresponding edifices are symbolically falling apart and gothic texts as new more democratic ideas threatened to topple their authority. When the heroin becomes trapped in one of these crumbling castles confidence. We. See the worst of that institution. It's corruption. It's desperate attempts to cling to power at any cost made evident in the psychological terrors. She's subjected to trapped inside. Because what they turn out to leak. Once, you insulted. Is. Impossible to find one's way around. There is always docked. There was always the threat of falling through shop. Door will find yourself in a lower level. These are. Owens unlike the conventional house. In which the new real maps, you can never tell exactly how to get out so these also no use of imprisonment. In other words, the place in which the heroine finds herself trapped also looks very much like an external ization of her own mind under the influence of the institutions manipulation confused. Perilous and darkened with self-doubt..

Victorian England ISM Wordsworth Walpole David putter radcliffe heroin Owens
"grad school" Discussed on Phil's Philosophies

Phil's Philosophies

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"grad school" Discussed on Phil's Philosophies

"Value to my life because I've gotten to the place in my self confidence and self esteem where I realized exactly what my value the US which has been such such a shift for me. I'm amazing I'm pretty dull the way that my brain works is really we cool. The way that my work ethic is is really cool. Though the way that I value growth is really really cool and I need somebody else who can value that. It meets you you a high. I almost want to end it right there. Man I'm sitting here wanting to type all kinds of knows that that's amazing. Not only for people who you are single but in general loving yourself and of the day. You're loving yourself for who you are. There's something I like to do with every single guests and that's to ask them if they've been reading a book recently that they would love to recommend to everybody typing on your mind So I have been super into any Graham lately so any agreement for those of you don't know There's a theory that there are nine personality types and all of them have a basic fear. Fear all of them have a basic motivation etc and we learn about any Graham in particular. It talks about what you look like when you're healthy and when you're unhealthy which is really why I like that tool Other personality tests are behavioral based. So they really look at your behaviors. The ideogram looks at why you do do do what you do. So I would look into a couple of books about the program There's one called the path between us which talks about the different types of any grams and how to get along with people who are different than you and then there's also a book that's hawks about so I'm trying to remember the name of it but it's the book that's a precursor to the path between I think it's the path t to you think it's what it's called. That really goes into depth. It really goes in depth into each type so you can learn more about yourself in y you do what you do. And while it may not describe describe you perfectly you can definitely draw what what matches for you from the book. Use it to become a healthier person. I love that. Ah Thank you so much for your time me. I feel like people are going to be really inspired because I am. I'm sitting here on the couch with you. And I'm like man I really need a level up. You gotTA gotTa get better than I am here to encourage a definitely keep up with me. You'll be hearing more for me Just about how to help other people live their lives. You know I'm learning as you can tell and want to help other people learn to. How can people find you to learn and watch you as you attorney for? Sure you can follow me on instagram. At Nia. Nia Flower blossom again that's at Nia flower. tongue twister tongue-twister tongue twister at Nia flower blossom on instagram. Also go to my website. I blog occasionally NIA DARVILLE DOT ORG or right knows Leonardo DOT com. Actually I think it is dot com. Yeah sorry guys. It is NIA DARVILLE DOT com. I think I'll be able to put those in the description. The people can check that out. Thanks again so much NIA and as of this As of today it is Dr Martin Luther.