19 Burst results for "Governor Morris"

"governor morris" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

02:48 min | 4 months ago

"governor morris" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"Let's talk about the unit of importance. So in sort of classical liberal tradition and in the United States in particular, the idea has been that the individual is the locus of all politics and the locus of all thoughts. So individual rights are predominant, those rights are supposed to be protected by government you delegate your powers to the government in order to protect those rights so far as the government invades those rights, then it is defeated. It's reason for being I mean, this is the sort of basic language of the Declaration of Independence, the world trained on. And so when we speak of freedom and liberty, that's what Americans tend to think of almost instinctively. You are using in that statement the nation or the state as sort of the locus or the tribe as the locus of importance. Which do you think is the level of abstraction that we should be aiming at conserving? Is it the individual? Is it the family? Is it the nation? Is it the tribe? Which level of abstraction is the most important here? Look, I think if you pick one and insist on it, then you end up being kind of like an a dollar and a dollar of the individual meaning somebody who just puts way too much emphasis on the individual or if you pick the nation, it's very easy for that to turn into something that is oppressive. I think that if you look at the American founding, there actually was a balance between jeffersonians and thinkers like Tom Payne, they basically were the left and they had this liberal view. But there was another party. The party of Washington and Hamilton, John Jay, John Adams, governor Morris who basically was the draftsman of the constitution. They were much more conservative. And they did focus on all you need to do is read the preamble to the American constitution. The first thing that they think that they're doing is a more perfect union. That's a nationalist aim. It's not an individual aim. It's an aim of we as millions of people. We have a problem that our union is insufficiently strong. And of course, of course, the blessings of liberty is there, but it's one of 7 aims. It's not the only. And I think that's fundamentally what Americans at this stage need to rediscover. They've got the individual liberty thing. It does bring blessings. But at this point, I mean, I think it's just, it's run out of control. I mean, if you're so far down the individual liberty path that you can't understand why pornography should not be should not be on the smartphone of every 12 year old kid. If you can't understand that, then you're just so deep into the individual liberty thing that you just don't think there are any other values. And that's what we're looking for is to rebalance along with those other values. That's a conservative way approaching these problems.

yoram Edmund Burke foundation Trump Yoram Europe
Yoram Hazony Explains the Problem of Idolizing Individual Liberty

The Ben Shapiro Show

02:48 min | 4 months ago

Yoram Hazony Explains the Problem of Idolizing Individual Liberty

"Let's talk about the unit of importance. So in sort of classical liberal tradition and in the United States in particular, the idea has been that the individual is the locus of all politics and the locus of all thoughts. So individual rights are predominant, those rights are supposed to be protected by government you delegate your powers to the government in order to protect those rights so far as the government invades those rights, then it is defeated. It's reason for being I mean, this is the sort of basic language of the Declaration of Independence, the world trained on. And so when we speak of freedom and liberty, that's what Americans tend to think of almost instinctively. You are using in that statement the nation or the state as sort of the locus or the tribe as the locus of importance. Which do you think is the level of abstraction that we should be aiming at conserving? Is it the individual? Is it the family? Is it the nation? Is it the tribe? Which level of abstraction is the most important here? Look, I think if you pick one and insist on it, then you end up being kind of like an a dollar and a dollar of the individual meaning somebody who just puts way too much emphasis on the individual or if you pick the nation, it's very easy for that to turn into something that is oppressive. I think that if you look at the American founding, there actually was a balance between jeffersonians and thinkers like Tom Payne, they basically were the left and they had this liberal view. But there was another party. The party of Washington and Hamilton, John Jay, John Adams, governor Morris who basically was the draftsman of the constitution. They were much more conservative. And they did focus on all you need to do is read the preamble to the American constitution. The first thing that they think that they're doing is a more perfect union. That's a nationalist aim. It's not an individual aim. It's an aim of we as millions of people. We have a problem that our union is insufficiently strong. And of course, of course, the blessings of liberty is there, but it's one of 7 aims. It's not the only. And I think that's fundamentally what Americans at this stage need to rediscover. They've got the individual liberty thing. It does bring blessings. But at this point, I mean, I think it's just, it's run out of control. I mean, if you're so far down the individual liberty path that you can't understand why pornography should not be should not be on the smartphone of every 12 year old kid. If you can't understand that, then you're just so deep into the individual liberty thing that you just don't think there are any other values. And that's what we're looking for is to rebalance along with those other values. That's a conservative way approaching these problems.

Tom Payne Governor Morris United States John Jay John Adams Hamilton Washington
"governor morris" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

02:17 min | 4 months ago

"governor morris" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"Society together? Is it blowing apart or does it need to be become more cohesive and coherent? Or what exactly is it that holds us together? I would say most conservatives would say that it's that it's the religious and national traditions of a particular nation that hold it together. So then you need to ask, well, what do we need to do in order to make sure that those transitions are being transmitted? Are they being transmitted in America now? And the answer is basically no one look what you've got. So I think it's really important that people understand what conservatism is and that both in their individual lives and in the national life that we open up the possibility of a life of conservation and transmission. So let's talk for there's a lot there. So let's talk about the unit of importance. So in sort of classical liberal tradition and in the United States in particular, the idea has been that the individual is the locus of all politics and the locus of all thoughts. So individual rights are predominant, those rights are supposed to be protected by government you delegate your powers to the government in order to protect those rights so far as the government invades those rights, then it is defeated. It's reason for being I mean, this is the sort of basic language of the Declaration of Independence, the world trained on. And so when we speak of freedom and liberty, that's what Americans tend to think of almost instinctively. You are using in that statement the nation or the state as sort of the locus or the tribe as the locus of importance. Which do you think is the level of abstraction that we should be aiming at conserving? Is it the individual? Is it the family? Is it the nation? Is it the tribe? Which level of abstraction is the most important here? Look, I think if you pick one and insist on it, then you end up being kind of like an a dollar and a dollar of the individual meaning somebody who just puts way too much emphasis on the individual or if you pick the nation, it's very easy for that to turn into something that is oppressive. I think that if you look at the American founding, there actually was a balance between jeffersonians and thinkers like Tom Payne, they basically were the left and they had this liberal view. But there was another party. The party of Washington and Hamilton, John Jay, John Adams, governor Morris who basically was the draftsman of the constitution. They were much more conservative. And

United States Tom Payne governor Morris John Jay John Adams Hamilton Washington
"governor morris" Discussed on This American President

This American President

05:35 min | 5 months ago

"governor morris" Discussed on This American President

"And this is sort of a core corollary to that in that today. Since it got me thinking Richard had some really interesting and popcorn choices of why to kill and save certain people, I'd love to hear what he has to say of who he what historical events he would personally like to witness. Hopefully just witness where we're going to try not to kill anyone today. But Richard, how are you? I'm great. How are you doing? I'm great. Thank you. So why don't we start off with you? What would be your first historical event you'd like to witness? Sure, absolutely. So first, let me say I love this topic. I often a cost Friends of mine that might not even care much about history with this question. This ten people, 5 people, would you like to meet if you could if you could go back in time? And I think this is one of the quintessential history nerd questions. So always a lot of fun to talk about this. So the first event I would love to see and this goes back to a question. So it's one of these historical mysteries, in 1818. In 1783, at the end of the American Revolution, there was an event called the newburgh conspiracy. And this event basically, it was a moment where some historians believe that members of Congress who wanted a strong national government were fed up with Congress in general because it was quite inept and weak and ineffective. That never happens nowadays, of course. And basically, in order to, in order to force Congress to act, they started potentially colluding with members of the military and talking about basically threatening to not disband when the war ended and to even maybe even have a show of force to intimidate Congress into acting and taking certain measures like strengthening the federal government and there were potentially members of the military that were not completely happy with George Washington's leadership during the war because Congress hadn't paid the soldiers and George Washington was kind of in between. He wanted to maintain a republic and respect civilian authority, but he also loved his soldiers and hated seeing Congress not pay them. And some of them felt that Washington should have acted stronger and to intimidate Congress, he had the power of the sword, after all, to intimidate Congress into doing his bidding, paying the soldiers, giving the federal government more power, which is something that he wanted because we were under the Articles of Confederation. Now, there has been a debate about the extent to which this conspiracy existed. And it's interesting because major members of the founders of the founding generation were in Congress at the time. Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, governor Morris, et cetera. And there are historians that believe that essentially these people were playing with fire and trying to get Congress to threaten maybe a coup or at least the possibility of one.

Congress Richard newburgh George Washington federal government Washington governor Morris Alexander Hamilton James Madison
"governor morris" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

05:05 min | 7 months ago

"governor morris" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"And who does it and how do we do it? But how do you suppose we go about enacting a lot of this? And obviously, you know, fascism is evil and awful. But do you think that there's anything to this argument that we as conservatives need to be willing to use political power to try and get us back to a conservative position, right? This is kind of a debate that's happening on the right currently. Right. Which is whether or not we should be willing to use political power. For example, using political power to penalize Disney, right, for what they've done in Florida. What's your perspective on that? Do you think that's conservative in nature? Absolutely. I mean, this argument that's happening on the right, I mean, it's very old. At the American founding, there were two parties. There were the jeffersonians who basically thought leave people alone and don't give power to government because, you know, because it's just fundamentally evil. But the United States was not founded by jeffersonians. I mean, the American constitution was written by the other party by the nationalists. The Federalist Party were the Nat cons of those days. And people like Washington and John Jay and John Adams Hamilton, governor Morris was the guy who drafted the constitution. These people were not cons. They were in favor of a strong central government. I mean, they wouldn't have been in favor of 4 million people, you know, like we have today. I mean, they would have thought that's insane. But in principle, they wrote the constitution of 1787 because they believed in a strong national government that exercises political power in order to do whatever needs to be done in order to defend the public's independence. Its liberties to defend religion. That doesn't mean they didn't care about individual liberties. But if you read the preamble to the constitution, you see. It says there's 7 principles that the American constitution was designed to advance. And those include a more perfect union, the general welfare of the people justice defense, but in liberty's certainly one of the 7, but in my book, I am, I make the argument that a conservative needs to return not to jeffersonians who say only liberty is important. You need to return to the national Conservative Party that founded the United States, which believed that there are these 7 principles that have to be balanced against one another. And that means using political power in order to advance those things that are crucial. And also understanding what liberty actually is, right? So Jefferson would have rejected licentiousness, but he was very appreciative of liberty, which is the pursuit of virtue. Their idea of liberty is completely different than kind of what we think liberty is today. They had no belief that liberty is being able to do whatever you want to do whenever you want to do it. It's having the freedom to be able to do what you ought to do. Not whatever you want to do. Talk a little bit more about those 7 principles outlined in the constitution and how that can kind of be a meaningful path. Okay, well, I think the question is, what is government for? And the 1960s fusionism came up with an answer that everybody knows. Government only has the role of defending and ensuring the liberties of individuals. That's Frank Myers book, and that's the idea that ended up conquering conservatism 30, 30 years later. And what we're talking about is a more traditional Anglo American view and it comes to us from England and it's adopted by the Federalist Party. And it sees, let's say, the number one function of government that's listed is establishing a more perfect union. Now, think about that phrase for a second. A more perfect union. That comes from the experience under the articles of the confederation. Ten 11 years in which the United States was close to chaos because it didn't have a strong central government. People don't remember that George Washington couldn't raise the army needed. He couldn't pay the army needed. And in the end, just moving the American troops to Yorktown required private donations, private citizens wrote checks in order to be able to move the army to Yorktown, so Americans could gain their independence. And the idea of a more perfect union, the first purpose of American government is that there's such a thing as cohesion. There's such a thing as loyalty as loyalty that the different parts of the country have to be loyal to one another..

John Adams Hamilton governor Morris Federalist Party national Conservative Party John Jay United States Disney Florida Frank Myers Washington Jefferson army Yorktown England George Washington American government
"governor morris" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

07:37 min | 9 months ago

"governor morris" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Well, before we get to that, so their issues, okay, the convention of states, again, for people that aren't familiar with it because some people are but many are not. This is something that where do we get this idea? Yeah, okay. And where does it? Let me just get to it. So I was at a point in my life where I'm thinking, okay, we need to do something about Washington because I am convinced Washington can fist itself. And so a friend of mine, a guy named Mark meckler, when I had just been fired from CNN or canceled, I guess. Did you do something horrible? Yeah, I did. Speak the truth. I did. I told the truth on you. I did. I told the truth. What are you even thinking? Yeah, I'm sorry. And so I would say, you know, I'm looking, you know, what's my next thing? What am I going to do? I want to stay involved in the fight. And I talked to mark and he said, hey, you know, I've seen you've been given these speeches about your concern about authoritarianism and what's going on in Washington and on both sides you said, there's an answer that the founders created. It's an article 5 of the constitution. It's called a convention of states. And I said, yeah, sort of know about it. Don't know too much about it. And so he provided me a bunch of information and sort of, let's just say, I read myself into the church, right? So where does it come from in the constitution? It's article 5. In the 5th article of the constitution, people have never heard about this. In other words, it's kind of there. It's almost like a poison pill, or it's like one of those things, if things go really bad, break glass. Exactly. If things get really bad, break the glass and there's a hammer or there's a button or there's a something. The convention of states and article 5 in the constitution, it's there. If things get really bad, the states. Okay. We've never had one in 250 years. Or whatever. And I would just say to any of your listeners, do you think we're not there? My listeners can't answer, but on their behalf, let me say, I think we're there. Yeah. And so that's the conclusion that I made. And so I looked at this and said, okay, what are the upsides in the downside of this? Because this is a sort of an emergency provision. Now, I don't know if the founders looked at it that way, but I think most people who look at it today do. And here's what it is. There are two ways to amend the constitution. One is Congress can propose amendments and the second never been used as you mentioned is the state legislatures can pass a resolution two thirds of the state legislatures 34 state legislatures can pass a resolution calling for a convention to propose amendments to the constitution. Right. So in a sense, take the place of Congress who can now propose amendments to the constitution, but create a convention where each state will come, whether you voted for it or not, all 50 states are invited to come every state because it's a sovereign entity unto itself, gets one vote. They will each appoint delegations. It can be. So this is like the constitutional convention of 1787. Except it is limited to what the resolution says it's limited to. Because the resolution as a prescribes the German amendments that are permitted during this convention. It is not a constitutional convention to write a constitution. It is a convention of the states to propose amendments to the constitution. And so you can limit the subject matter, which this resolution does to three things. So these are the three things I mean, there are plenty of resolutions that have asked for convention of the past, none of them have ever succeeded. But this one says three things. Number one, amendments can be proposed to limit the terms of congressman senators and other federal officials. Number two, it can limit the only get to steal one term as president. That would be fair. There. Number two, to limit the spending power of the federal government. So balanced budget, tax limitations, spending limitation. Number three, to limit the power and jurisdiction of the federal government. So we can have amendments that say, you know, Congress, mister president, you can not legislate, let's say, in the area of primary and secondary education. Just an example. Throw that out there. Right. So why would you need a rule when I would think that would already be in place without being in place, that what role would the president have? He doesn't have that authority already. But they do. I mean, I mean, you see, we have a Department of Education that dictates all sorts of things. That shouldn't exist. I agree. But thank you, Richard Nixon. But here's what happened. No, no, no. Thank you. Yeah, I agree. What happened is over time, and I think this is why they put this provision in there. They knew that over time, things would change. And I don't think they anticipated this, but what happened is the courts. The courts have systematically amended the constitution to create an ever increasing powerful federal state. And so what we need to do is get the state legislatures to pass constitutional proposed constitutional amendments to call back that power to the states. Okay, so just so I'm clear. Right now, and I'm going to play devil's advocate because I want to see to understand this correctly. Right now, somebody would say, well, wait a minute, the state's already have a voice. They elect a members to Congress. They each get two senators. How is this different from that? This is this that the state legislatures are able to exercise powers that they are not currently able to exercise that they would need a convention of states for the state legislatures to do that. The state legislatures would call the convention, the state legislatures would appoint the delegates and those delegates, which I assume would be mostly state legislatures, legislators, would then propose amendments. And then it would go to the state legislatures for ratification. So it bypasses the whole point and this is what George Mason talked about. Gary governor Morris, all of which were involved in this at the time of the convention, they wanted a way to bypass Congress and the president, and governors, by the way, they didn't trust governors either. And let the people who were closest to the people be able to maintain the sovereignty of states. So this is, it's a fascinating concept. I mean, for anybody who understands anything about how our government works, the idea that these founders, nearly 250 years ago, governor Morris, mason and others, that they saw that we might need to be able to do this. Yeah, George Mason was the big proponent of this. Okay. He was the one who was very much afraid of federal power. He ended up voting against the constitution as you may recall. But he was very strident on this point. And governor Morris and Albert Gary both came forward with this amendment to satisfy children vote for it, but that was the purpose behind it. And by the way, there was no debate on the amendment. None. It approved without comment. In 1787. Yeah. Okay, so right now, obviously, because of Mark meckler, you mentioned and others, there is the idea of having a convention of the states. 18 states have adopted this resolution. And how many do we need? 34. And so three of just this year. Simply by talking it on this program, we're increasing the odds. When we come back, we will continue my conversation with.

Mark meckler Washington Congress CNN federal government mark mister governor Morris Richard Nixon Gary governor Morris Department of Education George Mason Albert Gary mason
"governor morris" Discussed on Virtually Amazing

Virtually Amazing

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"governor morris" Discussed on Virtually Amazing

"Was refreshment authenticity and sociability. The united states of america. Big global brand. I will distill down everything. The united states of america means when we're at our best. I'm going to underline that we're best is about life. Liberty and the pursuit of happiness was a brilliant copywriting written by governor morris in the preamble of the constitution and the united states of america life liberty and the pursuit of happiness. And again when we're at our best everything we do and that's recognized globally. This is the place of opportunity why because of life liberty pursuit of happiness. So what are your key. Three things well for me. It's i'm creative. I have to be creative. I'd like to say you'll never get a spreadsheet from me you know because you won't. I'm not an analyst not an organizer. In fact i need an analyst and an organizer to work with because my next word. Is collaboration or collaborator. I am a collaborator. I have to work with other people. I'm not one of those artists. That's up in their garrett by themselves just peering out the window writing romantic poems. Sorry browning's but instead. I have to work with people to hear their stories to be able to spruce them up. Shine them up and then communicate them appropriately and then the third word and this took me the longest most deep searching to figure out is provocative. Everything i do. Should provoke conversation introspection investigation. Wow i never thought of that or oud that that's a little brusque but got me thinking exactly because if i'm not doing that if i'm not creative if i'm not collaborative in not provocative i'm not being my true nonfiction self. That is who. I like it or not and guess what some people don't like it. And i don't know if this is true but i once heard a saying that if you make people laugh everyone will love you if you make people think they will hate you. I'm proud to say i got a few haters. I think that's that's really that's really key to use your three case. I think it's important and i've always believed. Actually it will such that. We're not all suited to work with everybody that we come across either in this guy to be the client from halo the project from hallo whatever is often your gut tells you we were talking about this full reject. Often your gut will tell you. Keep away don't do it but sometimes you override that and at your peril you do it but but i also think there are million microsoft icy trainer's not everybody is gonna love me But those that do really do and they're the ones that you want to work with. You only want really. What was people to get you. Don't use totally resonates. Everything you've said is completely resonating with me and This is just being a fantastic interview will chat rather not really more of a check. I have loved every minute of edey paid off and i. We're going to have to draw to a close. It's just been fascinating. We will put all of your contact details on the web page. That goes with this episode. Goes tomorrow via website. Mars via dot com on the putt..

united states of america governor morris browning garrett edey microsoft
"governor morris" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"governor morris" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"TV the observation there's Farrell actually speaks to our guests They don't want to talk to me Brent crude 86 a print earlier 85 62 John Right now what are you seeing in the data I say lift Tom for yields at the front end and through tens as well I see a lift for commodities 83 50 on Brent on WC I'd rather on Brent we push 86 up by 1.4% There's a lift here Tom in a big way We'll have to see Right now let's get to Matthew brill Very important that we speak to him right now on these markets as well What a conundrum at brill What do you do away from full faith and credit What do you do with corporates given all of these narratives Hey good morning Tom I think right now we still feel comfortable investing in corporate credit You're seeing balance sheets continue to get repaired You're actually seeing your earnings still pretty strong We've not really seen a huge impact from the supply chain disruption jet It's really yet to squeeze margins really have any negative effect on earnings So overall we feel like you're going to have a little bit of a slower 2022 but corporations are still in very good shape So we like credit over full faith and credit currently I've just got to come in with a little bit of news so excuse me sir will return back to you It's from CNN and confirmed on the Facebook page of Colin Powell So Tom I just want to read this verbatim from CNN It's important to get this accurate Colin Powell the first black U.S. Secretary of State whose leadership in several Republican administrations have shaped American foreign policy in the last years of the 20th century and the early years of the 21st has died from complications from COVID-19 This according to his family on Facebook Tom he was 84 and I understand the team of the control room has visited that Facebook page Tom and confirmed that on the Facebook page Colin Powell the first black U.S. Secretary of State has died Tom He was 84 I would suggest this is only in America Johnny came out of Harlem in south Bronx the Morris high school named after governor Morris and this is a guy who started out in ROTC at CCNY There was no West Point There was nothing else This is a guy who grounded up and then executed as an officer through the many steps onto the column Powell We believe we know today And here's the statement from the pal family on Facebook Lisa general Colin Powell the former U.S. Secretary of State and chairman of the joint chiefs of staff passed away this morning due to complications from COVID-19 He was fully vaccinated We want to thank the medical staff at Walter Reed national medical center for their caring treatment We have lost a remarkable and loving husband father grandfather and a great American and they signed that off Lisa the Powell family And he was one of the most beloved politicians somebody who is truly respected as being as honest as he could be throughout the process throughout his tenure I do think that there will be a further discussion on the fact that he was fully vaccinated John and that he still passed away from complications This definitely will raise some questions among the among the public about efficacy as well as just who needs to still be careful and take precautions The control room of course Tom running to get a voice from Washington D.C. right now We'll have our Washington correspondent on the line in just a moment I think Tom best the catch up with mat real and vesco in a couple of minutes time for the next segment Just to repeat that if you're just turning in on radio and on TV just getting confirmation on Colin Powell's Facebook page from his family the following that general Colin Powell the former U.S. Secretary of State and chairman of the joint chiefs of staff passed away this morning due to complications with COVID-19 On the family going on to say he was fully vaccinated and they want to thank the medical staff at Walter Reed national medical center for their caring treatment They have lost them We have lost a remarkable and loving husband father grandfather and Tom a great American Colin Powell will continue with that Where are we going John right now We're going to go back to Matt brill or do we want to stay with us Wait for some confirmation from the control room But I think probably best Lisa to stay on top of this story as we get a little bit more news Especially because it's somebody who is respected for his bipartisanship And I think that that's important the idea that he kind of straddled both lines of the political spectrum throughout his career and really tried to be a powerful voice for what he thought was right of really important person and sort of the idea here too of straddling both the political theater of Washington D.C. with the very serious need for strategic importance of on a military basis Very good Joining us now Gregory joins us here We were to speak domestic politics but now with Greg villiers we speak of a general Greg what you and I know and what I've talked to about who had the courage to come out of naval academy in 1975 This is a general who absolutely defined how we picked up the military after Vietnam Absolutely He also was fearless He said what he thought sometimes he upset people with what he said but he was totally fearless a great patriot This is a major laws It's a major laws but it also speaks to the changing of the military guard As you know Greg it's been extremely long here And of course Colin Powell touched by the Iraq War and all the debates then and then on to Afghanistan From your study what.

Tom Colin Powell COVID Facebook John Right Matthew brill Walter Reed national medical c U.S. Morris high school governor Morris CCNY CNN Lisa general Colin Powell Washington D.C. joint chiefs of staff Farrell Powell vesco south Bronx
"governor morris" Discussed on 990 The Answer

990 The Answer

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"governor morris" Discussed on 990 The Answer

"It's remarkable as we read through this this beautiful sentence such a shame that Students today are not Being exposed to this. And the How it applies to them today. We hold these truths to be self evident where I know it's Constitution Day, but I believe the declaration the Constitution or tied together their partners. One proceeded the other. If teachers teach the opposite. They don't know what they're talking about. By their creator with certain unalienable rights by their creator. You see the founding fathers understood and naturally ordered hierarchy of rights and rights giver. Of people and creator. Better life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness that to secure these rights governments are instituted among men deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed. You see that? Thomas Jefferson is laying out here secure these rights governments and soon amongst men that's interesting, not amongst bloodline. Not amongst Hereditary hereditary. Kind of tradition. Instead. Amongst men deriving their powers from the consent of the government takes permission. Thomas Jefferson is saying it takes permission in the Constitution answers these questions. The Constitution goes into this and says You know what you do have these natural rights and we're going to assemble a government. That allows you to do these things. Because you naturally are able to do these things. It's a completely different form of government than you'll find in the European project. It's a completely different form of government. Then you'll find in most other countries. Now someone who loves the Constitution. As Clint Eastwood. Warner Brothers Pictures presents Cry Macho. I want to tell you this movie is incredible. It's from legendary Director Clint Eastwood. He is a constitutional lover. I can tell you and eastward returns as one time Rodeo star and washed up horse breeder. He takes a job to bring back a man's young son home from Mexico. The unlikely pair facing unexpectedly challenging journey The only road home is through redemption. See it in theaters and on HBO Max for 31 days now playing it's rated PG 13. I know I'm going to go see it because anything Clint Eastwood does. Ends up being magical, Big Clint Eastwood fan. He is one of the great actors him and John Wayne. They both loved America. I'll tell you what. Check it out right now Cry macho, and I have to say this portions of the Charlie Kirk show are brought to proudly By cry macho and Anything clean? Eastwood does. I'm a big fan of and his speech. Remember his speech with Barack Obama back in 2012. I was there for that speech. He brought up the chair. That was something else. Gratitude. One of my favorite words. Gratitude is something that So many people in our nation are missing. Our country would have already been disassembled by now, if it wasn't for the founders, giving us The tools they gave us in the United States Constitution. Still to this day, there is an all out assault to the bureaucracies to the progressives. From academia to the tech companies to the corporate tyrants to crush The United States Constitution this constitution. Is what stands between us and them. And the Constitution is only powerful if we decide to use it. The Constitution allows the sovereignty of the people to continue and to exist. The story of America As we look back at the peaks and at the summits of American history, we stand in admiration and awe and with gratitude. To Hamilton, Hamilton and Madison and J and Franklin. And Governor Morris to is a very interesting founder. He was a playboy. Let me tell you what I could tell you a story about Guber nor Morris at a different time and different showed a different time. People say, Charlie, What do we do? How do we save the country Number one, Every single one of you. Need to commit. To know and what we have Study it ponder over it. Spend an hour or two a day reading the Federalist Papers knowing where our founders stood on these issues, knowing the tools at your disposal, knowing your rights that are not given by the Constitution taken by governments given by God. These are just your protector. This is just your shield against earthly threats against naturally given rights of expression. Of congregation. There are threats both foreign and domestic against the U. S constitution. But I'm here to tell you that the threats against the Constitution are mostly domestic right now. We must continue to stand up against them Stand for citizenship. And be thankful. So I want to say thank you, the founding fathers who walked out That old Pennsylvania State house in September. 17th 17 87 for giving us a gift. Praise God for that. Next hour is coming up. I'm going to take your Philadelphia's.

Clint Eastwood Thomas Jefferson Barack Obama 2012 John Wayne Mexico 31 days Eastwood Madison Warner Brothers Pictures September. 17th 17 87 Charlie J Charlie Kirk Hamilton Morris an hour Guber United States Constitution Franklin
"governor morris" Discussed on We The People

We The People

06:54 min | 1 year ago

"governor morris" Discussed on We The People

"They're appointed by the state legislatures but for terms long terms and he figured that would make them independent think nationally. They would live off in this rather than living in their states. And the adding god's go back to work political power with six years they would move to this new federal city that they were going to create member. The constitution also called for creating federal city and some new place and they would have these terms and suddenly they'd be more interested in the central government. They were the government so they threw a wrinkle into this connecticut compromise but franklin was central absolutely central to the entire process and he actually worked very closely with governor morris. He'd often gib- when he couldn't give a speech he'd pass it on. Either gouverneur morris or wilson to read for him at the convention. So this was this was You know this was in so many ways. I view this as more his compromise than the connecticut compromise bill. You quote the language that franklin offered to the convention that the legislature of the several states choose and send an equal number of delegates namely and then he fill in the blank became too of course who are to compose the second branch of the general legislature. And you say. Franklin's motion became the basis for the grand compromise that saved the convention and made the constitution possible. Just so i on our listeners. Understand who actually came up with the idea of franklin or or sherman or or someone else and exactly. What was franklin's role and tell us more about how that related to serve pragmatic compromising vision. We'll possibly. It has more insight on this than i do but i find it impossible to tell exactly where this originated. These were people who were gathering daily to discuss this stuff and they were gathered at that was in convention hall and then they were meeting outside and they were speaking to one another and the this idea of turned up to senators from each state was just in effect of variant of what worked at the didn't work in the confederation congress where each state got one vote so you could make it one you could make it to attend but the key is that you make it an equal number and so the idea was in the air. I can't say that. Franklin was i come up with sherman whoever it might have been but it was one. That was pretty obvious. Once it was articulated. And i'd like to add something here that i think contributes to franklin national view of all of this franklin of course was born in massachusetts but then he spent most of his young adult life in philadelphia but then he spent much of the latter part of his adult life overseas in britain for nearly twenty years and then in france for the better part of the american revolution. And it's i think an experience that lots of people have had that when you get out of the united states us tend to think sort of more as an american rather than a resident of texas or california wherever you might be and so franklin was only well. They've made extreme version of this is the astronauts who went to the moon and look back now. I'm an earthling now. I'm a part of the human race. Rather than just an american and so franklin have had been thinking of the united states this united states sort of looking from the national view and it came to him more naturally than it did to people like washington who never left the united states like virginia. I'm doug jefferson who was virginian through and through and they adams's were massachusetts men and so it was. It was easier for franken to see things in these national terms now. It sort of came naturally to him in and supporters at points out for the idea that representation should be by population rather than by state because he was from one of the biggest states and so it would benefit pennsylvania. but i think he wasn't thinking in pennsylvania terms he was he had the ability to think nationally and think sort of where all this would lead and he really was a of a belief that republican principles mean that people should be represented more or less equally and i won't say that he thought of the the divisions between the state's artificial divisions but he thought if it is indeed a national republic rather than simply a confederation because that's what they had and that simply confederation that hadn't worked so they need to do something else they may need to make this a national government so it came naturally to him but at the same time he understood that this simply isn't gonna fly although agreement was made at the beginning of the constitutional convention that we're not simply going to propose amendments to the existing articles confederation. We're gonna start over again. There's still an understanding that this thing is going to have to be ratified state by state. And if we leave all of their rhode island's in the delaware's you know out of this then we're not gonna get sufficient consensus to make this thing fly so we have to bring them on board. There was something else as well. And this is reflected in franklin's closing speech where he says this isn't a perfect constitution but it's the best we can do at the moment and franklin was enough of a pragmatist and enough of a a believer in human nature that you never get anything perfect you never get anything right for all time and franken look back on his own life and that of washington the next oldest in the convention and the younger man. No we've done a lot. We have won independence or the united states we got we won our war against britain and our setting up this government. And so okay. We didn't get it off done week. Leave something for the next generation. So we'll do what we can with this. And if their problems with this next generation or the generation after that you fix it it'll be your job to do in the future before we close by digging into the closing speech. Let's just review. Franklin's final contributions to the convention. You bill note that he advocated requiring not one but two witnesses to the same overt act of treason which would become crucial in the treason trial of aaron burr. He's second emotion calling for an executive council to assist the president and he acquiesced although it didn't take the lead in the infamous compromises over slavery. Ed what can you tell us about. Franklin's contributions to the debates over slavery and the other contributions think that we haven't discussed. I agree with bill On this is to emphasize In you're going into those slavery compromises And here we have to work with some of his letters and some of his comments and we have to sort of piece together what he was thinking..

franklin governor morris general legislature Franklin sherman united states doug jefferson massachusetts franken legislature connecticut wilson pennsylvania britain congress philadelphia washington france adams texas
"governor morris" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

08:34 min | 1 year ago

"governor morris" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Is now open Emerald Queen Casino, the entertainment capital of the northwest. Wall Street closed today. It was up. On Friday. Dow Jones industrials were by 152 points. The NASDAQ was up 116.81%. Like Michael reopens tomorrow. 7 15 a little history lesson. Now I subscribed to a conservative newsletter called the Dispatch. And in a recent issue, they were highlighting a book called Fears of a Setting Sun, written by Dennis Rasmussen, now is about the founding fathers and We have lionized the founding fathers as these geniuses are set at the perfect political system. And yet, Dennis writes in his book that they were, in some cases disillusioned with what they had created, including George Washington himself. So I thought we'd call him up and talking about. He teaches political science at Syracuse University. And so what is the what is the theme of your book? And why were the founders? Uh, I guess less than satisfied with what they had made. Right, So the theme is the dissolution of one of the founders later in their lives. The key figures in the book are George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. There's a whole host of other founders who ended up dissolution as well. Usually the ones who lived a little bit later into the 19th century. There was no one cause of their disillusionment I have in the book, I have it. Particular theme that I associate with each of the figures. So for Washington, the real cause of his dissolution. It was the rise of parties and partisanship. For Alexander Hamilton, there was that he always felt that the government wasn't sufficiently strong or energetic for Adams. He worried that the American people lack the civic virtue that was needed to sustain Republican government. And Jefferson had a number of causes for for just there. But the key one, I think was the sectional divisions between North and south over the expansion of slavery that he thought rightly, I guess, as it turned out, would tear the country apart. It's the sexual divisions in the civic virtue part that interests me because we seem to be in that place today. I mean, is what they feared coming true. As we watch here. I think all of their fears are still with us. Right Partisan polarization is on the news on a daily basis. The lack of civic virtue or civic engagement is a perennial complaint in American politics. And when we think of the registered blue state divide Jefferson's were you still seem highly relevant? Hamilton is a little bit trickier, because I think most people would not say that the federal government today is, you know terribly we compared to the state governments, but it is pretty feckless. In certain ways. It's very hard to produce major legislation. So even his worries are still bears. Well, I think okay, so for people who today style themselves as I'll call them originalists they want to. They want to get back to the the good old days. The of the founding. Um are they giving us a a true picture of what the founders would have wanted? Well, in some cases? Yes, In some cases, no. But when we talk about what the founders did, or what the founders wanted, we usually look at them at this very brief snapshot of time. You know, what did they want when they frame the Constitution? You know they kept living. They live for many more decades, and they learned they lived under that constitution. They saw how it operated, and it's striking, I think is very telling that so many of them Ended up disillusioned with what they'd right when we look back and think, Oh, they had all their answers all the answers there will their intent must be obeyed. In all things. You know, it's worth keeping in mind what the rest of their lives looked like. So what would they have changed? Is there anything you can point to things that we are clinging to today? Which if the founders were here they choose ever found you want Would would have quickly abandoned. I think most of the big figures who we think of as that kind of the main founders today, the Washington's Madison's Hamilton's of the world would have liked much more powerful. National government, much more powerful presidency and I think, especially a Senate that was did not Representatives. Equally, they all wanted proportional representation in the Senate. It was really just the voting power of the small states have prevented it. We could look at the Electoral college. There are lots of things that I think they might be surprised are still with us. Let's talk about the Senate. Then the founders didn't like it. And and yet we we cling to it as something that's uh what key to supposedly a key to compromise but in fact has worked more often like a roadblock. That's right. And some of the features the Senate that make it. Such a roadblock weren't in the Constitution at all. Notably the filibuster, which has gotten so much attention in recent months. But yes, most of the big name founders left the convention. Deeply bitterly disappointed that the Senate included equal state representation rather than proportional representation. The Senate looks almost nothing like Madison wanted it to going in. And what about the Electoral college? The Electoral College was makeshift creation that it was really motivated by two framers who we know less about, but we're very important in the convention. Governor Morris and James Wilson, both of whom wanted direct popular election of the president. They were the two leading advocates of that, but essentially they couldn't give the other delegates to go along. So the Electoral College was devised as a second best option for for both of them, And frankly, we forget this. One of the main reasons they couldn't get the other delegates to go along was Slavery. The Southern delegates wanted some boost in their power and choosing the president on account of the people who made enslaved and a direct popular election wouldn't have done that, because, of course, the enslaved people wouldn't have been able to vote so electoral college grants each state a number of electoral votes equal to its members of the House and Senate. And of course, the members of the number of members of the house in the southern states were augmented by the three fiscal laws so that carried into the electoral college too. So it's really one of the reasons we have this electoral college that we spend so much time fighting over is that it was a legacy of slavery. Yeah, and so when we talk about institutional racism, there's there's an example staring us in the face. There are many from from the constitutional Convention and throughout the founding, But yes, there's wonderful. Well, what is the What are the others? I don't want to miss any here. Well, I mean, look, the there's been arguments throughout American history about whether to what extent was the Constitution, Pro slavery document, And to what extent was an anti slavery document and you know, abolitionists themselves fought over it. William Lloyd Garrison said that it was a pro slavery document. It was a covenant with death an agreement with hell At first, Frederick Douglass agreed with him. He came to both end up believing that it was an anti slavery document. So clearly it was one that could be read multiple ways. But it's hard to deny that there were huge protections for slavery. The slave trade. The fugitive slave clause are all kinds of protections for that in the Constitution, but really the 3/5 clause that augmented the political power of the South. In both the House of Representatives and in the Electoral college up until the civil War really gave the South the dominant voice in the national councils in a way that ended up being, you know, terrible. Yeah. Well, it's quite interesting, and like I said it was. It was also very surprising to read it and the conservative newsletter because generally, conservatives just do not want to hear criticism of the founding fathers. I certainly don't want to hear that they were disillusioned with the Constitution, which is Considered this sacred thing. One thing I didn't ask you about was the was the second Amendment. They didn't have a problem with people open, carrying at the political rallies and stuff like that. That was just done As a matter Of course, yes, but again, they're They're flintlock muskets that taking a minute and a half alone, right? I mean, it's a very different thing than carrying, uh, you know, semi automatic handgun in your back pocket. So Washington was not expecting people the ordinary citizens to have something automatic. Gonza surprisingly, no. Dennis Rasmussen teaches at Syracuse University. Dennis has been great to talk with you. Thank you. Thanks for having 7 23, and it's time for Cairo radio, real time traffic. It's brought to you by the Washington State Department of Health and for Chris Here's Harmon Shea. Waiting for our UN congested freeways to congest this morning, and it just isn't happening. Very few people are commuting. We don't have the.

Dennis Rasmussen George Washington William Lloyd Garrison Dennis James Wilson Thomas Jefferson House of Representatives Michael John Adams Adams Friday Alexander Hamilton 152 points Frederick Douglass Jefferson Washington State Department of 116.81% Senate 19th century tomorrow
"governor morris" Discussed on The Editors

The Editors

09:48 min | 1 year ago

"governor morris" Discussed on The Editors

"They want taxation to support the troops. Who are after all protecting the colonists on their borders Especially from depredations by the native tribes of the northwest but americans balked at this because they had been running their own shows in america for a very long time. Most of the time the british north american colonies had been founded as any kind of intelligent effort on the part of the british government. Basically the british government used its north american colonies as a place to dump all of the unwanted of british society and it was ugo off. And let's not hear from you ever again. Thank you so. The colonists created their own ad hoc assemblies which were technically speaking illegal but they created their own ad hoc assemblies. The did their own job taxing and they had been running their show for an awfully long time and now for the british suddenly step in and say well. It's all going to be done differently. We're going to take charge running things that's stuck in colonial kraaz and it comes first to political pamphleteering. Then it comes to confrontations over tax agents agents representing stamp tax agents representing various other kinds of taxes who get charred and feathered. Get intimidated. Who get mobbed. Then it extends by the seventeen seventies to These crowd actions in the streets and in the case of The the boston tea party crowd actions on board english owned ships. And then finally it comes to shooting when british troops confront colonial militia. Who are protecting the sources of their arms and supplies and by seventeen seventy five. We have now come to an open. Breach in which colonial militia and british soldiers are in fact in a state of defacto war with each other. So random question. What what happened to you when you retardant centered. Nothing nothing good. Your clothes were ripped off you. Liquid tar was poured over you charge had been liquefied and then atar Yeah you'd not hard on hot enough to skull but not enough for it to be liquid and then of buckets or barrels of feathers within dumped on you which of course stuck to the tar and not only were you almost literally naked in front of the people who were doing But then you had the tar all over you. Disfiguring you You had to get that off at some point and the feathers off it was a spectacularly miserable business. So rick bowl ended up being scarred. Some people were killed. You know our was. They did other stuff. You could be rolled in dot dish. This was not us. So rick who are the most compelling voices in favor of independence and what were their must compelling arguments. Well you. have you have radicals. Sam adams has been beating the drums in boston for a decade There was There was a riot indirectly instigated by his polemics in seventeen. Sixty five they. They stormed the house of the governor of the province of massachusetts who was a native thomas hutchinson. His family had done there since the sixteenth thirties. But he worked in the imperial system and so all the grievances attached to him and a mob of bostonians. One night invaded his house to chase him and his family out of it Broke up all the furniture stole all the cash tore the wainscoting off the walls and toppled cupola from the roof. It was complete trashing of his house. So this this kind of stuff. was was either happening or laden in boston for a long time in virginia you had local Planters local grandees. They're they're they're sort of the equivalence of the gentry. We read about in jane austen. Except they're you know they're off on the edges of the world and they have their own plantations and their own bond men bond women i e slaves and they have a very high opinion of themselves and they. They're a more proper can be easily a ruffled by by what they consider You know cook commands that That they don't like that cut to t- so so these are two local sources also. South carolina has particularly charleston. It's like a northern caribbean colony. Very wealthy again very self important and so so these are some of the engines of what's going on. I think we should. We should note that not everybody in in the future. United states is is for this revolutionary movement. The the famous quote from john. Adams's is that a third were four at a third ler against it in the third were in different now he. He obviously hadn't taken a poll. He was just guessing and and those percentages they shift depending on what colony what county. You're in what ethnic group. What political ropes. you're looking at. They also shift over time as a as the revolution goes on The british Not the regular troops so much but the british auxiliaries behave very badly and this turns A lot of the indifferent into patriots. But we should we should. We shouldn't forget that there were There were american loyalists. I'll just give you one case. My favorite guy governor morris from very prominent new york family. He has one half brother who signs the declaration of independence and another half brother. Who's a general in the british army. His mother is a loyalist through the whole war. All his sisters are loyalists If when he visits his mother during to get passes from both sides to go see her. So these these divisions sometimes divided single families so rick. How do we think about you described in detail. Some some of these mob actions. How do we think about that as conservatives and the legitimacy or how justifiable it was because in the contemporary debate you know this has been going on for forty or fifty years whenever we complain about some unrest writing somewhere people say well look you know. The the the the the early americans During the revolutionary war did it too. So what's wrong with it. Well it gets back to to ellen was talking about representation. americans do vote and So they have some say however attenuated in the policies of the united states or of their their states of their communities. The colonists had you know some input into their own affairs but they had no input into parliament. Now you know there were counterarguments. Samuel johnson wrote a pamphlet taxation the no erupt if you know trying to confuse this argument and he was saying that he made the point that a lot of people in england were not represented in parliament. Either it's like like two wrongs make a right and it's also true that the colonies had had agents in england who represented their interest. Lobbyists basically ben benjamin franklin who spent The years of the run up to the war living in london and considered moving there permanently and one of the things he was doing was acting as an agent for a handful of american colonies. So he you know he knew he was in like flynn and he wouldn't. He would present their gripes complaints to the relevant authorities. But the problem. You know the problem. There is that So what if the authorities weren't inclined to listen and then too bad and and you really had no recourse You couldn't form coalition and parliament. You know to To help yourself out because you weren't in there yourself and and and again they're always were englishman in parliament who were sympathetic to us. unlike edmond burke Charles fox Wilkes but they were in a minority so they never they were never able to affect government policy so so you could say of the riots and the rioters. Well you know. Yeah people that people shouldn't Do mob actions They shouldn't they hurt A bystanders or or even you know culpable officials harm them or destroy their property but on the other hand what other recourse was there. There was no representation..

british government rick bowl thomas hutchinson boston tea party northern caribbean United states boston Sam adams rick governor morris jane austen massachusetts charleston South carolina virginia british army Adams patriots ben benjamin franklin parliament
"governor morris" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"governor morris" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Whose new book, Just Out the Adversaries, a story of Boston and Bunker Hill. I know that there are a number of you out there who are students of all things America. From our founding to our civil war. Our victories and contributions to the world Wars are most recent incursions are most recent battles are most recent forever wars in Vietnam and in Iraq and Afghanistan, and you love the history. Well, this is a fellow who you can hear by the passion in his voice. Loves the history, and it's the newest addition to our understanding our attempts to wrestle with who were these men and not just Hancock and atoms and atoms, but also Dr Joseph Warren, and I got to ask you net. This is a name that doesn't get bandied about much. He's one of those lost to history. What was that moment where you said Wait a second. Here's an unsung hero whose story needs to be told. You know, I wrote a book with my dad and brother back in 2000 and two. It's called Heroes of Marcus. And it really was my dad's inspiration because he was in the House of Representatives at the time and that all these Statues of great Americans in the U. S Capitol in the rotunda and spread throughout the capital, said How great would it be It actually buy the books about some of these stories? So we started from that point, then start exploring whose stories we want to tell them. One of the chapters was actually on Dr Joseph Warren. So I would argue Michael the last 19 years. It's been something that has always fascinated me. And it finally got to the point beginning of 2020. I said, You know, I'm not getting any younger. I should probably write this story that I've been thinking about. With Dr Joseph Warren. And then again, all of those those events that took place in those blast nine or 10 months because it was truly a fascinating period when there are a lot of things that I think it was 20 that said, You know, truth is stranger than fiction. That some of these things are happening. No way This happens, but it did. And just all the research I did. Michael was really interesting to me the dynamics of things that were taking place in Boston at the time. This is a relatively small town. I mean, it's about 16,000 people. It's about the size of Central Park. At the time, and I told my wife. I think one of the most interesting things to me and really digging into those last nine or 10 months is that they didn't start shooting each other sooner because it was it was headed is accelerating rapidly towards violence because the British refused to compromise. And the American colonists. Their fellow Englishman refused to compromise as well, and everybody knew what everybody else was doing. They have spies in their midst. The British had paid spies Joseph Warren had high police spies in British command. Mean, this is it was just a fascinating point. But the one point I want to make building off a little bit of one of the last ones I made is this I think now in the 21st century, one of the lessons that we need to go back and learn and have a conversation with him, really explorers. What do we believe about rights? Where do they come from? Right. Do they come from government or they come from a transcendent creator? And what our rights about? And James Madison has called the father of the American Constitution. I wrote about this a little bit in my first book, restoring our Republic, but he wrote it really interesting piece in 17 92 about property. In which he said we have a right to property. And we also there is a a property in right. And understanding that we have to. We have the right to have the physical things right. The houses the land all of that, But we also have to understand that our rights or property, all right to conscience are right to speech. All of these things. This is what the founders believe in actually incorporated into our founding documents and then constructed the machinery of the republic. To basically make sure Powell was so diffused that it would not take any of these rights away. And so this is this is where these are. These men are coming from where Joseph Warren and same Adams and Hancock and would be are coming from this is what they believed transcendent rights given to them by a transcendent creator. How do we actually, you know, defy this authoritarianism that is trying to take these rights. What is principal defiance look like And then when they actually eventually get their freedom, you know, how do we actually construct a government that will not be authoritarian that will actually defend, promote and protect the rights of the American people. So I think that's the conversation. We need to start having amongst ourselves as an American people. In the 21st century. That you're steeping yourself in the historical documents and figures of American history, our founding our early days as I have. I think Governor Morris Who wrote much of the Constitution. Is this Dr Joseph Warren? Yep. But But so few people know who he is and what he's done. But my question for you come Yes. No, no, he Yeah, I agree. But my question for you is you're spending a lot of your intellectual capital and a lot of your precious time. Writing these books, and maybe it's cathartic because you're already going to be reading about it and enjoying it. And this is your opportunity to share it with others. I don't think you're making any money off of it. But your day job is helping good candidates get elected, uh, as part of American majority. Is it important? Do you see a link there, or is this purely a hobby? Is this how we went back? America's hearts and minds is is to go back to who we are and what we stood for. And get out of this nonsense silliness of arguing with Alexandria, Ocasio Cortez. I think the thing that links this for me a couple things first of all. We haven't. We haven't been taught these things in the public school system for decades, and that's intentional right because I think if people were taught through American history and how the machinery of the republic was constructed They might actually wake up one day and start looking around going. Hey, wait a minute. None of this actually makes sense. It's not at all what the founders of the Republic intended. And that's that's intentional because progressivism is the antithesis of what the founders intended for this country. You know, I write these books. First of all restoring republic was nonfiction. It's all about the construction of the Republican where the ideas came from. The adversaries. I call it faction 90% of it is historical and I color the edges. But it's all about how do you What do you believe one of the ideas, the principles that you feel strongly about. And then what does action built off of those look like and that's kind of I think what I want to do. Michael and a variety of things right, obviously inspired people that it's one thing to read idea, but it's another thing to put that idea into action. And it has to be meaningful, purposeful action, and that's the one thing that's frustrated. Frustrated me about the conservative movement for years. And that's really the genesis for American majority. We have great ideas, but sometimes we become so enraptured with them that we forget that ideas that are not implemented are really just good conversations. And I think the thing that you see, especially in the lives of Warren and Adams They believe something and we're willing to go into action to make those ideas a reality. And so, you know, I'm looking at I'm in Loudon County, Virginia, is one of the epicenters for this whole fight over critical race theory. In which the parents are rising up and saying enough enough, and I'm so happy to see that because they're realizing if we keep on sitting back and doing nothing, we're going to end up with even more generations. Not hold right there, because that's my next segment. Stay right there. Ned Ryan's our guest coming up. This is how What's the name to say? Michael Gary. I want to introduce you. The Thundercats Technology. Thunder. Cat Technology is a premier provider of solutions not only for government organizations but educational institutions and commercial enterprises as a leader in cybersecurity infrastructure, unified communications and cloud technology, verticals Thundercats, not just a reseller. They are trusted Advisors for businesses and their clients. Find out more thunder cat tech dot com. Thundercats tech dot com. Your favorite things feel made for you. Your education should too. University of Maryland Global Campus, formerly.

Warren James Madison Michael Gary Michael 21st century 2000 Just Out the Adversaries Iraq House of Representatives 17 92 Joseph Warren 10 months Thundercats Vietnam U. S Capitol Ned Ryan Thundercats Technology first book Hancock Ocasio Cortez
"governor morris" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

08:29 min | 1 year ago

"governor morris" Discussed on KGO 810

"Network and some of its people by the makers of Smartmatic election machines. So we're going to talk with David about whether their response is a good one. You know, because they've asked for this case to be thrown out to be dismissed. But we're talking about the impeachment. And, of course, the first day of the impeachment proceeding today was supposed to be the arguments about constitutionality. You know that the senators took a vote Not so long ago. What a week two weeks ago about whether they thought this impeachment the the impeachment trial of a person no longer holding office was constitutional, and the vote came back. About 55 45. I think it was so that there were Republicans who voted. Yes, it was constitutional. But there were a lot of Republicans. The majority of Republicans voted that no, it was not. And, uh And so there were a lot of people who said Well, that's going to mean that there's no way they're going to vote to convict. Well. Many of those Republican senators had said, Look, I don't know. I would like us to have a debate on this issue of constitutionality because I just don't know. And so it was determined by as they were setting up. You know the rules for the impeachment that the first day today they would spend four hours debating the constitutional issues. And so that's what they're supposed to be talking about. Although toe listen to the Trump team They don't really get around to the constitutional issues. Maybe they will. They're still arguing right now, but the first one I really didn't get to the constitutionality of this, he said. Democrats have to be careful because the pendulum swings and in the future Thea other party could decide to impeach Eric Holder. I mean, there were so many things that just did not make any sense. Okay, Here's the thing we're talking about, impeaching and trying a former president, But in this case, it's important to keep in mind that Trump was impeached while he was still president. He could have been impeached after he left office. But he wasn't he was impeached while he still held office and the Constitution says that the Senate has the power to try all impeachments. So when the House sends an impeachment to the Senate, according to the Senate's own rules, they have to take up that impeachment and they have to have an impeachment trial and it has priority. In the Senate. When that happens, it's one of the reasons this is happening today. Um, let's talk about some of this. There were, uh They're Wasps, a piece that was written by a guy named Eli Merit. He's a visiting scholar at Vanderbilt. He's researching the history and psychology of demagogues. He's writing a book about the American Revolution. And today he wrote a piece in The New York Times. That quote some of our founders and what they discussed what they were debating off the presidency and the important of the impeachment power. And in the beginning of his article, he tells us that if the 55 delegates to the constitutional convention in 17 87 were sitting as jurors in the Senate impeachment trial, one thing seems certain, based on historical record. He said, acting with vigor and dispatch, they would cast to near unanimous votes, the first to convict the president of an impeachable offense and the second to disqualify him from holding future federal office. I mean, he went into explaining how that was, he said that they believe the founders believed as a matter of civic principle. That ethical leadership is the glue that holds a constitutional republic together. It was a principal they lived by. It was one that they infused into every aspect of the constitution when they were debating at the constitutional convention, James Madison wrote in one of the Federalist Papers, which was invoked by Trump's first lawyer, But he didn't really get into what he was talking about. But James Madison in federalist, 57 said quote the aim of every political constitution is there ought to be first to obtain for rulers, men who possess most wisdom to discern and most virtue to pursue the common good. Of the society Ben Franklin. He highlighted the need to invest the government with wise and good men. James Wilson wanted men of intelligence and uprightness. Governor Morris saw the best, the most able, the most virtuous citizens. Madison spoke of impartial umpires and guardians of justice and general Good. They also left behind unequivocal statements describing the kind of public personalities The Constitutional Republic must exclude from office. Those kept out of office included corrupt an unworthy men designing men. And demagogues. Alexander Hamilton, who everybody quotes today because of the Lin Manuel is marvelous musical Hamilton fought really hard to end out our new government with checks and balances to preclude what he referred to as men of little power. Those who love power and demagogues. George Mason devoted himself to devising the most effectual means of checking and counter acting, the aspiring views of dangerous and ambitious men and Franklin urged the other delegates to add protections in the Constitution. To prevent quote the bold and the violent the men of strong passions and indefatigable activity in their selfish pursuits from ascending to the presidential chair, referring to the president, it was Madison who warned about the unique risk of incapacity, negligence or perfidy of the chief magistrate. So he went on to argue that in the case of the Executive Magistracy, which was to be administered by a single man, the president of the United States, loss of capacity or corruption was more within the compass of probable events, and either of them might be fatal to the republic. They were concerned with the public good with the national peace and harmony with the internal tranquility of the states and the safety, liberty and happiness of the community. They intended for our president, the commander in chief to pacify civil hatred. Resentment insurrection not to incite them In order to hold on to power. They wrote the language of the impeachment powers with a demagogue like Donald Trump in mind. They understood that demagogues are the singular poison that infects and kills Republics and democracies. It was federalist one, where Hamilton warned that these free forms of government typically die in the hands of ambitious, unscrupulous or Raiders, who rise to power on what he called Angry and malignant passions. Avaricious personal animosity. Party opposition. And the bitterness of their invectives. Hamilton said. These dangerous politicians and again I quote have begun their career by paying an obsequious court to the people commencing demagogues. And ending Tyrants. Mason was a big advocate of the Constitution's impeachment powers. On the seventh day when they were debating this, he declared that some mode of displacing an unfit magistrate must be incorporated into the national Charter for two crucial reasons. One was the fallibility of electors are voters. That is they might air and they might elect a demagogue and the other the corrupt ability of the man who was chosen. In another speech, he said of the indispensable instrument of impeachment. He said. This no point is of more importance. Shall any man. Be above justice. You know, sometimes you gotta wonder what happened to us. What happened to us?.

president Senate Donald Trump Alexander Hamilton James Madison Ben Franklin George Mason Smartmatic David Eric Holder Governor Morris Eli Merit The New York Times James Wilson visiting scholar Federalist Papers United States principal Raiders
"governor morris" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

07:16 min | 1 year ago

"governor morris" Discussed on WJR 760

"7 60 wjr. You will not be hearing extended lectures for me because our case is based on cold, hard fax. It's all about the fax. President Trump has sent his lawyer's here today to try to stop the Senate from hearing the fax. Well, we think you should hear the facts and the other side as well. And we heard from the House impeachment managers. They went on for about two hours or so we'll get some clips from them. On D even if you think this is a pointless exercise, even if you think that this is an anticlimactic, foregone conclusion, political partisan exercise to further discredit Donald Trump. There was still in very interesting legal question here, which is whether or not the Senate could take this up it all askew heard there from Jamie Raskin, who's leading the House impeachment team. They very much believed that the Senate has the jurisdiction to do this. Others not so sure. And they seem to be evenly divided. A lot of constitutional scholars, some from the right lining up, saying Yes, the Senate has jurisdiction. Others saying Not so much we turn to Paul Larkin Junior who is with the Meat Center for legal and judicial Studies at the Heritage Foundation. Hui Lie a rely on a lot for clear eyed conservative thought. And Paul Arcand joins us live this afternoon with a viewpoint that he shared in a thought provoking article in the Detroit News today. Mr Larkin is good to have you with us. The pleasure is all mine. I just hope I can help you out. Well, I I I I think that you can, if only providing another weight on this scale here. Um, when? When you look at what? What We're seeing play out here. You acknowledged in your your article that there are some good arguments out there, suggesting why late impeachment Impeaching a former official is a good idea, but you cite a major problem with that. Explain. The Constitution actually addresses this issue for a bunch of reasons. One is that Parliament used to use its legislative process not only to remove people from office, but the convict them of crimes. And impose punishments, and the framers wanted to make sure that that was not what our impeachment process would do. So they did that in several ways. They went out of their way to prohibit what are called bills of attainder, which is essentially a statute that says John or Jane Doe is guilty and off with his or her head. But they also regulated have the improved how the impeachment process works. Article One defines who can be involved in impeachment. It's the House of Representatives to impeach and the Senate to remove, but article to which most people overlook. Find who can be impeached, and it's quite clearly limited to the president, the vice president or officers of the United States. It does not include private parties. And that's because the whole purpose of impeachment was to remove someone from government so that that person could no longer abuse the authorities that he or she had while in office. If the Congress said, decided to impeach and removed Donald Trump before noon on January 20th. It could have done that that would have been lawful, but he is no longer President Trump. He's now like Cincinnatus Private Citizen Trump. He is no longer an officer of the United States or president and never was vice president. And as the result, he can't be removed and it only if someone is in office from that person be removed from office. And doesn't become in a leader and a legal bill of attainder if you do charge or try to impeach a private citizen, does that cross the line of the bill of Attainder Clause? Well, that is a difficult argument to make. And the reason is this historically bills of attainder were limited criminal punishments and common law when the term originated. The punishment for any felony was death. So what essentially was was happening was Parliament would pass a bill of attainder that said, You committed a certain crime, usually treason and therefore off with your head. Well. The Supreme Court has, in some cases expanded the notion of like bill of attainder to reach civil penalties. But it's not clear that This would be a bill of attainder because he's no longer in office and even if they voted to say he can't hold office again. That's probably not a bill of attainder cause Congress could have imposed that punishment if They had done so when he was still president, Okay? They cite a number of times during the deliberations over impeachment during the constitutional convention that Alexander Governor Morris made George Mason and others eluded to That British practice that you pointed out where you can impeach a former official. Um, they cite that they embrace that that by including that into the discussion that they meant for that to happen. And that they do not prescribe it to be something that they rejected. So without rejecting it. Do we accept it? No. And here's the difference between the English practice and the American practice, and it's critical one. England does not have a written constitution We do Hey, uh, what you have, that is a law making power in parliament is the ability through majority rule to set laws for the governance of the country? They are not bound by what a written constitution says because there is and never has been a written constitution in the United States. We have had a written constitution from Day one and 18 03, in a case called Marbury versus Madison, the Supreme Court said. What is in the written Constitution controls anything and everything that Congress for anyone else in the federal government can do so. While it may be that people like Hamilton and others envisions that they could impeach people who are no longer in office. That's not what the Constitution says. And what the Constitution says is what matters on Lee. One of three categories of people can be from, you know, impeached and removed from office, the president, the vice president or an officer of the United States, which is someone appointed by the president or somebody else. Well, according to the 20th amendment, Donald Trump ceased being president of the United States on January 20th. And so by definition, he cannot be removed from office. I'm gonna lose you here, but I wanted to ask you a very quick question, Mr Larkin, and that is where we're asking senators to be jurors right? But they just saw very inflammatory video that was aimed at their emotions and their personal experiences. That is jurors..

President Trump president Senate Constitution vice president United States Parliament Congress Mr Larkin officer Supreme Court official Paul Arcand Paul Larkin House of Representatives Jamie Raskin Detroit News Hui Heritage Foundation
"governor morris" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

06:06 min | 1 year ago

"governor morris" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Comes to talk. Let's take a few calls. Shall we? 105.9 FM Thank God for talk radio. I don't know where we'd be without it. W M A L tomorrow on the Chris Plante show, a senior Iranian cleric says those who are vaccinated with the woman vaccine become homosexuals. Not AM on W N A. L Let's take a few calls. What do you think, folks? Let's go to David Macon, Georgia on the Mark Levin apt. Law, Professor David How are you, sir? I'm fine. Thanks, Mark. Thanks for taking my call. I really enjoy your analysis of the Constitution. I want to circle back in the words our press secretary to the beginning of your show when you were talking about the Um, uh, Mr Cooper's often and you said that he really didn't have anything there. And you pointed out that there was nothing in the papers, the records of the Constitution and that Madison's notes on there that would support that, But I wanted to embellish it by pointing out that actually, there is a lot in there that would really clarify what was going on. On it. What's going on tomorrow should be to say that it's unconstitutional. They take this up only on July 30 July 19th and 20th of 17 87 during that constitutional convention they had brought just briefly mentioned it a couple times before them, but they got into a real Discussion of it in the context of other things as well. But those two days were The Big day's on impeachment, and it started off with Mr Governor Morris, who was quite the Virginia Plantation guy, but he was wealthy, I guess, but he was the biggest Opponent of slavery of anybody in the constitutional convention. But anyway, he said, he started it off, and he spoke all those two days. He spoke more than anybody else in that first anybody. He spoke at the beginning at length and then shut up. But the he said the executive being impeachable would be a dangerous part of the plan. I'm reading from Madison's No. It will hold him in such dependence that he will be no check. On the Legislature will not be a firm guardian of the people in the public interest. He will be the tool of a faction of some leading demagogue in the Legislature so he might just as well been predicting. People like Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer. Then the so two days go by, or, you know all the argument goes on and then at the very end to go back and forth is a lot of people make a lot of interesting arguments and then He's his elder statesman kind of guy, and he kind of he comes into the end. He's the last person to speak before the boat, and he changes his mind. And he says I wasn't asked to say about this, he says. Ah. Mr Morris's opinion has been changed by the arguments used in the discussion. Use now sensible of the necessity of impeachments. Yes, the executive was to continue for any time in office. And then he goes on to say that more says that, uh, he does not stop right there. If Either word again. Yes, yes, says Yes. The executive was to continue for any time in office. If the executive was to continue any time in office, go right ahead. Is not going to continue for any time in office. Mr. Governor, Morris wasn't interested in having impeachment. But he was conceding, he said. Okay, well given impeachment, but it's only to continue for any time in office. And then he also said That, uh, it should be limited by AH, list. You should be impeachable for treachery, corrupting his electors in an incapacity. And then he said, even then, he should be punished not as a man but as an officer and punished on Lee by degradation from his office. He goes on to say the magistrate is not the king that the prime minister, the people are the king. When we make him amenable to justice, however, we should take care to provide some mode that will not make him dependent on the Legislature. And that was it. That was the discussion. They at that point Um, voted and and they agreed to the impeachment as suggested by Governor Morris. The last word on the subject on it was 8 to 2. Let me ask you a question, Professor. Anything in there at all that supports the Cooper McCarthy notion that Well, of course, it's self executing and You're out of office. I think there's not a damn syllable is there Not that I can sell. I mean, it's e think you're you used the word Pretzel described his argument and I have to say, I mean, Mr Cooper is usually very good, hilarious. He's got a lot going on upstairs. He's a smart guy, but I think he just got a little too smart on this situation. And I just I'm not sure what's driving in there. But no, I am. He hates Trump He used to represent Bolton. I'm clear what's driving all these guys. McCarthy had a book on impeachment on Obama's, so he's trying to be consistent. I'm trying to be accurate. And I'm glad you called. I remember those those those those sections, But you brought him tea before I really is very, very important. I hope the impeachment lawyers, the president's we're listening. And you're right. It is. It is a counter intuitive argument, and it is an argument that runs counter to what Mars was saying. There's not a single frame of that embraced any of what's being discussed today. Not one. You just gotta read like three pages. You know, in the in the books here, we're going to the Yale Avalon Project that exact transcript. You know, I even cited that and liberty and tyranny. I said that Yell Avalon Project is It's great, isn't it? Oh, it's terrific. The original documents and so forth. Yeah, yeah, you mentioned Yeah. Trump Trump. Good knew about the pipeline thing, of course, because if you read the time magazine Uh, discussion of the shadow campaign is clear that the F L c. I O was heavily involved in that it let it there, guy. Let it.

Mr Governor Morris executive Mr Cooper Legislature Madison McCarthy Mark Levin Trump Trump Chris Plante David Macon Professor David Yale Avalon Project Georgia Nancy Pelosi press secretary Chuck Schumer Um prime minister Bolton
"governor morris" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

07:45 min | 2 years ago

"governor morris" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Know what they are. They're one of the four best teams in the league, but not one of the top two. It was just a hard team for me to get a read on because I would say mostly just the incredible transformation. Josh Allen, who reminds me of Think of a guy who was just kind of okay his first year that he played a starter and then just became spectacular the second year. Anybody come to mind? As a quarterback. Really easy question. Well, even more recent Rogers The first year. Very Rogers was not a good year. No, no, I'm in his first year he played They struggled. Pour your own. A lot of the guys were gone and it wasn't really his fault. In the second year. You could tell that this guy was going to be in the Hall of Fame and The same thing is gonna happen. Even very few quarterbacks. A spectacular is rookies and the ones that are they just have surrounded by a great supporting cast a Carson Wentz, one of the few quarterbacks who seems to get worse every year. If Jordan love is the Packer, quarterback of the future, I suspect he'll struggle in his first year I cut a lot of slack to Mitchell. True. Boesky, who has it who had terrible first year who's improved? Not much. Has some good games in some terrible games. It's very, very hard to be really good at the quarterback in your first year, and sometimes you talked a lot in horse racing. The biggest improvement that a horse makes is from his first race to a second. Lot of horses show dramatic improvement over their career debuts. In fact, we just bought a horse that had a terrible career debut, and we were hoping it would just aberrational that he'll be better. Um After that. What does this have to do with anything? Nothing. Eventually I'm gonna get two very important news that comes out of the state Legislature today. We're both the state Senate and Assembly acted on covert 19 issues. And it could be a little confusing. I don't people mix up the two chambers and so on. I will use all of my skills as the greatest talk show host. The greatest talk show hosted. How would you? How would you help Firewood you go geographically. Greatest talk show host in fill in the blank. Country Now, I will not say I'm the greatest talk show host of the country that's way too far. Wisconsin. You're willing to say that I'm the greatest talk show host in Wisconsin. Well, Who else Who else is there? J. Dan Vicky. The mayor of all Creek Way. Wagner's that Wagner's still around, isn't he? By the way, you won't believe this. I just bought another racehorse today. This has to stop. What if I told you his name? You just gotta bust a gut. You've had some personal tragedy in your life You want to have you want to bust a gut with lap laughing over something? Is that Wagner a way, way, way way. What's the most humiliating name for a horse that I could, possibly by? Oh, or by there actually is a horse named riding with Biden that these just say that that's not we don't know that he's He's a new horse in the name of after Biden. No. I from Charlie, You're getting there worse. But leave my blood horse named Homer. What He's already named. That's that his whole name? Thankfully, it's we buy these horses they're already named. You can't change their name. Although there is Is an unbelievable story you every now and then, because it's somebody determines the name was offensive will make you change it after the fact. But you don't do that otherwise. The horse's name is Homer screen. I have no idea what that even beads he ran in Brazil. Ivan Homer screen. What does that mean? I mean home screen my homer screen. I like I said the horse was, as I said, we bought him. He's raised the number of times overseas. And that's is that just once I wish we could buy a horse with a decent enough name. Spent forever explaining Governor Morris's name. I have this horse now named J. Beresford, Tipton. That's when the are our guy buried name. That's another one that I have to explain that forever and ever and ever. I don't know how to explain this because I don't know what the hell it needs. Anyway. I will get in the next segment to the action that was taken. In the state legislature. Heard an interview. Some years ago. You know all these especially late in his life. There were all these Wisconsin documentaries unless Paul The guitar God from Walker Shaw, who grew up in Walker's shot. Never really much came back that a couple of performances, but he's walking Shawn's claim to fame. There aren't many people who think that Les Paul was the greatest guitarist of all time. But many people believe That he was the greatest Hard to describe this. He was the biggest innovator in terms of how to use the instrument. Les Paul himself kind of did sort of country tinged kind of guitar Ng and so on almost in the Chet Atkins category, But he was somebody that could play with a classical musician like Segovia, but also had incredible admiration for the Jimi Hendrix is an Eric Clapton's and so on. Of the world and they all revered him. And in this interview I heard Les Paul say. I don't know why I am obsessed with sound. I've spent all my life chasing sound. Trying to I hear a sound in my head and try to figure out a way that I can create. The technique of picking the guitar string and the combinations of chords that I'm on to create that sound. And if nobody's made that sound come off a guitar yet I was obsessed with finding it. People ask me all the table. How did you get? How'd you get into this? That? I don't know. Sick of people asking. Why do you like horse racing? I don't don't Yes, Paul said he didn't know why. That's what he was into. But that's what he got into it. I think most people who follow rock and roll think that the great innovation of rock and roll was this All of the sounds that have been used. With the guitar. I still remember when. In fact, I was the editor discussion last night about Jimi Hendrix, The Star Spangled Banner that he performed at Woodstock, which for a lot of people who are kids in that era, including me the first time we heard that It was a life altering experience. And for some people, while that's disrespectful, the play that Star Spangled Banner that way you didn't do anything disrespectful with it. It was just creating a different sound while performing it. It wasn't like he was putting the fist up in the air or anything else disrespectful. They're doing the he wasn't taking a knee while he was playing it. He was playing the anthem, and it was clearly the same melody and so on. But creating sounds off that guitar that at that time member that was 69 78. 69 we had never heard before. He understood that distorting the sound. Was the key to the instrument ad. People have been playing guitars by distorting the sound ever since it making all sorts of sounds that ever came from and to think that you had a visionary. Years before Jimi Hendrix like Les Paul, who thought that just the idea's taken an acoustic guitar and.

Les Paul Jimi Hendrix Wisconsin Wagner Legislature Creek Way Rogers Josh Allen Hall of Fame Biden Ivan Homer Carson Wentz Governor Morris Boesky Senate J. Dan Vicky editor Brazil Walker Shaw Tipton
"governor morris" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"governor morris" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Paul's mentioning this this movie. The Devil wears Prada that it was out right around the time The story is going on, and we bought a horse. Who was sired by al Prato, who is a very well known stallion. Product was the son of Sadler's Wells. And the mayor. Was the daughter of horse from the nineties of the zeroes named Devil is due. So the horse it was Al Prato was the stallion and The damn sire. In other words, the grandfather on the mother's side was devil. His due and head came up with this name for the horse. Devil wears Prada. Oh, I just saw that is the greatest they've ever because that movie Devil wears Prada was coming out and they're in both the mother and the fight. I just thought it was the greatest name. Horse. As I recall, the horse turned out to be a nothing and did Zero. It's as I say that maybe that's what I'm gonna do on Lee boring stories all day. Did you think that story was interesting? What Course, Davis for three hours. A lot of the horses that we buy have already runs. You can change the name. I mean. And there have been some that are just stupid. If I just get one that isn't a terrible if we already bought the horse. I'm happy if it's just above the level of terrible like Governor Morris, our three year old from last year, who is now retired. That was the horse we had in the Derby trail. Didn't quite get there, but had a very good two year old campaign was a real good horse, but a perfect name for this particular year Because Governor Morris was the guy that drafted the preamble of the Constitution. Most people don't know that. But he Wasit and see his Cyrus Constitution in one of our partners had come up with this name so that when you had to explain, but at least in explaining it, it's kind of Cool and rather clever. Should I get on with the program now, or should I just continue to prattle here?.

al Prato Governor Morris Sadler Paul Derby trail Lee Davis Wasit
Saved By the Bell TV reboot in the works for NBCU streaming platform

Colleen and Bradley

00:26 sec | 3 years ago

Saved By the Bell TV reboot in the works for NBCU streaming platform

"Well you're ready to get saved by the bell again yeah doing doing after lots of Hemming and hawing a revival is finally happening as part of NBC universal's new streaming service peacock list with Berkeley and Mario Lopez will be back to star in a reboot did you say by the bell feature sack Morse's governor of California and when governor Morris gets in the hot water for closing too many low incomes high schools he proposes they sent affected students to the highest performing schools

Hemming NBC Berkeley Mario Lopez California Governor Morris Hawing Sack Morse