29 Burst results for "Gordon Brown"

Northern Ireland assembly meets after sixth night of unrest

Monocle 24: The Briefing

10:11 min | 2 months ago

Northern Ireland assembly meets after sixth night of unrest

"Edition of the briefing with me. Andrew mueller last night for the sixth consecutive night northern ireland witnessed scenes of the kind of violence likely to prompt considerable agitation in observers with long enough memories. More than fifty. Five police officers are known to have been injured in the last week and considerable damage done to buildings and vehicles. The worst of the most recent disturbances occurred around one of these so-called peace walls which separate nationalist and loyalist communities in west belfast. The northern ireland assembly has been recalled for an emergency session at stormont today on joined with more on this by lord. Peter hain former secretary of state for northern ireland lord as you would know better than most people the good agreement did not end sectarian tension in northern ireland. There has been sporadic tension and violence over the decades since but measured against that scale. How bad is what we're seeing. Now was nothing like as you indicate the level of bombing and assassination and horror at the said. He has also troubles brought to northern ireland. Whistle the terrorism but It is serious and it needs to be addressed not just by northern ireland's leaders who displaying frankly a lack of leadership which is really disturbing but also by trade minister boris johnson and state for northern ireland who've been pretty absent from the scene in northern ireland now full quite a while and especially over this. What's your read of what's behind this because there is always the trap of reading significance which might not exist into what might just be a bunch of board young men looking for trouble. No this is that there are elements of that and they're a variety of other factors but the main problem has arisen over frustration amongst the unionist community the protestant community over the fact that there are checks and controls in for businesses doing trade. With great britain with england scotland or wales across the irish sea northern ireland of course is on an island with the republic of ireland to the cells and also within the united kingdom and within the united kingdom the rest of the united kingdom there are no barriers to trade of any kind between scotland. And or between wales and england for that matter scotland wales but they're on house result of brexit across the irish sea between england scotland and wales to northern ireland for the first time and that is the reason because the type of brexit that boris johnson. The prime minister pursued which was to break any real alignment with the european trade and customs arrangements and to go for at entirely separate of great britain but in order to make sure that the good friday peace process and the stability which has brought since ninety nine hundred was maintained. The irish border had to be kept open. Let's say the border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland to itself as it has been now for decades and has become invisible with all sorts of human activity. Crossing it in their efforts not had the toxic role played a toxic role. Because it's been invisible it did in generations gone by and that's that's also the good if however that's it become the external frontier customs frontier of the european union. Then it could have ignited all those old problems that had beset and an bedeviled northern ireland. So instead what boris johnson agreed to was to keep the border open that men the northern ireland remained in the european union's customs union and it's trading markets but that's Inevitably because the united kingdom was leaving Great britain would be outside those arrangements so they have to be checks across the irish sea between northern ireland and great britain. of course. The prime minister denied this in his normal airy way At the beginning on the unionists and loyalists in particular who some of the most hardline involved feel betrayed. Because he didn't he wasn't straight with them way. Do you save in the causal connection between that dissatisfaction with the post brexit arrangements. And what we've seen in west belfast. Is it possible that there are people who are or were associated with loyalist paramilitarism. Who are leveraging that discontent to cause trouble. Yes there are and they're also criminals amongst them who drug. Traffic is and so on who've presented a police crackdown which has been quite effective in their communities to try and get rid of this drug trafficking problem and bought ignited. Not because of that so much though it's fit into it but also but primarily because suddenly loyalist protestant unionists suddenly found that Country what boris johnson told them. There are actually checks and controls strangling a lot of northern ireland businesses in a mountain of tape and naturally they see that as a break within the united kingdom because which puts northern ireland in a different place from say england scotland or wales and so they feel that their fundamental beliefs in the the union of the united kingdom northern ireland. Being within that is being threatened. And that is what ignites it. There was none of this until that issue suddenly arose around new year because the prime minister frankly say told a lot of porky's on us and didn't level with the unionist community and they suddenly found themselves in this predicament and had created Insecurity and understandable anxiety out of which these other factors criminality usa Vandalism and so on out of which that's fed you mentioned earlier a an absence of leadership both in northern ireland and in the united kingdom what would a constructive response from especially northern irish politicians. At this point look like presumably not like the one We saw her on twitter from arlene foster who went and it is a a term with which you will be familiar. Full water battery Suggesting that the violence will die quote. Take the focus off the real lawbreakers incheon. Fine that's probably not the most helpful into intercession. She could have made at this point. Is it well when you become first minister which is effective northern ireland as she is Although it's an unusual arrangement that she has joins us with the deputy minister. Michelle neil who's a shouldn't fain leader when you reach these positions you've got to speak for the whole of the community promises and president presidents naturally have their own party agendas to follow in their own party members to satisfy in any country in any democratic system. But you're trying to speak for the whole nation and that for the whole nation as well once you assume those positions and what has been disappointing about both of them and especially in recent days. Me aline fosters utterances. She's not adopted that role. She's effective acting as a party politician. A democratic unionist party rather than speaking for the whole of the the the the community across northern ireland and across the religious and political divides that have bedeviled for so many generations. And i think that's the kind of leadership we need. And we have gossips equally across the water London has been virtually silent on northern ireland. Now full rarely ever since David cameron and the conservatives came to power in two thousand ten under make this point on a on a party. Basis is a leave a politician and also it was labor secretary of state for northern ireland. A because it's traditionally been a nonpartisan issue between both the major parties. I make it. Because i'm genuinely an i've being hugely critical of the the absence of of number ten downing street of the prime minister in a way. That's attorney blend. Gordon brown were in vogue. John major's conservative prime minister before them. playing an honest broker role effectively. What they've done is said will not you know the the good friday process the peace settlement that i helped to negotiate in two thousand seven that brought the old enemies to share power together. That that's all done and dusted and therefore we can concentrate on the other pressures of government and that was fatal So we only seen a couple of sentences from the prime minister over the last few days when parts of belfast up in flames and a couple of tweets from the northern ireland secretary of state. Frankly that's not good enough. They should be convening all party. Talks in person to try and resolve these as labor shattered secretary. St louis hague has called for And they should be on the case all the time instead of effectively absence without leave as has been the case over northern ireland now sadly for a number of years lord haein. Thank you as always for joining us. You're listening to the briefing. Here is markle's ailing goffin. With the days of the headlines. Thanks andrew in the serum institute.

Ireland Boris Johnson United Kingdom Wales Scotland Irish Sea Andrew Mueller England Republic Of Ireland Belfast Northern Ireland Assembly Peter Hain European Union's Customs Union Stormont Britain United Kingdom Northern Arlene Foster Michelle Neil European Union Great Britain
Boris Johnson boots out top adviser Dominic Cummings

PRI's The World

04:37 min | 7 months ago

Boris Johnson boots out top adviser Dominic Cummings

"For his johnson's first year as british. Prime minister has been a rocky one. There's the pandemic johnson's own battle with covid. Nineteen never ending. Brexit talks and political u turns on everything from free school meals to a lockdown through it all johnson has had his chief advisor dominant cummings by aside last friday that partnership ended abruptly leaving many wondering. What's next for the prime minister and for brexit from london. The world's orla berry has more dominic cummings achieved what few advisors to any uk. Prime minister have done. He's become a household name in britain. Coming did so as the chief architect behind the vote leave campaign persuading voters to say yes to brexit in twenty sixteen. We can say the decision taken in one thousand nine hundred seventy five by this country to join. The common market has been reversed by this referendum. The british people have spoken. And the answer is we're out. The news was a stunning political developments. That cummings largely orchestrated when the conservatives won a majority in last december's election he got credit for that too for the campaign slogan that secured boris johnson. This landslide victory. Everybody my friends we didn't. We pulled it off in weight and monday and this majority we will at last be able to do what. Tension johnson awarded commes with the top job as chief advisor and the move upset. A lot of people because cummings is notoriously abrasive figure with a knack for robbing people up. The wrong way for those who oppose brags cummings is despised but in johnson's own conservative party. Coming plenty of enemies to is stone was abrasive and combative and involved attacking institutions in a way. That was very own conservative. That's david goldberg. A former justice secretary with the party speaking to the bbc his colleague. Mp charles walker says cummings cut off access to the prime minister. We feel we've lost in for the last year. We want him back. he belongs to. She doesn't belong to the advisers. He belongs to the parliamentary party. That elected him but despite the descent from his party colleagues. Boris johnson remained fiercely loyal to his toes. Assayed most memorably when cummings flouted national lockdown rules by driving to his parents home in another part of england and then taking a day trip to local castle what suffering with covert symptoms. Cummings was forced to give a press conference to try and explain his actions. My wife was very worry. Particularly given my is cited c. Which seemed to have been affected by the disease. We agreed that we should go for short. Drive to see if i could drive safely. Who drove for roughly half an hour. An ended up on the outskirts of bond castletown. His explanation did not go down well with the british public or many conservative. mp's but despite all the outrage the prime minister refused to sack. Cummings matthew flinders professor of politics at sheffield university. Says it's not just loyalty. Boris as a kind to me somebody who needs to be loved and actually bought. You had reposting dominant. Cummings was the most strangest sort of good cop. Bad cop political partnership basically domain. Cummings was there to ruffle feathers to be disruptive often that had to happen to shake things up. But boris was never gonna do that which makes coming sudden departure from ten downing street on friday. All the more intriguing. Some are convinced. That johnson's trustee aid finally turned against him but apart from the intrigue many wonder what cummings departure will mean for. The brexit talks with this hard line. Brexit tear no long regicide. Boris johnson agreed to compromise and strike a deal with the eu. Not to flinders. Doesn't think so. Now there are so many big big areas where there is no agreement a tool. It's hard to see even with dominic cummings out of the way whether that could be any agreement and actually the person who is strongest and most of bitten into not negotiating is is boris. So no. I don't think there's going to be southern rapid shift in european policy but former prime minister gordon brown says a deal could be on the cards speaking on national television. He says it's less about dominic. Cummings and more about who's moving into the white house. I think the arrival of joe biden has made all the difference. Icy trade deal coming pretty soon. The government simply cannot afford to be at war with america on the one hand in europe and the other at the start of the new year

Cummings Johnson Brexit Dominic Cummings Orla Berry Boris Johnson Mp Charles Walker David Goldberg Bond Castletown Cummings Matthew Flinders Conservative Party Britain London UK BBC Sheffield University Boris
Recipe edition, Jun Tanaka

Monocle 24: The Menu

02:03 min | 10 months ago

Recipe edition, Jun Tanaka

"Hi My name's Jane Tanaka. The ninth. Restaurant in London, say my recipe is a perfect summer simple recipes, rasberry and buttermilk Fuji. Cliff fifty is a traditional French baked custard dessert from limousin region and it's fantastic recipe because once you need a basic recipe, you can adapt it with all different kinds of fruits say it works well with raspberries traditionally with cherries can figs apples bananas. Once you know this, it's really easy to adapt it. All the seasons of the year. So mine is a rasberry and buttermilk cliff eighty. said to make this dish, take an ovenproof dish butter it likely sprinkle it with Kosta sugar take your rasberries and cover the base of the ovenproof dish to make the customer makes take three jokes to hold legs. One hundred, thirty grams of Kosta sugar one vanilla seeds only and whisk that together to make Salvia. Then add twenty five grams of plain flour. Mixed in now, traditionally, this food is made with double green, but I like to use buttermilk because it has a slight acidity which helps to cut through the richness of the did say take three hundred milliliters of milk and wis that into the eggs, the sugar and the flour. Once that's done, pour the mixture over the raspberries and you should still be able to see the Roz rasberries floating on the top of the custody and bake it in a preheated. Evan. At one hundred, eighty degrees centigrade for fifteen minutes until it's Gordon Brown on the top come. When you push the improve dish has a slight gentle wobble. Take it out sprinkled with icing sugar. and. So with a big dollar of

Roz Rasberries Kosta Jane Tanaka Cliff Limousin London Gordon Brown Evan
Recipe edition, Jun Tanaka

Monocle 24: The Menu

02:03 min | 10 months ago

Recipe edition, Jun Tanaka

"Hi My name's Jane Tanaka. The ninth. Restaurant in London, say my recipe is a perfect summer simple recipes, rasberry and buttermilk Fuji. Cliff fifty is a traditional French baked custard dessert from limousin region and it's fantastic recipe because once you need a basic recipe, you can adapt it with all different kinds of fruits say it works well with raspberries traditionally with cherries can figs apples bananas. Once you know this, it's really easy to adapt it. All the seasons of the year. So mine is a rasberry and buttermilk cliff eighty. said to make this dish, take an ovenproof dish butter it likely sprinkle it with Kosta sugar take your rasberries and cover the base of the ovenproof dish to make the customer makes take three jokes to hold legs. One hundred, thirty grams of Kosta sugar one vanilla seeds only and whisk that together to make Salvia. Then add twenty five grams of plain flour. Mixed in now, traditionally, this food is made with double green, but I like to use buttermilk because it has a slight acidity which helps to cut through the richness of the did say take three hundred milliliters of milk and wis that into the eggs, the sugar and the flour. Once that's done, pour the mixture over the raspberries and you should still be able to see the Roz rasberries floating on the top of the custody and bake it in a preheated. Evan. At one hundred, eighty degrees centigrade for fifteen minutes until it's Gordon Brown on the top come. When you push the improve dish has a slight gentle wobble. Take it out sprinkled with icing sugar. and. So with a big dollar of fresh.

Roz Rasberries Kosta Jane Tanaka Cliff Limousin London Gordon Brown Evan
"gordon brown" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"gordon brown" Discussed on Amanpour

"<Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Silence> Own <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> Aw <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> thank you very much more <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> stable. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> Thank you <Speech_Male> great talking <Speech_Male> to you. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Wynton Marsalis <Speech_Female> playing his father <Speech_Female> out and <Speech_Female> since his father passed <Speech_Male> he started <Speech_Male> the Louis Armstrong <Speech_Male> Emergency Fund <Speech_Male> to support jazz <Speech_Male> musicians in New <Speech_Male> York and <Speech_Male> finally a <Speech_Male> positive development <Speech_Male> on a story. We've been <Speech_Male> following closely <Speech_Male> Nazanin. <Speech_Male> Zaghari rattlers <Speech_Male> temporary released <Speech_Male> from prison in Iran <Speech_Male> has been extended <Speech_Male> by a month. <Speech_Male> According to state <Speech_Male> media the <Speech_Male> British Iranian aid <Speech_Female> worker was amongst <Speech_Female> eighty-five <Speech_Male> Thousand Prisoners. Who <Speech_Male> were released last month <Speech_Male> to limit corona <Speech_Male> virus spreading <Speech_Male> through the prisons <Speech_Male> in one of the worst <Speech_Female> hit countries? <Speech_Female> Now's it in husband <Speech_Female> campaigned. <Speech_Male> Tirelessly for <Speech_Male> freedom. Since two <Speech_Male> thousand sixteen <Speech_Male> when she was arrested <Speech_Male> tried and sentenced <Speech_Male> amid allegations <Speech_Male> which she denies <Speech_Male> of plotting <Speech_Male> to overthrow <Speech_Male> the Iranian government. <Speech_Male> Naza <Speech_Male> future remains <Speech_Male> unclear. <Speech_Male> But it is sometimes <Speech_Male> the small <Speech_Male> things that bring <Speech_Male> big. Hope <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> that is it for <Speech_Female> now you can always <Speech_Female> catches online <Speech_Music_Male> on our podcast <Speech_Music_Male> and across. Social <Speech_Music_Male> Media. Thank you <Speech_Music_Male> for watching <SpeakerChange> and goodbye <Speech_Music_Male> from London.

"gordon brown" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

09:03 min | 1 year ago

"gordon brown" Discussed on Amanpour

"Tell me about going to clubs with him when you were a little kid and you listen to him. Play gigs you know. I was always with them and they what they were. Struggling a meal wasn't glamorous places it was p people struggling in. They've never had a lot of people in the clubs. Really he had a good little period and early seventies that this club called Charlie's but in the earliest when I was a three four and five men were struggling country clubs older people black and white of black and red tile on the grounds sparkly tile with Sam and Dave on the jukebox combination restaurant. A Bar all-south segregated one point. You watched him play a Gig with only one or two people club races. Oh Man I play. Giggles like to the GIG stopped at two thirty so one thing about that way of life. Is You always out late so my entire life? I was always one thirty. Two one tweet. Twelve hundred this game did a two thirty but he clocked the club. Louis Louis jollies at a at a later time and there's one guy in the club was drunk sitting at a table so I went to the channel. I told my daddy man. Let's go to in the morning. Nobody in here. Let's listen to the guy was inebriated. Knee braided it. Add a little too much spiritual evolvement. It go man. These admit this game against two thirty. I said man. Nobody's he'll look around the globe. You'll ZIP. It could be a statement down listening to music man for change. So you know the first time I ever. I use the kingly English because that's how he talked to me so I went and sat down the first of all the gigs. I went on that. I actually listen to the music because even I was always in the clubs and that was really listening to what they were playing. I was always running around listening to whatever older people talk with people a knee braided of the five or six people as some kind interested human thing on on in and I sat down. I listen to him play and I was just looking around thinking what makes somebody played is good for nobody it to fifteen in the morning and you know just at thirty minutes is like it made me understand something about what it means. They have integrity in a kid. You not when I walk on stages around the world over all these years many times I walk out and I think about that night. I think about what I learned that night of. Just you know you do a thing because you do it and the meaning of it is being done. And he taught me that without even preached to me but then. I understood you know. What else did he teach besides music? The main thing I learned from my father's in the nineteen seventies. You know you being from New Orleans laws being such a backwards racist town and my father was very conscious jazz music but like a jazz musician he also was not segregate so we grew up in. Kenner which was really segregated so you never saw black white people together because my father was a jazz musician you saw him with white musicians and he would be in a barbershop. Black barbershop everybody. We gotTA apples black power. Everybody talking about white hopes in the way to take the day with them and my father would would never go along with the status quo conversation and he's made me man up. You let me why you embarrassed and be happy at Michelle taking this humanistic view. When nobody is nobody is about and he was he was he was not plus man he just never. He didn't go with the group. This thing was always attacked people in front of you. If you're going to say something dispatching to don't waste it on them them is right in front of you and it's not just something some words. I saw him accident. Live by that. Credo to a spouse would he believed some what they were saying. He believed other parts of it he did and when he got kind of extreme. Kind of xenophobic thing. Coops people love to fall into because it gives them the illusion of power. He never went for that. He was a great teacher of course for many years taught at the University of New Orleans. I remember about twenty years ago when he retired as a teacher. You and all your brother's got together the arena there and did a farewell concert to celebrate his life as a teacher. Thank you actually did. Some Louis Armstrong strutton with some barbecue. Aren't you tell me a little bit about that but play a few bars starting with some barbecue? My my brothers I Harry Harry connick. Don't forget Harry Ino is always in house. Musicians always will come to my house. My father was always the whip where people were like a family in this musicians all over the country. Who eventually I like that. He would have the same pride in Harry. Connick in Terence blanchet down Harrison. He had the same pride and Reginald veal as he hid in my brother in me. It wasn't a thing of my kids. He wasn't like the kind of family type of proprietary group person he was a world was a barbecue as another one that pop songs. You can easily mess up the Oh over. Wrong are possible to play all kinds of fantastic stuff on that you wrote on facebook page. Something very beautiful about your father was. My Daddy was a humble man with a lyrical sound that captured the spirit of place you will Orleans Crescent City. The biggies like many parents. He sacrificed force and made so much possible. Not only material things but things of substance and beauty like the ability to complicated music and to read books to see and contemplate art to be philosophical and to be kind but also understand that a time and place may require a pugilist minded expression of aged. Yeah he and all of that man you know above Ghafoor just thinking about I just kind of man he was. My Day was an he could talk you to death but it was kind of like he was used to always tell me man. Leave people alone. Man is hard enough Audi and sometimes he would say nope. You've got to put your foot in some behind. And he he wasn't. I was much more aggressive than him. You know growing up but but I may make my daddy layup because he was really Kinda Sweet Very Philosophical Guy. Probably had a hard time growing up you know in his neighborhood was with me. I never had a hard time like okay. We're GONNA get to that. We don't do not go see me after school. See me now. I'm not GonNa wait and then we didn't you see injury you know. He had a lot of depth purse. He was very kind to what people have all kinds very dancing his thinking it had a very loving spirit of so many things. The first time ever heard one was from him. Like the South Africans. The would musicians will plan in. Cuba the the the importance of intellectual development non non racism again Eka. We have a lot to overcome if we want to. But it's such a weakness if we could if we could address it we will be so much more progressive nature. We could get so much further than than we are. You know I'm just say one thing and I'm going on if we could ever stop confusing. Business in with civics civics is investment. I want your kids to be educate. I don't want your old people to die because they can't afford a two hundred thousand dollar pill that is ethics. There's not a business I exploit business. Has its own space both for some reason. We're not we don't believe in civics it's not a. It's not a civics business. It's not civics. Civic says the investment branch of our way of life and we have to business out of civics. We needed educated populace. We need people have to die because they don't have insurance. I mean it's just it's just common sense isn't that crazy A few days ago you did a gala for Jazz at Lincoln Center which you help Ron and it was pretty amazing you did Charlie. Parker's y'all bird sweet from around the world.

Harry Harry connick Charlie University of New Orleans Louis Louis New Orleans Louis Armstrong Harry Ino Michelle facebook Harry Orleans Crescent City Audi Kenner Sam Reginald veal Parker Dave Cuba Ghafoor
"gordon brown" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

11:19 min | 1 year ago

"gordon brown" Discussed on Amanpour

"For a response. Who didn't declare this as a pandemic until June? So what you saw with. President Obama was really listening to his technical experts and using the leverage of the White House to begin mobilizing immediately. What turned out to be a highly effective response. The second point I want to make is that President Obama also very early on not only declared this a national emergency. He reached out across the globe to other leaders to begin to lay the foundation for a coordinated global response until it was that twin sort of line of activity mobilizing national preparedness and beginning to coordinate a global response even before a pandemic was declared really sort of highlighted the difference between this current administration. Which quite frankly really did not start marshalling a response until March of this year three months after we recognize this as a significant public health event. I think viewers will be unbelievably interested to see the series because it's also starts with one of the main doctors who is undergoing sort of a drill. A drill in one of the New York hospitals to receive a first infected patients. It's unbelievably chilling and it reflects exactly what's going on right now but what. I want to ask you now from your experience and your expertise. You are an expert in and I'm going to say it the discovery of zoonotic viruses. Obviously we kind of understand that means viruses animals. Tell us about this particular virus the origin where you think it came from and the and this animal to human transmission that we keep seeing. Well it's important to recognize every new emerging viral threat. We're dealing with whether it was SARS of two thousand and two the influenza pandemic two thousand nine the Ebola West Africa epidemic of two thousand fourteen. All of these viruses existed prior to the outbreak are the beginnings of the pandemic in wildlife. They're circulating today. Every new virus that we're going to see over the coming decades over the course of this century already exist and it is circulating in its natural habitat in wildlife populations zoonotic component has to do with those wildlife animals. Whether it's a bat. A non human primate or rodent is carrying one of these viruses and and proximal near- nearby a human settlement or a human population and viruses. Have a very strong motivation to look for new ecological niches. They're always trying to diversify their host range and given the opportunity they will jump from bat into person and look for a new place to replicate and grow and spread further and it's fat phenomena. Okay jumping over. That is behind the cove in nineteen event that began sometime in November or December of this past year. Can you just lay to rest oneself? People afraid of all that they think is how it happened that somebody in Wuhan wherever eight the bat and that's how they got it. Is it in the eating of the Animal? Or how does an animal spillover shed the virus? Well there are several routes that we know about and let me first say this but we know about the spillover events really comes out of twenty years of intensive research in the field monitoring and evaluating these events and so we have quite a lot of insight into how this spillover event occurs the cove in nineteen virus. Really there were two potential routes way made its way from its natural reservoir which is the Horseshoe Bat into human populations. It could have and we're not sure about this. But the early reports suggested that an intermediary wildlife Animal Pangolin was infected by a bat and that Pangolin was brought into a wildlife market where wildlife animals are traded and that there was an exposure event in that market that could have led to spillover not dissimilar to what we saw with SARS in two thousand and two were a civic cat acted as intermediary moving a bat virus into human populations but we also know that bats can directly infect people by depositing their feces in areas where people are exposed and you can get the virus directly from that exposure as well. We're not sure which route was taken but we are clear that this is a natural virus and that the way it moved into the human population was through a natural route. So another thing that people have you know. There's been a hold of conspiracies and theories that maybe it was a mistake in a lab. In Wuhan maybe conspiracies they that it was a bio weapon being being developed now do. Who was particularly asked about that today and has quashed it as far as they said. There's absolutely no scientific evidence at all to back up either of those theories and it did come from an animal. Would you agree with that? I would agree absolutely. There's been some very good deep genetic work looking at this particular virus and it has genetic genetic signatures of a natural viruses. Nothing man made about it but the second point I want to make is that we do recognize that accidental release from laboratories is a real risk and so we need to pay attention to that and I would hope that As we talk more about this issue that the global community a addresses the vulnerabilities that we have for a future event where there is an accidental release but in this case Cova nineteen virus. Everything everything points to this being not only a natural virus but a its introduction into the human population was not by way of a laboratory. The other thing. Obviously everybody is waiting with baited breath for some kind of vaccine. Some kind of mitigation that will allow people to go out we here with this cacophony for ending lockdowns. Obviously many people are in pain financial economic pain Etcetera. And also you want this virus to be killed off and they say it won't happen safely unless there is a vaccine. Well today. The Health Secretary here in England said that the OXFORD TRIAL VACCINES AT OXFORD. University would start there first. Human trials on this Thursday and in the series that you took part in Dr J. He is also working on vaccines and now has moved to try to work on a covert vaccine. Just tell me what you know about that part of it and how you know how long you think we might have to wait well first off Christianity. The vaccine is the holy grail. This is a virus. I think that there's a very strong consensus. It will become an endemic virus coming back every winter. Season along with influences so in the absence of a vaccine. We're going to be very challenged society as well as economically and how to best manage this there have been much speculation that twelve to eighteen months. It's going to be required before we see a vaccine. Let let me also offer cautionary note. We've never developed a vaccine against this family of viruses before so while we're hopeful that a vaccine against this virus will be forthcoming. It really won't be available if available at all for at least another year to year and a half and for the it's also needed for eight billion people It's GonNa be a several years before we get to the level of production where we can even achieve that level of coverage so there are an enormous amount of uncertainty. We're not even sure to the extent that this virus will trigger natural immunity so there's a really significant effort underway within the science community to understand the immunologic response to those people who have been infected is their natural immunity. And if so can we use that experience to help accelerate the development of a vaccine? And if there isn't natural immunity what is it that we have to do to trigger a level of immunity that the natural infection doesn't so enormous outstanding questions to be answered? We're hopeful vaccine. I think more urgently where we're likely to see the emergence of an effective pharmaceutical treatment. And that I'm much more hopeful that will see become available earlier than we will see a vaccine and quickly because I just you mentioned eight billion people. I think you believe and many scientists believe that part of this because it's animals to humans is because of the huge population of the world right now and as people rise from poverty into the ability to buy meat protein etc the need for animals to eat or the desire for animals to eat has exploded exponentially. Is this ever ever going to then become manageable? If that's the inevitable trend well first off the point. You're is absolutely right. There are eight billion people on this planet now and it's an extraordinary number. If we were having this discussion one hundred years ago there were six billion fewer people on this planet. You can't have this accelerated intensification of the human footprint on this planet without dramatically disrupting natural ecosystems. And we're seeing within the twenty first century too dramatic examples.

Wuhan Obama President White House Africa Pangolin New York Dr J. He Cova Secretary England
"gordon brown" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

09:55 min | 1 year ago

"gordon brown" Discussed on Amanpour

"Welcome to the program. Everyone I'm Christiane Amanpour poor working from home in London. As Corona virus deaths continued to rise worries about the life and death impact of a shuttered global economy also grow by the day. President trump has resorted to his own political playbook saying that he'll temporarily stop all immigration into the United States in an effort to protect American jobs. More than twenty million have been lost amid this pandemic and that is just in the US around the world. Tens of millions of facing job losses and severe economic contractions are on the horizon thankfully debts on now at a slower rate in these countries that we're hit hard at the stock but what happens when the virus reaches the developing world. The World Food Programme ones. The number of people suffering acute hunger could almost double to more than two hundred and sixty five million. Because of the impact of the virus former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown is renewing his call for a coordinated global effort against the pandemic and its aftershocks. Having been at the center of the international move to tackle the two thousand eight financial crisis. He's best place to offer a battle plan. Now Gordon Brown is joining me from his hometown of North Queensbury in Scotland Prime Minister. Welcome to the program. Let me ask you because it does seem to be a contradiction. It is a global pandemic. Which kind of for the first time is notable for the absence of global response? You've been calling for it from the early days. Tell me where we are right now. Well it's not only a global endemic that needs a global response as a global economic crisis. That also needs a global response if people sitting at home wondering saying well look. I'm worried about my family. I'm worried about my community. I'm worried about my neighborhood. I'm worried about my own country. If we think of the consequences of this disease taking roots in Africa or in some of the poorest countries of Asia or Latin America or the Middle East and then he second or perhaps third or fourth round of the disease comes back to hit us in every other country in the world at than we have very very serious consequences to face. So to think locally. You've got to act globally to to solve the problem nationally again. This is what this is. What happens when we have live broadcasting in these circumstances where the technology sometimes can fail for a while? But we'll get it back so what we're going to do now is go to my next guest because few know more about infectious diseases than my next guest. Who is Dr Dennis Carroll? He directed the pandemic influenza and emerging threats unit of USA. That's the agency for International Development in the United States. Did that for fifteen years. And during that time he helped identify more than two viruses in animals. That can make us humans sick which is most likely how corona virus originated according to the World Health Organization and featured in Zero Point Zero Netflix series pandemic which predicted an outbreak months earlier. Here's the trailer one hundred years ago. The deadly influenza virus infected hundreds of millions of people some are in the order of fifty two hundred million deaths. We'll talk about another flu pandemic cabinet. It's not a matter of if but when a new strain of bird food. This is definitely one of the most lethal influenza viruses that we have seen so far. It just takes one person to start. An outbreak will leave. Its mark the result with Dave hundreds of millions of people. That would likely die. That's why I do what I do. We're making a vaccine. That could treat all future versions of flip. This vaccine could eradicate influenza as we know it. The problem so widespread the World Health Organization is calling the refusal to vaccinate one of the biggest threats of two thousand nineteen. Eighty healthy child has the ability to build unity. Naturally I know that what I do is important to my patients but what am I doing to myself and my family. Within one month the virus could spread throughout the country month after the widespread throughout the world. The next pandemic is point to start that we just don't know where or how but we know it will poses an existential threat to us as a species and that was Dr Carol in the film and he is now joining me from Washington. So welcome to the program. You know watching the series from the first episode of the sixth episode. You just thought. Oh my God how did they know? How did they know? And of course you didn't film it now you filmed it in the two thousand eighteen thousand nine hundred and flu season. Did you know that something like this could happen so soon? Well the answer. Christiane is absolutely the emergence of this particular. Corona virus really comes as no surprise we could never predict which would be the next virus and we could never predict exactly when but it was clear that the dynamics fat Dr Viruses Circulating Wildlife Spillover in the people there intensifying and the frequency with which these are happening is going up. It's all driven by population pressures. So what we're seeing with Cova. Nineteen virus is symptomatic of sort of a new age. We are going to see more and more of these events as we move further into the twenty first century so interesting. We showed it in the in the in the in the trailer. It's sort of like these virus. Sleuths investigators people who need to keep an eye on everything that's going on in this field and they were in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Because if a bola they were in in Egypt and Lebanon because of various of versions of flu whether it was swine flu. Avian Flu all those that cropped up in in two thousands. We saw doctors in the United States to opt in India. It looks like there is a shared amount of knowledge. Just a huge amount of knowledge. And people like yourself and these characters on the lookout. Can you explain in today's context? Why then including the fact that there were pandemic playbook we seem to have been caught so completely for want of a better word with a trousers down. Well first off. I think the fact that this virus was picked up and identified as a corona virus. Remember it began as an event of unknown causes and within a fairly short period of time a matter of a two to three weeks after it was first publicly identified there was a clear recognition that one we were not looking at an influenza virus we were looking at a Coruna virus that has a striking similarities to its cousin. The SARS virus the really. The surprise wasn't so much the emergence and the early spread it was the lack of a coordinated Regional or even global response. And that I thank as you noted. That's where we were caught with our pants down. Not so much about the biology of this virus but the political actions that responded to this virus or the lack of action. That responded to that virus this I think too many of its comes. As the real surprise the lack of early ineffective response and more importantly the lack of a well coordinated global response as your previous guest a Prime Minister Gordon Brown noted now this is a global event and global events require global coordination and global response. So far pants were down. When this occurred it really had to do with the failure of the global community to really come together recognized the singular global characteristics of this event early and mount a coordinated global response so some people will say well hang on. We've never seen anything like this. I mean that spread so far something that really took so much of the world in its grip in its deathly grip but you also point out that will in fact yes but there were previous times when you did see the president of the United States leading the global effort you talk about President George W Bush getting on the phone when the crisis erupted under his watch. You talk about President Obama twice once. I believe with swine flu once with Ebola having to get on and Marshall a global response just talked about that compared to what's happening right now from the White House looks back to the two thousand nine h. One N one pandemic that was picked up in early April of two thousand nine and very quickly. It was recognized as a novel influenza virus spreading out of North America and by the end of April President Obama had already stepped forward and declared this a public health emergency already mobilizing a resources across the entirety of the US government to begin preparing.

United States Prime Minister president Gordon Brown influenza pandemic influenza Christiane Amanpour World Health Organization World Food Programme Dr Dennis Carroll Obama President George W Bush trump Democratic Republic of Congo London Middle East
"gordon brown" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

Fareed Zakaria GPS

07:44 min | 1 year ago

"gordon brown" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

"Former British Prime Minister Gordon. Brown is raising the alarm saying we need an unprecedented amount of global cooperation to fight this virus. Gordon Brown was prime minister from two thousand and seven to two thousand and ten. During that time he helped written emerged from the last great economic crisis now he leads a group of more than one hundred former presidents and prime ministers who have outlined a plan to speed up progress on a vaccine while simultaneously staving off global economic disaster. Gordon Brown joins me now. Gordon let me ask you. Let's get to the heart of this problem. Which is you know your. What's your your plan is eminently sensible. But here's the problem. You have a United States that is led by a leader who does not particularly care for international cooperation in international joint action. But you and I decided that debate. You also have a Chinese leadership. That is more nationalistic. More closed in repressive in certain ways you know in terms of cover up of this disease and even in terms of the response seems more interested in scoring points public public relations rather than actual joined action. How do you make this work when the United States and China and almost a kind of new Cold War so we need a global efforts to finance the vaccine to kill the Diagnostics Therapeutics? It can't just be a national effort to build up capacity around the world for testing equipment. Ventilators and everything else. That's going to be a global effort if we're GONNA present prevent a second and Third Ryan of this coming from the developing countries which have inadequate health care systems inadequate social protection. We need to act globally to do as well. And if we're going to get global economy back to life they will have to be as in two thousand nine who are needed action now. Yes America used in Unicolor Age after the Cold War Act multilaterally NOGGIN. A multi-polar age. It seems to be acting unilaterally. China of course is during bilateral aid at the moment at but at the same time. We haven't seen the G twenty the g seven the United Nations Security Council while they've met they have not taken decisive action. And you've got to be in a position on a crisis I find in two thousand nine not to be able to say. I'm doing whatever I can do all the best I can do. You've got to be able to say we'll do whatever it takes. A not demanded come together now. I do believe that if we were to organize a pledging conference to meet the global health needs I think the European Union Japan Canada Norway United Kingdom the rest of Asia Africa pushing Latin America I think China and America definitely come on board G. Twenty executive taskforce chaired by Saudi Arabia. More difficult because it's passed to communicate but it hasn't got the detail in it. That means you get the decisive action where the employment protection phase but soon we'll have to restore demand in the world economy again. I think the rest of the world coming together persuading China in America to take action will be effective. You know after all American scientists corologis immunologist epidemiologist that researchers statisticians are all involved in this global effort. I think it's a right that the government should be persuaded to be involved in recognizing the importance of global cooperation. This is our moment of truth. But let me ask you about the politics of this Gordon because if you look at Europe what this crisis has done unlike Oh eight Oh nine and Utah me. You were there It's made everybody pull inwards so I look at the European Union which has reimposed borders even in the Schengen zone. I look at the Italians. Desperately pleading with their other twenty-six EU members for help and they got not one country responding which has resulted in very high levels of anti European Union sentiment. In in Italy. I had some some polls show seventy five percent of Italians and I want to leave the European Union. I think the European Union is hurting them. How do you? How do you get past that? I think you've got to look at the areas where cooperation camera and is necessary and essential to work. As I say we will look back in this and we will suffer condescension of hysteria. If at moment of destiny the World Kennel come come together. But the areas are highlighted and the two hundred who signed the letter to the g twenty a brilliant economist. Brilliant health experts at former leaders. They wanted to highlight who ordination to finance the cure. And the vaccine. Now that's in everybody's interests and I believe that America can be brought on board in China to coordination to build up capacity so instead of outbidding each other instead of outbidding for a limited capacity. We build up the capacity of ventilators test equipment. I think we can get agreement on that instead of allowing the disease to go right through the developing countries. Help them build up their resistance resilience but help them now so he doesn't come back a second and third weighed again. A common interest of course the global economy being restored to growth getting the global supply chains. Moving again that is going to require collective coordinated fiscal monetary central bank coordination. So yes there have been setbacks and yes people are doing their own thing in certain areas but when it comes to the things that are needed for cooperation coordination. I do believe we can get the different countries working together. It demands a relentless focus on these issues where global coordination is essential otherwise. We don't get the answers we won't do. You wish you had somebody like Barack Obama in the White House. But I would well with Barack Obama in two thousand nine during the financial prices. But you know this is not the time to look back the time to look forward. I'm not interested in criticism. I'm interested in being constructed. An I can see. America actually has put five hundred million into developing countries that into the health bunches into other support in the last few weeks at Britain is doing the same other countries are doing the same. But it's not coordinated if you cannot say we will do whatever it takes because you're not coordinated you're not in a position to concert. Jeff Gordon I I understand so sorry but we are out of time. Gordon Brown. Thank you so much for your perspective. We'll be back and now for the last look. Today is Easter Sunday. But you wouldn't know it from the deserted churches around the world. Even the very seat of the Catholic Church Saint Peter's Basilica stands empty and for good reason in eastern France a five day evangelical prayer meeting spark one of Europe's largest regional covert clusters and in India. The virus has been linked to a Muslim missionary groups annual gathering in New Delhi but for many religious observers the kind of social distancing seen at Saint Peter's is a sacrilege some Pakistani worshippers disregarded curfew to attend Friday prayers last week clashing violently with the police who came to break them up even in the. Us law enforcement has had to shut down religious events from Evangelical Churches in Louisiana Jewish. The New York Times reported Jewish weddings in Brooklyn. Now I don't have any religious standing but I would point out that most religions have at their core the affirmation of life the protection of vulnerable and the healing of the sick. All of that suggests doing what you can to keep yourself and your community safe and healthy. Thanks to all of you for being part of my program this week I will see you next week..

Prime Minister Gordon America Gordon Brown European Union China Barack Obama Europe United States prime minister European Union Japan Canada No United Nations Security Counci New Delhi Italy Catholic Church Saint Peter's Brooklyn The New York Times
"gordon brown" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

Fareed Zakaria GPS

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"gordon brown" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

"gordon brown" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

Fareed Zakaria GPS

08:38 min | 1 year ago

"gordon brown" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

"And we are back with Nobel Prize winning economist Paul Roma Epidemiologist Jennifer New and former FDA commissioner mark. Mcclellan all I wanted you to just explain your plan. I is that we reopen the economy. Now that the lockdown end right away and we ramp up testing so that you can start letting people who appear to be either immune or or you know explain your explained the plan so so i. We're not talking about Roger Sean I. We're not talking about ending lockdown right now. The goal here is to make it safe for people to work. The very first place to start is with the people who are already working under lockdown. We've got healthcare. Workers Police Officers Transit Workers. They're all working now and they're all exposed to risks that we could protect them from if one of these workers is an a symptomatic carrier that worker can infect a bunch of colleagues and if we just tested those workers before they win on shift. We could make sure that if you're a police officer you're not ready round for a day in a in a car with somebody who's spewing out the droplets with virus in it so the first thing to do is test and quarantine amongst the workers who were already on the job. These essential workers were relying on then as we get experience with that. We can start to ask. Can we bring in more workers? Get them back on the job safely. The core of poor rumors proposal. It seems to me Mark McClellan is testing and I I have to confess I mean. They have read his paper. I think I imagined thirty million. You're doing a lot of testing it. Sounds like a lot. It's thirty million a day. That's right sorry. Thirty million a day exactly now sounds like a lot but we just spent two point three trillion dollars. You know why. Why is it beyond the richest country in the world with the greatest scientific establish in the in the world? If this is a true you know. Once in a century emergency why can't we mobilized resources and ramp up testing so we can get people back to work. I completely agree with Paul. About ramping. Up Testing He's exactly right that the bill provided some needed relief for families for hospitals are frontline healthcare workers but in terms of getting the economy growing again. It's like pushing on a string unless there is a clear reason why people feel like it's safe to get back out and start doing more of their normal long all of their normal lives. It's going to be a different economy. But unless there's competence that people can go back out and not risk infection as much and unless businesses can be confident they can make investments now. We're not going to see that kind of recovery so this next stimulus legislation really needs to focus on providing the support necessary to create the for much more open Much more of a reopening of of the whole economy testing is a key part of that but I would encourage not DISA- focus on getting the number of tests up. That's coming out. We've got better lab tests. We'VE GOT POINT OF CARE. Test coming hopefully Home administrable test. Fda's of knowing a great job of working with the industry on getting that up but along with that is the need to make sure these TESCO I to where they're most needed that includes having rapid testing in every locality for people who may have symptoms to support them figuring out whether they've got covert nineteen or not and so they can go back to work or stay home at as needed. It means working closely with businesses as Paul just described it also means working closely with healthcare providers who are a main stay in this country for connecting on the front lines with patients who have symptoms all of this needs to be supported by state and local governments just as states and localities have built up capacity now for this first phase of the pandemic. The next big phase is a whole infrastructure to support this kind of testing so that includes not just the tests themselves but also the capacity to trace cases that are positive is what other countries are doing now for the US such a big heterogeneous country is going to be a different approach. Perhaps in in Los Angeles where they've already set up a cares core to help to start helping with this from Massachusetts from more rural parts of the country all of these features need to be included in the next round of legislation and along with the testing to make it work and I just add one final thing for the federal government. Getting out ahead of what will be a potential and supplies not just of the task but of the swabs of the other materials that are needed to go along with the test to. That's an area where the federal government can also provide a lot of support not just in backing up all of the capabilities that I just described Jennifer. Let me ask you a you talked about how. It's not just the ramping up of the testing. You need to ramp up the healthcare system because one of the things people forget. Is that the whole point of flattening. The curve is you're actually not reducing the number of people who will eventually get affected in sick until we get a cure or vaccine. You're spreading it out over a longer period of time so the healthcare system can handle it and you worried that the healthcare system is is pretty fragile right now. Yeah I mean that's the whole reason why we're sitting at home is that we are living with a very fragile. Health System doesn't take much to tip it over the edge so I agree that we absolutely have to ramp up testing for sure because finding where all the cases are so that we know who needs to be isolated so that they don't transmit to others is utterly important but the tests themselves to inform Matt Action. They're not an end in in and of itself where we also have to ask where is the healthcare capacity are the number of cases that we're seeing going to be able to be handled by healthcare. And Right now. We do not have good information about numbers of beds. Available numbers ventilators healthcare workers. And whether or not they're getting sick or if they're able to still show up and do the life work that they do one of limitations that we're dealing with in terms of ramping. Testing right now is not so much a lack of places that can do. The tests would lack of the little swabs that they take to Obtain a specimen for testing and also personal protective equipment to protect the people who would have to obtain a specimen and crucially protect the healthcare workers. Who have to do the work so we need to look at the numbers of people who are sick. Make sure we are able to isolate those people. So they don't transmit their infection. I agree we absolutely have to be able to ramp up. Contact tracing find all the people who may be annex have been exposed so that we can monitor them and make sure that if they become a case they don't pass it on to somebody else but we also need to be able to monitor the health of the health system to know what it is capable of dealing with and when it is potentially at the brink and make sure we keep all of those numbers in balance and unfortunately we don't have systems of right now to handle this. We're focused on the test. Which is Great? I fully agree but we also need to focus on all the other supplies that we need. There's just a lot more that we need to do. And so these conversations about when and how to open the absolutely have to be informed about this and just to the point about the stimulus. I just WANNA say that. When we're looking at two trillion dollar stimulus that has already been passed. And we're thinking that there's likely going to be another one. You know at the height of preparedness spending by the government. It was about seven billion dollars in one year at the time that seemed like a lot of money but now it seems like an incredible bargain so I really hope we're thinking about how we make investments in our future we think about prevention and making sure. This doesn't happen again point so much. I'm sorry I'm okay very quickly very quickly. You know it's true. There are a lot of things to do. I want to argue though that testing is by far the most important thing to expand right off on that note of agreement. I I really learned a lot. Thank you so much okay. Later on the show We have the British Prime Minister Gordon. Brown who lead the world out of the the last crisis But coming up now the WHOL..

Paul Roma Workers Police Officers Transi Mark McClellan Fda Jennifer New federal government Roger Sean Nobel Prize US Los Angeles commissioner officer Massachusetts Prime Minister Gordon cure TESCO Brown
"gordon brown" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

Fareed Zakaria GPS

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"gordon brown" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

"This is GPS. The Global Public Square welcomed. All of you in the United States and around the world. I'm Farid Zaccaria coming to you. Live from New York Today on the show to open or not to open the economy. That is the question DOPP. Health experts and a Nobel prize winning economist will offer their opinions and president trump says the World Health Organization is too soft on China and missed the call on Kobe. Nineteen Alaska official at the organization about these criticisms also former British Prime Minister Gordon. Brown says the world needs to come together in an unprecedented fashion to fight the pandemic. He'll explain why that's crucial. But first here's my take something important has happened over. The course of this crisis estimates of expected deaths have gone down by a lot on March thirty first the White House estimated that even with social distancing policies in place between one hundred thousand two hundred forty thousand Americans would die of covert nineteen. Dr Deborah Brooks the White House's Corona Virus Response Coordinator said that was quote our real number. Dr Anthony Pfau chief. The Nation's top infectious disease expert recently indicated. He now believes it will be more like sixty thousand. The University of Washington model which has been cited by the White House predicted on March twenty. Sixth that assuming social distancing policies that stay in place to June the first US debts by August would most likely be around. Eighty one thousand by April tenth. They had made many revisions to get to their current number. Sixty one thousand. Five hundred predictions for hospitalization rates have also proven to be way too high. On March thirtieth the University of Washington projected that California would need four thousand eight hundred beds on April third. In fact the state needed two thousand two hundred the same model predicted that New York would need fifty eight thousand beds on April third. It used only fifteen thousand. It made sense to take precautions but that may have come at a cost as there are concerns that patients with other conditions. Haven't gotten the kid they need. So what is going on well? Many experts believe that social distancing has worked even better than was predicted. But here's a theory acknowledging. We still don't know a lot about the virus. A group of Stanford Scholars believe that the basic reason estimates of debts have had to be revised downwards is because without an understanding of how the virus spreads and without widespread testing from the start. We didn't realize how many miles or a symptomatic cases there would be that means the denominator. Those who have been infected could be much larger than initial estimates and therefore the fatality rate for covert nineteen is much lower in March the. Who announced that? The three point. Four percent of people with the virus had died from it. That would be an astonishingly high fatality rate. Fao G suggested a week later that the actual rate was probably one percent which would still be ten times as high as the flu since. Then we've learned that many people in some studies fifty percent in some studies as much as seventy five to eighty percent have any symptoms. That means it's possible. Most people infected with the virus on not getting counted. Stanford's John Unidas believes that we have massively overestimated the fatality of covert nineteen. He told me when you have a model involving exponential growth. If you make a small mistake in the base numbers you end up with a final number that could be off tenfold thirty fold even fifty fold. He points out that in some of the places with the best testing the diamond princess cruise ship. The Italian town no vote you gain you. Iceland Denmark the numbers who were actually infected when adjusted for the US population as a whole suggestive. Metality rate that is actually similar to the seasonal flu based on limited testing data. He estimates that fewer than forty thousand. Us debts will occur from covert nineteen this season now that is still a tragedy and we should be glad that the work that we've done to abide by social distancing has done some good though it has come at a price of course that said no one knows the right answers that is why we need the best data and that's why we need to hear both from the mainstream voices and from dissenting voices. We have shut down the economy based on models which is understandable because we worry about worst-case scenarios but in science models evolve with new and better data. President trump says we don't need nesting but reopening the economy would depend crucially on mass testing or else wants controls are relaxed. We might see the infection sore again. South Korea has been able to tackle the virus without major lockdowns in large part because it has handled testing superbly. The most urgent task for the Federal Government is to get widespread randomized testing in place gathered the best data in the world and make policy based on that otherwise we will continue to fly blind through this crisis for more go to CNN. Dot Com slash. Read and read my Washington Post column this week and let's get started.

United States President trump White House New York University of Washington Farid Zaccaria Global Public Square Washington Post Dr Anthony Pfau World Health Organization flu Alaska South Korea Dr Deborah Brooks Nobel prize Federal Government CNN
Apple Says Sorry for Siri Spying

Business Wars Daily

04:55 min | 1 year ago

Apple Says Sorry for Siri Spying

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by sent pro online from pitney bowes shipping and mailing from your desk is never been simpler than with sent pro online from pitney leabeau's. Try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pound scale when you visit p._b._a. Dot com slash b w daily the uh from wondering this business words daily on this thursday september fifth. Hey siri with the eavesdropping being already that thought might cross your mind after it came to light that apple employees and third party contractors were listening to recordings of our conversations with siri apple says it was automatically saving voice recordings for technical reasons so human evaluators could assess the quality of series responses. A practice apple calls grading. Many of those evaluators were not apple employees but subcontractors then in late july. One of those contractors became a whistle missile blower. The person who went unidentified reported that these human evaluators we're listening to regular siri commands like hey siri. Where's the nearest gas station as well as is conversations recorded accidentally by siri for instance when the voice assistant was awakened by mistake unbeknownst to the speaker some of those interactions included things like confidential doctor patient meetings drug deals and people having sex well after that embarrassing news came to light the british newspaper the guardian apple temporarily halted the practice of human evaluations then last week on apple's blog company officials apologized adjudged saying they had failed to live up to the company's high ideals apple tried to use its commitment to privacy as competitive advantage over competitors google on amazon apple also promised a number of changes it will no longer automatically keep audio recordings and for now. It's suspending what it calls. Its grading program graham. It'll start that grading again later this fall after it makes certain software improvements and with a number of changes intended to reassure skittish angry customers when apple resumes the program you'll need to opt in. If you wanna share your audio samples with apple and you can opt out whenever you want to and no matter what apple won't give any more recordings to third party workers the company promised last week the company also said listens to a tiny sample of siri requests point. Oh two percent it d- identifies the recordings keeping track of them through strings of random numbers rather than for instance your phone number while apple's apple's apology made headlines. It didn't necessarily make users feel much better. Apple is now facing lawsuits over the so-called privacy breaches indeed the voice assistant privacy. Issue may be giving apple headaches right now but it's also a problem for google amazon and facebook according to c._n._n. Google stopped having contractors contractors. Listen to google assistant recordings in early august also early last month. Amazon changed its alexis settings to provide users with more control over their recordings. Baseball is also said to have stopped hume evaluation of some audio recordings ironically apple ceo. Tim cook has been calling for increased privacy regulations in may he told diane sawyer of a._b._c. news that quote privacy itself has become a crisis and deeded. Has hey siri this. This story won't be going away anytime soon. I'm wondering this is business daily. Hey if you like our podcast tele friend had a subscribe for free because word of mouth is best friend. You know the ride intentional kind trying to gordon brown. We'll be back with you tomorrow. So this episode is brought to you by central online from pitney bowes shipping and mailing from from your desk has never been simpler than with sent pro online from pitney bowes with simple online is just click sand and save for as low as four dollars ninety thirty nine cents. That's right four dollars. Ninety nine cents a month. Send envelopes flats and packages right from your p._c. And you are back to business in no time. Try it for free for thirty days and get a free ten pound scale but only when you visit p b dot com slash b._w. Daily that's p._b. Dot com slash b w daily.

Apple Siri Pitney Bowes Google Amazon Pitney Leabeau Tim Cook Baseball Gordon Brown Diane Sawyer CEO Facebook Hume Four Dollars Thirty Days Ten Pound Two Percent
Brexit Is The Latest Blow To The British Pound, Once A Symbol Of Economic Might

Morning Edition

05:02 min | 1 year ago

Brexit Is The Latest Blow To The British Pound, Once A Symbol Of Economic Might

"It's been some time since Britain's empire extended around the world but the British pound long a symbol of Britain's global power is still a source of great pride in the country over the years though the pound has lost a lot of its luster and the turmoil surrounding brexit has hurt its stature even more you Jim zarroli in the late nineteen nineties Europe embarked on a radical experiment it got rid of Italy's lira Germany's Deutsche mark and the French Frank among others and replace them with a single monetary unit the euro only one major country refused to get on board Britain here is then chancellor of the exchequer Gordon brown we will not seek membership of the single currency on first January nineteen ninety nine the decision was driven by much more than economics the pound also known as the quit or sterling is a rich cultural symbol a powerful reminder of the past glory of the British Empire I'll notes have been adorned with some of the most illustrious figures in British history Shakespeare Dickens and Darwin today people such as Jacquelyn Cup for a pharmacist's assistant in London say giving up the pound is almost unthinkable I think it's because it is so you know you've got an old school friend to turn everything now talk about the talent and it's part of our kind of culture really I think anything that you try to replace it with it wouldn't did the talking I think the pound is encrusted with centuries of British tradition one pound was long week will take two hundred and forty pence it bewildered tourists in nineteen seventy one the government decided to simplify things one pound would now be worth one hundred pence it took some getting used to even students had to take classes in the new money how many new pen if you guys have in one house for new my mom doesn't like the fifty pence I today's twelve to make sure they're not the singer Max Bygraves even put out a song of through all the changes the pound has long symbolized Britain's economic might at one time the pound was used to buy and spend all over the world it paid for roads in Africa and railroads in India it financed cotton fields in the American south Neil Ferguson is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and the author of the history of money if you go back to the nineteenth century the British pounds occupied the place in the global economy that the US dollar does today but as Britain's power wind so did the pound the government tried to stem the decline after the second World War travelers were barred from taking pounds out of the country you can take a holiday business alarms and travelers checks but not more than five pounds in studying those efforts like these not withstanding written over the years would have trouble controlling the pounds volatility the Ferguson remembers living through it my childhood was in some ways scarred by periodic sterling crises I think they were my introduction to economics as a boy growing up in Britain in nineteen ninety two came what was perhaps the worst crisis of all it was known as black Wednesday deep pocketed investors led by George Soros made enormous bets against the pound and the whole world watched as the pound collapsed the most dramatic turn in government if not extract you for twenty five years was forced on the prime minister and chancellor by the overwhelming pressure upon billions of being sold in the far next change mark Soros was said to have made a billion dollars in just one day since then the pound has only lost more ground today it's worth just a dollar twenty a fourth of what it was worth almost a century ago one big culprit lately has been brexit Britain's decision three years ago to leave the European Union sent the pound tumbling the government's chronic inability to come up with an exit plan has driven it even lower David Blanchflower is an economist at Dartmouth College the chaos that sits around a possible no deal brexit is scaring the markets and so the pound is folding steadily Blanchflower says the pound could soon be worth one dollar in the history of the pound that's never happened today the British pound with all its glorious tradition indoors but like the empire itself it's not quite what it used to be Jim zarroli NPR news New York

Britain One Pound Twenty Five Years Billion Dollars Five Pounds Three Years One Dollar One Day
"gordon brown" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

08:21 min | 2 years ago

"gordon brown" Discussed on Amanpour

"I'm Christiane Amanpour in London. Britain is trying to defuse mounting tensions tensions with Iran just today before this country gets a new prime minister the issue Iran's Revolutionary Guards capture of a British flag oil-tanker in the straight of homos on Friday claiming that it was violating international maritime rules in reality not it is a tit-for-tat escalation after the U._k.. Helped sees a tanker carrying Iranian oil near Gibraltar. The risky standoff will be a major test for the next British Prime Minister who will be revealed on Tuesday. The former mayor of London Boris Johnson is expected to win in what is a very limited vote within a special circle within his own Conservative Party and he has already demonstrated a risky willingness to bow to U._S.. Demands Hoping for preferential trade deals after Brexit and his much criticized stint as foreign secretary has raised questions about how he would handle the current crisis with Iran. His promise of Brexit deal or no deal is also highly risky. The former British is prime minister Gordon Brown warned in a speech today that crashing out of the E._U.. Would push the British economy quote off a cliff and I spoke to him in an exclusive interview about this constitutional crisis which comes amid a rising strategic crisis in the Persian Gulf Prime Minister Gordon Brown welcome to the program. Let's start with the sort of crisis of the moment which is Iran and its actions in the Persian Gulf industry. It's almost how does a new prime nine minutes to deal with this kind of thing. It's interesting because the minute I took over in dining street in two thousand seven. We had the Glasgow in London bombing so you can prepare you can look at what you want to do but events do take over now. I think Boris Johnson should be very much aware that the background to this is failure of the American Administration to stay with the Iranian deal and I think the background to this is also that Britain must remain solid without European partners but what he can do to persuade president trump to look again the conditions in which he might sign a deal with Iran is in my view very important. I am told whether it's right or wrong. Iran would accept at tougher conditions that they would move to a higher level of inspection earlier if that were something that America would press for and this may be the basis which this deal can be so now the problem is that we're dealing with an explosive situation in the middle least as a whole and so it does seem to be very important that president trump and the light of all these incidents looks at whether there can be solid basis for a deal with Iran or whether he and the Republicans are GonNa use this as an election issue and I think it really comes back to this so whatever's happening between Britain and Iran the background. The context is something that's going to be sorted out at some point and hopefully soon. What is this saying brexit situation? Where do you think Boris Johnson would put British interests? I asked this because it might seem like an obvious question but he did throw under the bus a key British diplomat in light of the fact that the president of the United States was upset by this. I think Boris Johnson is under a huge amount of pressure from from his own brexit those people who are very hard line and to European and they would prefer to see an even stronger relationship the United States even if it's based on effectively taking instructions from President trump so I think he is under a great deal of pressure in in that respect but I do feel that he is going to have to show that he is also independent and I think this will be the test of the first few days <hes> for example you know when you become prime minister you have Kohl's they go in a row you could do you call. I who takes a call I is it going to be president trump or is it going to be anglo-america is they're going to be Emmanuel macron and I think he's making decisions right from the would go about what his priorities are informed policy clearly he has to get a deal along on brexit or try to get a deal. Get US get a resolution of Brexit but obviously the American relationship is incredibly important and he has got to work out in which areas is he going to agree with President trump in which is going to be at odds with them under clearly the British policy has been wanting a good relationship with America to stick with the Europeans on Iran and I hope that that will be the position that he takes to try to press the Americans that we must try and find a way forward is the thing you to answer these checker. The time Tony Blair was prime minister. You have both been scarred by essentially Americans warmongering. Let's put it that way over Iraq. I WanNa know whether that plays into what you might think because the Iranian foreign minister has basically said unlike the piracy in the straight of Gibraltar are action in the Persian Gulf is to uphold international maritime rules as I said in New York it is Iran that guarantees the security the Persian Gulf in the streets of hormones the U. K. must cease being an accessory to Hashtag economic terrorism of the United States Prime Minister May has said that the next leader should try to continue to persuade the United States to come back into the deal or to really have a realistic negotiation on a second deal. Do you believe that Boris Johnson will try to do that. I hope he tries to persuade the Americans to do that. As I say I think he is under pressure as he was yesterday from in Duncan Smith who is one of the formerly of the Conservative Party simply to go along with American except there in the right on every issue on this but let let's wait and see I think the verdict the jury is out on this and a verdict awaits a few days but the first moves over prime minister importing it has been suggested by the Spanish that the Americans reached out to try to get the Brits to to stop this ship over Gibraltar that they had been approach. I and they're suggesting at least it's been printed this that the American is trying to lure Britain into causing or being part of some kind of causes ballet and John Bolton as you knows very eager to confront your arm excellent solent news U._K.. Is Detained. The Superman Grace Laden with Iranian oil bound to Syria in violation of E._U.. Sanctions American our allies will continue to prevent regimes in Tehran Damascus from profiting off this illicit trade so yes. Let's accept that they're sanctions against Syria but does does Britain with a new untested leader risk falling into this trap. I know we've gone around at several times. I think we have to accept that. There was a breach of sanctions in relation to Syria the question then is whether there is a longer term strategy here was this just a an incident where Britain was asked by America or given information that was relevant to the beach of sanctions and I think we've got to go back to this. What is the long term strategy and it must be surely to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons in the region the most explosive region in the world and for nuclear weapons to proliferate? There is going to be a huge problem. We've got a face up to that. Do you worry that a war or some kind of big military intervention could be on the table between the U._S. U._K.. Arising that's unlikely I think it's unlikely and I think to talk about it. In these in these these terms may suggest that <hes> both parties <hes> do not fear an aggression on one of that policy I I think I think the both trying to avoid war but I think they're fighting if you like by another means in which the breach of sanctions or piracy or whatever I don't. I don't think we're getting to that stage J._J.. I think the more important thing is the long-term security of this region and indeed of the world is at stake. If we don't find a solution to the nuclear weapons issue now brexit you have spoken out regularly against a no deal brexit and you made a speech and being very vocal now at the last moment and you have been throughout this talk about this for I listen to what president trump who obviously is going to be close. Ally Boris Johnson has to say about Boris Johnson. I like Boris Johnson. I spoke.

Boris Johnson Iran prime minister Prime Minister Britain president United States London America Gibraltar Brexit Conservative Party Christiane Amanpour Syria Persian Gulf Gordon Brown
Prime Minister, Boris Johnson And Prime Minister Gordon Brown discussed on Hugh Hewitt

Hugh Hewitt

10:56 min | 2 years ago

Prime Minister, Boris Johnson And Prime Minister Gordon Brown discussed on Hugh Hewitt

"Let me catch up on the British election understand that the special relationship matters to us a lot Great Britain has nuclear power. They have gone to war with us everywhere we've ever gone to war, South Korea. Vietnam. Afghanistan iraq. The Brits have been there, right with their nuclear power. They're rebuilding aircraft cares to jump jets. They're buying new thirty five. See, I believe they are important. We want them to leave the European Union. I do. I believe they could be. They could regain their past glory. As a trading company has it trading country opened a deal that everyone unburdened by the bureaucracy out of the European Union? And they put the question to the people three years ago. David Cameron won a majority government on the promise to have a referendum on whether or not to stay in the European Union and the people of Great Britain, voted, very healthy margin four or five percent four percent fifty to forty eight leave leave everyone in the country knew it was being talked about, like the vote for two thousand sixteen Hillary or Trump Trump won the constitutional majority. He didn't win the popular vote. I know that he won the constitutional majority of the way we've elected president since the framing of the constitution, and so Great Britain matters a lot to us. They've had great prime ministers, like Mattie Thatcher. They've had terrible. Prime Minister Gordon Brown. They've had good prime ministers. Tony blair. They've had week prime ministers. Theresa May have had funny prime ministers like the MAC. Mcmillan. They've had Wilson that all sorts of he was terrible. We need a good one right now. Theresa May has been terrible and feckless and they're not out of the peon union yet. So number of conservatives the way that it works over there as prime minister resigns as Theresa May has as the leader of her party. She remains the caretaker, prime minister and the party election, a leader who will in turn be elected that prime minister by the members of parliament. Well, how does a party with one hundred forty thousand card carrying members? I mean, these are the people really work the hustings these central committee people. These are the people who are delegates, you know, the equivalent to delegates at the Republican national convention, the democratic national convention. They are the party. How do those one hundred and forty thousand people pick a party leader interns, becomes the prime minister, will they vote? But there are a dozen. It's like the democratic primary, there it doesn't a fifteen different members of the Tory party who want to be prime minister, and they've all put out their hands. And they've said they wanted to be and they divide into two. Categories beginning, those who were leaving when Brexit was on the ballot and those who were for remaining when breakfast Brexit was on the ballot three years ago. Theresa May was a remainder. Never made a liquor sense to me that she should be the prime minister after David Cameron resigned and he resigned because he said, I was the remainder. I don't think I can leave a government that is committed to leaving and so pick a new prime minister and they did they pick threes. I mean, she she persuaded her colleagues that she ought to be it. She made Boris Johnson or foreign secretary Boris Johnson led the leave campaign with one principal deputy guiding Michael gov. Who doesn't look the part, but he's very smart also believed to be very slippery. So Boris Johnson police to be very Radic and a lot of fun. And former mayor of London, and a powerful personality says, I'm going to become the next prime minister, I'm going to stand, Michael g-o-v, who wants supported Boris Johnson for prime minister then stabbed him in the back fairly famous move and British parliament parliamentary politics and went over to Theresa May wants to be prime minister, one, other major lever wants to be prime minister Dominic Robb, so there are two lever three levers running Boris. G-o-v and Ron. Two of those three say come October thirty one we are leaving deal or no deal. Michael go says we can't leave without a deal. Michael go minute over the weekend based upon reports of a biography about the come out about him. He was something of a cocaine guy back in the day when he was a journalist. I don't know many journalists back in the day, who worked cocaine guys. But then again, I wasn't around London much. I'd have to ask Mark Stein about that. So Mike go by the way, we don't allow admitted cocaine users enter the United States. So it's gonna be tough to become the prime minister if you're we bought Brits before who, don't who had cocaine problems from coming in the United States. We don't want cocaine in the United States. And so he says he's reformed in a lot of time. We'll see how that plays out, but he's daddy that one's done. So from the leave side, there are Dominic Robb, and Boris Johnson. Over on the leave with a deal side, these are the remains who got religion. They stayed in the government. They didn't quit like David Cameron. They didn't fail like Theresa May. They say they can deliver deal to get us out. They want to lead the conservatives into the next election. They want to be the prime minister. There are a lot of the number one is a guy named Jeremy hunt. If you sent out the central casting, and you asked, please send us your very best central casting candidate for prime minister of Great Britain. They would send you back Jeremy hunt. I mean had in the pocket the whole prince of Wales handsome. He's smart. He's articulate president, like him and Boris Joe Boris. Johnson nickname is the rambling wreck from Georgia Tech goodness, the guy hasn't been to Barbara who's competent and a hundred years. And that's part of his charm. It's just kind of disheveled. Birdie Worcester character. And if you don't birdie Worcester is I can't tell you character from fiction. PG Wodehouse anyway. So Joe is going to what the way you get. The two is that all the members of parliament who are conservatives. And I think parliament's three hundred and thirty that got just under half. So what's that add up to one hundred? Seventy one hundred sixty different people hundred sixty members of parliament vote in a series of rounds. They call them crowns and the rounds are where. You've got to get at least fifteen percent of the hundred sixty which would be nine or ten for around one or you don't get to go around to, and then got ten people. They vote again, with one hundred sixty people and the one with the least votes drops off. And so you can give your buddy of I could be nominated for prime minister. So I would encourage if you're listening in Great Britain, I'd like to be on one of those ballots. Throw one my way, members of Parliament, I, I can't serve if nominated I cannot run if elected I cannot serve because I'm a proud American but, you know be fun at any of it. They get down to nine then, again, they get down to eight they get down to seven. They get down to six five four three two and then some people drop out, eventually, they get to, to get to a finalist and a semi-finalist to people, the person with the most votes parliament and the second most votes doesn't matter what order they in. That's the ballot that goes to the hundred and forty thousand. Electors. Hundred and forty thousand members of parliament. So if you get seventy thousand and one year the next prime minister Boris Johnson is heavily favored. I mean I should look up Ladbrokes. There's a. Betting house right in Ladbrokes online betting you can't use it till legal in the United States. But Ladbrokes always has a, a political thing broke prime minister. Let's see where the odds are this morning. I think for Johnson is the prohibitive favorite. But, but you never know until you actually find Ladbrokes in prime minister because they are constantly changing, and there's a big they call them big beasts. Big players. Michael Hesseltine, John Major people have been former prime minister and defence ministers and stuff like that. Right now. Boris Johnson is a five to four favorite. To become the next Tory leader. And that's prime minister Dominic Robb is a four to one favorite. Andrea lead sin is a ten to one favorite Andrea led. Some though, who's a lever remaining, excuse me. She's a remainder. Andrea, led some picks up no. No support this morning. Michael go visit tend to one. Jeremy hunt is at twelve to one and Peggy more. Dan, is it twenty to one saw Javi is at twenty two one. Those are really the only potentials when Jeremy hunt picked up, amber Rudd today, who was herself a sixty six to one player he'll go up. I think when they published the next odds, it'll be Johnson. Rob led some and hunt and it may be Johnson hunt, because the people don't really wanna leave. The people who are really remains at heart who think this is stupid, and I don't think it's stupid. I'm for them people vote. You got to do it people vote, they're all going to rally around someone. The idea is to the final round Dominic Robb just wants to get to the final round because he thinks. That the remains will prefer him to Boris and the contest is underway, and it's going to be wrapped up by July the contest is underway, and the vetting is the market is open, go back. And, you know if you're if it's legal, if you're in Great Britain, you can go bet. But I, I gotta tell you, I do not believe it makes sense to put a nother remainder in his and I'm very impressed with Jeremy hot. So is the president. I just don't think it makes a lick of sense to nominate someone for job when they were opposed to Brexit. I really really don't the timetable, by the way. For the election. I was looking at the guardian new rule one hundred sixty thousand conservative members and they will they will be casting their ballots, the week beginning July twenty second. So we are a good eight weeks away. And I'll bring you up dates on this. But you can get familiar with the names Boris Johnson Jeremy hunt. Dominic Robb Andrea led. Some, those are the ones you need to know. Michael go with the cocaine problem

Prime Minister Boris Johnson Prime Minister Gordon Brown Boris Joe Boris Theresa May Dominic Robb Parliament Jeremy Hunt Cocaine Britain Dominic Robb Andrea David Cameron Michael European Union President Trump United States London South Korea Great Britain
What Are the Ramifications of Theresa May's Exit from Brexit?

Coffee House Shots

14:54 min | 2 years ago

What Are the Ramifications of Theresa May's Exit from Brexit?

"So Theresa May has not Ted part date. She's leaving the office of prime minister after around free years in the job. What will be James trees may has joined a long list. Really now of conservative prime ministers have been brought down by the issue of Europe. Will she be remembered as a prime minister Hugh failed to deliver Brexit? Yes, in principle entry in the history. Books will be four. I've been there is another interesting question about, may that which is, it's easy to forget today with reason, having departed, the stage, two stage, said that when she will depart the sage accurately when she was riding high in the polls in those early moments of our premiership Harim was not justed liver Brexit. Aim was the change the entire nature of a conservative party and therefore, British politics. She and chief star Timothy wanted to turn the Tories into much more of a Christian Democrat style Ponti, and they have been, and it was a Wayne attempts gonna go back to almost gonna prefabs right, Tori party, but different in a way that it was going to be a Tory party. It was a more kind of working class voters than the toys have been previously and the Fady about twenty seventeen campaign, nor the only did it cut her off the Neal Brexit, because the loss of a majority meant that the. She was negotiating in Europe knew that she couldn't really walk away from the table because Paulin would NASA, uneven even if she did this wasn't going to prison wasn't going to respond to Moltke from table by can radically becoming Singapore overnight, because the parliamentary numbers simply were now but it also stymied her domestic plans, those people in the cabinet who had never been found slim, think of chancellor, Philip Hammond, Saturday, Javid, Vail, felt empowered to essentially stand up all of these ideas with more determination. That's why I think when she was talking about her domestic, like yesterday in her resignation statement was. I'm not saying stuff wasn't important on issues like mental health and domestic abuse, and the racist Bartle it. But these are not normally what promises would site as I have that principal legacies. Yes fraser. Let me look Theresa May's premiership. There was a point the full that snap election where lots of pundits house people in this room were predicting a long reign factories may. She looked on course for a very large majority landslide majorities some points. And there was a concern that she if anything she would have too much power over her party. Being in a pub with the one of her cabinet members two weeks before the election. He was literally planning, what they would towards do in their twenty twenty three budget because so long the rain front of them seem the expectation was that 'em. Choose about to put labor to the sword. And sure by doing lots of left wing stuff, which which my drinking partner disagreed. But he was saying, this is the price of ten years of power, I'm willing to pay it now as it turned out, this was a massive miscalculation. And sure people can blame her for this, nap election quite right to that's hardly, anybody said, actually, you lose your majority that was a show to every pundit every pollster, so everybody was taking a bag by just how much first of all her campaign fell apart. And Secondly, by the way, that Jeremy Corbyn made more progress than any leader of any post reporting twenty seventeen election and also there was no, I was actually I'm still I'm very happy of the result of election. Because I think Theresa May was on course to be a monster. She was behaving a boom nably to her cabinet. She was ruling by dick tat with Nick Timothy and funeral hill to her advisers. They were speaking, very harshly to elect politicians as if they were servants expressing the will of the master and reason me force that twenty seventeen legs and not as a conservative, she would have these party broadcast. We'd hardly hear the word conservative. This was about to resume and Theresa May's party, she sought a personal mandate, which intended to use to run a personal government. I think that would be a calamity, and even though the losing of that majority has led to lots of problems for the conservatives normally support. I'm still pleased that happened. I mean, Theresa May's women have incredible honor of public duty of stamina of lots of personal qualities, and I've been so many times, just awed the way that she's been able to walk through fire. And still come out the other side barely an expression changed on her face. And as journalists we always criticize people for people who are doing things that we knew we could never self as new way out of survivor two weeks injuries amaze job. So I'm not going to make out Viking disparage her bitter problem was to govern, you need to bring people with you, you need to be people person, you need to put together a whole bunch of talented people in the cabinet and share their ideas. David Cameron was able to do that to resume was not. And that ultimately is why she failed nab before we go into detail on the things that trees, the made did wrong. I think that this, plenty to go over James was appoint as we touch by she's doing very well in the polls, but she gave that burning injustices speech, which seemed to really reach to a new audience the conservative party as prime minister. What did she do? Right. One of the things he did. Right. As prime minister, the beginning was to appear different to pre-disaster I think too. Public that were slightly out with slipping then she seemed to be different kind of politician. People look to her slightly older less flashy, and they fought a sore someone. He was just going to interested in getting on the jolt approval ratings at one stage. We're not just high with the highest ever recorded for a party leaders, easy to forget that now just how popular wildly popular she was. And this is why coordinator election was such mistake, because she had repeatedly looked for country in the eye and said, I'm not going to call a general election. It's not right for the country to have a general election. I don't play. Let's go games. I'm not going to do that. And then suddenly, she goes walking wells and she finds it she go to twenty four point police, and that proves to tempting even for this bickers daughter. And I think that was the beginning of things on winding because the public will, like hang on a second, my what you were different and now you're having this election, and then obviously that was the manifesto that, that went so wrong. And I think that was the problem that resume which was she tried to act almost as an empty politics here. I only remember that famous speech at the beginning, they drink in the balls, they gossip in the tea room. I just get the job. And I think people saw who election and they were like, well, how does that compute? It just didn't quite work. The problem was. But in the election, they tried to push a Ford in into Theresa May's conservatives, they tried to push for almost going call to personality, and she's not comfortable in that role. And I think there is. I fought today pops fishing thing about the end of her premiership was the cabinet rule told that trees may was going to give a statement at ten o'clock in the morning, but they weren't told what she was going to say. And I think one of the things that I say strained relations, is that, that she's never really bought a cabinet entire discussions. The famous story about people on the on the minibus on the way to the Tory manifesto, lose telling shovel what's in it because the cabinet hun hundred proper reading it for the first time and even this week, the proximate cause of going was that she had a cabinet meeting about what she's going to say your new draw Bill, and she didn't tell them that was going to be a second referendum proposal in there. So she springs on them and you, you simply can't do that and lead. That is not how one leads politically, I mean she was fundamentally suited to different form of government where she was at Mathov and everybody else to orders. She might have been a good ruler of perhaps a slightly different country as democratic as ours. But this is not how you run a cabinet government in Britain. And even Gordon Brown wasn't as sort of dismissive of the rest of his cabinet's opinions. She ended up being, I think he's well, she never picked all you never prepared people. What it was. So in the run up to the famous checkers meeting off to export Johnson. David Davis resigned. Suddenly twenty four hours beforehand ministers, sent in the papers on their shocked, because they sent a big shift in the strategy now in room, number ten executed that shift several months ago, but they never told the Brexit secretary and they never told the foreign secretaries straight up, but this was the move, but they made and I think this was point of the problem, I think this is going to be one of the big challenges for her successor is probably Ponti is, is, as you pointed out on the twenty brings promises down over Europe Bisley divide on the subject. But you have to find some way to bring your cabinet with you to make them feel. Part of it's gushing think one of trees failures. She never did that. And then I think everyone off to twenty seventeen electrical room but you'll remembered how they have been treated by Theresa May's joint chiefs of staff is going to be humiliations. They had injured and you can say politicians Bill to rise bubbas in the national interest. But I think ever since then has been a desire to settle scores from some of capital. It's really we're seeing a bit about why she was like that. And I don't think it's because she was Ouragan or because there's a little dictator inside differ. I just think she founded difficult to talk to people difficult to have difficult conversations when m cabinet members were up to resume and they come back saying she barely moves. She barely acknowledged. I was speaking, she just found it incredibly difficult to communicate on a personal basis. And also with the country more broadly, and I think that's why she behaved. And she behaved is not that she wanted to be a little Decatur is just she just found increase. Ably on a personal level hearts, navigate this conversations that will lead to open discussion, and a compromise and always baffled me, why if you don't like Munich ation, if you don't like talking to people, by the way, people don't why you would choose politics as a career. Now trees made Clayton took into too many people in her party as you say, James, she prided has one point. I'm not going to the parliament buzz, but she did always have it in a circle and over the past couple of years has got slightly smaller, in part with loss of, of her key advisers, Nick, Timothy and Fiona hill after the snap election. Now they were credited as opposed discredited for helping her heavily when she made decisions. But they both resigned in the wake of this nap election. Result phrase, a t- think that she suffered from not having those close advisors after the election. It was said that the only of a person she really felt comfortable talking to us been for that may. Yes. Of course, she massively. Suffered from it because they were the only two people with whom she really had as of trusting relationship. Again, that's difficult if you're politically because people will come and go, you need to be able to form working relationships with people, who you hate, but you need to be together for strategic reasons. So unkind souls with save at the may boats had lost his programmer after those two left, and they were, and it was just wondering around coming up with whatever statements the last person to ride speech would say, and I think that she does have instincts instincts, that were very, very well, translated by Nick, Timothy hill, they'd worked with them. I mean, I knew anybody who works closely when people can know there are people you trust us judgment. You trust who are able to take the best of what you're trying to say and make it sound good. And similarly, people who vice you'll take. No. If you lose these people than is very difficult to carry on. And she was such a creature of these two. There was just triumvirate. And she was never able to reassemble that triumph for it. So you've got Roby Gaber chief communications officer go Gavin bar. Well, her chief of staff venue, only Robbins Briggs negotiator. She does of a habit being very reliant on the advice of three people, but they weren't ones with which he worked as well. I mean, take the burning injustices agenda. I've got suspicion that she was wasn't opposed to it, but that was only Timothy's and when he left so did that gender. So that was a major flaw, and Katy period era. Former communications officer used to have that burning injustices speech, literally posted on the door of her office because this inspired her. What she thought the me premiership ought to have been about Reza me has one of these or whatever quite itchy. Be leaves us, by the way with quite a few soundbites, one of them, of course, is the sins of the world systems of nowhere. That will be happy to be the. Famous and notorious one another one will be Briggs. It means brings it. So I think there was actually more wisdom in that than people said at the time the one that sticks mind right now is this, if you don't believe in Briggs, it, you won't be able to deliver Brexit. I think it was fundamentally her problem. But I would add to it saying, if you don't really believe in the burning injustices agenda, you're never really going to be able to now when it comes to trees maze, belief in Brexit. She did struggle, then probably one of her more difficult entities when she has us has she been vote, if there was an e referendum tomorrow, and here is her aunt, sir. If there was a Brexit vote now, would you vote Brexit, because you voted remain in the referendum? Have you changed her mind? Well, I, I don't answer pathetically questions. But what I well, I voted remain. I voted remained for good reasons, the at the time, but circumstances move on. I think the important thing now is that? I think we should all be focused onto littering Brexit, delivering the best to you what you want us to say, how would I vote in a vote now against a different background national background different economic? Now, James says she refused to really say, do you think that was approved him there in the sense that she could never be work at what the answer was a question like that. She just didn't really believe that she would change vote want resilience problems. Is she? How old for someone who was prime minister an old lack of intellectual self confidence. She was uncomfortable. Responding spontaneously to a question now, I personally not into a failure of staff work because in Delhi being very excitable. Jeremy hunt told

Theresa May Nick Timothy Prime Minister Premiership Brexit Neal Brexit James Europe Bill Cabinet Jeremy Corbyn Robbins Briggs Principal Philip Hammond Nasa Singapore Wayne Hugh David Davis Moltke
"gordon brown" Discussed on David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"gordon brown" Discussed on David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

"That's true. Well, you know with ministers apply or get offered a job in in Scotland it says his because he'd been called the being summoned so it's not their embellishing that someone else bringing them on. But no, I I want I wanted to, you know, want to I was really interested in sport. Then I was probably going to be a university of electro something like that. Because I did that for a bit. And then then I got the chance to Stanford. I tell the story that is absolutely true. That when the first time I was asked to stand for an elected office was for the Edinburgh city council, then returned cancel, and I was a student then and because they were looking for candidates, and they this guy comes to me and says, we would you like to spend the council, and I said, well, I don't know much about cancel taxes and council of has. And I keep saying that probably I never did even when I was chancellor no much of cancel taxes. And and I said, I don't know whether I can do. Very difficult to you know, sitting on the council when I'm so young. And he said look Polly said if we were going to win this seat, you wouldn't be the custody in my place. I'm not an early lesson. And did you I didn't sound for that? But I did I became the rector of Emory University. Because we found the students could elect the right to share the university. I did that for a bit. And then became a candidate. I was a candidate in that Rome where it'd be a student and didn't win the seat. And and then I was chosen for my home area, which is five in nineteen eighty three. So it was sort of. Then I arrived in parliament. And again, given we're talking on the microphone I made all fatal mistake, I ride in parliament, this guy general coffers, and you may remember he was our foreign affairs spokesman, and this is nine hundred three hundred eighty four and he liked to go to the theater in the evenings. Like to go to the opera any light to go to the films and everything else. And so it Tony Blair were around then. And so he is tasked us to deputise from in any interviews. He wanted to do. And there was this one night. He comes to me and said, I'm going to the theater said promised to do an interview it's really regret not about promised to do it. And would you stand in a radio station down on that? Would you just go there into my office at ten o'clock the phone through and the they'll do the interview? And so I went to his office at ten o'clock, the the the telephone rang, I got this guy in the end of the phone. I said, can you tell me more about this? He said, no, no, we're going straight through to the studio. And the guy comes to me and said, Mr Brian said, you represent the labor party in Britain down here. We've got a labor party. That's very stuck in the mud. Have. You got any advice to them and was able to us at I've just met your prime minister, Bob Hawke and met people from the labour party. They're doing really well said, Mr Brian he said, this is radio Auckland. You're speaking to the people of New Zealand, and our prime minister is David Lunghi bobble. What can I say I had to act as if I never even said these words, so embarrassed my first big interview foreign affairs talking to the world, and I got the country. Just incredible. I'm I'll never forget that. I thought I thought my career was. So as you went through these mountains elected parliament, and then part the shadow cabinet, and then chance of these check when you and then, of course, prime minister were you able to enjoy these milestones..

Edinburgh city council prime minister Tony Blair Emory University Mr Brian Scotland labour party Rome chancellor Polly New Zealand Bob Hawke Auckland Britain
To Curb Taliban, Afghan President Replaces Security Chiefs

BBC World Service

00:25 sec | 2 years ago

To Curb Taliban, Afghan President Replaces Security Chiefs

"Herself to her role, and the people of Japan would sincerity the empress said he was relieved that his rain ending without Japan. Having been again being engaged in a war. Hundreds of Hindu hardliners have blocked a path leading to a well-known temple in southern India to stop a group of women from reaching the hilltop shrine. The temple has become a major battleground between Hindu radicals and gender activists since the Indian Supreme Court in a landmark ruling overturned a longstanding ban on women of childbearing age from visiting the shrine BBC news. This is from our own correspondent here on the BBC World Service. I'm PASCAL harsher. Hello and welcome to the program that takes you to places others. Don't reach in this edition. We visit the Somali town where pirates once flaunted their ill-gotten bling. We also follow a dramatic story of one woman's escape from violence in Cameroon with little granddaughter into and we meet a man helping to keep a dying language alive. I I to Hungary. I don't know what's happening to my country. A young Hungarian woman told me recently, it's crazy what the government is doing. It. Seems that many Hungarians from right to left are alarmed at the policies, the Prime Minister Viktor Orban, and his feeders party of pushing through he had already increased his power to controversial extent. As far as the e u is concerned and more recently, a new Bill, which almost doubles, the hours of overtime, an employer can demand from their staff sparked demonstrations across Hungary from Budapest, Nick, THORP examines. How this crisis came to be two bronze lions flank the steps of the Hungarian parliament. They're proud forms appearing and disappearing through the billowing red white and green smoke from the protesters flares peg tyre on the steps between them stand. The riot police in full dress uniform tear gas canisters of the ready like Roman centurions. Arranged for a family photograph. It's an image which would have given the famous Hungarian architect Imre style. The mastermind of the parliament building and champion of symbolism. Pause for thought were the lines flanked by police protecting Hungarian sovereignty from the mob as the carefully scripted government. Messages would have us believe or were the lions blessing the people as they tried to retake. They're building from corrupt power hungry, mafia as the messages circling on the leaflets in the crowd suggest the roots of the protests live far away in another country with a lot of problems lines Britain at least half a million young skilled Hungarians who've left their homeland in recent years, mostly for Britain, they left for good economic reasons a minimum hourly wage four times higher than in Hungary, many others now leaving for political reasons to according to agency which finds jobs for them and interviews them beforehand. They say they've had enough of Prime Minister Viktor Auburn his feet as party and their eight year rule, the four million also Hungarian employees left behind a being asked to work longer and longer hours to cope with the ensuing labor shortage on the twelfth of December the government pushed a law through parliament, which would increase the ceiling on annual overtime hours from two hundred fifty two four hundred Hungarian jewelry work the equivalent of thirty one days overtime a year. The new law adds another nineteen to that a total of fifty extra days a year, meaning employers could demand a six day working week German car giants like Audi Mercedes and the new kid on the block BMW a drawn here by the fact that Hungarian labor is cheaper than robots and the tax breaks unfavorable exchange rates as they pay their workers in Hungarian foreign and so they caused for euros. But the social consequences of overwork. Wherever it takes place on dia, Hungary, has one of the lowest life expectancies in the EU who actually asked for the new overtime law, not necessarily the Germans Karoi. Judge. A trade union leader told me, though, they would certainly have been pleased by it more likely the owners of the many medium and small enterprises in the ruling party's empire. He suggested the vote in favor of the law should have sailed through parliament powered by these strong feeders majority instead opposition MP's, ambushed it blowing whistles and sirens. An occupying the stairs to stop the speaker reaching his pulpit. One politician. Ben Saito die broadcast the whole four hour drama live on Facebook. There were two point four million views Prime Minister Viktor Orban comes across as a weak and powerless figure in the videos alerted to. What was happening by toward is livestream. The protesters gathered in front of the building and the standoff began. For several months after his landslide reelection in April. Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban seemed to have the wind in his sales. But in just the last two weeks because of the protests, the wind direction has changed and blowing the smoke in the prime minister's is as well. As those of the riot police the new law this proven deeply unpopular opposed by eighty three percent of those consulted by one polling agency. Even before the protests began last Sunday, they marched on the state television station, which they denounced as a factory of lies when opposition MP's were prevented. From reaching the live studio to read out their demands, the event was also rich in historical symbolism in one thousand nine hundred eighty six the Hungarian uprising against the communist regime began when protesters were prevented from reading demands on Hungarian radio in the past week protests, civil said being organized in towns across the country and March is held to. Local media which now under government control back at the parliament, building the lines lookout on a snowy landscape on tourists Christmas decorations and policemen mildly festive in their red hats and on protest his happy Christmas. Happy Christmas John the crowd as though Christmas too is a match that they just have to win. Nick, stop our next. Stop is a town that became famous for all the wrong reasons, I'll in Somalia's semi autonomous region of Puntland was thrown to the center of global attention. When an American flag chip was captured by pirates operating from the town that was nine years ago. Now when I'll was known as the hub of Somali piracy, the pirates and their riches have largely gone now imprisoned dead or moved on to karma waters. But what has become of I'll and soy has been. Into safer self. Boat approaches the town of a I can't help. But notice the beautiful landscape. It time is trip of white Sunday beach is dotted with a mixture of modern buildings in traditional mix. Shift shelters behind. It is a dramatic Gordon Brown cliff possibly hundreds of meters, high it breaks to the left to reveal the distant horizon Puntland imagine how beautiful the setting this would be to shoot a movie instability in this country is the obvious deterrent. But I have really been immortalised on film, captain Phillips the Hollywood blockbuster. Starring Tom Hanks is based on the true story of an American captain Richard Phillips in two thousand nine he will sailing from Oman in the Middle East to Mamba Kenya. When his ship was captured by four heavily armed Somali pirates on skiffs, led by Abdul say the forced the American. Onto one of their boats and tried to take him ashore dramatic risk emission followed involving a US navy destroyer and seal commandos, captain Phillips will saved Mosa arrested and the other pirates killed I think of that film. They arriving Abdulah Busey's hometown, not knowing what to expect but locals tell me the little drummer here. These days the threat of piracy has declined thanks in part to the UN Security Council's decision ten years ago to allow ships to enter Somali territorial waters at the time pirates like Mosul parading with impunity the tuck ships almost every day and often return to I to try and blend into the community donors paid in brunson's flowed freely here as huge sums were paid to secure the release of ships and their crew the pirates lead lodge in. By the residents. Tell me just as they did it see the pirates terrorized people here to the locals soon grew to resent this treatment, the pirates don't come here anymore. A police chief Mohammad diarrhea SUV tells me proudly EMMY legal boats would be brought here by PM PF and rewarding with them. He PM PF is the Puntland maritime police force which has been expanding with help from the European Union. It's now the biggest marine police force in Somalia with eight hundred recruits some of them took up strategic positions around the town ahead of our rival holding rifles and tearing away from the sea into the vast country, insecurity and land is still a major problem. The Al Qaeda linked. Al Shabaab militants are active to the south local leader of these Lennox state group holds an enclave to the north, and there were fears some. Pirates may simply be lying low. But there is growing optimism in. By a group of women wash and sliced fresh fish on the beach before laying them on a mesh the local authorities king to read I of its association with piracy the women want to build businesses to process and sell their fish won't tourist to come one man tells me the persona much to see and learn from the springs that drain into the ocean to this twitching natural beauty of the land. Not to mention is on history. Overlooking the ocean is a historic fort built by Mohammed Abdullah Hassan. The charismatic religious and cultural chief who led a twenty year resistance against British and colonial rulers his religious zeal and brutal tactics in battle on him. The nickname the mud Mola. He continues to inspire some of the most ruthless

Hungary Prime Minister Viktor Orban Prime Minister Government Somalia Puntland MP European Union Prime Minister Viktor Auburn Captain Phillips Nick Bbc World Service Indian Supreme Court Japan India BBC Hilltop Shrine Cameroon
Is your heart in good shape?

Today

01:09 min | 3 years ago

Is your heart in good shape?

"People over thirty are being urged to take an online test to find out if they're an at an increased risk of suffering, a heart attack or stroke. Public health. England says as many as four out of five people who've taken the test have hearts, which are more damage than they should be given their age indicating a shortening of life expectancy. Jane francis. Kelly reports the heart age tests people over thirty to answer a series of questions about their lifestyle and physical health public health. England said the test of being completed by almost two million people more than a third had a heart age at least five years above their real age fourteen percent found it was ten years higher. Eighty four thousand people die from a heart attack or stroke each year in England health officials say about a quarter of deaths occur in those aged under seventy five and they believe eighty percent of them could be prevented by lifestyle changes such as weight-loss regular, exercise stopping smoking and cutting back on alcohol. The chief executive of the British heart foundation said millions of people were unwittingly living at high risk of a heart attack or stroke. But it was never too late to. Take charge of their health.

England NEC Afghan Taliban Donald Trump Jeremy Corbin Israel Nike Colin Kaepernick Michel Barnier USA Brad Kavanagh BBC British Heart Foundation RAY Jane Francis Executive Committee John Mcdonnell Gordon Brown Labour
President, Senate Judiciary Committee and Senator Lindsey discussed on Dana Loesch

Dana Loesch

00:14 sec | 3 years ago

President, Senate Judiciary Committee and Senator Lindsey discussed on Dana Loesch

"The horsedrawn case on carrying the senators. Casket led a procession of mourners from the academy's chapel to its final resting place. At least seven people were injured in a shooting outside a concert hall in Birmingham, Alabama this evening. The shooting happened shortly before ten

President Trump Senate Judiciary Committee Senator Lindsey Birmingham Reuters Myanmar Gordon Brown Prime Minister Alabama Brett Cavenaugh Fox News Britain Graham Kavanagh Official Seven Years
"gordon brown" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"gordon brown" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Com click on the poor pack special enter promo, code USA but do it now The seventeen, year long war against the. Taliban drags on in Afghanistan where NATO forces have a new commander USA's Chris. Barnes reports US army general Scott Miller taking over command in Kabul Sunday is Washington continues to deal with that long war. Against the Taliban there the former commander of the US joint special operations command saying at a ceremony that American forces cannot, afford to be complacent the US has been, working to increase pressure. On the Taliban with more airstrikes and more troops. To trade local Afghan forces but a Pentagon report, earlier, this year round there's not much evidence it's having a significant impact for. USA radio news I'm Chris Barnes as a former chief rabbi, says Jews you're asking whether Britain is a safe. Place to bring up their children Britain's former Prime Minister Gordon Brown said in speech in London the injustice. Against the Jewish, community must be remedied this stain, has got to be removed. This soul that exists hobby, that has been done on, the heart that is Caused has got to be, undone and it's got to be undone immediately, and it's got to. Be undone and seemed to be undone Brown made. His comments at the Jewish labor movement conference the, father, of slain twenty-year-old Iowa college student Molly Tibbets wrote an op Ed who. Des Moines Register Saturday saying don't expect my daughter's death to, promote a racist agenda the suspect in her murder. Is an undocumented immigrant from Mexico Iowa has seen an increase in anti immigrant graffiti and racist Rubio calls for USA I live alone and. Rarely have visitors so when I slipped and fell in the. Kitchen last month and couldn't get to a, phone I knew I was in trouble I could barely move I tried calling for help but no one could hear me. As I lay there I couldn't help but think of my kids and grandkids having to go on without. Me I was terrified it took eight hours from my. Neighbor to find me it could have been..

USA Taliban Prime Minister Gordon Brown Chris Barnes commander Britain Des Moines Register Iowa NATO Afghanistan Pentagon Molly Tibbets Kabul Scott Miller murder Rubio London Washington eight hours twenty-year
Zack Martin of Dallas Cowboys out with knee injury

Beyond Sports

00:26 sec | 3 years ago

Zack Martin of Dallas Cowboys out with knee injury

"And Gabor Pro, Bowl right guard. Zach Morton severed a knee injury in the second, quarter didn't return. Cowboys head, coach Jason Garrett Update on, Greg Martin And we'll get an. MRI tomorrow on it I think the initial, evaluation was was positive but we'll certainly get that reconfirm tomorrow You hit the helmet hit his name Get one low. On him is what I. Was. Told I didn't see the

Josh Gordon Browns Josh Gordon Brown Cleveland NFL Dez Bryant Espn Football Josh John Cowboys Zach Morton Dallas Bengals Zack Martin Dickerson Baker Mayfield Baltimore Ravens
"gordon brown" Discussed on Get Up!

Get Up!

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"gordon brown" Discussed on Get Up!

"We to what they're doing. As far as the skill position bring in Jarvis Landry terrorize a slot position. Green eight. My goodness. That's the best movie. Career in buying those two players with Josh Gordon Brown appears to be much better. Can be Bridgeport Obama, whoever they take with the first pick on the draft, the Cleveland Browns, select Baker Mayfield. I feel the Browns pain, their fan base. Congratulations on this. He thinks he's invincible. The NFL will bring you back or I wasn't brought here to just start. I was brought here to help turn this thing round. They've done all the right things have changed the culture. They have actually a legitimate opportunity to make the playoffs. Part two. There's just a little snapshot if you will, of the Cleveland Browns who have been the least successful franchise basically in American sports for the last several years. And as we bring Adam Schefter into the conversation here, we will pick up the conversation with the Browns with his trade that I just saw the note come across that the trade of Corey Coleman with buffalo, the Browns, get back, a seventh round pick. This is the last piece of the Carson Wentz trade. And so if we sit back now and look and I think I can give you the full screen here on this sort of the recent history of the Cleveland Browns on just how incredibly bad that has been. Here's the Carson Wentz trade in April twenty sixteen Wentz and it's much too soon to say he's going to be this, but he was on an MVP trajectory last year and he looks like he's going to be great, and you take a look at all the players of Brown's got in that it obviously just continues to add to what has been all of this misery. So how do we assess what has gone on with the Cleveland Browns in recent years shefty and what should give their fan. Dan's done cause for optimism that it's going to change now we'll before we get to the Browns in the future. I, I wanna wish you very happy birthday and let you know that I think Jalen rose is doing a marvelous job as the co host, Eric, get it this morning. So. Jio demand hell to the victors yet there you go. The Browns second firmness happening. What he's talking about. God bulls calls in this morning. They wish me happy birthday, and then I introduced them to jail Jalen and he's all excited to talk to Jalen on my shady. All right. Let's talk about the grounds. Okay. So you mentioned the seventh round pick that the Browns. We're getting back in return for Corey Coleman. It's actually a seventh round pick in twenty twenty, which means if even less than a seventh round pick in the two thousand nine thousand nine hundred and it tells you a teams around the league thought of Corey Coleman and how much they desired him..

Cleveland Browns Corey Coleman Carson Wentz Jalen rose Josh Gordon Brown Jarvis Landry Baker Mayfield Obama twenty twenty NFL Adam Schefter MVP Dan Eric
"gordon brown" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"gordon brown" Discussed on talkRADIO

"In real terms to be given to the nhs on top of what it was going to get in the first place well it looks like is going to be getting an extra twenty billion a year in five years time compared with how much et's now that's that's a pretty big increase depending which billionaire gets about one hundred and twenty billion a year now say twenty billion on top will make a bit of a difference it's worth saying that it's the kind of scale of increase even the sounds huge it's the kind of scale of increased the nhs was used to getting in the run up to the crisis twenty ten is much more and it's got since then but it's not so big by comparison with historical standards well this is certainly more than even the labor party were offered at the last general election in real terms and the question is there is not because as you say even even even fabulous day this was the sort of increase that it was giving us these massive increases under tony blair and gordon brown you're right on all those fronts actually the labor party manifestos offering really very little to the at hss last year they had lots of spending commitments but they were for big new shiny things rather than keeping things like the nhs going if you look at the period up to twenty ten and the increases were enormous we have the biggest increase in health spending my far in the new labor in the new labor years so what we've got going forward is something which takes the increases back so the sorts of levels they were in the runup to nineteen ninetyseven it's important to remember in terms of the nhs at the moment the whilst it's beginning to creek while satisfaction levels of beginning to fall and waiting times are beginning to rise add norma sleep better than it was back in nineteen ninetyseven satisfaction levels of far higher than they were that waiting lists of follower than they were then so what what hopes will happen is that this increase will at the very least stop the chefs getting any worse and keeping his a level which whilst not quite as good as it was.

nhs gordon brown tony blair five years
"gordon brown" Discussed on RadioLab

RadioLab

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"gordon brown" Discussed on RadioLab

"However you see is where he started down he doesn't gordon brown was into his office in polls up and out if you've done reasonable and so is this were right yeah is it is sad yet but yes under ram islam i would for him he's just like over and over and over says what what a reasonable police officer do more in that moment what was you know uh you could in on which should what is you know while johnson voters says a talks about rang quest in the decision is like what rank was set is awhile worse smith splitsecond judgments in circumstances that are tense serb rapidlyevolving bobby the amount is necessary this is fast it's time now make it's nothing like television there's no five cameras on it there's new change in the music there's no upswell in the music it's fast and the court recognizes that our jim plays another example a this one of the guy white guys police officers shot because they thought he had a gun get nayef but dakota got me call that he had a gun in in the split second he raised his arm like he was raising a gun up and so the cop shot him were another one call cimh at a video of police officer shooting an unarmed white man in the head and again he walked through it by beater where you're what your thoughts city elegant just superseding moment forget everything else in what you realize if you do that.

officer jim dakota gordon brown johnson smith bobby
"gordon brown" Discussed on FT Banking Weekly

FT Banking Weekly

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"gordon brown" Discussed on FT Banking Weekly

"Um and says it's a scandal he was allowed to keep his bonuses that he didn't have to give up all of his pension that he wasn't banned from ever working the city again not that he ever has worked in the financial services industry since he quit after the the gordon brown's government bailed out obvious to the tune fortyfour billion pounds at warned extraordinary nugget gordon brown throws into the into the his book is this idea that some a barclays as well as bidding for lehman brothers in two thousand eight also tried to buy rbs at the peak of the crisis i mean i find that s pretty extraordinary idea of checked it out with balked treason a few investment bankers who were involved with those banks thymine nobody gives it very much credence but it does show the extraordinary combinations that were being talked about the time i suppose and in the comments section of the article today online um a lot of our readers have made the point that sets quite hypocritical gordon brown to be criticising the state of british banking today when he was the one who put in place the lots of the postcrisis rules and of course it precrisis when he was chancellor the exchequer he ogilby stoked the the boom yard and he he oversaw what was you know um touted as as a lighttouch regulatory regime in a very welcoming m a jurisdiction four for international banks to come and dumb and and trade a lot of these assets so that some so yeah i'll he it when i mean he does address this in a way he says that you know he only got partway through his reform ideas and plans for the sector would like to dunlop moi talks about a.

gordon brown barclays lehman brothers financial services chancellor dunlop moi fortyfour billion pounds
"gordon brown" Discussed on FT Banking Weekly

FT Banking Weekly

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"gordon brown" Discussed on FT Banking Weekly

"What's your toppick gordon brown is a pretty controversial character in in the city he knows friend of the banks but these credited with a lot of people in having stepped in after the financial crisis as butch prime minister and got the g twenty countries to come together and agree a kind of post crisis consensus on the need for all the banks to raise their capital levels and to introduce certain financial stability rules that should prevent a future crisis so he's a bit of a marmite figure if i can call him that you know you i love you i love him or you hate him but he certainly isn't a natural friend of the banks and that's that comes through he's very very critical of of the british banks particularly rbs and bought claes he's very critical of the fact that bank has pay remains extremely high that the the banks remain all guaranteed and reliance on a on a government guarantee should things go wrong and yet so they they have reward for failure know is his argument he also says that it's in a scandal that no bank has it been sent to jail i would i would say that i she that's not quite true we've obviously hats several of the libel traders m a including tom hayes the ex cbs citigroup star trader who uh a serving jailtime right now and we will of course had the h boss bankers who were convicted earlier this year of defrauding small businesses at h boss um they're they're in jail as well so it's not it's not totally true that the bank has hadn't been put in jail for precrisis actions um but i guess what he's talking about and he he focuses a loss of his attention on fraud goodwin.

gordon brown financial crisis prime minister rbs tom hayes fraud
"gordon brown" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"gordon brown" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"The gordon brown and the labor government were not culpable for the crash well i'll tell you think i think britain was particularly well prepared for what happened for a couple of reasons one was can come on to talk about this from shaw the public finances were not as strong as it could been after a 10year expansion and second i do think it was a fundamental mistake to take banking supervision now the bank of england mistake which the could serve to govern i was part of rectified but did gordon brown calls the subprime crisis in america no and although i would have their questions about some of the decisions taken in two thousand seven eight over banks like the royal bank of scotland broadly speaking the government did what was necessary in a very difficult situation are you say that the government's fiscal position after ten years of expansion going into the crash wasn't as strong as it could be but is shudder chancellor you had promised to match labour's spending plans you'd promised to two eight their fiscal position so there was a difference between the two from benches on this and indeed you many tories were calling for even lighter regulation of the bank's so in a sense both political parties were singing from the same songsheet and complicit in the conditions that helped to create the crash whether it was certainly a determination to try and keep financial services competitive in the uk and that remains of course a preoccupation for anyone who's in the treasury and as i say we had not my predescessors as shudder chancellor in the consultative body have complained about the way the regulatory system was set up.

britain shaw financial services uk treasury chancellor gordon brown labor government bank of england america royal bank of scotland ten years 10year