19 Burst results for "Good Food Institute"

Fresh update on "good food institute" discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

00:40 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "good food institute" discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"Of turkey from there and it was gone. I said the coward happened. And he said well they got rid of it because of a of investigation with some animal Cruelty stuff. You're not saying the name because you're not sure because there were several different names. But i went online. This morning looked at appear investigation. Apparently of how turkeys were treated at the supposedly you main natural place. It was gruesome and that was linked to the turkey. I couldn't get a whole foods or at least they were paying some attention but it does make you think if you were going to these stores to get the cage. Free eggs to get the humanely raise whatever it is. We don't really have any idea. Did they have any idea. How trader joe's and wholefoods you know. I applaud you for carrying about animal welfare but as we've discussed and we will discuss again with whole foods. That's their own system of animal welfare. Raisings isn't even done by the animal welfare institute which is a really good one but there are competing designations for what is raised with animal welfare in mind so i actually applaud whole foods. I didn't know that they've actually removed a product from the shelf because they've been promised that they've investigated a big criticism of these kinds of advocacy organizations. We've been talking about. Is that companies. Leave it to themselves to say. Here's what we think is animal welfare. I think that cage free has a definition but free range does not and so. They're all these terms that are constantly on labels and they don't necessarily have trade organizations let alone any kind of government organization that is defining the only term that you've mentioned so far that does is organic so the organic trade act. Which is i almost. Twenty years old by now is at various redefinition. But it's the only thing that's actually got government backing of what it means to put organic on the label. Animal welfare sustainability natural completely. Free for all talking to corby kummer so corey. I never miss an offer on just one last thing before we leave this so since so many people do go to those stores. I'm sure there are other ones as well that advertise humane to house. What's the consumer supposed to do grass-fed as otherwise it. All the time about milk grass-fed melker locally raised milk et cetera. Is there some repository of information that can help. You know where to go or what to do there. Is you know a number of these organizations like the good food institute are trying to post names of people that they approve of that. They disapprove of but on but right. now it's all a question of who's bringing lawsuits against for example star. Gento put antibiotic free cheese and then there was a sting in which there were various products of of a surgeon. Do that did have antibiotics in. This has come up a lot with non gmo It's almost impossible to plausibly claim. That something is non. Gmo because the supply chain doesn't have full transparency. I actually believe in genetic engineering for products. But but that's a real welter of stuff so martyr. I don't think there is an easy way of finding out but your for example making your consumer choices based on you. Trust and whole foods is going to have a lot of these priorities in mind trader joe's and trader joe's and wegmans for example segments. Yup these are places in the boston area that have kind of hung their hat on saying we care about our suppliers and and making this packed with our Consumers as part of our brand identity. So that's kind of as good as it gets way how it should be much better talking to corby kummer. Thursday corby i. I never miss an opportunity to coal. Use the term big as a pejorative adjective. You know big tobacco big pharma. I love that just has an. It just has a visceral great. Think i read a story..

Animal Welfare Institute Corby Kummer JOE Good Food Institute Gento Corey Boston Corby Pharma
"good food institute" Discussed on The Audio Long Read

The Audio Long Read

18:11 min | 2 weeks ago

"good food institute" Discussed on The Audio Long Read

"Been engineered primarily for the benefit of the owners of farmland and huge agribusiness firms and at the expense of the public. Nowhere is this more visible than in the case of meat. Animal slaughter was industrialized by the meatpackers of late nineteenth century chicago where forty thousand mostly low-wage black and immigrant laborers slaughtered millions of cattle and swine every year on so-called disassembly lines this high volume model required standardized inputs grain and the animals that ate it suitable for industrial processing. This was supported by the us government. Which early in the twentieth century launched research programmes tax breaks and technology drives designed to facilitate intensive agriculture. To turn every form into a factory as the historian deborah fitzgerald puts it all this led to the advent of factory farms after the second world war chickens had not previously been a staple of the american diet but they proved to be particularly well suited to industrialization because they reproduce quickly and their size and egg-laying capacity or easily modified through breeding meat company. Set about creating a market for chicken meat through relentless advertising campaigns and the factory farming models soon spread to pigs and influence the development of ever larger feedlots for cattle the environmental health scholar ellen silver guild has described this as the chicken is association of agriculture. There are plenty of smart progressive critiques of this system but most of the suggested alternatives involve breaking up the food giants and downsizing or diversifying. Us farms but antitrust policy alone won't address the harms done to animals labor or the environment by modern animal agriculture. Breaking a big operations could simply generate more if maybe slightly smaller and slower factory farms as for genuinely small farms engaged in more holistic agriculture. The theory is that there are more environmentally sustainable. Protect jobs and keep local stores stocked with juicy heirloom tomatoes and humanely raised beef but building an agricultural system around small farmers that is economically viable and convinced it. Most of the population could be a tall order. Many people don't want can't afford or don't have access to organic free range farm to fork meat and produce what they can get our nuggets and proponents of going. Small often struggle to explain how their ideas can be done on a big enough scale and at a low enough price to challenge the status quo and in a time timeframe that response to our ongoing ecological crisis meanwhile experts on the environmental impacts of the food system. Mostly concur that we need to eat much less meet some proposed vegetarian and vegan diets as solutions and even meet inclusive proposals like the eat. Lancet commissions model diet recommend steep reductions especially in the global north and suggest a move away from the factory farming model of meat production however there are no signs that anything except outright bans on factory. Farm meat can achieve the required cuts and that for now is a political nonstarter. This is where cellular. Agriculture comes in the thing that could help solve the chicken. Ation of our food system is not pasture raised tens but mass produced chicken. Lewis nuggets the guardian. Whatever business you're in growth isn't just about getting bigger at adp. We believe it's about getting stronger by turning data into insights so you can build teams that work as teams by using our ai technology to help catch payroll errors before their errors and by keeping ahead of thousands of changing regulations. So you can keep ahead of everything else. Adp helps businesses like yours grow stronger every day. Adt hr talent time and payroll the guardian in nineteen thirty one. Winston churchill proclaimed that technology would one day allow humans to escape the absurdity of growing a whole chicken in order to eat the breast or wing by growing these parts separately under a suitable medium as recently as the late nineties. The remark could be cited as an example of the futility futurology but a rapid development of biotechnology and medical science is making cellular agriculture. A reality stem cells. The basic building blocks of most organisms were identified in the sixties growing in-vitro muscle tissue became possible in the seventies and the first peer reviewed research on the possibility of in vitro meat production was published in two thousand five for a cutting edge biotechnology. Cellular agriculture is actually a fairly straightforward. Process it begins with stem cells usually harvested from live animals via biopsy. The cells are placed in a bio reactor a temperature and pressure controlled. A septic steel that filled with a nutrient dense growth medium. That is basically abroad of sugars and proteins under these conditions. The cells proliferate and differentiate to form tissue fresh from the bi-reactor. You'll have an edible if not yet appetizing substance cold wet mass which must then be processed in various ways to produce nuggets ground beef and so on mimicking more complex cuts of meat a filet mignon say requires additional techniques. Such as growing muscle and fat cells on scaffold made of a material such as collagen. It's structural engineering. But at a microscopic level. The potential benefits of this technology are manifold. Most analyses of these processes suggests that they would use far less land and water and have a smaller carbon footprint then beef and dairy if powered with clean energy a big but not implausible. If they could have less environmental impact than chicken and pork it would prevent the torture and killing of billions of creatures every year and also greatly reduced the risk of diseases spreading from animals to humans. Cellular fish could have even greater ecological benefits through relieving pressure on endangered ecosystems and reducing the extensive pollution caused by the fishing industry rendering abattoirs. Obsolete would also end their inherently abusive labor practices the labor required to culture meat is highly technical and involves carefully monitoring maintaining and adjusting bio reactors without compromising the fragile septic environments. That cell growth requires. That's the polar opposite of fast. Pace slaughter and dismemberment labor which results in on average to amputations of hands fingers feet or limbs a week. In the us cellular agriculture factories would offer substantially better paying jobs than abattoirs and would also be considerably safer and healthier work environments albeit likely. Not to the same workforce. There is a parallel push to develop plant based animal product alternatives given that these kinds of foods can be made with existing technology and widely grown plants and can scale up and reduce costs quickly. They are probably a better bet than cellular agriculture to challenge the conventional animal agriculture industry in the short term the market for plant based meat and dairy is forecast to pass seventy five billion dollars globally in the next five years and includes fo- chicken nuggets from myriad companies including beyond makers of the eponymous burger but ultimately the companies behind them are offering artful imitations that they hope consumers will end up choosing instead of meat. Cellular agriculture produces real meat allowing it to take the one trillion dollar global meat industry head on. It does all this by taking ethics off the table. In the words of the good food institute an ngo that promotes alternative protein relying on market mechanisms and appealing to consumer choice. And that could improve. Its chances of disrupting factory farming. It's a moonshot that just might land. This vision of cellular. Agriculture seems like just the sort of boost tourism that silicon valley loves to inspire an exploit to a growing number of critics. The enterprise smacks of solution. Ism the foolhardy believed that technology can sidestep thorny social and political problems for some scholars of technology. Cellular agriculture is yet another exercise and eko modernist techno optimism. They argue that it is blind to the fact that actual modernisation has entailed very real and sometimes violent effects for people and societies to be modernized as the uppsala university geographer. Eric johnson put it many would prefer if everyone simply went vegan or vegetarian. There are valid concerns that silicon valley and food corporations could use technologies such as cellular agriculture. To tighten their control over the food supply and greenwash noxious agricultural capitalism current meet culturing techniques and stem cell lines are valuable intellectual property closely guarded by armies of patent lawyers and nondisclosure agreements. Critics worry that this new industry will replicate precisely the opacity and lack of accountability of the one at aims to replace to them. Cellular agriculture embraces the worst parts of the current food regime mass-produced nutritionally dubious nuggets sold at homogeneous fast food joints. There are three responses to these challenges. The first is that the potential benefits of cellular agriculture outweigh all these costs. If the technology can dramatically diminish the production and consumption of conventional meat even if it does so using the tools of financial is d- neoliberal agra capitalism this is still ethically and ecologically preferable to the status quo income at me companies such as tyson and cartel are not after all philanthropic enterprises feeding the world. Out of the goodness of their hearts. Either put differently to suggest that a world of sell meat and one of factory farms are remotely comparable is to lose all sense of perspective on the food system. The second is that cellular agriculture at a big enough scale could help restructure agricultural land use by reducing demand for animal feed thereby opening up space for more progressive food politics. If a government finance landbank bought even a fraction of the three hundred twenty million hectares currently dedicated to feeding animals in the us it could resell millions of acres at favorable terms for bold new uses. Establishing agro ecological and regenerative farms that are foundation for healthier rural communities and landscapes. Supporting community in worker owned farms providing land to people from communities that have been historically dispossessed and excluded from owning land returning lands to tribal nations re wilding and conservation initiatives. Many of these ideas are championed by critics of cultured meat. Who often suggest. It is incompatible with the holistic ecological sensibilities of slow small and local. But all of these ideas become more feasible in a world with commercially viable labra culture. Finally there's nothing inherent to cellular agriculture technology that favors venture capital or restrictive intellectual property regimes. Those who want cellular agriculture to live up to its lofty potential shouldn't just be worried about the malignant influence of capital. They should be finding practical ways to limit it. What's needed is the political vision and energy to liberate this technology from the grips of corporate stakeholders and to use it for the radical project of improving the human and animal condition around the world but if cellular agriculture is going to improve on the system it is displacing than the critics are right. It needs to grow in a way that doesn't externalize. The real cost of production onto workers consumers and the environment. There are serious questions about whether production can scale up safely and and some cellular agriculture practices need to be cast aside for instance many companies current production techniques including the ones. Eat just used for its singaporean. Nuggets use fetal bovine serum as a cell growth medium. Which is harvested from the blood of cal. Fetuses during slaughter but scale may be as much a social and political question as a purely technical one while some cellular agricultural research is being carried out at public. Universities was support from ngos such as ge fi and new harvest most research and development is being done privately substantial capital is needed for research development and commercialization but the fact that the private sector sees potential in technology. That governments have mostly ignored is a political problem. What we need are public institutions. That can nurture cellular agriculture and rain it in with public investment regulation and licensing. It is perfectly plausible that private firms flush with venture capital will find ways to scale and sharply reduce the costs of cultured meat but they will almost inevitably do so while maximizing investor value rather than social welfare the challenges to achieving scale and affordability are substantial an independent analysis for open philanthropy estimated that to be commercially viable cultured wet. Mass would need to sell at about twenty five dollars per kilogram current culturing techniques. Could put it at about thirty. Seven dollars per kilogram. This creates a paradox. Cultured meat at its current level of development is best suited to replace the most mass produced standardize readily available. Meet the chicken nugget but the east just nuggets. Were seventeen dollars a plate a price. That would flop on the mass market and may already have been significantly discounted for promotional purposes. Chicken nuggets are far. Cheaper than twenty five dollars per kilogram. Which is closer to what you might pay for free. Range beef. Perhaps the best way to overcome these challenges is to deploy the same strategy that the us government used to industrialize farming a century ago invest robustly in research and development through public universities national apps and generous subsidies between talk of the green new deal and the biden administrations ambitions for comprehensive climate crisis policy the window for public investment in environmentally responsible. Technology is unusually wide substantial and continued government investment in cellular agriculture could be a part of whatever legislation emerges more. Broadly governments should learn from economists such as mariana matsu cotto who argued that mission driven public investment in innovation is crucial to serving the public. Good we are already seeing some of this sort of proactive. Investment in regulation in places such as singapore and israel all this could serve to lower barriers to entry into the industry and could help with the establishment of regulations such as a moratorium on fetal bovine serum an industry-wide safety standards regulations in licensing should also require that cultured. Meat facilities are unionized workplaces and that where possible qualified workers displaced from the conventional meat industry be given preference in hiring intellectual. Property could remain in the public trust. Most critical visions of cellular. Agriculture are dystopia. N- unaccountable corporate giants force feeding a captive population with fake meat. Ironically that describes the food system we already have a world in which the factory farm nugget is replaced by the bio reactor brewed nugget. Would be a monumental win for animals and the environment. If tied to progressive industrial and agricultural policy it could also be a win for labor public investment land use and champions of sustainable agriculture. No this would not be a one shot. Magic bullet solution to the mini ills of food production. There is no panacea but it's a start. Chicken nuggets might represent everything. That's wrong with our current food system but cellular nuggets might just help build a.

nuggets deborah fitzgerald ellen silver association of agriculture Lewis nuggets good food institute us government adp Winston churchill us chicago uppsala university Eric johnson tyson
"good food institute" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

13:52 min | 1 year ago

"good food institute" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Vegetarian you're supporting the meat industry by buying it and there is so much innovation happening right now in terms of new textiles. You know it's interesting to kind of watch that evolve feel like the food. Space is a little bit further down the line in comparison to what's going on in apparel and garments but it's changing quickly. It's phenomenal in animal. Kind I talk about. That is one of the things that you can do is you. Just sometimes don't realize it but if you look we now have you want to look chic or trendier my God or if you want to be warmer than if you were wearing polo real fleece or for. We have apple leather grapefruit leather pineapple leather. You name it. I just saw out of Mexico's coming. Cactus leather every phenomenal things. Nike has a range of shoes now made of Ash. I think Nike or Reebok has a range of sports shoes made of trash. I just saw that Dyke's releasing this new shoe. That's completely made out of completely recycled garbage and recycled fishing net. So back to if you want to save the oceans you can save the ocean saved the cows. Save THE PLANET. All in one one. Go with fashion. How does it go like if you'RE GONNA approach? Michael Kors Ralph Lauren. Or any of these big houses. And you're having this back door kind of negotiation with them. What does that look like? It's actually pretty simple. Is that we ask for a meeting. And we start at the top and we see who we get and often we will get the buyers and we will get the decision makers and we will show them. We will go to Milan or wherever it is and some of them like Zara for example has flown as over to their neck of the woods and we will show them the videos. We'll say this is exactly what this material comes from. It's not a materials not a natural fibre. It's it's from the animal stolen from them. They're killed for it they're abused. The suffering is atrocious. It's not sustainable. That's one of the buzzwords now the humane washing words or the environmental washing words It's not sustainable. Cruelty shouldn't be sustainable. It's it's cruel it's not. We've got Patagonia regard all these areas in Argentina where the sheep are decimating. The land and the people's income should not be dependent on that. You can have other things you know. We didn't have to continue to grow tobacco to sustain people's livelihoods. So we go and we sit down and we show them and then we show them the alternatives and we show them. Here's a faux whatever. Ages fleas will lever his a range of them and these are the actually bring in the samples. We do like carpet salesman. We have a portfolio. And it's got all these samples and we hear the contact names and addresses and for these companies. Please get in touch with them. And they're actually is a new Company now that is just started up that is trying to and I forget the name But it's it's on the website but it started up trying to get investor money to help these companies just the way impossible and Burgh beyond and all these other countries food institute. What Bruce Friedrich snowing? It's a Good Food Institute folks. That's a a great idea. Yeah and we're helping funded at the moment that it needs to have investor capital and what is the general level of receptivity? I would imagine it does vary. I mean there are some old holdouts. But they've seen now what's happened with four. You know there are people that we will always use. And don't anymore. They had to go with the Times. You look at Anna wintour vogue who is never seen on the hottest summer day without colon. Ma We actually complained to the IRS. That she needed to declare all his free I. She was getting but just last week week before she was in a Stella McCartney FO- for it's just phenomenal they know now that times of changing consumer interest are changing the next generations up. Don't like cruelty to animals. They don't like the fact that if you throw a fur coat out the window or even a pair of leather shoes out the window you can come back in a decade. They're still there because they have been treated with Morton's anti decomposition chemicals so still I'm still stuck on Anna winter imagining her in her office in nineteen ninety four like swearing about the thorn in her side. That is Ingrid newkirk. She was clear because you know we invaded her off. We went up. The elevator took over her office. She locked herself in her office. We had begged her. We had written her. We'd shown everything heart of of absolute ice and I sat at the reception in Vogue and answered the phone and every single call that came in. They would ask for something. I'd say I'm awfully sorry. Vogue is closed today due to cruelty to animals and hand. Where was the receptionist at the table? Everybody fled what happened. She had to eventually come out of her office eventually. The police came and took us out of the office and It got great news and people heard all story about what happens to animals in traps and I had interactions with her since Yes but they haven't exactly been a pleasant one of them members some years back through a dead raccoon into her soup plate when she was dining at the four seasons hotel and that was in the news off to that. I am not the best way win her heart and mind that you know we had tried everything on it wasn't does. It was a member but people were angry with her because she had seen all the footage she she couldn't miss it and French. Vogue could decided they never French. Vogue of all places had decided it would never chauffeur and yet Anna. Wintour VO- carried on just really pimping for in almost every page. So then she had a birthday. I think and I actually suggested because the had been new research that showed if you are oblivious to suffering that perhaps it's not your fault that mirror neurons might not be well. Developed that your seat of empathy might. I offered to give her three brain scan so he could start sending your lettuce begging to where she did not reply. My God Well you said we provocative narrow listen one hundred percent one hundred ten percent. I it seems to me that like when you look at the food. Space THE WAY TO WIN. The war is to create Plant based analogs to people's favorite meat and dairy products make them cost effective and tastes just as good if not better and I think that applies as well in the fashion context like you need the Stella McCartney who can create something. Beautiful and magical. That isn't using these materials to kind of lead the way and once you do that if you can meet. Anna wintour standards like than than all the rest of the chips fall in line. I agree with meat and dairy week. We call them taste alikes. Because you don't really have to make an ethical decision you can just have watched the taste that you've grown up with or your tongue has been become accustomed to without any effort. It's all there. It's in the store. It doesn't cost more to to switch over to it. The same is true with clothing. And what we're finding of course is big companies now know that they've got better sports gear if they go away from the old animal I mean. Can you imagine someone climbing Everest now in a big coat so we those things poly fil and all these things are available to an edge changing the market but yes always have to be? Pyan is Joaquin Phoenix standing up at the Oscars and saying I mean that was a watershed moment. Absolutely he'd already Vegan is what the Golden Globes and the other award ceremonies up until that point and then he stood there and he decided to talk about mother love. He decided to talk about the love of mother. Cow Has for her child. And how thoughtless it is to just want to real cheese pizza topping and I just thought I love you all my heart. Wonderful man was a very courageous bold and beautifully honest and heartfelt speech that I it was on his and we are grownups aren't we. I mean that's what I say in the book is it's time to come to grips with. Who we are. We tell our children that we're kind with decent that you know. We live by principles. We don't like oppression domination. Bullying injustice will do we. Because you can't pretend that animals are tables and chairs. They're not they're animate you know anima from life is that they feel. And how awful if we don't behave like adults and take personal responsibility? I was really moved that Joaquin after the saga wards left the ceremony and in his Tuxedo went straight to the pig visual. Does it all the time? He was there last night as well. He's a true activist. And I mean you can be an activist as talk about animal come. You can be an activist. Just by deciding will eat three times a day at least and I'll make sure that that doesn't contribute or what I wear. I shampoo my hair. Whatever you do in the normal course of your day but Joaquin is an activist activists. He's like James Cromwell like a bunch of people. Pamela Anderson wherever she goes in the world she calls us and she says what's happening in Lithuania or wherever she is for animals and we tell her and she makes sure to do an action for animals in addition to whatever else she's doing thorough only so many people and they have such a command of people's attention that each one is gold dust. Each one is precious. He his heart breaks for animals. Yeah it's it's it's for real with him totally through when you look at the current state of affairs. I'm interested in how you choose your battles right like if you. If we want to identify like the biggest culprits. The biggest problems I mean factory farming to be number one to me. And it's also you're shaking your head. Maybe you disagree but let me just finish this thought in that. Also it's it's it's a situation in which there's massive popular support like. Nobody's sitting around going gay for factory farming even ardent meat eaters. Don't like that idea. And it just seems right to be reformed if not completely overturned and innovation is working towards that. But I'm interested in where you kind of come down with the work. Pitas doing to combat the you know the tragic ills and suffering that that system creates there's no question animal-based agriculture has had. Its Day at needs to go. Only people defending it really a two camps the people who do it for a living the farmers the factory farmers themselves and their trade groups who will defend it in fact a farmer was addressing a conference a few years ago and said if Ingrid newkirk where a coward have her on the truck right now which I thought. That's so nice. I hope you're single. Anyway yes don't want so. Yeah there's that but there's also I was just at the Jimmy Carter Library in Atlanta and one of the filmmakers for C. Span said to me. I really like cruelty to animals but you know I'm never going to give up eating meat and so I said to him. You can't eat anything from a supermarket now. You can't eat anything whereas somebody who didn't walk up to the cow or pig chicken shoot them in the head when they weren't looking and none of the other animals were either. You cannot do it. And he was so desperate to cling to this old habit that that's another group that we have to deal with but the way we figure out what to do. I think as we'RE OPPORTUNISTS. Because we have to see which way the wind is blowing and then helped push it in the right direction so we give away food. We were down when KFC did they think licken Vegan chicken giveaway in Atlanta. And we've been working behind the scenes with them and that will be.

Anna wintour Times Ingrid newkirk Joaquin Phoenix Stella McCartney Vogue Nike apple Dyke Mexico Bruce Friedrich Jimmy Carter Library Michael Kors Ralph Lauren Reebok Atlanta salesman Good Food Institute Argentina James Cromwell Milan
"good food institute" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"good food institute" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Human behaviour doesn't always make a ton of sense. At least on the surface, I said, would you mind if I give the dogs a little piece of cracker with some hot sauce on it, and without and see what they choose hidden brain a spicy podcast about science psychology. And why people do what they do. It's the Ted radio hour from NPR. I'm guy Roz and on the show today ideas about how we can stop the worst effects of global warming and save our planet. And what the way we might be able to do that is, by changing our diets and eating a lot less meat. I read a book called diet for a small planet by Francis morla pay and Francis Marlow, pay basically, makes the argument that in order to eat meat we have to grow massive amounts of crops that we then funnel through animals. This is Bruce Friedrich. He's co founder of a nonprofit called the good food institute the most recent statistics from the world Resources Institute indicate that it takes about nine calories fed to a chicken to get one calorie backout in the form of chicken meat, and chickens are the most efficient animal. So you're talking about nine times as much land nine times as much water nine times as many pesticides, herbicides on the crops. And then you have to ship all of those crops to feed you to operate the feed mill you have to ship the feed to the factory farm, you have to operate the factory farm, you have to ship the animals to the slaughterhouse, you have to operate the slaughterhouse. Once you crunch all of those numbers. And all of that inefficiency what we find is that meat production. According to the United Nations causes about fourteen point five percent of all human caused climate change globally. That's more than transportation. So the animal agriculture industry causes more climate change than all of the cars and the trains, and the planes than all forms of transportation combined. Here's more from Bruce Friedrich on the Ted stage. I'm gonna get one thing out of the way. I am not here to tell anybody what to eat besides convincing the world to eat less meat. Hasn't worked for fifty years environmentalists, global health experts and animal activists have.

Bruce Friedrich Francis morla NPR world Resources Institute Roz Francis Marlow United Nations good food institute nine calories five percent fifty years one calorie mill
"good food institute" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

07:55 min | 2 years ago

"good food institute" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"It's the Ted radio hour from NPR. I'm guy Roz, and I'm the show today. Ideas about how we can stop the worst effects of global warming and save our planet. And one of the ways we might be able to do that is, by changing our diets and eating a lot less meat. I read a book called diet for a small planet by Francis morla pay and Francis Marlow, pay basically, makes the argument that in order to eat meat we have to grow massive amounts of crops that we then funnel through in a most. This is Bruce Friedrich. He's co of a nonprofit called the good food institute. The most recent statistics from the world Resources Institute indicate that it takes about nine calories fed to a chicken to get one calorie back out in the form of chicken meat, and chickens are the most efficient animal. So you're talking about nine times as much land nine times as much water nine times as many pesticides, herbicides on the crops. And then you have to ship, all of those crops to a feed mill yet to operate the feed mill you have to ship the feed to the factory farm, you have to operate the factory farm, you have to ship the animals to the slaughterhouse you have to operate the slaughterhouse. Once you crunch all of those numbers. And all of that inefficiency what we find is that meat production. According to the United Nations causes about fourteen point five percent of all human caused climate change globally. That's more than transportation. So the animal agriculture industry causes more climate change than all of the cars and the trains, and the planes than all forms of transportation combined. Here's more from Bruce Friedrich on the Ted stage. I get one thing out of the way I am not here to tell anybody what to eat besides convincing the world to eat less meat. It hasn't worked for fifty years environmentalists, global health experts and animal activists.

Bruce Friedrich Francis morla Roz world Resources Institute NPR Francis Marlow good food institute United Nations mill nine calories five percent fifty years one calorie
"good food institute" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"good food institute" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Let's grow the cells directly. Yeah. I mean I mean, here's the thing, right? Like the theme of the episode of time that the effects of climate change are here. You're talking about it needs to happen now. But how do we get this to happen faster? How do we expedite this process? Well, we need, we need something like Manhattan project level moon landing level, resources put into reinventing meets. We are at house on fire were climate change is concerned, so we are probably on a trajectory right now where the market will get us to plant based meat and sell based meat over time. But we don't really have that much time. So governments that care about these issues should be prioritizing it, making it happen as quickly as possible happen. That's Bruce Friedrich. He's co founder and executive director of the good food institute. You can see his full talk at Ted dot com. My sense, is that when most people hear about climate change, faith think, you know, it'll be fine. I just I don't live near the coast, or I'll just move inland Thursday. That's a lot of people just see it. This is an issue. We see in surveys that if you all people is little warming problem or big challenge for the world. They say almost everybody. Yes. And then if you all is this going to post you a personal risk, or really harm you or your family, and most people say, no, this is Paris been stoke now I teach at the new business school in green economics..

Bruce Friedrich Manhattan good food institute Paris executive director
"good food institute" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"good food institute" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Human behaviour doesn't always make a ton of sense. At least on the surface, I said, would you mind the fide give the dogs a little piece of cracker with some hot sauce on it, and without and see what they choose hidden brain a spicy podcast about science psychology? And why people do what they do. It's the Ted radio hour from NPR. I'm guy Roz and on the show today. Ideas about how we can stop the worst affects of global warming and save our planet. And one of the way as we might be able to do that is, by changing our diets and eating a lot less meat. I read a book called diet for a small planet by Francis morla pay and Francis morla, pay basically, makes the argument that in order to eat meat we have to grow massive amounts of crops that we then funnel through animals. This is Bruce Friedrich. He's co founder of a nonprofit called the good food institute the most recent statistics from the world Resources Institute indicate that it takes about nine calories fed to a check in to get one calorie back out in the form of chicken meat and chickens are the most efficient animal. So you're talking about nine times as much land nine times as much water nine times as many pesticides, herbicides on the crops, and then you have to ship, all of those crops to feed millions to operate the feed mill you have to ship, the feed to the factory farm, you have to operate the factory farm, you have to ship the animals to the slaughterhouse you have to operate the slaughterhouse. Once you crunch all of those numbers. And all of that inefficiency what we find is that meat production. According to the United Nations causes about fourteen point five percent of all human caused climate change globally. That's more than transportation. So the animal agriculture industry causes more climate change than all of the cars and the trains, and the planes than all forms of transportation combined. Here's more from Bruce Friedrich on the Ted stage. I'm gonna get one thing out of the way. I am not here to tell anybody what to eat besides convincing the world to eat less meat. Hasn't worked for fifty years, environmentalists global health experts in animal activists have been begging the public to eat less meat and yet per capita consumption is highest it's been in recorded history. The average North American last year eight more than two hundred pounds of meat and I didn't eat any. Which means somebody out there. Eight four hundred pounds of me. On our current trajectory. We're going to need to be producing seventy two.

Bruce Friedrich Francis morla Roz NPR world Resources Institute United Nations good food institute Eight four hundred pounds two hundred pounds nine calories five percent fifty years one calorie mill
"good food institute" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

10:42 min | 2 years ago

"good food institute" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Program because we couldn't figure out what was going on my phone's, blowing up William Shatner, and I'm like, I don't know why he's calling and he kept calling. Yeah. He needed to find Kevin any thought your phone number was Kevin's phone number speaking podcasts. Liveth alfono is with us and you know, her you love her from radio dot com WGN, plus all those things, wherever and wherever the podcasting lives, and all of that, here, the you're at the very tippety top of the Tribune tower, which is no longer called the Tribune tower, three threes, whacker, we should we should rename it, and they'll be very happy about that. But let us you now you are all things that are plant based plant based editor for WGN the vegan resident, so I'll take that, I'll take that it's fun to be. That's I get to talk about plant based food plant based news plant based, lifestyles plant based news. Oh my gosh. Well, let's talk about some things. So did you know that the light life burger, which is going head to head with the beyond meat burger is in the meat case, and they are growing leaps and bounds. So much so that they are investing three hundred ten million dollars in Indiana to build the largest plant based factory. It's only going to be plant based production, two hundred thirty thousand square feet, giving Indiana ins giving hoosiers, four hundred sixty jobs in the heart of farm country. It's industry as a whole is exploding. I've seen the prices on meat hit the IPO and left Uber in its dust nowhere near it. They think it's one hundred forty billion dollar market in the next ten years. It's growing. And it's not just vegans who are helping this area grow. You are so, right? So according to the good food institute, which has its headquarters right here in, in Chicago for the department of innovation flexible -tarian market is the largest market, so that's the people who are saying you get into that meatless Monday thing. Well, hold on. Feel Good Friday. I'm about that to let me work in more vegetables. So that's really the growing markets of your market out there and you're interested in reaching those people, that's who you wanna reach. According to data. Analytics twenty two and a half percent of meat eaters are trying to work in more vegetable. So is that you wrote true? I don't eat meat. I actually have red meat fewer than twenty thirty times a week. So pretty much and down down down to like a good, fifteen times a week now from for my thirty, but it's there, how's that cholesterol role as well. It is what it is. They've got drugs for that, too. I know it is true. I, I have actually found myself. Especially like I love Indian food. So I go to this place just does as great southern all vegetarian Indian food. So it's like at and I do dig that. But I also know that item growing thing I have a friend, who's just in, of course, from LA who just invested actually in the beyond burger people, great investment happy, and they, they seem to be very happy about that right now. Well, I'll tell you something super interesting because you're talking. Okay. Let's start doing drinking. I would love to go to go sell they're going to do. Fine. They're raising ten million. No. No. This is the light life burgers. It's beyond meat competitor. They're not raising they've already invested three hundred ten in Indiana. Okay. Yeah. And that's just one little tidbit. I could go on forever. Make that out of which one either one. Okay, so beyond me. It's made out of mung bean, and pea protein. And then beats. It doesn't taste good. Ask Bill and Wendy. They both try this morning there over the over the moon, really Wendy loves it. So when you say pea protein, it just doesn't come out. I know what you mean. And among being what does it have legs muscle tendon like? Right. That stretch. I pulled my muscle tendon. I never I don't think about that when I'm eating, you know, as far as I'm concerned the red meat that I eat comes from a case from behind the wall or the guy thing deal I don't ever I never connected to the source material. All right. And then what is the other bird? There's a light life bigger and there's the impossible. The impossible rigor is the one that they invested into what what's in that. So the impossible burger does have so and it's genetically modified yeast extract to mimic, animal hime. So it's vegetable hime that mimics animal, which is why the taste is so spot on so tastes like me. Using thing for me 'cause people eat vegetarian burgers, so that it tastes like it is actual burger. Well, these are the taste just like these are the questionings people. What did you call them? The people are trying to figure out carriers. Yes. Scenario. Apparently, I'm I'm flexible because I've seen I'm seeing what you're eating what we brought in today from no bones. Chambliss out. It's outrageously guys know bones is here. They're, they're doing the wagon wagons. We got all this food. Let's first of all, MacKenzie devito's here, so MacKenzie. What's the food? We have a few different items here. We are featuring our Jack fruit fly as one of the Staples that nobody's beach club. I have a buffalo cauliflower wing with some ramps dipping sauce. And then we have our amazed balls, which is a jalapeno bacon, fried macaroni and cheese ball. It's gluten free. You know it's not gonna hurt you still bacon. No bacon. Bacon. But it's made out of Tempe. I'm sorry. What? That's the answer. Most of those ten is. So and it's got more protein than you'll ever get anything else. So the protein in the amaze bowl is going to be like through the roof because it's all Tempe, just saying, just say. The flavor and you're really, really good, outrageously. Cauliflower is outstanding. Cauliflower though. That's that's your go to now. I mean you gotta have a tile. You could make a pizza base out of it. Did you watch commercial mashed potatoes? Yes. Bread is her enemy, and so not her friend. And so she realized she had to go with the growly flower. There's cauliflower and then there's no bones collie flowers. So that's just hold onto your bootstraps people. This colleague, lower so good and, and so beautiful. I hope we get a picture of this for the website. A picture of my plate. So you, did you get into the amazed balls. 'cause row. That's yeah. Oh, yeah. Okay. Yeah. I did you know, it's funny because I bit into the amazed ball and I thought to myself, I think I think they made a mistake I think there's meeting here, but they'll tell them nothing is. Good. Awesome. And have you been keeping up with your drinks, sir? No, I have not because you. So what is the what? All right. So we got cocktails why now why does the cocktail have to be vegan, aren't they all vegan? No, not necessarily. There's different different ways of distilling. There's no tendon in the alcohol. Some fish eggs. If you're not watching carefully. Whites and whites. So, but all of the drinks that I brought for you here are one hundred percent plant based, so I will start with the coconut monkey toe, which is this tall? Delicious looking fellow here. It is coconut rum, muddled with fresh lime and our house made no bones coconut milk, with it. We make with raw sugar. You've got some toasted coconut on the rim there, the, the one in the Cup is our might and this is I, it'll it packs, a punch be careful. I think you can handle it. Yeah. Why do we find out about him? Well, he's just start with beer. I love beer, PJ squeeze like. Boys are going to be upset about this. If you're not happy. Alike. Beer, beer. Senator. All right. So this is this thing this might tiger will what's in this one here. Wow. You would think so it's basically all wrong a splash lime juice and a little bit of or. I watch. Oh, yeah. All right. Now. Complement at the time. All right. And then there's a thing that's going to pineapple in it in a Lotus flower. Yeah. This is our Drake drink on. There's a picture of Drake. Why do I have a picture of Drake going through a jalapeno wanted to come to happy hour to he didn't get the invite so we awesome spicy, tropical yummy, passion, fruit, and biscuits? Oh, sure next is going to be calling your answering machine. Yes, Bill shatner's give calling your answering machine and you're going to be wondering how does he have my number because that's exactly what everybody's even Kevin the guy who was intending to call. Does he shed or have my number? How did that happen? All right. Nobody knows stay right here. Nobody move is rolling. It is. It's a no bones beach club can no bones beach club. If you're looking for it on the street, it's on north avenue. Right. What's the address nineteen forty-three west north of right there in the corner of buck town in wicker park, right? Yep. Yeah. That's a beautiful beautiful part of the world right there. Mecca center of the life of the hipster line. Yeah, there's a lot of people walking around that six corner area all trying to out hip each other at all times hockey hip Tech's. What are we talking about? They're like wearing hamp. And then they're deciding who's cooler who's gonna sneak who's gonna try to jump the turnstile to get on the train because they don't wanna pay the man, you know, things like there's a lot of things that go on that corner, those corners. But it is a very, very, very great. If you are a vegan, vegan, vegetarian vegan dairy free, and, yeah, meat free is what you're saying. Takes your mind. To try this. You'd never know it's just and you look at it and you're like oh, gosh. This is filled with meat and dairy fried. And you just complete comfort food so good. That is it really is really good. Florida's. There's being taxed to now, what's the tax on a flout these days in Illinois? All right. Well, you're. Lexa. -tarian. Right. I went total flex right here front of it. Snap something to might have been attended. All right. Let's check in with Cam, what's coming up at the top of the hour, it's not officially summer yet, but West.

Indiana Kevin William Shatner WGN Tribune tower good food institute MacKenzie devito growly flower Tempe Drake Wendy Chicago editor Illinois Florida hockey LA Chambliss Cam
"good food institute" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

09:52 min | 2 years ago

"good food institute" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Studio on this Wednesday afternoon. You heard Terry savage is voice there. We'll talk to her about Wall Street just a couple of seconds a little bit later on the program as well. Zach question. He's a food service analyst at the good food institute. And I we are gonna talk about plant based foods, because it does interest me it's interesting in how they market it, where it sells better in the stores and the future of it, too. That's in the second half hour, Terry savage here now though. And we'll go shopping on on Michigan avenue with the new store opening up tomorrow. It's called. I missed something in retail. I don't see you wearing sweats but it's, it's called weekends road. Sis canadian. Yeah. The company was started by two Americans who left the United States during the Vietnam war. They they went north candidate. Absolutely. And routes. I spent a lot of time in Canada and routes is eight. Before the amnesty. Or when did you come back? A lot of friends here and routes, I've had a roots purse forever. Never routes is like the coolest store. I didn't know they're opening up on Michigan avenue tomorrow. In fact, Amy Guth. We'll talk about that in the daily just podcast. So that's next. Okay. So it's been a weird day on in while I was going to say on Wall Street Wall Street's down. But we're day in America. It's, it's all about Washington in many ways today. It's so amazing. Two weeks ago. It's just two weeks ago. It's hard to believe we had great unemployment numbers. We had economic growth we had the stock market approaching its all time is from a year ago, and everything was just Hallelujah glory days. And now we've got the trade thing is falling apart. Any hope of congress doing something about infrastructure seems today to a fallen apart. It's it's like we've shot ourselves right in both feet to review a little bit show, Nancy Pelosi who's under pressure from Democrats to move toward impeaching marvelously, demonstrated self control day could get done if they didn't pick a real terminal to fight them off in a meeting today. She came out of the meeting, and she said this president has engaged in a cover up, but she's just short of impeachment. This is she and Schumer. We're about to head down to the White House to talk infrastructure the president's watching this is rate about it Schumer Pelosi show up at the White House. The president tells his staff to set up and they call reporters to the rose garden for a flash briefing. Get there right away. And he goes out and says, you know, I'm not gonna do anything with this congress until they stop their investigations. Now. His aides ABC's reporting his top aide said, don't do it. Don't do this, and he went out and did anybody. Well, apparently not so, so there's that police war now between Pelosi went back up on the hill and played it perfectly, you know, they did this to him on the government shutdown to the same scenario. And she said, well, maybe he's doesn't have the confidence to get the infrastructure done. And this is how he's trying to get out of it. So he he shot himself in the foot there, I think, in America. Well, for sure. Sure. In in, in the future not futures. That's the place where we've been shot not long before that deters secretary Steve Mnuchin was on Capitol Hill talking about a variety of things, including tariffs and was pushed by an Iowa democrat on just who pays for these there may be a small number of items where the tariff may be passed on. And those are the things we will specific. Oh, you agree that American consumers will be paying more, because we've made no decisions on that to last tranches is subject to the presence approval and subject to exemptions. I think it's the importers that make the decisions on that. So there was the exchange just on Capitol Hill not too long ago. Wait, I, I don't know where to start what let's start with who pays for tariffs. Let's be very clear about this. We've already gotten a twelve billion dollar farm support Bill and there's talk of another fifteen dollars farm support Bill. So the American taxpayers are being taxed to pay to support our farmers. Why not? Because they're. You know, crops are, you know, we've had a disaster, which might yet by the way, but not for any of those reasons, but because the Chinese retaliated against our tariffs by targeting agricultural exports. I've said before illinois's big soybean exports, our largest export and the Chinese aren't buying any soybeans from the US. So it's either not growing the farmers lose money. It gets shipped to Brazil, where they buy it from there. But the farmers don't make money on that. So we've heard our own farmers. We're now using tax dollars to support them. And of course, American consumers are paying because at tax money could have been used for something else. And everybody is raising prices. Look at whirlpool, the first tariffs were on washing machines world pool makes all its stuff right here in the United. You hear us. We went out and bought a wash washing machine the day those were announce. Okay, but I didn't want us and people said, how can you do that? How can you do that? But look, when you raise tariffs. Prices are going up to consumers. And even domestic producers used that cover to raise their prices. Tom cotton. The Senator Republican Senator said a little articulately, but I what he was trying to say was, maybe it's worth the pain of these higher prices for time to exact changes structural changes in China. Okay. Is that a scenario let, let me acknowledge that we have some very real grievances against China and addressed strategically, the president might have been in a far better position than any recent president of any party to get some demands met, but the Chinese are not about to fall over and capitulate because their economy slows 'cause we don't buy as much stuff 'cause we have tariffs and it's more expensive. They are not going to capitulate. They've got five hundred years of living in poverty, if their leaders, tell them, so. Sorry, you got another twenty years of it gonna go darn, and, and they'll buckle under here. If we tell American consumers that you know, twenty five percent of the stuff on WalMart's shelves comes from China. Just read hold me to that. But I, I know I just read that all the retailers planning for their now importing for their Christmas season are not going to either have the product of going to have to raise the prices. If we tell Americans that either a prices are going up or be you'll have to only by one of this in one of that, but none of the other stuff because your dollar won't go as far. Or we say that the businesses are going to swallow the cost of an additional tariff, which they have done so far pretty much, but not in the future. Then businesses won't expand and create jobs profits. Go away in there goes. The stock market trade war is been waged poorly, you can put it in another way, Quinnipiac poll just out today showed I think it was eighty percent of the, I'm sorry. I don't have the numbers of a huge majority of people think the economy is going great. You know, everything. A minority minority like the president's trade policies. So where he could be writing really on a great economy. He's hurting himself politically with capital with the straight war. Now again, maybe he thinks that it will be worth it in the long run to suffer capital, number one. And number two, he should heed the words of that great strategist political strategist James Carville who wants set. He was a democrat. You'll remember it's the economy stupid. Why not ride on rest on your laurels of a growing economy? Growing tax revenues, we've had that of peak in individual income tax revenues up six percent last year despite the cuts and increases in corporate revenues brought money home from overseas and ask you about one side of what we have declared victory and walked away. Now, we started trade war once taco and ask you about the trading down today Qualcomm down more than twelve percent. Okay. So now the courts are being dragged into this. I'm. Let me just give you the bare outlines Qualcomm is our leader in five G telephone communications for the future. This is that really the cutting edge of where communications will be. They have some unique patents in proprietary patents that they own. It was really apple who said, wait a minute. They've got a monopoly because apple didn't like it. So a court just ruled that Qualcomm really has to share in effect share these patents. They're, they're, they're motor on them. That makes him so special in the all the research and development, they put into this won't stand up. So now Apple's fighting China and, and Qualcomm has been fighting China apple helped bring Qualcomm down. They say that they will appeal this decision, which basically invalidates many of their patents, but we are not helping ourselves America in the things we're doing in this court decision, and the trade wars, and the tariffs in the lack of ability for. Grownups to communicate about doing basic things that are needed is just not what America needs right now. And if that doesn't bring you down wait till the next segment with Terry night. Talk about growing old alone. Oh my gosh. It's the wintrust business lunch on seven twenty WGN. Schick traffic hotspots? Now here's Lauren left in overturned dump truck and deer park is blocking Quinton road northbound between lake cook and long grove in an overturned semi still causing a lot of issues on I sixty five south. The right lane is blocked near state road, fourteen for personalized traffic on demand, get the Traffix Chicago app, approved by the mortgage experts of team hockberg just search. T. R A, F F, I X Chicago more lap. Good WGN traffic central James Holt's our from Chicago's back on jeopardy, and he's winning again. He's either really good or really quick or both. Or something fishy here, we're talking to his brother.

president Qualcomm America Schumer Pelosi Terry savage China apple Michigan congress United States Chicago Zach question Amy Guth White House WGN analyst good food institute
"good food institute" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"good food institute" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Are you ready to hear the last of my interviews from Ted CARA? He I'm here Kate making sure the chair does not go anywhere. I've I've just like put like chains around its you can't take it. All right. This one's about meet, right? Yes. All right. Not meet not meet, right? Well, it tastes like me. Tried it. So yes, I spoke to Bruce Friedrich the founder of the good food institute. This is a nonprofit group that is promoting alternatives to meet including artificial meat, dairy, and eggs made from plants. Bruce, welcome to Rico decode it's great to be here. Thanks erica. So I have a full disclosure. I had a. Last night from beef. Well, you could have had a burger from plants. Well, I'm open to learning about this. So you are a Ted fellow this year. I gave a talk about the future of agriculture. So tell me I like, what's the big idea? What's the big idea? You're talking about this week. Well, the big idea is that we're going to need to produce seventy two one hundred percent more meat but twenty fifty and attempting to educate or shame the public out of consuming meat reference. Your burger from last night isn't working that. Well, so I do want to say, I'm a fan of activism. I think activism is great. But if we actually want to turn back the time on consumption, we need to be thinking about the problem in a different way. And what we've learned as we can bio mimic meet with plants everything in meet exists in plants. So we can make plant based meat, which is not I think you called it mock meters Fetig meat or something it's it's plant based meat. It's still meet it just made from plants instead of from animals, and then we can also grow meet directly from cells and both. Of these methods of making meat cause much less climate change require no antibiotics. They're just much much better for global health much better for the individuals, consuming them and much better for our environment. Quick non important question. But I guess it is important. Does it taste good? Well, that's kind of the point. Yeah. I mean, it doesn't work if it doesn't taste the same or better got and cost the same or less, and yes, everything in meat, you know, meat is made up of lipids, and he knows and minerals in water that all exists in plants. So what we found is if we apply, you know, the right amount of effort and the right amount of science. You can't actually construct meat from plants and then growing directly from cells. There are now dozens of companies the first one Memphis meets was founded in two thousand sixteen and now there are more than twenty five of them. They are all right now growing meet directly from cells and ask the process scales up because it is so much more efficient. It will cost less, and it will require probably ninety. Nine percent less land caused ninety five percent less climate change won't cause rainforest to be chopped down won't require ending any antibiotics. I mean, if you wanna scare Google the end of working antibiotics, so medical authorities are literally telling us that we are just about there. And a big part of that is all of the antibiotics that we're feeding to farm animals said tell me, let's talk a bit more about the problem. Just so that people who maybe aren't that familiar with the I guess the term would be industrial farming. Like, what is the problem with industrial farm? What is it? You know, I grew up in Indiana, as I mentioned to you before my grandfather, great grandparents had dairy farms. I grew up in a place with lots of little farms. That's no longer the way food is produced. So what is the problem with the current state of agriculture today, in your opinion, well at its most basic, it takes nine calories fed to a chicken to get one calorie backout, and the chicken is the most efficient animal, so that's nine times as much land nine times as much water nine times as many pesticides herbicides. But it's not just that you then have to grow all of those crops you ship them to the. Mill you operate the feed mill you ship the feed to the farm you operate the farm you ship the animals to the slaughterhouse you operate the slaughterhouse..

Ted CARA Bruce Friedrich Indiana good food institute Memphis Google erica Kate founder Rico seventy two one hundred percen ninety five percent nine calories Nine percent one calorie Mill mill
"good food institute" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"good food institute" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Absolutely. And. Actually, so another big piece of advocacy is on me reduction, vegan advocacy, and we we're big supporters of good food institute. Many on the show. Yeah. He's rocking. Obviously bringing in the next level meat substitutes and dairy substitutes are key. We just obviously need to be reducing army consumption in the developed world. But then as you say in the developing world, like this is not you know, we we need to skip. What we did we need to kind of like, hopefully, what they're doing with like going from no phones know four g cellular like if we can just getting the stepping, you know, skipping some coal, maybe going straight to Seoul. We can skip. Well, we did here with facts. Helter. Yeah. You know, or at least will you know, cause like India rate like they have. I mean most population was and maybe still has vegetarian. Although now that's starting to shift, but they still have the cultural memory of the ethics of it. So if you can bring in like, okay. So now, maybe they develop a taste for you know, lamb, or whatever it is that is interfering with kind of traditional mores like if you can bring in like, a like a clean meat or something that approximates, I'd taste and texture and feel on price and everything else. Bruce says, you know, then you know, maybe we can avoid right disasters to overcome a lifetime of a lifetime habit of eating meat in a different way. Yeah. Right. I mean, the cultural memories there, and you know, hopefully, yeah, it's going to be interesting because it's happening at some point. Yeah. It's. I I was on a panel with the foul with the CEO, Memphis Meads, and I think a lot. Yeah. It was like a few years ago. I think he had like the meatballs were like ten grand pop at that point. But I think they're down to a grand and are about to be ten bucks. And you know, very soon they're going to be ten cents. So that'll be a whole different saying I because I keep bogging him to come on the podcast. It's like I'm not ready yet. We're still working. We still got a long way to go. But it seems like it's advancing pretty quickly. I mean, it really is just a matter of time before they hit some inflection point. And the price will will be able to comport with consumer demand for it. And we're gonna see some big changes. Yeah. I think increasing the ability of tasty plant based options is key part of the quesion and the consciousness of you know, why we should be thinking about you know, what we're eating and do we really need to be killing an animal to sustain ourselves or do. We can. Are we not do that? And if we choose to do that, let's like really take responsibility for that. And make sure that animal lived a life wasn't going to help them back. And you know, and that's a big other part of Abbasi's integration of cannabis and psychedelic allies to help us wake up to some of these dimensions of our collective planetary being. So we're hopeful that. You know, we're going to be bringing these these allies in the culture and significant way and in the coming years, and as the sustainable, you know, plant based options are more favorable, you know. Yeah. And the consciousness of the movement everything else is really hitting its stride. So you are your grandfather's grandson. Yeah. You are. I mean, I want to get into I wanna get into the consciousness stuff because this this is like amazing to me and super trippy and awesome. Because you're carrying a certain vibration that really is the legacy of your grandfather. And it's it's fascinating to see how you've taken that mantle and a very natural way. And not only, you know, gracefully ushered it into the business that you're running with your brother. But, but also, you know, in this very activist way in this very conscious.

Bruce good food institute Seoul Memphis Meads India CEO Abbasi cannabis four g
"good food institute" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"good food institute" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"But the two places where I have a real question on that whether or not that is true way of thinking about this era is the amount of animal suffering and global warming and global warming is like a like, we will see, you know. And I think the optimistic view on animal suffering is at technology like the same thing that has led to so much improvement in so much else will will lead to the improvement here. But when you say what you just said a second ago, it was per capita meat consumption higher this year than last year expected to be higher next year than this year, the rise of China the globe, Gloria. Unbelievable amount. And you know, sometimes I think that the negative way to think about it, the the grim way to think about it would be that there is a huge extra analogy of all this human progress, and there's a very famous Ursula Gwynn's story. So if the dispossessed I don't remember, it's the one where there's basically utopian society. But it turns out that the topi- in society runs on importantly, like the utter torture. I think it's in this story of just one person. And like at the end, it's like, you know, the person that people realize that some of them just having to walk out of this utopia because like the the the connection there is to is to grim, and there there's some dimensions of that in our society. Right. That, you know, we're having all development, but you know, the causes that we're going to torture all these animals or we are having all his development, but the cost is we're going to torch the climate, and like, maybe it all worked out, and we hope it will. And hopefully, you know technology will get us out of the problems, we're creating, but if it doesn't. If it doesn't then our descendants are going to face a a world that we do not intend them to face. Even though we created it for them. This is like my darkest thought. Like if we're going to like fall into a pit like a like a psychological pit. It would be this one. It's not clear to me. Are we the heroes of our story or not? But I mean, I guess the thing is all of that could be true. And I mean, I I don't think pinker disputes any of that. I know you chatted with him about the the animal aspect of it. I I think you've chatted with him about climate change to we did a little bit. I think he's a little too. I would not say disputes it. I think he does not. I I'd say that the space it takes up his cosmetology is smaller than the space. It takes up in mind. He doesn't have disputed. I think he would agree with most of what I said he's just more optimistic than I am. Yeah. But I mean, I think you can symbol tiny Asli say, the, you know, the moral arc of the university is long, but it bends toward Justice. You know, the Dr king, quote like that can be true, and we can have huge issues with technology that caused this sort of you know, like nobody is excited. I mean, even if they're global warming. Deniers like, nobody thinks yes, let's burn as much fossil fuel as possible. Like, if you could not harm human progress and burn less fossil fuel people would be down like with that. If you could produce meat that people want to eat and not 'cause animals to suffer like, you wouldn't find anybody who opposes as anybody. Who's even to that? I don't think that's true. And I I think it's not true on a couple of levels. And and this is one thing I wanna push it. Because when I when I go to the good food institute conference, or when I when I've been in somebody's other clean meat kind of gatherings or looked at this NF talk to that people about this tragedy some reporting on it one of the things that comes up a lot that I think is going to be a real hurdle. Here is this idea of naturalness. There are actually reading a piece in the guardian just last night. Although I think it's from a little bit ago that is attacking all of these meat replacements with basically the argument that like this is highly processed artificial food like this is Franken food like I prefer eating beat like I wanna eat real natural food. And there is a..

Ursula Gwynn good food institute China Gloria Dr king Franken
"good food institute" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"good food institute" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"I think we have like a like we need to make it easier to not, but there can be this tendency to try to low the moral weight of the world onto the individuals shoulders. And if the world does not make it manageable to live in that way. Does not make it headed to to live in that way. It's very it's too much to put on individuals. And I I think we have like a language problem. There are a lot of words that we need to use it to describe what is actually going on. But we don't know. It's like we almost need a tense where we can like make clear we are describing like an outcome and a society, not a motivation, right? And like, we don't have that tents most of the time. And I think it actually I think it messes up a lot of our conversations. I think it's part of like, I'm always frustrated that you can't have these conversations. Without so many people feeling personally assaulted, and there can be this sale at like, we'll get over it. Like sorry. You feel bad. It's worse. If you're actually facing these things, but on the other hand because we need to have these conversations. It really does seem to me like a place where language fails, if people stop listening, that's not really, very helpful. And we can be self righteous. You know, as you were just, you know, you have to listen to this. But no, they don't have to listen to this. And for the good food institute in particular. I mean, like we have really good relationships with Tyson Foods with Smithfield foods with Purdue with like, huge chicken conglomerates, huge meat companies. And it's helpful to recognize that the people who run those companies like they want to do something noble. They want to feed the world high quality protein that's their goal. And when you chat with them, you know, they're like the part of what is happening is certainly the outcome. You know, the cruel treatment of animals, but that's nobody's motivation in any of those companies and a lot of the people, you know, like. They got into Tyson or Smithfield. Or whatever company they got into it with really noble motivation. You know, it's a it's a central to the world that people fed, and it's interesting to see these companies sort of reconstituting themselves as protein companies on and excited to move in this direction. I'm excited to move in a direction because it's a more efficient way of producing meat. So it will be more profitable over time. But also excited because it's an eight in human beings that we want to be part of doing good in the world. And this is a way to do sort of even more good in the world. So it's helpful to sort of recognize that and recognize that, you know, again, this is like to the degree there's cruelty it's not intentional on the part of really anybody. Like nobody like wakes up in the morning excited about factory farms or excited about slaughter houses. It's sort of an ancillary effect of of our food system. And it's something that I think is more replaceable by technology because there's not going to be a lot of defense of this industry. Let me ask you about something that. Is a little bit of a digression. But but will bring us back, which is I'm curious how you think of the overall ecosystem in which these conversations in this activism happens you are at pita for many years, and I run the good food institute..

good food institute Tyson Foods Smithfield Smithfield foods Tyson Purdue
"good food institute" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:15 min | 2 years ago

"good food institute" Discussed on WGN Radio

"He's the most famous vegan of all right? He's wonderful. Hey, Michael Stipe. He's up there to yes, right? Yeah. He's a little and there's lots of Natalie Portman and Pierce Brosnan and gonna see my beloved Morrison. Yes, now, there's a lot of them for sure there, more and more all the time. That's right. What? And so as you have been interviewing people, what is what is a common thread that comes up again. And again, people just said they had seen enough information that for one reason or another, and and everyone has a different thing that tugs at their heartstrings for one reason or another they just felt I can't be putting my dollars towards something that ultimately is bad for me. I don't want to vote against myself. So I'm not going to to keep furthering things that either I know are morally wrong, or I know that are bad for the planet. I mean, most everybody has kids and they care about Ken, my kids survive on this planet when I'm long gone people care about that. And. And then people are in it for the animals to and then certainly their own health. So and then the more people know about it, the more they know that their ripple effects to that. So a lot of people care about their wallet. Right. So, you know, it's really expensive to be sick. And if you look at what used to be the food pyramid. Now, it's the food plate. The USDA tells us to eat fruits, vegetables, and grains, what we subsidize where our tax dollars, go its meat and dairy lobby. So when people get into that kind of level of specifics. They get mad. Yeah. Well, we were that a little bit on the last segment of how people even confronted with information. People tend to answer emotionally. In fact, you've got a couple of callers and everybody listen be cool to esteemed producer, Tom hush. He's just answering the phone if you're mad at me save it for me because to him is what I always like to say. But we got a couple of callers he said really emotional things back. Yes. Like, we're. And I led the segment and saying, hey, I don't care what you eat. I just care about that. We have a planet for long enough to be on. And that it's inhabitable, but what you want and yet it like, I think people push back with emotional stuff. Yes. I saw agree. Everybody has to come to it themselves. You can lead a horse to water, but that's not gonna work out. If they don't want to the let me give you a couple of interesting stats from the good food institute, which is headquartered out of Washington DC, but they have their department of innovation here in Chicago, bad Barbera share these with me, so great. So it's not that the vegans are vegetarians are the ones fostering, the growth, it's actually the flexitime. So the people who are thinking. Yeah. Or the reduce the terriers as well. So there's two words they reduced the -tarian and flexibility. They mean, the same thing not exactly but very similar the flexible marian's, sometimes they eat meat. Sometimes they don't they definitely try to include a lot of vegetables, the reduce a specifically are trying to work their way back from meat. They don't want to cut it out. Okay. Those people are taking seventy one percent of what they eat is already meet 'cause meets on our plate all the time. They're trying to work that down to fifty five percent. And that's the real consumer drive. Let us push companies like Tyson to change their name from a meat company to a protein company and Tyson is not alone. I see your eyebrows going up. I'm amazed. You don't know this? Yes. Tyson has changed their their company. Perspective Cargill has changed. They are no longer a meat packing company. But they are now looking at being just a protein company maple leaf out of Canada, which now has headquarters here in Chicago. So very exciting maple leaf bought field roast and they bought light life. And those two companies are now under an umbrella called green leaf had. Quoted here in Chicago. They were on my show last night on nightside. So they are a protein company because people now that consumers shifting interesting. And so by by having that shift Tyson, for example, and Cargill are they saying we're actively looking for other protein sources to have in our portfolio one hundred and eighty percent their way out ahead of this because you guys were talking about population growth, and how factory farming is just not going to be sustainable, and they know that so they're looking for strategy long term, and so they have to shift their production. And they know that from a sustainability standpoint, and they know that people are requesting it so Cargill's working on. I believe I'm not a hundred percent sure of this. This will be an off the record, quote, the veggie burger from Donald and India and Tyson is a five percents investor and beyond meat and less. I said maple leaf company which was an all meat company bought field roused and Dannon bought silk almond milk. That's that these companies are saying, okay, we're not going to do the research. We're. Just going to by the people who know and we want to have a foothold here. We'll just by their brains rabies by their brains and move right in 'cause it 'cause it's gonna happen fast. I mean, you look at the UN climate control change reports. And you know, they're predicting in our lifetime things will change dramatically and that we need to change climate control really rapidly. So everyone knows it's coming and when consumers shift to more plant-based again, flexible, Terry, not the whole kit and caboodle, but you know, start moonwalking back from meat that shift is going to happen with tremendous speed and the companies need to be ready. That's really interesting. It's really interesting to look at this from a business point of view, not part of it in the big strategic decisions happening there. Oh, do we have time because I would love to tell you about two more stats from the good food institute. And Brad Barbera right now plant based milks are thirteen percent of the marketplace. I believe that thirteen percent of the milk quarter. That's huge right now meets need-based alternatives are only about one percent of the marketplace. But if they can get up to where milk is that represents a. Ten billion dollar industry right now plant based meat is a six hundred eighty four million dollar industry up twenty three percent from last year. That's really interesting that there's that much growth. I think people are hearing messages of, you know, even people that don't necessarily want to become vegetarian. They're like, you know, I do want. I want to eat healthier at the very least, I think people want to eat healthier food. Absolutely. That was plant based meets plant based foods in general, so cheeses and other things three point seven billion dollar market already up seventeen percent. And here's a really fun one that I love grub hub nineteen percent increase in plant based dishes in two thousand seventeen interests. So I don't even have the two thousand eighteen statistics right yet. That's very interesting. I think well, that's there's a lot of stuff you've given us a lot to think about we need to take a little break. We're talking.

Tyson Chicago good food institute Michael Stipe Cargill Natalie Portman Pierce Brosnan Morrison Ken producer UN USDA Canada India Brad Barbera Washington Tom hush Dannon Terry
"good food institute" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

05:10 min | 2 years ago

"good food institute" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"You. Wings. We make we make it a McLean. Meter dirty meeting him a filthy meat. We're so filthy. Watching one of those food paradise shows one time they went to a Chicago steakhouse. Speaking of dirty me, they leave it out in mold on to dry age. And then they slice the mold off. And they cook it up currently, it's delicious. So good. That's a new sometimes I go to the supermarket. I look for the Browns of the manager special needs. And I'm like that's gonna be going gonna be so pungent I want that. I don't know. I've never done. I've never eaten that kind. Would you like your makes it makes the flavor much? It makes us flavor like much stronger when you dry age. It's I think it's just it. Just I go out there that one right there. You know, when you pick your lobster out of the tank, so I want that that I want that porterhouse out there the one that's at the trough right now, get get get cut that porterhouse out and bring it to me. Would you like it? Rare medium rare. So we got the clean meat and the dirty meat. And so what they're trying to say. Is that science the people that make scientific soiling green meet right, which is people is clean. Meet finally green meet the conventional meat industry. The conventional what the versus the alternative meat industry. Yes. Conventional meat industry strongly opposes the issue strikes. A particularly strong coordinator Brassica one of the nation's top states for livestock production. You know, this is coming to California, right? Where Carl cars roll down the interstate with beef state license plate and the governor each year. Declares may as beef month. Go there, man. Honey, if you're listening, we're vacationing in Nebraska for the entire month of may, I wanna go for beef month. I think we'll go to. I think we'll go to beef month over in Nebraska, and then we'll get on the highway with my with my with my my camper on the truck. And we'll go to Sturgis now where my chaps after he know that beef. Farm groups have found unusual ally of this. Great state, Senator Carol blood. Huda thunk Carol blood a city dwelling vegetarian from the Omaha suburb of Bellevue blood grew up on a farm. A lot of blood is shed on the farm to blood grew up on the farm said she introduced a measure because agriculture is Nebraska's largest industry and needs to be protected for the good of the whole state. I'm not bringing this Bill to tell people what they can. And can't eat all asking for is truth in advertising. It's clear that meat comes from livestock and livestock is our livelihood in Nebraska. By the way, Nebraska led the nation in commercial red meat production in two thousand seventeen had the most feed cows as of last year. Livestock and livestock products sales generated twelve point one billion dollars the economy of Nebraska in two thousand sixteen. Now, the measure is certain to face resistance from food producers that sell plant based alternatives as well as those working to cut so gross those working to bring lab grown meat to market. Critics say the Bill infringes on the free speech rights of companies that produce vegetarian alternatives to real meat. John. I am in the mood. I am in the mood. All I'm in the mood for some tasty. Tasty lab-grown mutton chops. No. The good food institute. The American Civil Liberties union, the university of Missouri the animal legal defense fund and plant based food company. Tofurkey have filed a federal lawsuit challenging the Missouri law. They argue that it unfairly stifles competition to call meet meet. The Nebraska would censor food labor labels and create consumer confusion where there is none supporters of the Nebraska measure say they want to ensure people aren't misled about what they're eating blood said. She proposed the measure after seeing two women in a grocery store who couldn't tell whether a product contained meat or meat substitute. I don't I don't believe. I don't know. What this is. It looks like it's celery is this meat. No the seller. Now, it looks like what's this is. No, that's not me. That's a vegetable what's that over there? Baked potato potatoes. Were you have that with these meat potatoes? What about meat potatoes, meat and potatoes? You have to get meat separate. Maybe we need to move to a colder. I'll maybe we need to go from the vegetable oil to the back where the guy with the funny paper had his with the with the bloody smock he'll tell you what meet just you know, what you do. Walk into your local grocery store, the butcher counter. And just look. The guy at the meat counter and go which is meat. He's gonna get mad,.

Nebraska Browns Senator Carol blood Chicago good food institute coordinator Tofurkey American Civil Liberties union Missouri California John Omaha Huda Bellevue university of Missouri one billion dollars
"good food institute" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:23 min | 3 years ago

"good food institute" Discussed on Science Friday

"So on one side, you have the meat producers and farmers who want to protect their industry against this new burgeoning market for non meat products, the plant based proteins, if you will that are based from soy and other types of plants that that are watch us the words that are Societa typically with meat like sausage or hot dog or ground beef. So this is kind of trying to get ahead of the curb with with food labels to set that standard for the state before the federal legislatures can come in and try to do it themselves. And are there a lot of fake meat companies in Missouri that might have problems with this there? Are some? And that's kind of what's created this problem that's been exacerbated by this labeling law. One of the biggest companies that you'll hear of is tofurkey, which is the company that makes the vegetarian turkeys that are popular with people who are interested in that type of food during the holidays. So these companies are not happy that they're going to have to accommodate this new label because their industries just developing they spell me differently or Turkey different. You know, I'm serious about this because we have cream filled things that are not real cream, and they spell CR EM. Right, right. I mean have they thought about that kind of getting around the low? Well, there are certain types of words that are being allowed. So if it says plant based meat, then that won't be as challenged as much than certain words that are just trying to I guess what base assume is. Trick the consumer into thinking they're actually buying a different product. So I haven't seen anything yet about tricking people with the spelling of the words, but I've not I wouldn't be surprised if you don't see that. There's a lawsuit already right? There is a lawsuit. Yes. So tofurkey and also the American civil Civil Liberties Union the animal legal defense fund and the good food institute of sued the state of Missouri. This is just a month or two ago saying that this law, violates the first amendment, and that it prohibits these alternative companies from using words that consumers actually understand. So at the core of this. You see the consumer us as the pond to try to move the pendulum toward whichever side. They want whichever side wants the words regulated their way. And do you think we'll see similar labeling rules coming up in other states down the road? I wouldn't be surprised twenty sixteen Vermont had a GMO. So genetically modified label law that all the states inevitably had a fall in line with because if you want you. L your product in that state you have to abide by those laws. So from his Ari if this loss Dan than other states who want to market and sell their products in the state of Missouri will have to abide by this labeling law until federal locking around and set the standard for the entire country. We've seen some challenges also in California with using the word milk. So soy milk or almond milk, the dairy industry doesn't like that. Because they think that fooling consumers as well. There's been some challenges there. So until federalize that they it's probably going to have to fall in line with Missouri's done. Thank you so much filling in Chris no problem who said is senior reporter, and it's a K by KPI in Columbia, Missouri number. She liked to call in lots of phone calls. Eight four four seven two four eight.

Missouri Turkey American civil Civil Liberties tricking Vermont Columbia good food institute California reporter Chris Dan milk
"good food institute" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

05:00 min | 3 years ago

"good food institute" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"It's unclear what the timeframe is might take a little bit longer than we may realize, but it certainly coming in the same way that that automated driving is coming. There might be a weird acclimation period of people trying to get used to this. Idea, but I think that they will. And you know, this is explored this topic on the podcast. Paul Shapiro on row, clean, meet, who I know you know, you wrote the forward to his book and have Bruce Friedrich on. I'm trying to get from the good food institute. You know him amazing individual. I'm trying to get a lead on from Memphis meets because I think it's fascinating what's happening there. And we have a dire crisis in the form of factory farming right now that's wreaking ecological havoc on the world, we need a more innovative better way to feed our growing population which brings me to the subject of veganism your your vegan yourself. You've got a million interviews. It doesn't get people. Don't ask you that much about this, but I'm interested in in in, you know, in in what motivated you to adopt this lifestyle? I begin each big, no, I'm not very religious. I, I try. To limit my involvement as far as possible. Meat and dairy industry, but I don't see it as a kind of, you know. Purity lows. Like I come from a Jewish Vikrant so I know all about the CDs that people can develop about ritualistic purity lows with food. So I try not to go there. The reason that brought me to to veganism is purely ethical. Just a growing awareness of the enormous suffering will inflicting on billions of sentient beings just to indulge our our culinary fences in at least twenty first century. If you were an Inuit living thousands of years ago, and the only thing you have to eat around you is heels and fish then, okay. I won't try to convince you to become vegan, but if you live in New York in twenty, the defense doesn't hold right. And so I think that just for the ethical reasons, this is what we what we need to do. Yeah. Our our is almost up and I want to be conscious of your time, but I wanna I wanna end this conversation bringing it back to where we started, which is the site DEA of clarity as power and your methodology for being as clear as possible is your devotion to your meditation, practice, pasta meditation, you meditate two hours a day, so perhaps it good way to end. This is to talk a little bit about the impact that that practice has had on on you as a human being and how it informs the work that you do. I don't think I could have survived these last few years, all the money station. You know, we'll all the publication of the book and all the attention and traveling around the world. With the peace of mind that the meditation brings. I could not have done it. I have written the book in the first place without the meditation, because as you say, it brings a kind of clarity and focus, especially if you try to condense the entire history of the world into like four hundred fifty pages ambitious. Yes, you need gives you. It gave you this incredible objectivity though to see everything from ten thousand feet yet, but you need to be able to focus because there's so many details that can take you here and there and then you end up writing four thousand pages, not four hundred pages. But for me, the most important contribution of meditation as to to really be able to see a reality as it is, and to tell the difference between what is really happening and what is just stories generated by the mind, the human employer, your smartphone out, and the algorithm would tell you, this is the one so far algorithms gets close to telling you. That the Uman mind, these effects for generating fictional stories about myself about my family, about my country about the world. And it's so difficult to tell the difference between the stories we invent and objective reality. And when I came to my first meditation, which we, we, which rates it was eighteen years ago, I was doing PD Oxford, and I thought was very smart person and that I know myself.

Bruce Friedrich good food institute Paul Shapiro Memphis DEA New York ten thousand feet eighteen years two hours
Missouri Officially Defines 'Meat' to Exclude Cultured and Plant-Based Foods

Red Eye Radio

00:28 sec | 3 years ago

Missouri Officially Defines 'Meat' to Exclude Cultured and Plant-Based Foods

"New laws, making Missouri, the, first states regulate the word. Meat when used to describe foodstuffs the new law prohibits manufacturers, from using meat to describe anything other than animal flesh producers. Of food that are plant based such as tofu are taking the law court Jessica all? Me with, a good food institute says the law is unconstitutional rumors understand exactly what they're buying when they Go. Into the market and they buy a, plant meat product the Missouri Cattlemen's association had. Supported the

Nasa Neil Harrison Missouri ABC Jessica Union Township New Jersey New York City Mark Remillard Official Saint Louis Donald Trump President Trump Thirty Four Year Fifty Years Two Year
"good food institute" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"good food institute" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Trained to understand and regularly yes so that's why a lot of people think it's going to be fda and that's probably what will happen i will say the right now it's certainly is produced in queen rooms and people in white lab kurds but what will happen is that when it's time to for commercialization clean meat will be produced in breweries i mean it's gonna look like a sam adams brewery not like a factory excuse me and not like a ladder to look more like a fact of food factory than a lab and then what are these folks do i guess they can ensure there's not contamination in the actual brew but it's completely irrelevant to the current system of meat inspection that you have with usda inspectors looking at how animals are slaughtered and if they're intestines or being spilled out onto the meat and so on getting over the kind of quote unquote x factor for the general public i would imagine is going to be a hurdle in you know some interesting stuff in your book about you know how it's being presented and marketed to the public and there's this whole thing about like what are we calling ed cultured meat and it was bruce who came up with the phrase clean meet right look you did all these studies like how does that landed people and how you know how what our people thinking about this how are we going to get them to acclimate to the idea of this as a palatable alternative dea anka pun powerball turner so bruce popularized the term queen media did not invented but he did he did he did popularise it with the good food institute and with good reason they did consumer serb reason they found that clean meat perform the best but as far back as two thousand eight this dude a professor wrote a letter to the editor to the new york times that they published in which he bristled at a new york times article that had called this.

sam adams bruce good food institute professor editor the new york times usda