12 Burst results for "Goldman Sachs Barclays"

"goldman sachs barclays" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

08:05 min | 5 months ago

"goldman sachs barclays" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"A fairly quick, nice quiet show, and Some news about our upcoming Friday that we record show who that's right. Don't let me forget. Don't let me forget. All right also with us is Max trescott host of Aviation News. Talk Podcast, a CF I of the year in. He's an expert on learning to fire purchase series aircraft. Well. Hello, there and I'm GONNA. Just be quicken quiet. Okay. Well, someone, who is neither quick, nor quiet is also with us in our airplane Geeks reporter At Large Launch Pad Mazari. Low Crime your not quick reporter Lar. I think I think you've all got heatstroke. It's coming out. All right well, we're going to jump right into this episode with some of the news from the past week S- everyone ready. READY FROM THE WEST Ready deep in the heart of ready. All right our first story comes in from our Listener Linda. This is from one mile at a time surprising statistics about mileage, plus about united, mileage plus. In, we see that united has announced financing in the amount of five billion dollars secured through the airlines loyalty program. This is part of their to have seventeen billion dollars in liquidity by the end of September. Separately CNN reports that that's three times the cash. They normally have on hint. Of course all the airlines are. Struggling essentially with their cash flow situations and they they need to have. Cash on hand united is amongst them of course and It's it's an interesting strategy to take their mileage plus program and leverage off some financing based on that and the findings. He's GonNa come through Goldman Sachs Barclays. And Morgan Stanley and united will have seven years to repay that. These affinity programs like mileage plus our big business for the airlines united estimates that the value of their mileage plus program. If it was a standalone business, would be twenty billion dollars, so there's a lot of. A lot of revenue that changes hands here. We need Dan back as guest to explain all this 'cause. I tried to read how they mortgaged their frequent flyer program to raise five billion in my head started to hurt. Well I'm just thinking I I'm GonNa. Leave the show early right now because I'm GonNa, go start the airplane, Geeks, mileage plus program. I mean there's this is a twenty billion dollar business. We're wasting our time here, guys. I know it's It's pretty amazing so. The, the partners United Partners Pay United to award miles to their own customers, so says things like credit, cards and hotels when you earn united miles or mileage plus miles by reserving at a hotel or using a credit card. United gets a piece of that action and it adds up to quite a lot. So that large part of it comes from selling miles to other airline programs. I didn't see them call out specifically income from credit cards for example card I use most often still is the united mileage plus a credit card. I would imagine they must be earning. Some money from chaser manages that card. Even My my Hilton Program have the option the option of taking my awards, my my points, basically that I earned from staying at Hilton, properties and I, either get Hilton points which I can redeem for rooms, or I can get united, miles well Hilton. Kick something that United Four that for Hilton. There's value because it's you know. It's a service can offer its customers. If you look at the one mile at a time website. It gets down to break some of the stuff down. Like seventy one percent of the cat is offer twenty, one, thousand, nine hundred. Seventy one percent of the cash flow is from sales miles purchased by third party partners. But then when you look at how it was redeemed, ninety seven percent is redeemed by. using it on united. Right for travel, in yeah, only three percent of those milder redeemed for non travel rewards, it does make you start to wonder if the the planes are just kind of you know aside business. Instead they're making money off of mileage plus baggage fees. You wonder at some point Could this be one of these businesses where you know you give away the the razors for free, and you're making it all on selling razor blades. Absolutely I am particularly these days, but even you know even without the huge drop in air traffic is the result of the pandemic. Even before that the aircraft, just the promotional item Eb. Senses Yeah and in some in some way, so it's it's a really interesting business. It's not always what you What you think we also see here that you united his made an SEC filing an aide filing in in that filing. We learn a little bit more about the program. that united mileage. Plus program has over a hundred million members. And that fifty percent of United's flight revenue comes from mileage plus members. Which is that's? That's pretty high. Also the mileage plus program generated five point three billion in cash flow from sales in two thousand nineteen, and that's roughly twelve percent of United's overall revenue. So, Oh, another interesting The number here is it. The mileage plus program generated one point eight billion dollars in Eba, DA, which represents about twenty six percent of their total adjusted ebitda. That's. earnings before interest taxes depreciation and amortization. So that's that's sort of a A. Year of earnings from an operating standpoint, twenty six percent of united's basically operating earnings from this mileage plus program that stunning. I wouldn't have guessed that it looks to me like united better be very careful. Make sure they pay back this loan. Can you imagine if suddenly gets sold off? And it's run by the Chinese or so? That's what I was thinking. Is that what happens if you know bad things happen? This program goes sideways and suddenly you're mileage press. Program is owned by Morgan. Stanley Yeah. Yeah so well, you know companies corporations do. I was gonna say desperate things, but I I don't I. Don't think I'd call this desperate, but but they do things that that they wouldn't do in normal situations when they're in a crisis and quite literally I think the airlines are in crisis mode right now, and so to make sure that they have the cash flow, they can pay their employees and so forth. Some strong measures sometimes you do whatever it takes, that's right. Right next to items comes from Metro Airport News Amazon Air Fleet to grow from thirty nine to two hundred.

United United Partners Pay United Morgan Stanley reporter Max trescott Stanley Yeah Hilton Goldman Sachs Barclays CNN Aviation News Metro Airport Dan SEC Eba
Airline Cash Flow

Airplane Geeks Podcast

05:44 min | 5 months ago

Airline Cash Flow

"All right our first story comes in from our Listener Linda. This is from one mile at a time surprising statistics about mileage, plus about united, mileage plus. In, we see that united has announced financing in the amount of five billion dollars secured through the airlines loyalty program. This is part of their to have seventeen billion dollars in liquidity by the end of September. Separately CNN reports that that's three times the cash. They normally have on hint. Of course all the airlines are. Struggling essentially with their cash flow situations and they they need to have. Cash on hand united is amongst them of course and It's it's an interesting strategy to take their mileage plus program and leverage off some financing based on that and the findings. He's GonNa come through Goldman Sachs Barclays. And Morgan Stanley and united will have seven years to repay that. These affinity programs like mileage plus our big business for the airlines united estimates that the value of their mileage plus program. If it was a standalone business, would be twenty billion dollars, so there's a lot of. A lot of revenue that changes hands here. We need Dan back as guest to explain all this 'cause. I tried to read how they mortgaged their frequent flyer program to raise five billion in my head started to hurt. Well I'm just thinking I I'm GonNa. Leave the show early right now because I'm GonNa, go start the airplane, Geeks, mileage plus program. I mean there's this is a twenty billion dollar business. We're wasting our time here, guys. I know it's It's pretty amazing so. The, the partners United Partners Pay United to award miles to their own customers, so says things like credit, cards and hotels when you earn united miles or mileage plus miles by reserving at a hotel or using a credit card. United gets a piece of that action and it adds up to quite a lot. So that large part of it comes from selling miles to other airline programs. I didn't see them call out specifically income from credit cards for example card I use most often still is the united mileage plus a credit card. I would imagine they must be earning. Some money from chaser manages that card. Even My my Hilton Program have the option the option of taking my awards, my my points, basically that I earned from staying at Hilton, properties and I, either get Hilton points which I can redeem for rooms, or I can get united, miles well Hilton. Kick something that United Four that for Hilton. There's value because it's you know. It's a service can offer its customers. If you look at the one mile at a time website. It gets down to break some of the stuff down. Like seventy one percent of the cat is offer twenty, one, thousand, nine hundred. Seventy one percent of the cash flow is from sales miles purchased by third party partners. But then when you look at how it was redeemed, ninety seven percent is redeemed by. using it on united. Right for travel, in yeah, only three percent of those milder redeemed for non travel rewards, it does make you start to wonder if the the planes are just kind of you know aside business. Instead they're making money off of mileage plus baggage fees. You wonder at some point Could this be one of these businesses where you know you give away the the razors for free, and you're making it all on selling razor blades. Absolutely I am particularly these days, but even you know even without the huge drop in air traffic is the result of the pandemic. Even before that the aircraft, just the promotional item Eb. Senses Yeah and in some in some way, so it's it's a really interesting business. It's not always what you What you think we also see here that you united his made an SEC filing an aide filing in in that filing. We learn a little bit more about the program. that united mileage. Plus program has over a hundred million members. And that fifty percent of United's flight revenue comes from mileage plus members. Which is that's? That's pretty high. Also the mileage plus program generated five point three billion in cash flow from sales in two thousand nineteen, and that's roughly twelve percent of United's overall revenue. So, Oh, another interesting The number here is it. The mileage plus program generated one point eight billion dollars in Eba, DA, which represents about twenty six percent of their total adjusted ebitda. That's. earnings before interest taxes depreciation and amortization. So that's that's sort of a A. Year of earnings from an operating standpoint, twenty six percent of united's basically operating earnings from this mileage plus

United Partners Pay United United Hilton CNN Goldman Sachs Barclays Morgan Stanley EBA DAN SEC
"goldman sachs barclays" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

03:03 min | 9 months ago

"goldman sachs barclays" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Much risk then you might want to make sure you're not taking too much risk so what is something some of the things you can do to reduce the risk the buffer the risk now if you look at the definition if you look up the definition of a buffer it's either to lessen or moderate the impact or something so there's something called buffer notes and buffered annuities and that's exactly what they're designed to do they're designed to lessen the impact of a down market well unlike indexed annuities buffered notes ends buffered annuities do not guarantee the you can't lose money but they will reduce the amount of money you can lose because the market went down a lot buffer no symbol for newbies here's how they work buffer notes issued by major banks other publicly traded and they can be sold on the open market and the actual trade like a bond once they're issued some of the banks that offer these are Morgan Stanley Goldman Sachs Barclays and buffered annuities are issued by insurance companies and they're treated like deferred annuities for tax purposes so how these things work well the banks of the insurance companies these derivatives options to hedge against the market going down and to allow you to participate in some of the upside or in some cases all the upside of the market so when they make these they're not taking any risk because the transactions are already hedged in advance so a lot of times the customers the clients think well if I make a lot of money in the and I don't keep it get it all the bank's getting it they're not they're actually it's it's already been a hedge transaction with use of derivatives in advance but let me give an example what's available in the market right now on a six year term if the S. and P. five hundred goes up you make the games of the index some notes have no limits I was of very high limits so for instance let's say a company says all right over the next six years you get exactly what the S. and P. five hundred makes but the most you can make over the next six years is a hundred twenty five percent right so if you put a hundred thousand and it went up a hundred thirty percent you'll make a hundred twenty five percent if it went up a hundred percent you double your money you get it all so if one of how to present your hundred thousands out two hundred thousand and you're not paying a management fee there's no annual fees are being subtracted the only way you're getting less money than the S. and P. five hundred is if over the next six years the S. and P. five hundred goes up by more than a hundred twenty five percent so most people they made a hundred twenty five percent on the money over six years they can live with that but what if the market doesn't go up what if the market goes down so there's a buffer all right they're gonna lessen the impact of a down market and a buffer could be twenty percent so that means that if the.

"goldman sachs barclays" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

03:03 min | 9 months ago

"goldman sachs barclays" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"That much risk then you may want to make sure you're not taking too much risk so what is something some of the things you can do to reduce the risk the buffer the risk now if you look in the definition if you look up the definition of a buffer it's either to lessen or moderate the impact or something so there's something called buffer notes and buffered annuities and that's exactly what they're designed to do they're designed to lessen the impact of a down market now unlike indexed annuities buffer notes ends buffered annuities do not guarantee the you can't lose money but they will reduce the amount of money you can lose because the market went down a lot buffer no symbol for newbies here's how they work buffer notes issued by major banks other publicly traded and they can be sold on the open market and the actual trade like a bond once they're issued some of the banks that offer these are Morgan Stanley Goldman Sachs Barclays and buffered annuities are issued by insurance companies and they're treated like deferred annuities for tax purposes so how these things work well the banks and insurance companies these derivatives options to hedge against the market going down and to allow you to participate in some of the upside or in some cases all the upside of the market so when they make these they're not taking any risk because the transactions are already hedged in advance so a lot of times the customers the clients think well if I make a lot of money in the and I don't keep it get it all the bank's getting it they're not they're actually it's it's already been a hedge transaction with use of derivatives in advance but let me give an example what's available in the market right now on a six year term if the S. and P. five hundred goes up you make the games of the index some notes have no limits others of very high limits so for instance let's say a company says all right over the next six years you get exactly what the S. and P. five hundred makes but the most you can make over the next six years is a hundred twenty five percent right so if you put a hundred thousand and it went up a hundred thirty percent you'll make a hundred twenty five percent if it went up a hundred percent you double your money you get it all so if one of how to present your hundred thousands out two hundred thousand and you're not paying a management fee there's no annual fees are being subtracted the only way you're getting less money than the S. and P. five hundred is if over the next six years yes the P. five hundred goes up by more than a hundred twenty five percent so most people they made a hundred twenty five percent on the money over six years they can live with that but what if the market doesn't go up what if the market goes down so there's a buffer all right they're gonna lessen the impact of a down market and a buffer could be twenty percent so that means that.

"goldman sachs barclays" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

08:53 min | 9 months ago

"goldman sachs barclays" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"The you can't lose money but they will reduce the amount of money you can lose because the market went down a lot buffer knows about for newbies here's how they work buffer notes issued by major banks other publicly traded and they can be sold on the open market and the actual trade like a bond once they're issued some of the banks that offer these are Morgan Stanley Goldman Sachs Barclays and buffered annuities are issued by insurance companies and they're treated like deferred annuities for tax purposes so how do these things work well the banks and insurance companies they used the Riveters options to hedge against the market going down and to allow you to participate in some of the upside or in some cases all the upside of the market so when they make these they're not taking any risk because the transactions are already hedged in advance so a lot of times the customers of the clients think well if I make a lot of money in the and I don't keep it get it all the bank's getting it they're not they're actually it's it's already been a hedge transaction with use of derivatives in advance but let me give an example what's available in the market right now on a six year term if the S. and P. five hundred goes up you make the games of the index some notes have no limits I was of very high limits so for instance let's say a company says all right over the next six years you get exactly what the S. and P. five hundred makes but the most you can make over the next six years is a hundred twenty five percent right so if you put a hundred thousand and it went up a hundred thirty percent you'll make a hundred twenty five percent if it went up a hundred percent you double your money you get it all so if one of how to present your hundred thousand out two hundred thousand and you're not paying a management fee there's no annual fees are being subtracted the only way you're getting less money than the S. and P. five hundred is if over the next six years the S. and P. five hundred goes up by more than a hundred twenty five percent so most people they made a hundred twenty five percent on the money over six years they can live with that but what if the market doesn't go up what if the market goes down so there's a buffer all right they're gonna lessen the impact of a down market and a buffer could be twenty percent so that means that if the market goes down fifteen percent over the next six years you don't lose anything it was down eighteen percent he does anything it goes down twenty two percent you only lose to the extent it went down more than twenty percent you lose two percent in that scenario so if you'd invested in the S. and P. five hundred a hundred thousand dollars and it went down to you know the market went down twenty two percent he only has seventy eight thousand dollars after six years with this instrument you have ninety eight thousand right if the S. and P. five hundred went down ten percent after six years with the national investment you have ninety thousand with this investment you have a hundred thousand if the S. and P. five hundred went up a hundred percent six years in both scenarios you're gonna have two hundred thousand it went up under thirty percent well with the structured note that has a cap the only have you only making one twenty five if you actually invested the money you're making the full one thirty so that's where that's the trade off would you give up capping your your returns to be more than double your money over six years exchange for very low risk of losing money because if you think about it over any six year period the index is very rarely are down from six years ago right you might have a bad year with the markets down twenty percent or twenty five percent but six years later it's usually covered enough by then okay and if it doesn't you have that buffer now there's also indexed annuities now there's various opinions on indexed annuities some opinions are based on longstanding generalizations that were based on products that existed ten or twenty years ago they have to keep an open mind the problem with having rigid philosophies regarding specific kinds of strategies is that you're not gonna be open to new innovative ideas and products to come out and you always need to be open to innovative ideas you can't have a closed mind you have to give things a chance and view them on the merits not on what the name of the product is no friend since last year a new election duty came out they gave sixty percent the K. sixty six percent of the gains the S. and P. five hundred index with an annual reset so what does this mean annual reset that means that every year it's it's it's so near it doesn't matter what happened here before it doesn't matter what happened here after so let's say the first year is up and he made ten percent on your money that gets locked in now let's say the next year the index closed down a lot you don't give back the gains for the prior year let's do another scenario let's say the first year the index is down twenty percent you don't lose but then the next year it rebounds ten for ten percent from the low point from where close the year before you make money that year you don't have to wait for the next to get back to where it was at the time you start your contract every year starts over that's the powerful benefits of an annual reset so obviously resets are great because it locks in your profits and if you edit the index because then it lets you start fresh from a low point and the more you can reset the better a two year resets not as attractive as the one you reset so if you're gonna get to your reset you're gonna want favorable more favorable terms in terms of participation or caps but if you ever want to reset to to to justify that makes sense so that's how it works and what's nice about annual resets is that we have a really bad year it might take three four five years for your portfolio to get back to even wear with an index annuity with an annual reset if you have a really bad year you could be making great money starting at the first anniversary right so it's a much shorter wait to make up for a bad year when you have an annual reset so let me talk about a recent contract that I recommended I decline was very risk averse had all this money in cash and I'm basically negotiating with a look you got to do something you can't just keep your money in cash for the next twenty years and so he he agreed with me he put two hundred seventeen thousand dollars into an index annuity which is about twenty percent of his assets at that point right so we put twenty seventeen thousand this anybody the market did really well it has a nineteen he made almost two thirds what the market made any earn sixteen percent interest for the first year so they can't they went from two hundred seventeen thousand to two hundred fifty two thousand was a guaranteed to make sixty percent of course not but he had the chance to make sixteen percent any did make sixteen percent without market risk think about how great that is right anyone can make sixty percent of the by the right index fund or they take enough rest right but if you're not taking any investment risk and you made sixteen percent on your money in one year real returns not a bonus not an income rider actual interest credited to your account in one year the other is the other concern was liquidity right he didn't want to tie up the money right he liked having a liquid right but in this case after one year his account value was two and a fifty two thousand his surrender value if you want to cash out with two hundred thirty nine thousand so he decided to pay a surrender charge is to seventeen would have grown to two hundred thirty nine thousand after one year he could do whatever you wanted with that money I think a ten percent gain he never would've made that money in the bank so I remember how concerned he was but liquidity can be overblown Hey he had the ability to take a ten percent a year without penalty right and he wasn't a cash in his whole life savings anyway this year right so that is the magic of indexed annuities you can make money with the market goes up you don't lose when it goes down and guess what shortly after the lock in that game the market went down tremendously in March and he's not worried at all he's not giving back the gains if he doesn't make this move any money the second year no worries he's not losing any so if you want to learn how to mitigate risk had less risk but still find a way to make decent returns that's what we're here for if you don't know how to do this on your own and you want to learn more about it.

"goldman sachs barclays" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

02:29 min | 9 months ago

"goldman sachs barclays" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"The you can't lose money but they will reduce the amount of money you can lose because the market went down a lot buffer knows about for newbies here's how they work buffer notes issued by major banks other publicly traded and they can be sold on the open market and the actual trade like a bond once they're issued some of the banks that offer these are Morgan Stanley Goldman Sachs Barclays and buffered annuities are issued by insurance companies and they're treated like deferred annuities for tax purposes so how do these things work well the banks and insurance companies these derivatives options to hedge against the market going down and to allow you to participate in some of the upside or in some cases all the upside of the market so when they make these they're not taking any risk because the transactions are already hedged in advance so a lot of times the customers of the clients think well if I make a lot of money in the and I don't keep it get it all the bank's getting it they're not they're actually it's it's already been a hedge transaction with use of derivatives in advance but let me give an example what's available in the market right now on a six year term if the S. and P. five hundred goes up you make the games of the index some notes have no limits I was of very high limits so for instance let's say a company says all right over the next six years you get exactly what the S. and P. five hundred makes but the most you can make over the next six years is a hundred twenty five percent right so if you put a hundred thousand and it went up a hundred thirty percent you'll make a hundred twenty five percent if it went up a hundred percent you double your money you get it all so if one of how to present your hundred thousands out two hundred thousand and you're not paying a management fee there's no annual fees are being subtracted the only way you're getting less money than the S. and P. five hundred is if over the next six years the S. and P. five hundred goes up by more than a hundred twenty five percent so most people they made a hundred twenty five percent on the money over six years they can live with that but what if the market doesn't go up what if the market goes down so there's a buffer all right they're gonna lessen the impact of a down market and a buffer could be twenty percent so that means that if the.

Morgan Stanley Goldman Sachs B
"goldman sachs barclays" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

AM 570 The Mission

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"goldman sachs barclays" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

"The fed lowered the lending rate tell us about that and what it means in essence for everyday people. all they lowered it a quarter of a point but the fed was a split vote on this the most divided said in history seven voted for rate cuts three were against it adamantly the the the same seven members are saying that another rate cut of a quarter point is going to happen this year but the CNBC poll shows that there's a fifty percent percent chance of a rate cut in October and another one seventy two percent rent chance the rate cut in December what this means is interest rates are going to get lower so if you're buying a home or purchasing some fixed rate items typically a home you're going to get a lower rate on your mortgage so it's going to benefit some stimulus the flip side of it is still down tremendously negative because there might be doing a quantitative easing become Powell even came out and said it's possible on that we needed to resume the you're going organic growth of the balance sheet earlier than we thought so he's insinuating quantitative easing is coming well I not just coming then the fed in Jackson money into the system last week. some people say it's Q. aegis hidden term and I said on your program a year ago watch the fed is going to do Q. E. four they just might not call it that and some economists are saying completely this is a quantitative easing what it is is you know if you remember back in two thousand eight the credit markets seized up and so the fed have inject money in the system and it said that through thing called the repo market to they repossessed treasuries and mortgage backed securities from the big banks overnight to provide instant liquidity so we came really close to two thousand eight all again last week this is severity of this and so what happened there's a crack in the financial markets money stopped flowing in the fed injected on Tuesday fifty three billion dollars they did it again on Wednesday seventy five billion dollars there's been a total of of almost blew over two hundred billion dollars injection the system last week so and rates soared from two and a quarter to four point seven five percent so this is the financial challenge that we're having in the fed is you know probably going to launch another Q. he's not a matter of if but more women and we saw this happening in the actually want to set up a repo company within the fed up I'm a reporter silly they're talking about so they got to do something and so we'll find out what that actually is here in the coming weeks well every time I hear about the fed with plans like this it makes me nervous I think they're too powerful already I'd like to see them dial down a notch or two but you're saying you're officially on the record you're saying you do think it's an issue of when not if a quantitative easing four takes place. I'm on the record for that and here's some other people that are much more insight this than I am the head of the market group at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York Simon potter last week said quote the fed may have to expand the central bank she throughout outright purchases of US treasury securities to enable liquidity as conditions at the end of the quarter will be needed after years and and quote and then also JP Morgan Goldman Sachs Barclays bank bank of America all said that we're going to have a quandary easing for Goldman Sachs said the fifteen billion dollars a month a hundred fifty billion dollars toll increasing the balance sheet bank of America says they have to do this is the long term solution Barkley said something similar and we are seeing that this is going to push the central bank she'd much higher in the Morgan said the fed may need to start the open market operations sooner rather than later so it is coming the big banks are saying we're on the doorstep of this as well and the one thing that's guaranteed one Q. we kick sand is that the value of the dollar goes down is that correct the value of the dollar goes down usually it supports the indexes in stocks bonds mutual funds it causes them to go up usually a gold is the number one asset in this environment gold rallied fifty percent a whole bunch but the troubling factors all this does is make money cheat and the bank of international settlements is put out a warning here last week that financial disaster is a minute us seventeen trillion dollars of the global negative interest rates and David Rosenberg is a global economist said today there's a hundred percent chance of recession next twelve months old this is were on the the cost this of everything I've been talking about now we have the fed confirming this with their actions and also the Big Bang. you're saying it's coming gold is the place to put get some money to take advantage of upward tick single yeah well and the the so the reason I ask that last questions because every time the dollar gets weaker gold gets stronger so friends if you're hearing this and you're saying but wait a minute I've got you know my my retirement is mostly cash or paper now is a great time before that Q. E. four hits to transfer into tangible commodities that that won't that will gain in value as opposed to lowering their value which the dollar in paper currency well it's just it's just a natural common sense thing and I don't trust anybody on that transaction the way I trust landmark gold eight four four six oh four two five seven five the coming bail in is there free white paper their new newsletter gold is it to now a golden opportunity you get these papers gets yourself caught up on facts and then.

fifty percent hundred fifty billion dollars seventy five billion dollars fifty three billion dollars two hundred billion dollars seventeen trillion dollars fifteen billion dollars one seventy two percent seven five percent hundred percent twelve months
"goldman sachs barclays" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"goldman sachs barclays" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Anyway, I can tell you as a certified financial planner and someone who is always working with people that seem to be the same situation, our clients that are in retirement, most of them tell me, look if I had my money doubled tripled. I really wouldn't live any different. But if I lost money that would be bad that would affect my lifestyle. And so for a lot of our clients, and we tend to have this niche that we focus on how do we help our clients make money get interest be productive with their assets. But not take a lot of risk. That's the conundrum because we all seen the charts. If you want more return you have to take more risk. And if you take no. No risk. You don't get any return. But there are exceptions to that rule, and there are ways to get teeth returns and have less risk. We know that stocks had a certain amount of risk. And it's tenuous tool to use for most people that are investing because the studies show that people tend to get panicked and sell when the market goes down. And then after it's been doing, well, they tend to have more of an appetite for equity exposure, and a lot of people don't like that a lot of people don't do well with stocks, and it's our job to make sure that whatever stocks clients own that they pay little cost as possible to tax efficient, and they're disciplined as we don't bite off too much risk because then they'll be calling us saying, oh, we can't take this get us out. And it's their money. There's nothing we can do. We don't wanna put them in a position. So to the extent that equities and stocks and ETF's are suitable for our clients will absolately help our clients get the right exposure to stocks at our accounts that we manage Charles Schwab. But there's a lot of people that can't take that much risk. Don't wanna take that much risk, and they still need to get a decent level return. So I wanna talk about a few things that could be of interest to you. If you are looking to have very little risk and still make these returns. Now, I have a lot of people say to me, I have CDs making and CDs, and it's better than it used to be. But I don't need all my money in CD's. I probably shouldn't have all my money and sees what else can I do to make more interest. So there are companies there are banks that are getting involved in the structured CD marketplace similar to index. Newbies. Sees that are linked to the returns of an index. Some of the players that are big in this space, Goldman Sachs. Barclays J P Morgan Chase. They all issue structured CDs. And instead of giving you interest based on whatever interest rates are we know it's about two and a half percent on CDs. Big if you interest based on the returns of ESPN five hundred index or some other index, and you don't. Get all the upside. They may say you only make over the next five years, you can make whatever the five hundred is if it's up ten you get ten percent of twenty twenty if it's forty he get forty but fifty we're going to cap you at forty percent interest over five years, and so historically if you look since nineteen eighty and you look at all the different five-year returns starting every day. So you knew day looking at the next five-year return the average five year returned for the s&p five hundred is about fifty eight percent. So on the average if you have a five year equity linked CD issued by a Bank then on the average the returns were fifty eight percent. You would get forty which amounts to over seven percent annualized return on a CD. Now there are going to be five year periods where you don't make any interest. But on the average you're gonna make over seven percent a year on a five CD. Now, if the issuer has financial troubles and your CDs at the IC insured, which they are then federal government will give you your money. That your own by the Bank, if the Bank was out of business or it becomes insolvent. Now, obviously, that's remote. But for some people they like having that FDIC insurance. Now, if you wanna to take the credit risk of the Bank and not have if the I insurance having note, let's go to structure note, you can get a lot better terms. Some of the banks are actually offering structured five-year notes linked to the five.

Charles Schwab Morgan Chase FDIC Goldman Sachs Barclays ESPN five year five-year fifty eight percent seven percent five years forty percent ten percent
"goldman sachs barclays" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"goldman sachs barclays" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Anyway, I can tell you as a certified financial planner someone who is always working with people that seems to be the same situation our clients that are in or near retirement, most of them tell me, look if I had my money doubled tripled. I really wouldn't live any different. But if I lost money that would be bad that would affect my lifestyle. And so for a lot of our clients, and we tend to have this niche that we focus on how do we help our clients make money get interest be productive with their assets. But not take a lot of risk, right? That's the conundrum because we all have seen the charts. If you want more return you have to take more risk. And if you take no. No risk. You don't get any return. But there are exceptions to that rule. And there are ways to get decent returns and have less risk. Now. We know that stocks had a certain amount of risk. And it's a tenuous told us for most people that are investing because the studies show that people tend to get panicked and sell when the market goes down. And then after it's been doing, well, they tend to have more of an appetite for equity exposure, and a lot of people don't like that a lot of people don't do well with stocks, and it's our job to make sure that whatever stocks are clients own that they pay as little cost as possible to tax efficient, and they're disciplined as we don't bite off too much risk because then they'll be calling us saying, oh, we can't take this get us out his their money. There's nothing we can do. And we don't wanna put them in a position. So to the extent that equities and stocks and ETF's are suitable for our clients. We will absolutely help our clients get the right exposure to stocks at our accounts that we manage Charles Schwab. But there's a lot of people that can't take that much risk. Don't wanna take that much risk, and they still need to get a decent level return. So I wanna talk about a few things that could be of interest to you. If you are looking to have very little risk and still make decent returns. Now. I have a lot of people say to me I have CDs making two and a half percent and CDs, and it's better than it used to be. But I don't need all my money in CD's. I probably shouldn't have all my money and sees what else can I do to make more interest. So there are companies there are banks that are getting involved in the structured CD marketplace, similar to index new Witty's sees that are linked to the returns of an index. Some of the players that are big in this space, Goldman Sachs. Barclays J P Morgan Chase. They all issue structured CDs. And instead of giving you interest based on whatever interest rates are we know it's about two and a half percent on CDs. They give you interest based on the returns of ESPN five hundred index or some other index, and you don't. Get all the upside. They may say you only can make over the next five years, you can make whatever the s&p five hundred is if it's up ten you get ten percent of his twenty twenty if it's up forty he get forty. But if it's a fifty we're going to cap you at forty percent interest over five years, and so historically if you look since nineteen eighty and you look at all the different five-year returns starting every day starting a new day looking at the next five-year return the average five year return for the s&p five hundred is about fifty eight percent. So on the average if you have a five year equity linked CD issued by a Bank then on the average the returns were fifty eight percent. You would get forty which amounts to over seven percent annualized return on a CD aren't going to be five year periods where you don't make any interest. But on the average you're gonna make over seven percent a year on a five-year CD. Now, if the issuer has financial troubles, and your is at the IC insured, which they are then federal government will give you your money. That you're owed by the Bank. If the Bank is out of business or becomes insolvent. Now, obviously, that's remote. But for some people they like having that FDIC insurance. Now, if you wanted to take the credit risk of the Bank and not have the icy insurance that having note, let's call it a structure note, you can get a lot better terms. Some of the banks are actually offering structured five-year notes linked to the.

Bank Charles Schwab Morgan Chase Goldman Sachs FDIC Barclays ESPN Witty five-year five year fifty eight percent seven percent five years forty percent ten percent
"goldman sachs barclays" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"goldman sachs barclays" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Today's Wall Street actually US market looks relatively safe from Bloomberg intelligence, Bloomberg influential newsmaker McCarthy joins us right now. With weenie Alicia Abramowicz today. Bloomberg business. Podcasts to be a successful entrepreneur the expertise of the best. And most prosperous entrepreneurs is a big advantage in think bigger real estate developer. Michael Sonnenfeldt reaches out to his network of entrepreneurs and investors to provide practical advice and well tested strategies to God business downers throughout their careers. From starting a business to growing it to building wealth and finally to using those same skills to leave your Mark on the world think bigger will army with the insights you need to succeed available now from Bloomberg press. There are lots of considerations. When you travel mug comfort and safety. The big question will I still get the business news? I need is it enough to convince us that growth is not going to roll over. Here's your answer yet. The general Venezuela's story isn't that going to affect the price of where we used to see those inflationary pressures as transit tree is that a function GDP growth, Bloomberg radio, the Bloomberg business app and bloombergradio dot com. Bloomberg the world. Listening. Bitcoin slump continues Monday, the popular crypto currency sunk to its lowest in more than a month dragging down Bloomberg scouts and crypto index with it. Disappointing start to the year for investors who hope twenty eight teams volatility was behind them when four hundred billion dollars in crypto market value was wiped out in the last year enter discussed we've got who else? Bloomberg's Julie Verhaeghe in New York. So Julie's or any end in sight. So this drop. You know? I haven't heard any good news about bitcoin or other crypto currencies at this point something that could happen that could use them in value, again would be institutional investors suddenly wanting to get back into the game around this time last year. We started hearing that maybe Goldman Sachs Barclays and others wanted to open up trading us around this which obviously was something that a lot of crypto. Traders were excited about thought not only was that good to legitimize the crypto currency. But also meant that it might bring some more stability into the market. And I guess it kind of has brought some stability since we have been around three to six thousand for the last few months, but I don't know that that was necessarily the stability that they were looking for at the time. Now, I've got a chart here in the Bloomberg that shows that actually the cost to mine bitcoin is actually higher than the value of bitcoin, which kind of makes it a fruitless effort the white line. Here's the price of bitcoin. The blue line is the cost of electricity that it takes to actually mine the stuff, you know. Is what's the impact of this? Right. So this is coming from J P Morgan report that I believe it was last week, and this is an average. So there are some places where you could still mind bitcoin for less than what that report is saying, I believe it was around like four thousand dollars store trading slightly below that. But obviously if you're in a place where electric city and whatnot costs more where it costs you four to five thousand dollars to mind at this point there, obviously much less incentive to continue doing that. And it's just sort of one other negative sentiment. That's out there right now. Now, there is some hope for stable coins. What is happening to all of the digital startups. Were founded based on the hope that this was going to be a huge market. Not that it won't be Sunday. But it's not looking good right now. Right. Exactly. I think a lot of them are waiting for broader use cases in sort of exploring that stable coins. Being one of them. We saw coin base raise at the end of last year. No, their previous round had them and evaluation around one point six billion in this new one was at an eight billion dollar valuation, which is obviously a massive jump. So you can see a little bit of that impact. But based on people that I was talking to during the fundraising talks. There was one point where that valuation was as high as twelve billion. So you have seen some of that comeback down. And then along with the story that we had about their funding round. We've talked about what their sales were in two thousand eighteen in wall that wasn't broken out by quarter. They did still increase from the year before I would obviously just to know what the actual quarter looks like because I'm sure the bulk of that was back when you know, the first couple of months of the year when bitcoin was still trading around nineteen eighteen thousand dollars. All right. Bloomberg's julie. Keep your finger on bitcoin pulse. For us. Thank you so much as always coming up.

Bloomberg Bloomberg radio Alicia Abramowicz Julie Verhaeghe Michael Sonnenfeldt newsmaker McCarthy Goldman Sachs Barclays Venezuela New York J P Morgan nineteen eighteen thousand dol four hundred billion dollars five thousand dollars four thousand dollars eight billion dollar
"goldman sachs barclays" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"goldman sachs barclays" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"Deadline this week to report their gender pay gaps the wide gaps within the financial sector has already attracted scrutiny the average woman at hsbc makes fifty nine percent less than the average man the figures that goldman sachs barclays or fifty five percent and forty eight percent respectively and it's already spoked pledges from these private institutions to do more for a quality but what does it look like in public financial institutions while my colleague narration i spoke to deny career kapoor new chief economist at home fifth the official monetary and finance institutions forum every year issues an index that tracks the balance of men and women in central banks and she started by slain explaining how this index is put together so the index that we construct looks at their gender balance the presence of men and women in central banks around the world we wait the results by the seniority of the individuals within those institutions so a governor for example we'll have greater influence over the overall results than a deputy governor we also look at monetary policy committees and so on overall we've looked at six thousand individuals in four hundred and fifteen institutions this includes one hundred and seventy three central banks and the results showed a decline from last year's index to this year score to a great extent that is because of the stepping down of janet yellen because of the us economies role in the global economy this has a greater weight in the oval find she was a big hits in other words yes the score of north america declined from sixty eight percent to twenty six percent and we're looking at the global picture out of seven regions that we looked five of them saw a decline on the europe and latin america so their scores improve so it's very much global phenomena nachos janet yellen central banks that you look at.

hsbc chief economist official janet yellen us north america europe goldman sachs barclays kapoor forty eight percent sixty eight percent fifty five percent fifty nine percent twenty six percent
"goldman sachs barclays" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"goldman sachs barclays" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The average man the figures that goldman sachs barclays our fifty five percent and forty eight percents respectively and it's already spokes pledges from these private institutions to do more for a quality but what does it look like in public financial institutions while my colleague narration i spoke to deny career kapalu chief economist at home fifth the official monetary and financial institutions forum every year issues an index that tracks the balance of men and women in central banks and she started by slain explaining how this index is put together so the index that we construct looks at the gender balance the presence of men and women in central banks around the world we wait the results by the seniority of the individuals within those institutions so a governor for example we'll have greater influence over the overall results than a deputy governor we also look at monetary policy committees and so on overall we've looked at six thousand individuals and four hundred and fifteen institutions this includes one hundred and seventy three central banks and the resolve showed a decline from last year's index to this year score to a great extent that is because of the stepping down of janet yellen because of the us economies role in the global economy this has a greater weight in the oval find she was a big hits in other words yes the score of north america declined from sixty eight percent to twenty six percent looking at the global picture out of seven regions that we looked five of them saw a decline on the europe and latin america saw their scores improved so it's very much a global phenomenon if not just janet yellen.

chief economist official janet yellen us north america europe goldman sachs barclays america sixty eight percent fifty five percent twenty six percent