36 Burst results for "Goldman"

Fresh update on "goldman" discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

01:46 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "goldman" discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Update. First it was the great resignation then quiet quitting. The latest hot buzz term is career cushioning, like many buzz terms, it doesn't describe anything, especially new. It just means starting to line up a new job while still working at your current one. As layoffs increase in today's slow economy that only makes sense, of course, if a recession hits layoffs will certainly increase and many companies offer little severance pay. Some people wonder if it's fair to your employer if you look for a new job before you quit or get fired. It's absolutely fair. Just don't do it when you're supposed to be working. Commenters on Twitter are already having fun with the new buzz term as one put it. Back in my day, this was just called finding a new job. I'm Jeff Goldman. It seems like it's busy everywhere during the holiday season, but it's especially true at a store in mid Michigan that promises Christmas all year round. The family owners of bronner's Christmas Wonderland in the town of frankenmuth say they see 2 million visitors a year, most in November and December. Bronner's vice president Carlo bronner spells her talks about what's popular. Our personalized ornaments are naturally very popular that people can get with their names and their families or their pets or about a special vacation or anniversary or wedding that type of thing. And also our religious ornaments are very popular naturally. Bronner's was started by her parents in 1945 as a small sign painting business. An update on traffic and weather together next, it's 8 55. The weather this time of year

Jeff Goldman Carlo Bronner Bronner Frankenmuth Twitter Michigan
How's Life After Graduation?

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:47 min | 5 d ago

How's Life After Graduation?

"So tell me about the other three. Well, before I do that, I just want to make this other point because I think it's important with regard to the obsession my peers have of going into these big fancy firms. Yes. We are the most as Harvard students, we are the most privileged cohort in the country, and that means the world. We, I mean, Harvard has such a vast network of people in many different industries. We have so many resources. Honestly, if you're at Harvard, it's more likely than not that you come from a family that is financially well off. And that to me is all the more damning why those people go into a financial services industry. I have a period Harvard who both of his parents died before college. He grew up in The Bronx. He has to care for his ten year old sister, and he went on to one of these companies because he needed to make really big money off the bat. Totally understand that, I would do the same thing if I were in his position. But most of my friends, Dennis, who go into these lines of work, they're not in that position. They could take a risk. It's not a do or die situation for them. And yet they still go and work it. I'm saying Goldman because that's not where my two friends are working. They go and work in a place like Goldman. Clearly, okay. The other three. The other three, two are unemployed. And the reason if you're unemployed after graduating Harvard, it's your from thank you. Time 51. If you graduate Harvard from, you've really chosen to be unemployed and the 5th one. The 5th one, I'm very proud of her. She moved to a southern state, and she's working at a local newspaper as a crime reporter.

Harvard Bronx Goldman Dennis
Lee Zeldin: The Real Life Implications of Democrat Spending

Mark Levin

01:04 min | Last month

Lee Zeldin: The Real Life Implications of Democrat Spending

"That's a pretty big problem mister zeldin that one of the biggest hedge funds in the world is saying we are headed for a hyperinflation What do you think of that I mean I think these experts or supposedly at first are smarter than I am with this stuff and it's certainly not transitory We see it the impacts here locally for us here in New York You wake up one day and city announced that they're setting up offices inside of Connecticut in Jersey wake up one day JPMorgan's going down to the states like Florida and Texas Goldman Sachs going down to Florida and Texas The real life implications of blue state policies Democrats in Washington D.C. spending money like drunken sailors trying to make us all think that this is all just transitory and the problem only gets worse So I mean I don't think that this is something that's magically disappearing just because they pass a bill and call it the inflation reduction act It's just not going to turn around automatically Obviously it's only going to get worse

Mister Zeldin Washington D.C. Florida Texas Jpmorgan Goldman Sachs Connecticut Jersey New York
2022: The Year the Grassroots Fought Back

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:03 min | Last month

2022: The Year the Grassroots Fought Back

"Last evening, we had a spectacular event with the next governor of Arizona God willing. It sure looks like it's going to be trending that way. Kerry Lake. Carrie Lake is a special candidate. Abe homme was also there, Mark fincham was there, Blake masters, I think, had another event. One of the things I want to build out for you today is how the Democrats are increasingly synthetic we've talked about that. They're increasingly artificial. And how much money they have spent and despite all the money they've spent, they can outspend the grassroots. They can't outspend you. They've tried, but there is something that shows the long-term viability. The long-term health of the conservative movement. That is unlike anything we've seen over the last decade. You see, the conservative movement, America first, maga populist, parents party, pro freedom, pro liberty, whatever label you want to put on. We had a choice. We had a choice post January 6th when every major corporation came after us. When the government decided to go after moms and dads that show up at school board meetings, we had a choice when all of a sudden we had our backs against the wall. We could have given up. We could have just threw our hands up. We could just surrendered. We could have said no more, but instead we started to mobilize. And it's very interesting. It will go down in history. As one of the best things ever to happen to the Republican Party was corporations going woke. Now, corporations going woke, created a baseline, where all of a sudden, the Democrats were able to get unlimited amounts of money with very little effort. So they got very lazy. Democrats were able to get money from Coca-Cola and Goldman Sachs and Boeing and all these major corporations, where Republicans usually used to enjoy support from these companies. Coca-Cola said that whiteness is a plague on society, major corporations are saying men can become pregnant and Republicans wanted nothing to do with it. And so Republicans had to decide what kind of party we wanted to be.

Kerry Lake Carrie Lake Abe Homme Mark Fincham Blake Arizona America Coca Republican Party Cola Government Goldman Sachs Boeing
Nigel Farage on Why Liz Truss Was the Victim of a 'Globalist Coup'

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:50 min | Last month

Nigel Farage on Why Liz Truss Was the Victim of a 'Globalist Coup'

"Nigel Farage joins us right now. Nigel, welcome back to the program for our American listeners. Can you offer some clarity about what the heck is going on in your beautiful sister country across the pond? An astonishing four months, Boris Johnson, the elected prime minister goes because, frankly, he wasn't truthful with the British public about many things. And elected as a conservative, he rather governed as a liberal, and people got upset. Then the queen dies. You know, she'd been there for 70 years. That was very destabilizing. We then got a new prime minister who attempted to introduce conservative philosophy. She wanted to reduce the size of a state and cut taxation. And the world went to war against her. The International Monetary Fund spoke about our mini budget in a way they'd never spoken about any country ever before. The American administration piled in. The German Chancellor piled in, and in the end, you might argue that some of their tax cuts weren't very well thought through, but we have been through in the course of the last two weeks. Nothing less than a globalist coup, we get a mangled Jeremy hum, out of left field, becomes Chancellor of the exchequer, and now we have a new prime minister. He's taken over today, our third and 7 weeks, but the name of Richie sunac, I can pronounce it, even if Joe Biden can't. And he of course is our first former Goldman Sachs prime minister. He's a globalist. He's a supporter of Central Bank, digital currencies. He's barely conservative at all. And it all goes to show that the British Conservative Party isn't conservative at all. And we have a real problem on our hands.

Nigel Farage Boris Johnson American Administration Nigel Jeremy Hum International Monetary Fund Richie Sunac Joe Biden Goldman Sachs Central Bank British Conservative Party
Charlie Welcomes Michael Walsh, Editor of 'Against the Great Reset'

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:57 min | Last month

Charlie Welcomes Michael Walsh, Editor of 'Against the Great Reset'

"Joining us now is Michael Walsh, author of against the great reset, 18 theses contra the new world order with contributions from Victor Davis Hanson Douglas Murray, roger Kimball, Angelo codo villa May he rest in peace. James poulos, Conrad black, Michael Anton, David Goldman, Janice, John tyranny, Harry Stein, and more and edited by Matt Walsh. That's a really great list. My goodness. Michael Walsh, welcome to the program. Hey, thanks, Charlie. Good to see you again. Yeah, you too. Tell us about your book. Well, it's not edited by Matt Walsh. She said it by Michael balls. I have a problem being confused. I'm sorry. I say it so often, so I apologize. I know you do. My young colleague, the idea behind the book is a direct attack on the great reset. And I know Charlie, you've talked about it a lot and many of our colleagues and conservative movement have talked about it. But very briefly, it's an idea that arose at the World Economic Forum in Davos Switzerland. It's been kicking around for some years now and generally on the left. It's been dismissed by our ideological opponents as a conspiracy theory. And yet the World Economic Forum under the direction of Klaus Schwab is quite open about their ambition for the world, which is to put it in a nutshell, you will own nothing and be happy. So as we said, as I say, the introduction to this book, this is our salvo opening salvo against Davos against the great reset against Schwab against their plutocrats who would keep all of us to basically confined to high rise buildings, driving electric cars, whether if they allow you to have them, and of course eating bugs instead of beef because after all, cows are killing the planet.

Michael Walsh Matt Walsh Victor Davis Hanson Douglas Mu Angelo Codo Villa James Poulos Michael Anton John Tyranny Harry Stein Michael Balls Roger Kimball David Goldman Conrad Black Charlie World Economic Forum Janice Klaus Schwab Davos Switzerland Schwab
NYT Admits on Their Front Page That Republicans Lead for the Midterms

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:29 min | Last month

NYT Admits on Their Front Page That Republicans Lead for the Midterms

"22 days, can you believe it? All the hype over the summer, all the focus on the grassroots work, canvassing, voter registration, we are 22 days out. From a midterm election that should begin the end of the modern Democrat party. Our success is not just getting more votes than the Democrats. We want a complete and total annihilation and extinction event of the woke Democrat party. We want to send a message from corner to corner of America from Bangor Maine to Malibu, California to Seattle, Washington, to Chicago, Illinois, to Birmingham, Alabama, that the far left wing aspects of the Democrat party have no place in America. From medical mutilation of children to late term abortion to wide open borders to deteriorating economy, we want to make the Democrat party extinct. Now I'm not saying that's going to happen assuredly, but we are certainly trending in a direction that is going to put the Democrats on defense and The New York Times admits it. On the front page of The New York Times today, of which I read so you don't have to. And sometimes we get emails, Charlie, why do you read The New York Times? Look, they of course are fake news and a waste of time. But they are one of the major incubators for elite opinion across America. So if you read The New York Times, you really get an idea of what all the people in the FBI are reading Goldman Sachs are reading Bank of America reading. GOP gains edge in poll as economy sways voters.

Democrat Party The New York Times America Bangor Malibu Maine Birmingham Seattle Alabama Illinois Chicago Washington California Charlie FBI Goldman Sachs Bank Of America GOP
The Arranged Marriage Between the Wokies and Big Business

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:11 min | Last month

The Arranged Marriage Between the Wokies and Big Business

"A an arranged marriage that has happened. Where the wokes take over these companies. And I think a lot of this happened post 2008. Post 2008 with the occupy Wall Street economic Marxism that was starting to resonate with the American people, Wall Street, and big companies started to get very nervous. Now, they were able to successfully thwart a lot of the complaints of occupy Wall Street, even though ironically, a lot of the complaints of occupy Wall Street were actually legitimate. It just got taken over by such pure, unadulterated Marxism. It became unpopular for all people to all normal people to tolerate and especially those of us that have some sort of love for western civilization we found it to be disgusting how occupy Wall Street and zuccotti park in New York quickly became that of a Bolshevik moment, but the complaint of occupy Wall Street was the banks have not been held accountable. No one has gone to jail. Wire taxpayers funding and bailing out Wall Street and Wall Street was getting very nervous. Well, then after they were able to weather that storm, the woke east decided to take a page out of Herbert marcuse's book, Herbert marcuse, of course, Frankfurt school, came to America, wrote one dimensional man amongst many other pieces of literature, and he argued in the mid 1960s that the American middle class was integrating itself far too successfully into a capitalist society that the middle class was getting very wealthy, they were able to buy homes, air conditioning, dishwashers, their standard of living was increasing dramatically, and that economic Marxism wasn't as popular as they would have liked to believe. So therefore, the Herbert marcuse argued that there needs to be a new type of Marxism as James Lindsay calls it race Marxism, fast forward to the 90s, Derek bell writes intro to critical race theory, and the woke his adopt this and they take over the major institutions, and this was a much easier pill to swallow if you're Goldman Sachs. If

Herbert Marcuse Zuccotti Park Frankfurt New York James Lindsay America Derek Bell Goldman Sachs
Kash Patel: The Media Will Say Anything & Everything After Midterms

The Dan Bongino Show

01:21 min | 2 months ago

Kash Patel: The Media Will Say Anything & Everything After Midterms

"When you think of your if you had to have like a top two three four or 5 like you're disinformation specialists in the media Who do you go with I mean people are like well when I want to know a story's fake I go to Delaney I go to Natasha Bertrand and Adam Goldman at the times And when I see them reporting a story is I know it's fake like instantly You have more to add to the list or this at a pretty good list of who you got it That's a great list That's a great list of coincidentally I'm suing two out of three of those guys for The New York Times And Politico So I mean look you're right And we laughed about it because look you and I can take it We don't care They want to throw whatever missiles in Canada were fun We're not bending the knee But the point is the protection of the American people and the destruction of our media but you're right These guys will run with anything And just wait till the mission is over It will be 100 X on Donald Trump And I can't wait to be out there in Nevada and Arizona I'm going to be on stage before the president is speaking at his rallies And you're just going to see that the people are starting to listen more and more to your great show and your great reporting on TV and turning off the folks you just mentioned because they got bamboozled not once not twice but ten times from Russia gate the Ukraine impeachment to January 6th now to the next iteration And I think we're winning that argument with the facts

Natasha Bertrand Adam Goldman Delaney The New York Times Donald Trump Canada Nevada Arizona Ukraine Russia
Chris Rock Is in Hot Water for His Nicole Brown Simpson Joke

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:31 min | 3 months ago

Chris Rock Is in Hot Water for His Nicole Brown Simpson Joke

"The other day changing subjects, Chris Rock. We haven't heard much from for a while since the whole smack with Will Smith Chris Rock made a crack about the 1994 murder of Nicole Brown Simpson during some comedy set and Phoenix last weekend. And he said something like, you know, the academy asked him to come back and host the Oscars and he was like, no, I wouldn't do that because it would be like asking the call to go back to the restaurant where she left her sunglasses before she and Ron Goldman were murdered by a mystery man with teeny tiny hands. They didn't find it funny. I think it's great Nicole brown's just a Tonya really got mad. You know, and that was a chance to really light into Chris and tell him how bad and how distasteful it was and she got a hold of TMZ and, you know, and she said, you know, this is his crack wasn't just on funny. It literally doesn't make sense. It kind of does. She said he claiming getting slapped at the Oscars to a gruesome double homicide is apples to oranges and she thinks it's lacking in logic and a bad connection.

Will Smith Chris Rock Nicole Brown Chris Rock Oscars Ron Goldman Phoenix Tonya Chris
The Importance of Remembering the Names

The Dan Bongino Show

01:58 min | 3 months ago

The Importance of Remembering the Names

"I'm at the point now and you should be too that when you you know what do I always tell you about the cases like this Remember the names right Remember the names was kind of an adage I used when I was talking about the spy gay case I'd say memorize the names It's a trick I learned as a federal agent Because if you don't remember the names what happens is you'll be sitting in a room and you'll be interviewing some bad guy and say a credit card fraud case that's really complicated And they'll throw out a name And if you don't have the names memorized and how they fit in the case you'll miss it But if you have a memorizing he says hey John Brown and you're like John Brown oh my gosh that was the guy who was connected to Tony Smith and whatever And right there in the room you can put it together and you had so I tell you all the time remember the names especially when it comes to scanty Trump scandals like spygate because when you see the name creep up in a news story they may not make connections you'll make So whenever I see names like Bruce or Steven soma Joe Bianca I know exactly Bianca those were the guys that were involved in the interview with Mike Flynn and somo was the New York guy involved with the exchange of information here and there It's really important to remember the names I bring that up not to get off track but because it's important with reporters too I can read a New York Times Washington Post story or I should have stuck an ore in there or Washington Post story And by seeing the headline in the author and the byline right away I can tell this is a deep state piece I'll throw NBC in there too If I see something by Adam Goldman Kendall and NBC Maggie haberman Glenn thrush Charlie savage Devlin Barrett who else Philip bump I know instantly that you're essentially reading you're reading what the deep state crowd wants you to read because their mouthpieces for the deep state

John Brown Steven Soma Joe Bianca Tony Smith Mike Flynn Somo New York Times Washington Post Bianca Bruce Adam Goldman Kendall Maggie Haberman NBC Glenn Thrush New York Charlie Savage Washington Post Devlin Barrett Philip
The Government Wants the Affidavit Sealed yet Still Leaks Info Out

Mark Levin

01:40 min | 3 months ago

The Government Wants the Affidavit Sealed yet Still Leaks Info Out

"Maggie haberman AKA maggot haberman Jody Cantor Adam Goldman and Ben protists Have a piece last night in the New York slimes Trump had more than 300 classified documents of Mar-a-Lago And now I see our friends at fox are reporting 700 pages I thought the government wanted to keep all of this secret I thought the government was on the trail had witnesses When I was on Hannity last week he said to me why Why won't the government release the affidavit And I said because they want to leak it Will there salami tactics They want to cherry pick They want to create the narrative That's why Because they go in court and lie and outside a court they leak to their favorite publications especially the New York slimes Now Maggie haberman first worked for the New York Post then she worked for the New York Daily News and she worked for Politico Now she works for The New York Times where she got a Pulitzer For effectively lying about Russia collusion She sees if you want to make money you want to get awards you need to work for a corporation they covered up the Holocaust that encouraged Stalin and encourage cash And has an anti semitism problem And I would be the New York slimes

Maggie Haberman Jody Cantor Adam Goldman Donald Trump New York The New York Post Hannity BEN FOX New York Daily News Pulitzer The New York Times Russia Stalin
How Fragile Is China Today? David Goldman Explains

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:20 min | 4 months ago

How Fragile Is China Today? David Goldman Explains

"Fragile is China today? Demographically, especially after the decades of the one child rule. Is it a paper Tiger or can it overcome its internal limitations demographically? Well, it is fragile, but I don't think it's doomed. China took a population of poor farmers who had lots of kids, moved them to cities where the average person has 35 m² of living space, turned them into a modern country with very few children. As a result, their aging very quickly, their aging about as fast as Germany, not as not as fast as say either Japan or Korea or Taiwan. But ultimately, that's a crisis for them. The belt and road initiative. Has the purpose of requiring into the Chinese economy dozens of countries with lots of young people. If you don't have enough babies, you can do two things. One is you can get immigrants to come to you, young people, the other thing is you can export your capital to where there are young people and get them to work for you. So just in the past two years, China's exports to the global south have doubled.

China Taiwan Korea Germany Japan
David Goldman: China Is the Most Formidable Strategic Competitor

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:07 min | 4 months ago

David Goldman: China Is the Most Formidable Strategic Competitor

"David, I want to play to you a couple of video clips from the man who sadly bears the title of commander in chief first was from the campaign for election and then the second one is from actually the Oval Office. So this is Biden before he was president. China is going to eat our lunch, come on, man. They can't even figure out how to deal with the fact that they have this great division between the China Sea and the mountains in the east. I mean, in the west, they can't figure out how they're going to deal with the corruption that exists within the system. They're not bad folks, folks. But guess what? They're not competition for us. Not bad folks not a competition, then I guess he was mugged by reality and this is what he had to say a few months later. Our last night, I was, I was on the phone for two straight hours with Xi Jinping. And you all know as well as I do. These folks, and it was a good conversation I know him well. We spent a lot of time together over the years. I was vice president. And but, you know, they're going to get moving, look at these lunch. Not competition, or they're going to eat our lunch. You're the expert you've literally lit a written the book. Which is it? Tell us China is a competitor or somebody who's going to take it all away from us, David. Well, China is the most formidable strategic competitor. The United States has ever had. And it's ascendance to a place of dominance in the world where bankers poor, less secure and generally quite miserable. So I'm against it. The thing to remember is that 40 years ago, excuse me. The average Chinese was making $200 a year in U.S. terms. Now it's closer to $20,000 a year. No other country has brought so many people up the income scale so fast.

Oval Office China China Sea Biden David Xi Jinping United States
David Goldman Paints a Unique Picture of China

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:46 min | 4 months ago

David Goldman Paints a Unique Picture of China

"Is a place where a lot of things are kicked down the road for a very long time and in the short run don't make sense. From China standpoint. And this is not simply the fact that there's a communist government from the standpoint of any government in China, the nightmare of the emperor who sits in Beijing is a rebel province, because China is not a nation state. China is a polyglot collection of different peoples who speak 200 dialects, Cantonese, can't understand a word of Mandarin, the citra needs can barely understand Mandarin. And many times at its past, countless times China has broken up into warring provinces and had long periods of chaos with terrible suffering and in each of these cases foreign intervention typically made the internal divisions worse. So the nightmare of Beijing of Xi Jinping is Taiwan becomes a dependent and long so province, canton decides why should we be part of China either. Sichuan does the same thing. And China begins to break up. So in order to prevent the possibility of the fragmentation of the empire, as has had so many times in the past, China will go to war to prevent any part of its territory. Being split off. And that's why the Taiwan issue is more than a matter of 23 million Chinese living 90 miles away from the mainland, a country of 1.4 billion. The symbolic end, if you will constitutional value of Taiwan to China, is inestimable. So

China Beijing Taiwan Canton Sichuan
Taiwan 101: Sebastian Talks to David Goldman of the Asia Times

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:13 min | 4 months ago

Taiwan 101: Sebastian Talks to David Goldman of the Asia Times

"Known as the Spangler columnist for Asia times also PJ media Claremont institute on and on and on and most recently the author of you will be assimilated China's plan to sign a form the world David Goldman. Welcome back to America first. It's a privilege pleasure to talk to you thanks for the invitation. So I want to do a kind of one on one O one here. If you don't mind, because not everybody, we have 3 million plus lists. There's not everybody is assigned knowledge and understands exactly the significance of what happened recently in Asia. So if I may, please endow me, what is Taiwan, how was it formed, and why does it matter? Let's start with the basics with regards to Pelosi's recent trip. When the communists won the Chinese Civil War in 1947. The nationalist forces under Shanghai shek, our Friends, to camped en masse to the little island of then called formosa or Taiwan. And established an alternative Chinese state, the republic of China. All the international agreements agreed that this island was part of China the same way say Puerto Rico is part of the United States. However, they had opposing governments in the stood each other off. Now, in 1972, when Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger went to China and began the process of restoring diplomatic relations, they agreed that Taiwan and China were part of the same country and then it was up to the Chinese to the two sides to work out what their common future was without American interference. That was the Shanghai communique of 1972. And I spoke to one of the original members of the Nixon delegation who helped draft that communique. In 1972, and I was told that Pelosi's visit to China was a really terrible idea because it violated the spirit of the agreement. Why

Pj Media Claremont Institute Asia Times David Goldman China America Pelosi Shanghai Formosa Asia Henry Kissinger Puerto Rico Richard Nixon Nixon
Jim Hanson and Miranda Devine Discuss the Biden Crime Family

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:54 min | 4 months ago

Jim Hanson and Miranda Devine Discuss the Biden Crime Family

"Told you guys before I'm working on an AI project to find out who was behind the censorship and disinformation of the Hunter Biden laptop story. And guess what? We have now on the show, the woman who wrote the definitive tale of this laptop from hell, Miranda Devine. Good to be with you. Hey, great to be with you, too, Jim. I love your project. It's none of your project. Very important. Well, it's one of the most horrendous things I think has been done as far as interfering in an election in this country, and I want to expose it. And I think everyone needs it exposed. But you did a lot of the hard work in digging into the story as a whole, and it seems to be, you know, there's a lot there and I think there was always evidence of Biden family corruption. Given that we've now got some whistleblowers talking about what's going on in the FBI, do you think there will be any adverse action for anybody named Biden? Well, look, I think that's all up in the air. Certainly, you know, if there's polls show the Republicans take back at least the house, if not the Senate. I think next year they are all systems go, they are locked and loaded. They're doing a lot of work now to live for the work to get on top of all the issues and the whistleblowers are starting to knock on their doors. That's what's really the latest kind of turn in this story because we have had a lot of twists and turns and we first started working on it back in late 2020 just before the election. And so I think that's good news. And I think it really will depend on patriots, particularly within the intelligence community and particularly the FBI

Hunter Biden Miranda Devine Biden JIM FBI Senate Patriots
Pelosi Trip to Taiwan Tests China’s Appetite for Confrontation

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:18 min | 4 months ago

Pelosi Trip to Taiwan Tests China’s Appetite for Confrontation

"By far the most powerful country in the world in military terms. Without any doubt. But with a home court advantage off China's coast, China has put massive resources into anti fit missiles interceptors and submarines precisely in order to be able to kill an American fleet in proximity to their coast. Their land army is terrible, peel of people's liberation armies, maybe the worst land army in the world. But their missile corps is excellent. And the studies from the air force and the Rand corporation and the office of net assessment, which I used to do some work for a Pentagon. Say that those missiles are extremely good. Now, you can argue about whether you contract moving the ship 800 miles off the coast if it's maneuvering. Can you really hit it well? The Ukrainians managed to sink the Russian flagship, the Moscow, hundred kilometers off their coast and at the Ukrainians can do it the Chinese who, after all, did put a space landing craft on The Dark Side of the Moon, probably could be able to do it. So the risk of a kinetic engagement against Chinese missiles and the possible loss of a carrier with 8000 American sailors and all of our prestige, as you say, is not a risk that we want to take. The

Office Of Net Assessment China Rand Corporation Air Force Pentagon Moscow
Pelosi Poised to Visit Taiwan As China Threatens Military Action

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:53 min | 4 months ago

Pelosi Poised to Visit Taiwan As China Threatens Military Action

"Have a strong belief that we should do everything we can to convince the Chinese that they shouldn't do anything aggressive towards Taiwan and that our policy can include aggressive deterrence. I don't think they've managed to pull that off with the inability of The White House to articulate this position. But what if all right, now it appears she's going. It sounds like that she'll be there Tuesday night and the Chinese have literally threatened that if we fly military aircraft into there, they're going to do something about it. Are they blowing smoke or could this actually blow up? Well, I don't think they're going to shoot down in American military aircraft. But when Xi Jinping tells President Biden as he did, if you play with fire, you will get burned. That is language stronger than the Chinese have used at any time since we established diplomatic relations. Not since the Korean War have they said things like that. Remember, Xi Jinping is facing a tough contest for his third term as premier. He's got the 20th Congress of the Communist Party coming up in November. And after he's put his credibility on the line, there's no way he can back down and do nothing. So what I would expect is not a kinetic action on China's part. I think more likely would be a blockade, and they dare the United States to try to break the blockade. That's up to easy when Taiwan's 90 miles of the Chinese coast and they have the home court advantage. As the Chinese keep saying, they've got what about 1400 surface to ship missiles, and most experts certainly the Rand people, the air force, believe that the Chinese could sink pretty much any American ship within. 500 miles or more of their coast.

Xi Jinping President Biden Taiwan Congress Of The Communist Part White House Chinese Coast United States Air Force
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"And so we're kind of <Speech_Female> tracking a lot in <Speech_Female> our investors <Speech_Female> position in their <Speech_Male> portfolios <Speech_Female> only across <Speech_Female> capital structure <Speech_Female> but also within <Speech_Female> equities domestically <Speech_Female> in in the <Speech_Female> states but also internationally <Speech_Female> as <Speech_Female> signals in terms of <Speech_Female> their risk appetite. <Speech_Female> So there's a couple <Speech_Female> of macaroni <Speech_Female> more of the technical things that <Speech_Female> were certainly tracking <Speech_Female> not that we <Speech_Female> are concerned <Speech_Female> in any way shape or form about <Speech_Female> them mortgages <Speech_Female> that these are things <Speech_Female> that we want to make sure <Speech_Female> that we stay on. Top <Speech_Female> of in terms <Speech_Female> of tracking <SpeakerChange> <Silence> investor mindset <Speech_Female> then even <Speech_Female> beyond institutional <Speech_Female> investors. You <Speech_Female> know what about the <Speech_Female> retail investing <Speech_Female> space obviously <Speech_Female> until <Speech_Female> recently <Speech_Female> the institutional <Speech_Female> investors have <Speech_Female> typically bought up the <Speech_Female> lion's share of an <Speech_Female> ipo. <SpeakerChange> But is <Speech_Female> that now. Changing <Speech_Female> it reached l. <Speech_Female> In the past eighteen <Speech_Female> months has been a tremendous <Speech_Female> force <Speech_Female> within the market. <Speech_Female> Not only and as we <Speech_Female> know the broad market <Speech_Female> in terms of fanatics <Speech_Female> and trading but <Speech_Female> also kind <Speech_Female> of a follow one buyer <Speech_Female> in many ways within <Speech_Female> the ip space. <Speech_Female> So we're <Speech_Female> focused on is twofold <Speech_Female> one trying <Speech_Female> to get the best <Speech_Female> understanding of the psyche <Speech_Female> of broad <Speech_Female> retail investor <Speech_Female> base. What type <Speech_Female> of assets <Speech_Female> willing to kind of deploy <Speech_Female> capital and track <Speech_Female> with the ios <Speech_Female> but also <Speech_Female> thinking about <Speech_Female> the retail investor <Speech_Female> for <Speech_Female> issuing clients <Speech_Female> and. How can we <Speech_Female> harness that type of <Speech_Female> demand to <Speech_Female> really think about another <Speech_Female> an immediate <Speech_Female> of distribution. <Speech_Female> And so <Speech_Female> i think most <Speech_Female> people would <Speech_Female> agree that the retail <Speech_Female> investor is going to <Speech_Female> remain. You know berry <Speech_Female> active with inequities <Speech_Female> and we <Speech_Female> continue to learn <Speech_Female> and track <Speech_Male> more in <Speech_Female> terms of their <Speech_Female> flows and focus <Speech_Female> as a broad <Speech_Female> universe of investors. <Speech_Female> But i don't <Speech_Female> think in any way shape or form <Speech_Female> that it's gonna go away. <Speech_Female> And i still <Speech_Female> think you're gonna see <Speech_Female> very broad distribution <Speech_Female> in the ipo space <Speech_Female> across <Speech_Female> all different types <Speech_Female> of investors whether <Speech_Female> it's institutional investors <Speech_Male> or retail <Speech_Female> investors <Speech_Female> across the board. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Thanks so much <Speech_Female> for joining us at <Speech_Female> what is obviously <Speech_Female> a very <SpeakerChange> busy time <Speech_Female> for you. <Speech_Female> I was my pleasure. Thank <Silence> you so much. <SpeakerChange> For having me <Speech_Female> back includes <Speech_Female> this episode <Speech_Female> of exchanges goldman <Speech_Female> sachs. Thanks <Speech_Female> for listening and if you <Speech_Female> enjoyed this show. <Speech_Female> We hope this as five <Speech_Female> on apple podcasts and <Speech_Female> leave a rating comment <Speech_Female> this podcast <Speech_Female> for the on <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> september tenth. Twenty <Music> twenty one <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> All price references <Speech_Male> and market forecasts <Speech_Male> correspond <Speech_Male> to the date of this recording. <Speech_Male> This <Speech_Male> podcast should not <Speech_Male> be copied distributed <Speech_Male> published or reproduced <Speech_Male> in whole <Speech_Male> or in part the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> information contained <Speech_Male> in this podcast does <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> not constitute research <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> or recommendation <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> from any goldman <Speech_Male> sachs entity <Speech_Male> to the listener neither <Speech_Male> goldman sachs nor <Speech_Male> any of its affiliates makes <Speech_Male> any representation <Speech_Male> or warranty <Speech_Male> as to the accuracy <Speech_Male> or completeness of <Speech_Male> the statements or <Speech_Male> any information contained <Speech_Male> in this podcast <Speech_Male> and any liability <Speech_Male> therefore <Speech_Male> including <Speech_Male> in respect of <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> direct indirect <Speech_Male> or consequential <Speech_Male> loss or

berry goldman apple
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"See those three kind of pillars in the market right now plus a very stable macro backdrop a really allowing issuers and investors to focus on the asset class or whether they are going public or look into the capital on various efficient manner. So let's talk a little bit more about the various routes to going public that you just mentioned special purpose. Acquisition companies or stacks. They've obviously been quite a big focus of the markets. We talked a lot about specs on this podcast in the past. But there's been a broad-based decline in stock returns and greater regulatory scrutiny. So what's the outlook for stocks and some other alternatives. You mentioned sure so into one if two thousand twenty one we just saw record spec issuance levels and it's really normal. I think natural that when you have such an unbelievable uptick in terms of supply to the market. You're naturally going to have some indigestion. And so if you couple about alongside some of the regulatory focuses within that product. I think it's been healthy to see a pullback in that issuance volume issuance has come down from itchy. One highs it's still incredibly important viable product within the equity capital markets for a host of reasons and really encouragingly. The entire market is working together to create more sustainability within that product and really evolve the product composition the products criteria and so that really means in terms of the forward for spat ax is that it's positive. The market is certainly open for spec issuance. But i think importantly for issuing clients and for investors forward. We're going to continue to see a lot of innovation across the back product directly in product the traditional ipo products because it really is just the method to going public and the method in terms of partnering with investors and so we have a lot of conviction and confidence that all of these products are here to stay and we'll continue to see more evolution within them respectively. What types of companies are going public at. This point are you. Seeing any specific industry trends we continue to see great diversification in terms of our issuing coming to market within the ip space. And so we have very good growth oriented assets. They're coming to market as awesome very strong value oriented assets coming to market. I think that talks to the testament of the capital formation. That i spoke to earlier but it also find it very encouraging. That's matic whether it's in. The americas region are more international news to ring true. And so we're seeing great. Diversity across sector in product and region is certainly very encouraging and obviously supports amount of issuance volume. That's com last year but also the first of this year but talk a little bit about performance of deals and how that's affecting the mindsets of issuers and investors..

americas
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"This is exchanges at goldman sachs and i'm alison nathan a senior strategist and goldman sachs research. Today we're going to look at the surgeon equity issuance end. What promises to be a record breaking market for. Ibo's this fall to do that. I'm joined by lizzie. We'd global head of the equity capital markets syndicate desk in our investment banking division lizzy. Welcome to the program. Thank you for having alison. So to start off lizzy set the stage for us. Give us a sense of overall equity issuance this year and where we are as we head into the fall wonderful well. The market is certainly open. And we're really excited about what will be very active september but also very active q four of two thousand twenty one. I guess to put some context around issuance. Volumes on a global perspective street-wide issuance year. Today is just north of a trillion dollars to put that in perspective. That's up thirty nine percent versus where we were this time last year in two thousand twenty and in fact or very close to the record breaking global issuance volume record which was one point. One six trillion that occurred full year of two thousand twenty. So clearly we're tracking very well in terms of absolute issuance levels for two thousand twenty one. So what is that. Look like by region every region is obviously up on the year and up substantially. So if you look at america's for example america's issuance stands just shy of four hundred fifty billion dollars. That's up about thirty five percent year over year. If you look at e e mia issue and stands just north of two hundred billion dollars year to date. That's up about fifty six percent your ear and if you look in the asia region asia issuances at three hundred sixty five billion which is also up about thirty five percent ear every year and so it's really encouraging to see issuance volume continue to increase. Not only by region but also by product by described street-wide issuance volume that's inclusive of ipo's marketed. Follow on's convertible offerings and registered blocks. So now that we're all back at work brian. This september calendar. How is the fall shaping up. We're really encouraged in terms of the backlog that we're seeing for september across all products and regions and so. Let's just take america's as a very quick example for you. September of two thousand twenty in the americas region was the most active september in history at fifty one billion dollars this.

alison nathan goldman sachs research Ibo goldman sachs lizzie alison america asia ipo brian americas
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"And we've actually scaled back to some degree or expectations for how quickly the participation rates won't lies us and you know i think even the year all solid dissipation. It's probably still going to be somewhat below where it would have been in. The absence of one is this on mean for wages the fact that we have seen company struggling to find workers. Some of that might be abating as you said but ultimately do we think that wages are going to continue to grow here as companies need to reason to attract workers. I think they're going to continue to grow what they're not going to do. I think as role at these extremely rapid rates at the bottom end of the bay distribution if you take out production new won't supervisory workers in leisure on hospitality. Who on the average. Make fifteen dollars an hour. We've been seeing wage growth rates at an annualized is of twenty five to thirty percent in the last three to six months. You know obviously far about anything we've seen in many decades or actually ever in these data and that's not true surprising because if you make fifteen dollars an hour with three hundred dollar top people are basically as well off or better off from jacomb. Bedrose suspect the working than working. So i mean this is sort of what you should expect that then get enormous competition for these workers and being racism day. I think ask. Those benefits end will get much lower wage roll rates. I don't think we'll get outright which defines wages tend to be quite sticky to the downside. So i don't think you cutting their wages but it also think you onto half this kind of wage growth elsewhere you know high up in the income distribution towards the you know twenty five thirty deliver our rates. I mean they are wage. Growth rates have been reasonably farm out of line with what we had in the past. I mean on composition adjusted basis. We've seen about three and a half percent wage growth more in the middle range of income distribution. you know. i think we'll probably continue to see numbers. Not sort of range and you know steady wage growth and if we could see substantial job growth and that probably or accelerate somewhat from there and now is that pace that. A sustainable probably sustainable. I mean we've seen pretty good productivity growth the in general productivity news. Pretty good so. I think we should be able to sustain somewhat higher wage growth rates than we had in the last cycle maybe on a sustained basis in coming years. So let's end on the big picture again. We talked a lot about the virus. Obviously a key determinant of the outlook. But what do you see is the biggest risks to the. Us and global economic expectations. We've discussed i mean. I wish i could say something other than the virus but the truth is kobe variance and additional negative news on in all variance. That are more actress and escape vaccination that still the biggest risk. I mean you look at delta. In some ways it's been a negative surprise but at the same time the vaccine still work pretty well from a hospitalization perspective and of course we could see barrier. That is even more dangerous because the vaccines might not work as well from severe disease perspectives. I mean not predicting that you know. I don't know i don't think the medical experts really know but that is the downside. I think we have to have our eye on. You know there are a number of you know obviously risks that maybe a little bit closer to the usual ups announce of cycle that also relevant. I mean the fact that fiscal policy is coming off of this extremely stimulus have level and that were almost certain to see a significant negative. Fiscal impulse. I mean that pulls us some risks as well and i do think it's going to have an impact of the big one is still going to be gold at and some countries are going to be better placed to deal without than others again. I do think that backs. The nation is still progressing. Pretty well we're going to have we think. Fifty percent of the global population fully vaccinated by the end of the year. That's roughly all time line. That obviously makes a very big difference. Bots were also seeing higher infection numbers than we had hoped in all three months or six months x. Or that racist more jude in some ways than perhaps we have thought that long ago. So let's hope don that we don't see a very negative turn in the variance. Thank you so much for joining us. It's always good to her insights on the global economy. Thank you so much. Alison adopted soon. That concludes this episode of exchanges. Goldman sachs thanks for listening and if you enjoyed the show we hook you describe on apple podcasts. And leave a rating and comment. This podcast.

severe disease Us Alison Goldman sachs apple
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"This is exchanges at goldman sachs and i'm alison nathan a senior strategist research for this week's episode. I'm delighted to welcome back. John hutsi as the firm's chief economist and global head of research to discuss the economy takeaways from jackson hole and his us on economic growth and inflation. John welcome back to the program. Good we on so. Let's start with last week's fed conference in jackson hole. Wyoming which is of course a closely-watched annual meeting held by the kansas city fed. What were your key takeaways from the conference and did anything. Chair powell says surprise you not much no. It was pretty much in line with what we thought coming out of the minutes of the last ever eating in july. I think if you take what jabil said and what we saw in the minutes there too key points about the timing of tapering of asset purchases. One is that they want to get started this year. Which basically means that. They probably after announced by november and number two. According to the minutes they will provide bounce notice of date ring which basically means that they can't really announce it in september so that really only leaves the november meeting. Obviously that change. If we saw shifts in the economic outlook something very negative happening would be delayed of course bottle. Baseline is the will get a november announcement and the december star today bring. It's a little bit less clear how quick the tapering would occur. We haven't gotten as much indication about that. Baseline is they reduced purchases by fifteen billion dollars or meeting so we start from one hundred twenty billion of meeting that were basically. Take them down to zero apowa next year. They are some people who won't go faster but that still an open debate and ultimately we think it's probably going to be something more like fifty billion that would then mean that spy the fourth quarter of next year you could in theory star to hike rates. They're not going to be hiking while tapering jew. We bought for that. You would probably need to see significantly higher inflation and somewhat stronger role than what we have in. All forecast saw in all four counts. It takes until maybe third quarter of two thousand twenty three before you get the first rate hike. That's much want certain and depends on the economic outlook and what we see in the numbers. So let's talk about growth you've had strongly above consensus call for us growth for much of the year but you've recently taken your forecast down. What's behind those provisions and do they market important shift in growth expectations. I think it's always important when there's a change in direction. I'm there is a change in direction and drums of both where we are relative to the consensus partly on the back of our downward revisions and we've taken two thousand twenty one down by about a percentage point. We were seven or little above seven when all at six percent. That's one shift on net. The consensus has been revised up in two thousand and twenty one so far. So that's why would not a little bit below the consensus. And if you look at the sequential pace of growth. We now think that the peak is probably behind us and that's true for the quarterly. Gdp numbers just about. It's also true for the business. Survey's i think both have probably seen the highest levels and probably going to decline from here and that's always going to be an important shift for markets. What are the drivers of the shifts that we've made. The main driver really has been virus related the rebound in virus cases in the. Us has been certainly bigger than we thought several months ago. The impact on activity has still been reasonably limited. But there has been some impact we've seen somewhat more as the delta wave as progress and you know it's probably just going to take longer especially in the service sector four activity to get back. We already saw some signs that for example. The return to office was pretty slow. Even during the period when enthusiasm about vaccinations was probably at a peak and with this renewed setback. of course. you've got to believe that. It's going to take even longer and rebuild that in awe forecast a little bit more than the other thing i'd say is yom downgrade that we've made to our numbers we've always had a pretty subdued growth forecast in the second half of two thousand and twenty two basically because of the payback for the very large amount of fiscal supported. That we get thousands and twenty. Once we've only got one and a half to two percent sequential growth in the second half of next year. That's not a change. But obviously as we're moving closer to that it's also becoming more relevant for markets and for policy makers and what about other countries outside of the us. We've also been downgrading forecast there. So what's driving the weaker growth elsewhere in some places. I mean mainly in asia. We really haven't made significant changes elsewhere. But in asia we've taken by china most importantly on the back of the delta outbreak. Rake and you know much smaller numbers than in the us and drums of virus cases. This is a very small fraction but china's still trying to achieve basically zero colbert. And that's meant some pretty significant restrictions on activity in the service sectors that we now think that third quarter sequential growth is probably only going to be something like one and a half percent annualise. that's come down significantly. We do think that as the numbers in china have also improved again. As far as virus cases are concerned it will be significant. Rebound policymakers up providing support. But nevertheless it's going to leave an imprint in the annual number so a few tense lasts and drums of growth. Not eight and a half percent but maybe eight point two percent eight and a quarter percent those kinds of numbers than we've had some pretty significant outbreaks elsewhere in asia while more serious in southeast asia and with very bad health outcomes and of course they are economic consequences as well and then australia also some significant lockdowns soul. It's all been very much colder related and you know. The news has just been worse than we had expected in them. What we had built into our numbers. Europe continues to do pretty well despite the renewed outbreaks. We still think that european recovery is progressing quite well. Uk continues to progress pretty well. Despite the relative behind numbers are not in america. The virus numbers actually have been generally better. And that's also showed drouin somewhat better economic numbers so you know you look around the world there. Lots of different sort of trends and lots of different elvira situations and economic consequences from that. So it's no longer quite as synchronized on the upside on the downside as.

alison nathan John hutsi Chair powell jabil goldman sachs Wyoming kansas city jackson asia John china us
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"As a result of all this gym and migration from adr's so local listings in hong kong as as mainland china have already started and disbelieve. All know very few areas where you are star among don. Chinese government are in full agreement. They both want these companies listed in china so in total there about two hundred dollars she stayed. Companies chinese companies listed in the us swayed yards and most of the high quality companies. That be speed. So already have deadlines and map and they want the have listing spec in hong kong or mainland china. And be saying that the stock exchanges and brokers local brokers will be the main beneficiaries of this trance. So finally what's the risks. That concerns about china spillovers the broader emerging markets universe. I mean we often talk about contagion risk during these types of episodes. So are you seeing any evidence of this at this point or do you think that's a risk going forward for criti- maybe you can start show so i would say. In terms of market impact. The china regulation related volatility has not spillover to asia high yield or. In fact. You know to the broader. Em credit market. It's been very china specific and in fact within china also it's been very sector-specific in as we discussed earlier i think on a forward looking basis it could have some impact and that would be a channel to china's growth by to the regulatory uncertainty beginning to weigh on corporate sentiment in china overnight. We got total social financing data and indicated that medium and long-term lords to corporates softened in the month of july amidst the regulatory uncertainty and this is in addition to already existing headwinds to chinese growth in the second half right all the property-related de leveraging and also the resurgence in code that we are seeing so i think it can impact overall risk sentiment towards emerging markets and also em growth given the china such a big component of it and at the end of the day when you step back and think about it. Em the growth asset. It's so we could see some concerns on a forward looking basis the shock what about you do you see signs that this is spilling over on the equity side of the emerging market universe. I did agree with prime treaty. So far it looks limited to certain sectors within china and the rest of yelm doesn't seem to be impacted on one basis all major. Em markets are nice each and so far you're not concerned about any agent. Of course china's growth is very very important or the rest of the market. So if chinese growth is appointed it will have impact or em as well as young in my. Thanks so much for joining us. The shock and criti- and sharing your thoughts on these really interesting developments in china. That i'm sure are going to continue to evolve. Thank you thanks very much all of the having us. That concludes this episode of exchanges. That goldman sachs thanks for listening and if you enjoyed the show we hope you subscribe on apple. Podcast rating and comment. This podcast was recorded on august..

china Chinese government hong kong yelm asia us goldman sachs apple
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"This is exchanges at goldman sachs and i'm als- nathan senior strategist and goldman sachs research in this episode. We're going to discuss. The impact of china's heightened regulatory scrutiny on the capital markets and the implications for investors to do that. I'm sitting down with my colleagues from the asset management business. Stephanie que- a shock ws and critique so fought. Will i turn to stephanie who leads goldman sachs's private equity business in asia with a focus on growth equity investments stephanie. Welcome to the program. Thank you alison to start us off. We've seen a series of regulatory changes in china that have obviously rattled markets. Can you. I just give us a sense of the nature of some of these changes and their significance. So two weeks ago there happened. Announcements that rattled the stock market. It started with the attack sector there. The government announced that after school tutoring for kids from takes twelve needs to turn nonprofit there were restrictions in capital raising for these type of companies appeals not allowed in important vestige should not make investments there so the purpose of that stated still lower cost and anxieties of tribe weary as shortly after that there were other announcements that were made the focus spans across different sectors and i would say areas in food for example cyber security specifically companies that have more than one million users need to apply for cybersecurity approvals before they actually can listen in another trumpster. Antitrust is another area. That people were looking at and so i think that flurry of announcements caused the market to be very jittery in the last two weeks so i have been investing in the region in private equity for the last twenty five years i would say over the years. There have been a lot of cycles that came through right. I remember the asian financial crisis ninety seven saws. There was of course the cfc's an in between the volatility. It was always constant. I would say this time around. It came fast. In terms of the regulatory changes announcement. It came quite broad and it came cereal in terms of you know every day every other day so it did cause people to pause and take a look at ed but that being said i would say this change is not particularly very different from previous ones. In the sense that there will be adjustments. That will be made and we'll learn and will grow from here so uncertainty but definitely opportunity go forth and so what are we. Seeing in terms of private investor flows our clients getting to reallocate funds away from china. How they responded because we're in the private markets. The reaction is not that start yet. We're seeing people hundred understanding learning but we're not seeing any dramatic reaction at this moment in time. I think fundamentally people still believe that china is a very important market is large is growing and that this is more adjustment targeting internally to quote a quick fix the economy so that it could be a long term sustainable but that being said interestingly you observe the public markets while all that volatility was coming in china in the last two weeks in india. We actually saw that. There were a number of early stage. Tech deals are getting you know very strong funding closing and also some of the debut of the public market trading tech companies. Were doing very well. So why would try to put into together and say it's from china into india. One concluded that way. But i would actually say that it makes people think were diversification of geographies and diversification of sectors and industries. And i think a lot of the private investors remain very focus. I would say the pipeline deals that we have been discussing whereas all the discussion still going strong. So has this changed your medium or longer term thesis behind the growth opportunities in the region so we are focused on four actors in terms of growth investments namely enterprise software. Fintech consumer in healthcare. And i do think that. The whole seem of digitization and hence enterprise software into it will continue infrastructure still needs to happen and bieber not going to go back on that so we continue to look into quality companies let by good management teams in those sectors and in consumer for gen z. The whole theme about them be more individual. Sustainable you know looking for products are quality rather than clutter. I think that will continue. And we just have to again overlay with the lens of what is good for society as we make these investments and by the way some of these sectors are new. So we have to expect that regulation slow catch up at some way and so that any of those coming through would not be a surprise and on healthcare. I think the key there is innovation new stuff which is good for society which helps make the people healthier. I think that always be a need for that. That's therapeutic gap is there and it will remain there so we will continue to look into that and the key i would highlight again is margin setter fair and sustainable and that's how we're gonna look at the sectors so you ask me today. I was so saying that those four sectors are sound good and hopefully the valuations will be more reasonable right. So what i'm hearing from you is. This really hasn't changed your view. On the opportunities in the region the sectors that feel the most compelling from a growth perspective but ultimately is just putting a different lens on it as well absolutely. There's one element that is constan. It has changed and from. Our perspective is understanding the change seeing the change and continue to look forward. But i do believe the size scale of the marketplace will sustain our investments going for us and i think it is the key question in the sense that you can we still see the type of growth and innovation that the region's been known for in the wake of these type of developments. What is your sense of that. For sure i think innovation economic rose jock creation. it's imperative it will continue. I would see this as adjustment for quality for social goodness in factional. For the last i would say two. Three years has been a lot of talk about she about diversity and i would see this as highlighting the s within the es gsi rights sustainability when we make investments now we need to consider increasing lay is good for society but what does it mean for. Quality is a good for the next generation. Now what would regulators think about these type of industries and it is imperative that we actually factor that in when we look at sectors industries and companies. So i think as market calms down by the way. We're starting to see a bit of that happening already. There will be renewed interest into the markets. And it's probably not a bad thing for the valuations to the adjusted because it was actually getting pretty hefty. I would say in the in the last call. Eighteen months so the market is beginning to digestive at this point and turtled looking ahead absolutely. Thanks so much for giving us. This insight stephanie. We appreciate you joining the program. Thanks a lot. Allison is a real pleasure when now turn to a shock you abuse who has collided. Emerging markets equities and procrustes afaat a fixed income portfolio manager to discuss the regulatory impact on equities and fixed income markets but shock and critique. Welcome to the program. So i start having us so. We just spoke with stephanie. About the impact of china's regulatory moves on private investor flows. What's public investors sentiment looking like in the wake of these developments and bassac your investor in china on the equity side. So maybe you can give us a sense of.

china goldman sachs research Stephanie que goldman sachs stephanie nathan alison cfc india asia government Allison
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"He could just take longer for global industrial sector to recover similarly or baseline view in the us on the labor market is quite bullish. We expect unemployment rate to fall from five four nine percents to the low four percents this year on the back primarily of the expiration of the generous federal unemployment benefit dope ups but also rising vaccination rates. It could take longer perhaps that there are more complex reasons why people are not back at work. People are potentially revisiting their priorities. Host endemic between work leisure money family health. And so i think a slower. Us labor market will go reasonable. Something i worry about him going to learn a lot in next month's by an from that ultimately it's just are there people to service the industries that had been lagging and if there aren't there could be a constraint on growth but we're expecting that to fate exactly thank you so much for the update dan. Let's hope we don't have another variant coming our way but we appreciate you being here. Thanks for having me. That concludes this episode of exchanges at goldman sachs. Thanks for listening. And if you enjoyed the show we hope you subscribe on apple podcasts. And leave a rating and comment this podcast recorded on august fourth and fifth twenty twenty one all price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied distributed published or reproduced in whole or in part the information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or recommendation from any goldman sachs entity to the listener neither goldman sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore including in respect of direct indirect or consequential loss or.

goldman sachs us dan apple
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"Now one of the questions is maybe this has to do with the timeframe of vaccination as many people know israel was at the leading edge of the global vaccination campaign and so there could be some of waning effect of the vaccines over time. and so. that's one thing that again. The companies are studying. We're gathering more data on to fully understand that now as we shift to look at severe disease. Remember as i mentioned before this is a spectrum right so again here importantly i think the message is the vaccine. Efficacy against severe disease in hospitalization is still around ninety percent even with the delta variant and that comes from some data out of both israel and canada. So that's very encouraging and so bottom line is if you're double vaccinated have very good protection against delta especially against severe disease and hospitalization and that's obviously a big focus of the healthcare system because when we talked about these lockdowns in different measures that countries are taking it relates to really trying to preserve that healthcare system capacity. And so given the vaccine efficacy. Were seen here out of israel and canada very encouraging protection against severe disease. Let me just thought to that. Because obviously we have pfizer. We've moderna we have other vaccines around the world. Are there any very material differences between these vaccines. So i'd say bottom line it looks like the messenger. A vaccine so pfizer by on tech and madeira are somewhat better than the adenoviruses. Vaccines those from astrazeneca. Jay for symptomatic kovic nineteen so again that kinda symptomatic disease but all four these vaccines look to be very very good again. Severe disease hospitalization. So not as much of a difference there and remember that's the big focus of the healthcare system is ensuring that we're protected against severe disease and hospitalization so less differentiation among the vaccines on that front. We're hearing that the severity of illness for breakthrough infections so meaning vaccine to people getting the infections is actually lower. Is that true. What is the evidence. Say around that yet. Obviously another very important topic here in everyone's probably seen a lot of different headlines on this. So look you know. Vaccine breakthroughs are still generally rare. But unfortunately they do happen. Now the flip side of it is if you do have a breakthrough infection. The symptoms and duration of illness is likely much less severe than it would be if you aren't vaccinated and there's some data that's emerged on this front from earlier in the pandemic that suggests if you do have a breakthrough infection you still have about sixty percent..

severe disease israel pfizer symptomatic disease canada Severe disease delta astrazeneca Jay
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"This is exchanges at goldman sachs and i'm alison nathan a senior strategist at goldman sachs research. In this episode. we're going to discuss the delta variant and how the fast spreading virus is affecting the path of reopening and economic growth. More broadly to do that. I'm sitting down with my colleagues in research. Terence flynn in our healthcare group and dan driven from our economics team. When i turn to terence flynn who covers the us bio pharma sector gs research for his thoughts on the delta variant and vaccines terrence. Welcome to the program. Thanks so much else in really appreciate the invite so the delta variant seems to be driving yet another wave of corona virus cases. Obviously the news is dominated by the spread of it so just to start why is it delta variant. So worrisome sure so as most people know by now the virus changes over time and there've been a number of these different variants that have arisen over the course of the pandemic delta's obviously the latest one and the thing about delta is it's more transmissible so basically has the ability to spread much more rapidly and so for example when a person infected with delta they can infect a greater number of people than a person who is infected with one of the earlier strains of the virus. And for this reason. It's why it's become the predominant strain around the globe. This also means that you could become infected during a shorter period of exposure and so that really relates to the fact that delta leads to higher levels of virus and people so as a result even if you come in contact with someone who has the delta variant and you're not vaccinated. You could become infected over. You know a very short period exposure versus some of the prior strains of the virus where it might take longer for you to become infected so those are two of the reasons. The third one is essentially relates to something that relates to the vaccination so even if you're vaccinated people are able to spread the delta variant and that's a little bit different from before with some of the earlier strains of the virus where if you were vaccinated it was very unlikely that you would be able to spread the infection via eight symptomatic infections. So you know some differences here with delta and that's why there's such a big focus on it now and the reason why it's spreading so rapidly so what do we now about how. Well the current vaccine's hold up against the delta variant yet..

alison nathan goldman sachs research Terence flynn terence flynn goldman sachs delta dan us symptomatic infections
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"This is exchanges at goldman sachs and i'm alison ethan a senior strategist goldman sachs research. Today we're going to discuss. The in emanate activity. And what's in store for the second half of this year we're joined by stefan feld voice and mark sorelle the global co heads of mergers and acquisitions in the investment banking division here at goldman sachs stephan mark. Welcome back to the program. Thank you for having us. Look forward to you..

alison ethan goldman sachs research goldman sachs stefan feld mark sorelle global co stephan mark
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"Can you provide some insight into this growth trend in the family office. Space share and allison. I think i'll start by defining. As j because it's used all the time it stands for environmental social and governance investing and. It's certainly been on the rise for quite some time now. But i think recent events around climate issues social unrest and the pandemic have really amplified investor. Focus on the s g and family office interest in the space is really a combination of mission and value driven as well as a search for innovation and outside returns. And if we look at this year two thousand twenty one has been the strongest year on record for flows into espn investments and global es g funds have generally outperformed their category peers over the last ten years on a risk adjusted basis. This is according to morningstar and goldman sachs zone. Investment research and i think regulatory tailwinds are really key factor here and have reinvigorated. Espn focus from.

allison espn goldman sachs zone morningstar Espn
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"More honest.

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"Now i think osceola ambitious goal and upload players can actually lead the charge on best from our side but it means is really making diagnosis of cancer really reliable and absolutely making cancer. Less your disease for sure as a side effect that very much. We'll begin breakdown barriers walls and really lead the innovation to everyone. Looks like how to bring safe. A i enj- everyday practice antonia from your seat in investment banking. What's the outlook. What's the future of the space setting prior to kobe. There was a clear. Any long-term everyone saw clear need for greater application of technology and digitization of healthcare more broadly in particular given the increasing. Health costs that. We're going to see over time with an aging population. Potential constraints from government's inability to spend on healthcare spending a long term trend. Was there i think there. Just wasn't that koster impetus necessarily for investors today to invest in technologies. They didn't necessarily see that. Catholics their adoptions of certain technologies are digital in healthcare today and starting with the practitioners themselves and sometimes allergy from medical practitioners themselves in doing things differently to the way they've been attending patients and giving care over the past decades. I mean that was a big With kobe what we've seen is medical nerves. I'm governments Meeting to give treatment differently needing to use digital technology an speaking of much broader sense than what they'd had previously and it's worked very effectively. And i think about spin a real eye opener in the change both medical practitioner level but will set the government loved one through regulations working hand in hand with companies owns. We have on podcast today. Driving charge and change. Thanks so much to all of you for joining us and for all of the amazing worker. Doing that has so much promise. For having that concludes this episode of exchanges. That goldman sachs. Thanks for listening. And if you enjoy the show we hope you subscribe at apple. Podcast and leave rating and comment. This podcast.

cancer osceola antonia koster goldman sachs apple
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"And our shareholders we in the investment banking team have newly created a decarbonization group that ultimately is meant to be the entry point for our clients as well as their newly changing commitment specifically in space and who are also looking for solutions to meet their own net zero targets. I think what's interesting about this right. Is that like any company like goldman sachs were trying to figure out our own path towards carbon neutrality and now tonette zero. We learned a lot in that process. We learned a lot about how to set up the goals themselves. What is appropriately aggressive. We've learned a lot about how to ensure that our es g and our carbon emissions story is consistent with our own corporate strategy and that its core to our business and then also you know how to disclose that to the market. I think in that whole process we have now thought about. We've been through that process. How can we help. Our clients go through that process right and so it obviously makes sense for our own decarbonization group now within the investment bank as we start to advise and support clients in their own targets for carbon reduction for cindy for example. Who did it for goldman to now. Help advise our clients in terms of how to get there and so what sectors are most active in these efforts. Yeah i would say elson ultimately. It's really the carbon intensive sectors right. The majority of the activity has really been driven by large tech as john had mentioned the likes of apple. Google microsoft who've really been very innovative in a lot of the structures that they have brought to market and some of the targets ultimately microsoft was the first to come out with their own carbon negative goal. Which is a new term that ultimately they'd coined and followed very closely with by this onslaught of just net zero targets. But we've also seen just a tremendous uptake in heavy industry as well as the transport sectors following big tech and so over four hundred companies now across some of the largest greenhouse gas emitting industries from shipping to steelmaking have now all come together to decarbonise not only their own operations but given that they are in numerous supply chains as well to be able to bring down their missions by twenty fifty euros. Interesting people off and say well obviously big tech. I've been the leaders and decarbonization because they have the liquidity and balance sheets to focus on it right and thinking through innovation so for an example..

goldman sachs elson microsoft cindy apple Google john
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"This is exchanges at goldman sachs and i'm also nathan of goldman sachs research today. We're going to talk about climate change. And what companies are doing to reduce their carbon footprint a trend. Broadly known as decarbonization to do that. I'm joined by john. Greenwood and cindy quan who are spearheading an effort within our investment banking division to help companies and sovereigns which their net zero goals. John is a partner within the financing group and has co head of the division sustainable solutions council and cindy is leading corporate conversations for the newly formed decarbonization group johnson. Cindy welcome to the program. Thank you thanks. Alison the pressure on companies to reduce carbon footprint. Continues to bill. John start by first explaining to us. What decarbonization actually means for companies and how it's fitting into their overall esp framework so we often say that decarbonisation and that zero is the new es g so espn is obviously a very broad concept covering companies environmental social and governance practices. But in the last year there has really been a strong focus on the e part of es g primarily coming from our institutional investors who are now integrating efg into their investment decisions so decarbonization is simply the reduction of carbon intensity removing carbon from process. Why is that important. There has been a massive focus on climate change. and how does the world combat climate change. And i think most of this has around the paris agreement which is now that there is a kind of broad alignment across the world to try to reduce temperature rises to one point five degrees celsius. And we all have a part in this governments regulators companies and consumers and. I think there's a broad awareness that this cannot only come from government regulation and that companies really have to change their own way. They go about doing business. In order to be able to reach the goals that we've set forth for the world under the paris agreement but as you just said the paris agreement is not new so why now for increased efforts from companies. I think what has really changed over. The last say. Eighteen months is not just companies acknowledging that climate change is a big issue in the fact that they need to start thinking about their own carbon footprint and weighs into which to reduce their carbon footprint. It's really coming from their. Shareholders is really coming from institutional investors. There has been increased focus now from institutional investors to actually embed..

goldman sachs research cindy quan division sustainable solutions goldman sachs Greenwood nathan John cindy Alison efg Cindy paris espn johnson john
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"Weaker at some point in the future because of this. This is a matter of great debate. We believe it has pulled forward demand. We think that those statistics just throughout or pretty informative that you've seen no growth in these categories for years and yet all the sudden we've seen an incredible amount of growth. I think that we believe that doubt. Full hoard may attenuate over time as opposed to just immediately drop off in a binary way. So there's a little bit of debate in our minds about how fast this attenuates but whether or not at attenuates i think we have put forward quite a bit of demand and we'll see somewhere out in the next eighteen months of fall off of demand as consumers move their spending to other areas like going on vacation for example. So what's the outlook for the sector. All will overall we think for consumer electronics. The outlooks pretty poor. You know right now. We're seeing incredibly high demand that'll be followed by a period of weakness as normalized and then we'll come out the other side of that to a more normal world but that may not happen for a couple of years. We haven't talked about the it hardware part of this. The servers compute storage networking all. Those products are probably going to be a little bit higher demand particularly think campus networking and things that enabled to zoom calls and all kinds of other digital interaction on campuses. They go back to offices will be in high demand. Some companies like cisco for example should benefit from that. Actually let me just clarify that so at least zoom in the rear view mirror a little bit. So why do you think the sectors will benefit. We're moving to a little bit more hybrid way of working in my mind. I think all of us want to be back in offices. All of us see a lot of benefit to being together. Personally i know that we in san francisco's goldman sachs. San francisco office have opened up more and we all saw each other last week. Which was great. I think that at the same time people learn that these technologies can be leveraged for greater efficiency. Where when we're traveling people will be working from home a little bit more those times. You wanna be able to integrate people in the office with people that aren't in the office and zoom. We've all learned a great way to do that. But we need to enable that in the office we need greater network capacity to support all this video traffic it loads networks substantially more than boys. So that's the reason that we think these technologies are going to be really in demand the next couple of years by companies trying to make sure that can work in the office. Say where does it hold. It does feel like the future. Work is evolving here. And some of what we've seen will persist. Thank you so much for joining us today. Rod charles and length pleasure that concludes this episode of exchanges at goldman sachs. Thanks for listening. And if you enjoyed the show we hope you subscribe on apple podcasts. And leave a rating and comment. This podcast was acquitted the week of june twenty-first.

last week cisco Rod charles today june twenty-first of years months San francisco next couple apple san francisco next eighteen