35 Burst results for "Golden Age"

Barbashev scores 2, Golden Knights beat Canadiens 4-3

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 2 weeks ago

Barbashev scores 2, Golden Knights beat Canadiens 4-3

"The golden knights earned a four three win over the Canadians as I've been Barbara chef scored his first two goals for Vegas. Barbershop scored once while the knights were taking a three zero lead, then added the eventual game winner. Jonathan quick stopped 25 shots of winning his golden age debut. I felt good, you know, it's a fun building to play in front of, and these fans are great. We've known that, you know, since day one, since his team came in for 5 6 years ago, so yeah, definitely a warm reception. I enjoyed that. Quick secured the win after allowing two goals in a 35 second span of the third period. The wind puts Vegas on top of the Pacific division. I'm Dave ferry.

Barbara Chef Golden Knights Jonathan Quick Barbershop Knights Vegas Pacific Division Dave Ferry
21st Edition of Manufacturing IT Summit Indonesia

ACN Newswire

04:09 min | 2 months ago

21st Edition of Manufacturing IT Summit Indonesia

"8 a.m. Monday, January 16th, 2023. 21st edition of manufacturing IT summit Indonesia. Jakarta, January 16th, 2023 ACN news wire after successful 20 editions of manufacturing IT summit, exito is all set to host another milestone event the 21st edition of manufacturing IT summit, and in person event which serves as an ideal platform to enhance the experience to quote reimagine, innovate, and transform what. The manufacturing IT summit is a by invite only in person event exclusively for technology leaders from leading businesses, institutions, and government officials representing Indonesia pass manufacturing sector. Recent data from the ministry of industry has indicated that the manufacturing sector has had the largest contribution to its GDP. Indonesia aspires to be a top ten economy by 2030, with net exports to be its growth engine, the next 15 years is forecasted to be the golden age for Indonesia, as it will realize a demographic bonus peak. Accelerating growth of the manufacturing sector is critical, with the Indonesian government planning to implement industry 4.0 through the ministry of industry apos making Indonesia 4.0 road map manufacturing IT summit Indonesia aligns itself with Indonesia pass national goals and is a leading networking conference. Gathering the most influential of these technology leaders to explore synergies and discuss today apos biggest technological challenges, fostering deeper collaboration and generating new ideas this conference will bring together over 150 sea level executives, directors, and heads of technology to discuss the critical technology issues affecting today across manufacturing industry, speakers like IR ignatius war zito, minister pass expert staff for strengthening domestic industry capabilities, acting director general of chemical, pharmaceutical and textile industry, ministry of industry, republic of Indonesia, director of community development amp. Entrepreneurship, coordinating ministry for economic affairs, republic of Indonesia, salil debt, chief technical adviser, United Nations industrial development organization you need, rain rinaldi S IIP, chief of digital assist committee, caden president, I had a printed group, republic of Indonesia, Juan canga one, head of product, triban data, Indonesian national ministry give tick and smart cities, republic of Indonesia, will British darma, CIO, Toyota ASTRO motor, mocha mad James fellow hooden. Executive director, Indonesia blockchain society among many others will be sharing their experiences and expertise at the summit. Event registration has commenced for delegates and sponsors. The delegates will be exposed to in depth, trimmed forward Sessions, amp workshops, practical takeaways, and ideas to keep you ahead in the digital economy. The spots will be able to create an overwhelming branding in the event along with meeting their prospects and displaying the products. Hundreds of seasoned marketers, strategists, designers, and more to network and connect with. Meet your customers, vendors, expert resources, Friends, and colleagues on 15th amp 16th of February, register now to engage at this grand event as the slots are filling up fast T oh no more about the event. WWW dot manufacturing its summit into an issue about excel we are globally to be business events company focused on crafting bespoke solutions and contexts by designing platforms that create new business opportunities for our clients across concepts and industries. We cherish the trust over the last 12 years garnered from our partnering organizations globally and with the growing team of young, vibrant and creative individuals, excel aims at success and perfection copyright 2023 ACN news wire. All rights reserved. WWW dot ACN newswire dot com.

Republic Of Indonesia Exito Ministry Of Industry Ministry Of Industry Apos Ir Ignatius War Zito Community Development Amp Ministry For Economic Affairs Salil Debt Jakarta United Nations Industrial Deve Rain Rinaldi Digital Assist Committee Juan Canga Indonesian National Ministry British Darma Indonesia Blockchain Society Caden Toyota
Rita Moreno's Tempestuous Love Affair With Marlon Brando

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:57 min | 3 months ago

Rita Moreno's Tempestuous Love Affair With Marlon Brando

"I got to know about mala Brando through his daughter. I got to know a lot about him. But Rita Moreno had a hard time with Brando. And she admitted she tried to kill herself with pills. A couple of times. She didn't understand that if she said, if I was gonna kill this pathetic said, trot upon Rita, the rest of Rita was also gonna go with me. I really didn't seem to understand that, but that's what the attempt was. It was an attempt and I love when people get this, there's honest late in life, you know? Because these are these people are from a different generation, obviously, but Hollywood was so different back then. It was the golden age. People didn't, you know, kiss and tell. But you read these biographies that come out autobiographies that come out and memoirs and man, you get the whole skinny. What a great time must have been to be out here. But Moreno was married to a heart Doctor Who became her manager. I named Leonard Gordon and, you know, Brando kept coming around. And read it and want that. But he did. And she said he lost a big pot of himself. The good part of him, the good mullin that read a love, it was very complicated our thing really, really complicated. He was the king of movies. He was really one of the most sexual men on earth. It was one of those very tempestuous love affairs. And don't forget what you just said. He was one of the most sexual men on earth. That's why you have to believe me when Quincy Jones said what he said about Randolph would screw a doorknob. And he had sex with men. His own daughter told me he had a fling with mobile, James Dean. We were having New Year's Eve dinner and she told me that and my family couldn't believe it. It refused to believe it. And then she said, was having sex with men even after James Dean. Marvin Gaye was another one. So nobody believes these stories, but when you talk to people from their family and they admit it to you, you're going to tell them they're wrong. They're not wrong. And even though he was crazy, she admitted that she wanted to marry him. You know, but she kept sleeping with him regardless of the fact that he was sleeping around with other women, and it killed her. She said, one time she found lingerie that was not hers. And she went home devastated, crying and crying. And something wonderful happened the next day, she said, she was spotted by Elvis Presley. Who liked what he saw? And he asked for a meeting with Rita. And she accepted the invitation with that stranger's lingerie still on her mind, you know, it's going to happen now, she has a fling with Elvis because she's pissed at random.

Leonard Gordon Mala Brando Brando Rita James Dean Moreno Mullin Hollywood Quincy Jones Randolph Marvin Gaye Elvis Presley Elvis
Sebastian Reflects on Manhood and the 2nd Amendment

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:38 min | 4 months ago

Sebastian Reflects on Manhood and the 2nd Amendment

"Want to talk to you about the Second Amendment and how it was put into effect last night in my home. First, let's have a little reminder of, well, the manhood hour is going to be next with senior CIA operations officer Rick Prado, a legend in the black ops community. And in the spirit of our weekly manhood hour, you do not want to miss it. Let's listen to what the man in a wheelchair said on the floor of Congress an individual I was hanging out with at Mar-a-Lago just two weeks ago when the president made his historic announcement. And it has to do with the Second Amendment, and it's about being a man, cut 5. Our young men are taught that weaknesses strength that delicacy is desirable. And that being a soft metrosexual is more valuable than training the mind, body, and soul. Social media has weakened us. Siphoning our men of their will to fight to rise in a noble man or square their jaws and charge once more into the breach of life to defend what they love. So on this precipice of disaster, I ask the young men of this nation a question. Will you sit behind a screen while the story tales of your forefathers become myth? Or were you stand resolute against the dying light of America's golden age? We reclaim your masculinity. Will you become a man to be feared to be respected to be looked up to? Or you let this nation's next generation be its final generation? Will you let this next generation be our final generation of men? Thank you, Madison Cawthorn.

Rick Prado Lago CIA Congress America Madison Cawthorn
Why AJ Wants You to Watch the Netflix Series 'Hollywood'

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:15 min | 5 months ago

Why AJ Wants You to Watch the Netflix Series 'Hollywood'

"Have to tell you while I got you. Listen, the new Netflix series, Hollywood. Okay? It's Ryan Murphy's new series. It's a 7 episode series. It's gonna be on Netflix starting May for May 1st. You gotta watch this. It follows a group of aspiring actors and filmmakers in tinseltown right after World War II as they try to make it in any cost. It's basically a love letter to this town. Each character has a unique glimpse behind the gilded curtain of Hollywood's golden age. There's a lot of unfair systems in place back then. A lot of biases, concerning race and gender and sexuality, et cetera, and that continues to this day. But the show, I saw some previews and I talked to people who worked on it, it's really going to do what it can to expose and examine those power dynamics, and maybe what the entertainment landscape might have looked like had it not been dismantled.

Netflix Ryan Murphy Hollywood
The Left Will Never Stop Harassing Conservatives

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:23 min | 5 months ago

The Left Will Never Stop Harassing Conservatives

"He was a Nazi. He was Hitler. He was Satan. He was a dictator. He was a racist. He was corrupt. He was a tool of the wealthy. The newspapers hated him. The entire comedy industry devoted itself to the singular task of mocking and discrediting him. His name, Richard Nixon. And Ronald Reagan, and George Bush, and George Bush again, and Donald Trump. And whoever comes after Trump. For almost as long as anyone can remember, leftists have reserved the right to dispense with reason and critiquing their political opponents. Relying instead on biased personal insults. This is always true for whoever carries the banner of leader of the Republican Party. Especially if that leader is also president. Sometimes these attacks work as they did during the administrations of Nixon and both bushes. And sometimes they become epic self owns. As was the case for Reagan and Trump, whose legacies of peace and prosperity seem now like some forgotten golden age of legend. It doesn't matter when this tactic fails. Just like it never matters when leftists fail at anything. In a matter of decades in the 20th century, they can spill more blood in the name of communism than the entire history of religious wars combined. And yet still criticize all religions for being divisive.

George Bush Richard Nixon Hitler Satan Donald Trump Ronald Reagan Republican Party Nixon Reagan
"golden age" Discussed on Animation Addicts Podcast

Animation Addicts Podcast

07:01 min | 5 months ago

"golden age" Discussed on Animation Addicts Podcast

"All right, I'll write all right, the Pixar golden age, 2004 to 2010. There are 6 films during this age, classics, iconic, you will love it. We're starting off with The Incredibles. 2004, Brad bird, gotta love him. And The Incredibles was very, very incredible at the box office, did $631 million. So much money. So much money. The Incredibles really was a stand-alone film. Everyone volleyed for a sequel for years and years. This was really where Brad bird became a name for me. He's been doing this for a really long time, so it's not like he was new at making movies, but like from he entered into my world and I was like, ah, I now know who you are. And The Incredibles, I mean, it really set a standard for what people expected out of the superhero genre, which would be hitting its full force a few years later. The great thing I love about Brad bird is that his films, he is such an adamant. Defender that animation is a medium. Yes. It's a medium that can tell all sorts of genres. It can tell the horror genre. It can tell the superhero genre can tell whatever fairytale and that it's not just something that is for kids. And you see that in his films. In The Incredibles isn't a kids film, it's a film made for adults that kids also enjoy. And you'll see that with his other films as well, we're at a two week coming on later on. I mean, ratatouille isn't a kids film. No. If you're really looking at the themes and the intricacies of it, it's a film made for adults that tackles a variety of interesting concepts, but it is primarily for adults. And I think that's why his films are so great and why The Incredibles is so great because he doesn't pander down. He uses the medium to enhance the story that he has to tell. This is the story about this family, this marriage that just has this super component to it, and the struggle that they are having in their marriage, you know, as things they're getting older and then the families getting older and he's having a hard time at work and it's just a really, really great story about family dynamics with all these other great things as well. Syndrome, I just love syndrome as a villain. And my favorite thing is that the concept artist subtly designed it after Brad bird and he didn't realize it. And when you see it, you're like, oh my gosh, that is Bret bird. That's amazing. I'm pretty sure that what you just explained, you know, goes back to the first section of movies that we just did and then this whole coming up era where it really did, all of these movies are for adults. You look at each one of the actual stories happening. And they're four adults and I think that the fact that every one of these directors, so John Lasseter P doctor Anders Stanton, Brad bird, Leon crick, all of them loved animation as a medium so much, and it comes through that they are telling their stories through this, no matter what genre that might fall into. I love that. So next up we have cars 2006, John Lasseter. I remember when I saw the preview for this, I was like, what? I didn't quite get it and it just seemed more kitty to me. However, cars when it came out, it was actually really great. And cars has become this epic iconic franchise for Pixar, little boys love their cars and girls, but I see a lot of boys playing with cars. And every little kid that I know it seems like they have a few Pixar cars. They have lightning McQueen, they have made they have these cars and they're just zooming them around their house and they really hit a really great medium or niche with cars. Yes. So cars actually, I think that the public kind of felt the same way you did when you said that this felt like it seemed a little kitty because the worldwide box office was actually 200 million lower than what it was for The Incredibles. So it's kind of an interesting roller coaster that they go through. And so Finding Nemo was huge, Finding Nemo almost a $1 billion, 936 million, then The Incredibles, 631 million, and then cars 461, but then ratatouille with Brad bird, which comes next, pops it right back up to the 600s. But at least, you know, cars they only spent 70 million on the budget, so good for them. I'm sure they didn't really care that much. It's still a really good ROI. I have cars being a 121 for the 120 for the budget. Oh, really? The numbers, Disney's box office history definitely was what I'm sure Pixar would like it to be. It only 70 million versus the one 20. Yeah, for sure. So I don't know where they're getting their numbers, but yeah, you start looking at the budgets at this point in time and it's just like up, and it just hardly goes down ever. So I bet they miss the 120 million days. Yes. You know, I don't have a lot to say about cars. I've seen cars a few times, but it's not something that even when I'm watching it, I'm not totally drawn in. I agree. And love my experience watching cars. I agree. It's one of those that I'd rather, I think is pretty, but I don't get tied in as much. And I think I probably should considering I'm from what would be more known as the in the west, you know? So it's very much Arizona type landscape, and route 66 goes right through us. And so I mean, I'm not anywhere close to it, but it's the concept of it. I can see, I guess I'm in a place now where I kind of just don't like having people move in to where I'm at. So I kind of wish that rue 66 was, you know, if I were in that position and be like sweet. Go away, everybody. Let me live my life. So the next one is ratatouille 2007. Brad bird is back at it pretty quick turnaround. Now this film was one that he had taken over previously. So it wasn't his concept wasn't necessarily his idea, but it just wasn't going the way that it needed to and so Brad bird stepped in and saved the day and turned this into one of Pixar's most iconic films in my mind because it's just so unique and

Brad bird John Lasseter Bret bird Pixar Anders Stanton Leon crick Syndrome McQueen Disney Arizona
"golden age" Discussed on The Aloönæ Show

The Aloönæ Show

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"golden age" Discussed on The Aloönæ Show

"Italian sausage, I guess. Oh, that's a good one. Do love a bit of sausage once in a while? Yeah. Italian mild Italian sausage. I don't like the hot. Okay. I don't like spicy. All right, okay. That's cool. So, who was your celebrity crush? Okay. You may not even have heard of him. No, I have no idea who he is. He's all good. Are you Google him? Yes, sir. Okay, girls, I had a brush on sound menu. Okay, I'll come up later. So have you had any experience anything paranormal in your life or not? Three times. Oh, really? When was that? Three times. In the 19 70s, from 1972, 73 was in The Bahamas. And this bahamian guy, I had on a bikini and cast try to try to hit on American women. But and he was really nice. You know, he was very cheerful and all of that. So he asked me if I wanted him to teach me how to float. So I said, yeah. And he was really nice and he actually taught me how to float. So after a few minutes, you taught me how to float and all that I had finally gotten down. So he asked me if I wanted him to stay. I said, no, you can leave. I got it now. So not realize that me. I'm just helping the sky was so pretty, you know God in the water was so clear. I'm just floating and flowing and flowing and floating. And I lifted my head up and looked around everywhere and saw me. No sight of land. Okay. I did not panic. I just started floating backwards. I got out of the water about ten feet from where I got, you know, back in about ten feet from where I got you. Okay. That to me was a miracle. I wasn't shark meat for one thing. Let's see. Then another one was I felt a lump in my breast. And took my two sisters with me to the doctor, and before we went to the doctor, a voice, I was, you know, how you would like twilight sleep, you don't know if you're just going to sleep or just coming out of sleep? Yeah. I was like that. And I was concerned about the look. And so this voice, it sounded like a man's voice. Said, as clearly as I am talking to you, you do not have breast cancer. So the most calm sense of peace came over my whole body. I laid back laid my head. I just raised my head up to see where the voice came from. I saw nothing. So I laid back down very calmly, and with that sleep. And then when I went to the doctor, like I said, I would like two sisters 'cause I was holding both their hands. They would be on each side of me. And the doctor said that whatever the law was, that it probably had just burst and disposed of itself or something like that. So I was just relieved. That was the second miracle. Third miracle was, this was only about 5 years ago. I went to my son's house to pick up my granddaughter, and I was putting her in her cherry or seat, and I laid my keys on top of the car on the near the top of the car, not the hood at the top. And so I got in the car and drove on, and then my older granddaughter was riding passenger side. So, you know, we live in Arcadia and my son lives in Los Angeles. So it's about 25 miles. You know, he got a weave in and out, you know, going through different exchanges on the freeway at all. And about halfway through the drive, we heard this weird sound. So she said, what was it? I said, it's probably just something in the street. So when I get to where we are going, I have the car, and I notice I have a peak flashlight, a hot take flashlight on my key train. And I notice a hot pink, whatever. In the will of the rear window, it was just my keys stayed in as well as the window. They did not fall off that car. For 25 hours. Oh, okay. That was a very interesting paranormal activities. Yeah, I thought so. Well, that is all we have for this episode. It was great having you here, Joyce, talk about the books you've written and about your life. It was great. Oh, wonderful. And you know, the books are available at good, short books, dot com. Okay. Great. There are very affordable 7 9 9 to 1299. That's a pretty good price. I thought, so we don't try to break people. Me and my sister, we have the website together. My sister and I have the website together. So and we got ebooks too. Excellent. Yeah, thank you for the opportunity. You're welcome. And until next time, stay tuned. For more..

The Bahamas Google breast cancer Arcadia Los Angeles Joyce
"golden age" Discussed on The Aloönæ Show

The Aloönæ Show

07:21 min | 1 year ago

"golden age" Discussed on The Aloönæ Show

"I love it. $8 the nuts out first and then smoothing out the ice cream. Yeah. Everybody has their way of eating whatever it is. You know. Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. What? What superpower do you wish you could have? I wish that I could change people's hearts. Okay. Cool. I like that. Yeah, I wish that. That's what I wish for. Okay. Do you I mean, that's not, that would be what I would wish for. But I can't. So I don't know. Okay. Makes sense? Yeah, it makes sense. Do you see yourself still writing books 20 years from now? I had no idea. I was going to write the books that I wrote. Except for the first one, I deliberately set out to write that one because I wanted to document the way that our parents raised us. And the book goes from 1944 the year I was born to 1977, and you're that our mother passed on transition. So, but I wanted to capture the way that we were raised. And in the book, there's the one chapter is entitled the poem, and that is what I remember the most about our home growing up. Unbelievable that there would be 9 people and a dopamine puppy in the house. And you never had, I never saw my mother or my father get angry or upset, especially not out of control, angry, or out of control, upset, never in my life. When I was 33, when my mother died, younger than that when my father died, he died three years before she did. And so, and I didn't even realize that I had never seen a 33 years old. I had never seen her. Angry. She just took everything and tried to get the best she could and all of that. And none of her children are the type who are quick to anger, none of us are that way. We are very patient people. So and that is, she modeled all things good for us. Great. I love that. What's the biggest, what is your biggest regret in life? Not having, I wish that I had had an all of us. There's two sides to this point. I wish that I had had more children. That's the two headed snake because the pain and the, of labor, all of that. And not only that, but the raising of the child from birth to 18 years old. That is not a walk in the park. But we did it successfully. But when I think about it, I wouldn't want to have to do it 5 more times. Yeah. Like my mother did. Great. Do you like spicy food? Do not know. I do not. Okay. That's cool. But I do know there's a variety of lay's potato chips that I eat every night, and it's sweet, southern heat. It's just enough spicy to give it a little kick. Oh my God, that is those potato chips are to die for. I think it is a little bit sweet southern heat. That's a good potato chip. How you every night? All right, cool. So one was the last time you actually gone out and done something. I stay home. I know, but you had to at least gone out at school as a child at some point. And were you homeschooled? No. When you said Flynn was the last time I went out? Yeah, you went out and outside your house and gone outside. I go to the grocery stores. I got two grocery stores. And then I wear my mask. And then I come back home. Okay, okay. Yeah, I don't want to go around people because too many people are not vaccinated, not wearing masks and all that, but I ain't gonna get off into that. That's your own choice. Okay. Cool, cool. Did you have any role models growing up? Yes, sir. My mother, all of my aunts, and my older female cousins, my whole family, all the way through to cousins. We are a in kissing family when we see each other. We greet each other with the hug. When we depart from each other, we depart with a hug. And one of the friend of the family, a long, long, long time for coach said, y'all a lot of hugging his family. That's what we do. We hook. Yeah. Everybody needs love. Absolutely. Yeah? What is the most comfortable piece of clothing you own? Oh. Oh, where is it right now? It's like it's a gray men's lack of flannel shirt. This is very comfortable. Great. So. And it's loose. So I, you know, you can move. Oh, okay. Okay, cool. So you have some really good questions. Oh, thank you. What was the strangest dream you've ever had? I was just talking about that one was my husband with pap. We don't call each other husband and wife general. We speak because we think that they have negative connotations. But the strangest dream that I used to have as a, I was maybe like, let's younger than maybe ten, 8 or 9. It was I judge a lot of stuff by on the day I met that. So I met him when I was 13. So I was having these dreams long before I met him. So I was probably around ten. But it was the dream was I would standing on a coffee table and lions and tigers were trying to get to me, but they could not get to me. So I haven't had that dream. I was just telling him that I haven't had that dream in years. Okay. Great, fantastic. Which penny that you would ask me that question? Which pizza topping do you most relate to?.

Flynn lions tigers
"golden age" Discussed on The Aloönæ Show

The Aloönæ Show

06:55 min | 1 year ago

"golden age" Discussed on The Aloönæ Show

"Then I get out of the bed, and I do my stretch. I stretch up to the ceiling. Then down and touch my toes without bending my knees and man, does that feel good? I have a workout on YouTube. It's called easy workout by grandma Jay. Okay. Great. Yeah, I just put it on YouTube. So I just turned 78 on February 4th. And so ladies been asked in me, what kind of routines I do for the, you know, the exercise that I do. And so I decided to do a three minute video. It's on YouTube. I put it on Facebook and Twitter and all of that. So it's inspirational for the females, especially men can do it too. You can stretch as well. So okay. Great. What was the last good book you've read? Jump. Nice, Steve Harvey. Oh, okay, great. Yeah, I loved it. And what is that book about? It was funny. What's the book about? About taking a leap of faith, Joe. It's like, just, you know, if you're pursuing your, I have a quote that personifies that. I calling this quote in 2013, and it was chosen out of over 5000 entries for a 2013 calendar. And the quote states, I posted this on social media to encourage people. It's better to die, chasing a dream, never caught than to die, never having chased the dream. So his book is based, you know, it's like parallel to what I quote says. You gotta have a jump for your dreams. Okay. So, have there been any interesting people you've met in your life? Interesting people. Nobody that's famous, but my cousin was Claude Harvard. He and he had, I don't know, like 90 inventions. He worked for Ford Motor Company. He invented the piston inspection machine and all kinds of other things he invented. He's a black and African American inventors and I used to go to his house and play with his kids and all the time. He was extremely modest. He knew that first said one word about the inventions that he had patented. Yeah, he had patents. So it was extremely interesting person, but I didn't find out about it until after he died. Okay. Are you a cat person or a dog person? I agree. I love dogs. Yeah. They're the best. Yeah, don't have one now, but we have had them grew up with dogs. We always had it all. Absolutely. What's the best? There's one book, my 15 dogs. Say 55 year journey of love. That's my sister's book. She wrote that one. And if you like dogs, you will love her, but it's about 60 pages. So it's good. I've read a million times and makes you laugh and it makes you cry. Oh, okay. What's the best way to travel? The best way to travel? Yeah? In your dreams. What? Yeah. I told you. I like home. I'm a homebody. And I was one of my girlfriends bought me this little tiny globe because I told her one time and this is 30 years old. I told her one time that I sit in my easy chair and travel around the world. Okay. So she bought me this little miniature globe. Great. I'll think about people in all parts of the world. What they're doing all that stuff. What is the most beautiful sunset have that you have witnessed? Every sunset to me is beautiful. Okay. Great. Every single one. I love sunrises and sunsets. I love landscapes, seascapes, snowscapes, all of it. It's beautiful. Nature is just, I'm so glad that I can see. Yeah. What is your favorite season? I would say spring and fall. Summer is too hot and winter is too cold. So spring and full, it just right. That's what I think. Great. Yeah. So I don't like it above 85. And it starts getting closer to 90. That's too hot. Yep. What kind of what kind of music do you listen to often? We listen to everything. Our playlist is full of blues, R&B, country western symphonic, everything. I listen to all of them. Okay. So now I'm really stuck on, I don't know if you've ever heard this guy's name is Michael wyckoff. He's passed away now. But he has a song called love makes me sing and oh my God, I just swung when I hear it. Love makes me sing by Michael what I call. Oh, it's good. Okay. Great. Who was the last person you've talked to? The last person I talked to was my man. Okay. Yep. And what do you like? About him when he has less soul him. Let's see. We will talk about his drinking his green tea. He had his green tea in his hand. You know, it's a cup of green tea in the same. And that's what we were talking about. He was drinking it. Oh, great. Fabulous. Yes. What flavor of ice cream do you wish existed? It already does. I don't have to wish. And that is butter pecan. Okay. Okay, interesting.

grandma Jay YouTube Claude Harvard Steve Harvey Ford Motor Company Twitter Facebook Joe Michael wyckoff Michael
"golden age" Discussed on The Aloönæ Show

The Aloönæ Show

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"golden age" Discussed on The Aloönæ Show

"Just turned 78. And like I said, I'm the oldest of 7. And our parents raised us in such a way, we all adore each other. There was never any sibling rivalry in our family. So I wanted to capture the way that they raised us. And again, this book is a 169 pages. And it includes 20 pages of recipes and 20 pages of pictures. So I'd let lots of people read it back when I first wrote it. And they said, you should get this published. So I did. I got it published. I self published, because I sent it off to reputable publishing houses, but they said they were only interested in celebrities and all of those kinds of people, well established. So I said, okay, how self published? So no skin off my nose. But so that's what I did. And when I finished the manuscript before I even submitted it, my husband and I have been together for 64 years, since we were 13 years old. And so he knows my family very well. He adored my parents, my brother, who passed away in 2013. He had lung cancer. And my brother was his best friend. He and my husband were best friends. And so I finished the manuscript and he was I didn't know what to call it. So my husband made that kind of statement or that statement. That all of y'all have that line of serenity running through you. So I said, oh, okay. Line of serenity. And the first 20 some odd pages, he describes what he sees as this line of serenity in each one of us starting with my parents. So I'm here to work as I said. And so then I go on to tell the story about how we were raised. And that was the first book that I wrote. Great. And was being an author always been your dream job or how have you dreamt of doing other jobs as a child? No, because I first wanted to be a nurse when I was a little girl. I felt that nurses didn't get sick. So I wanted to be a nurse. Then I wanted to be a secretary, and that's what I did. I ended up being an executive assistant. I'm a retired executive assistant. I did that the administrative type jobs for I was supervisor word processing. Office manager for an advertising firm, different kinds of administrative jobs. And I, like I said, I'm retired executive assistant. So I wrote that book that was the first book that I wrote in. I also wrote three articles that were published in the Detroit free press in 1997 as well. And they were published verbatim, just the way that I submitted them. And so that told me my writing was worthy of being published. Then I don't remember, but I wrote an article for a word processing magazine word processing no longer even exists. That was the way they introduced computers into the mainstream, so no border processing doesn't exist anymore. But I didn't even think about it. 19 97, I wrote the first book. Then in 2003, I wrote a book and tried to mothers darling and easy recipe for raising great kids. In 2008, by this time I'm thinking I am an author. So in 2008, I wrote the best way to keep a man in let him go. Among other things. That's 64 pages. Mothers does on his 48 pages. Then in 2009, I wrote the vision, telling kids that they can make the world a better place. 2009, another one I wrote jet black in her 7 friends. That's a fairytale. And that's 28 pages. And 2011, I wrote dear bully, a collection of poems about bullying. In 2013, I wrote my super quotes to live by. In 2014, I wrote a breast cancer journey to greater joy, taking the fear and mystery out of a breast cancer diagnosis. So those are the books. And the mothers does and I had that one translated into Spanish, so that included in the ten books that I wrote. Great. What do you like about being an author? I like seeing the fact that I am a retired executive assistant really helps a lot because the words come into my head and then it goes out to my fingers to the keyboard. I don't hand write, you know, a lot of people, a lot of authors do still do longhand or some other kind of, I don't know what other maybe they do text text to voice or something like that from Tudor that kind of stuff. So I use word. That's all I do. I use word and so God bless me with the fact that English has always been my best subject. So I have a decent vocabulary and spelling punctuation, grammar, all of those are my strong points. So I feel free. I'm my own proofreader drive-through for you. I was like, as I go along, is all right. Okay. Great. Did that answer your question? Yes, absolutely. Okay. Good. What is something people are always surprised to learn about you? That I'm.

lung cancer breast cancer Detroit Tudor
"golden age" Discussed on The Aloönæ Show

The Aloönæ Show

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"golden age" Discussed on The Aloönæ Show

"Hello, welcome to the lemony show. I'm your host, John maloney. And in this episode, I've brought on a guest. She's from California. She's a writer, executive assistant, and she's now an author of ten books within 9 different genres. Ladies and gentlemen, I'll give you Joyce fields. Hello. How are you? Going great. How's life? How's life? I am too blessed to be stressed. That is my typical response. Great. So I think that everybody is as long as you got your 5 senses and you're standing upright and even sometimes even when you're in a wheelchair. All kinds of different things. I think that we are all too blessed to be stressed. I agree. Let me think about it. Yeah. So, tell me more about one of the books you've written recently. Aren't my latest one is entitled the limitless golden rule. 21 ways to use the golden rule in your life. And it's only 43 pages. God bless me with the talent for being succinct. I can say a lot in a few words. I don't like long, thick books. So again, this one is 43 pages. And it lists many different ways. 21 to be specific. That you can use the golden rule every day in your life. And it's the title includes the word limitless because it is limitless. There are this book list 21 ways, but you can think of a ton of ways that you can use the golden rule in your life. You can also use the real on yourself be kind to yourself. The golden rule states do unto others as you would have them do onto you. And it is some semblance of it appears in every major religion in this world. I'm not a religious person. I talk to God all day. And I don't know what you want to call it. You can call God, whatever you want to call it. If you don't believe in God, you can still use the golden rule, treat others the way you want them to treat you. Great. You raise our children with that. Incredible. What inspired you to become an author? I wrote my first book in 1997. That was entitled line of serenity. I'm the oldest of 7. I'm 78.

John maloney Joyce fields California
"golden age" Discussed on The Slowdown

The Slowdown

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"golden age" Discussed on The Slowdown

"When I was a kid, I loved falling asleep to the sound of the television in the living room. I liked it most because it meant someone was up watching the world, so I didn't have to. The trouble of the world was unfolding on the news and I could sleep through it. There was something both comforting and eerie about it. A world that never shuts off. As I've aged, I find myself reaching for the remote to constantly push mute or turn the TV off when the news gets too loud and terrible. I wonder now how it changes us, the images, the sounds, all that obsessive watching. In today's tender poem, we see how the TV becomes almost another character in a multi generational family. This poem explores how the events of the news, and the way we let the world into our homes can define not just who we are. But how we love. Golden age, by Chris Santiago. It used to embarrass me when my father talked back to the TV. Since my mother died, he doesn't talk any more, but falls asleep in wound by voices, anchors, procedurals, the invisible labor of foley artists. My teacher gasped when the challenger exploded, on live TV. We had to wait for the set to warm up. From a white, hot, pin prick of light. It was so heavy the librarian warned it could crush us. We watched as a column of smoke split in two. Gasp comes from old Norse. And shares a base with Bragg, bluster, and Babel. My second week of teaching kindergarten, a girl came in and said she saw a plain on TV fly into a tower. By the end of the day a colleague had rushed in and announced that we started to bomb Afghanistan. We are still bombing Afghanistan. My father turns the volume up to 77. 78. Each morning I have to crank the volume back down. His hearing loss could be described as severe to profound. Still, he must feel bathed in those shifting backdrops, those faces, profound, from the Latin for before the bottom. In order to remember what to capitalize in McAuliffe, I think of how it contains the chemical symbol for gold. The noise of the television soothes everyone on the other side of the house, it tells us someone is watching, but not watching us. Not the room where we can finally make love undetected. I was taught to be silent when praying. She was taught to pray out loud, the way our sons threw up their hands when we could solve any unhappiness by lifting them, up they would say, up. The crew of the challenger were likely conscious, the whole way down. I want to lay like this a little longer, before getting up, before erasing all traces of intimacy. Sometimes I go back out, and pour my father a finger of jura, and he pretends he hasn't been sleeping. I've been doing this since I was a boy, sneaking out, after bedtime, and over my father's shoulder, watching the Cold War unfold. The atomic number for gold is 79. God, he says, when there is a protest, a wildfire, a shooting, God, as though there were someone else.

Chris Santiago Afghanistan foley Babel Bragg McAuliffe
Hector Rodriguez on What Inspired Him to Create El Peso Hero

Latino USA

02:12 min | 1 year ago

Hector Rodriguez on What Inspired Him to Create El Peso Hero

"I. Am the creator of the graphic novel lattes next series as best so hero hours raised in the border so specifically i was raised in eagle pass texas. Which is about two hours away from san antonio in the sister city of being that us negative. While we la norfolk mexico. The border is a whole different world. It's rage between cultures languages food and growing up. I had a huge appetite for mexican entertainment media. And so i used to watch a lot of lucia di team flask staticky of when the yolk when the letter mccain and my grandparents loved the golden age of mexican cinema. Aw and so. Those characters are greater than life. And i had that influence. My father was also huge geek himself with being raised by watching. You know the old scores star trek. And you know reading captain herkus upturn rock and so i had these two worlds and i was just fascinated with these greater than life characters by you know. The american characters never really spoke to me. You know i like. I like to get around you know. When was the last time you saw batman eat bananas. You know or superman eat bundled say a spider meeting poly no of of course it wasn't until By ninety late ninety one eighty two. We moved to middle of texas college station which to me was a huge culture shock going from a majority latino classroom bilingual classroom to a general ed monolingual classroom but really cool thing about college station that they actually had independent comic bookstores. And so my dad would take me and my siblings to pick up comic books.

La Norfolk Lucia Di San Antonio Mexico Texas Mccain Texas College Station
The Golden Age of American Bands

Classics for Kids

01:17 min | 1 year ago

The Golden Age of American Bands

"Patrick s gilmore. An irish-american is known as the father of the american concert. Band gilmore made his name putting on huge concerts. One concert alone included a thousand person orchestra. A ten thousand person chorus and six bands but gilmore started out as a cornet player who eventually organized his own band. The gilmore been wore snazzy military style uniforms and played concerts of marches dances and music from popular operas. And operettas victor. Herbert was an operetta composer. Who also spent time as a band master in fact when patrick gilmore died in eighteen ninety. Two victor herbert took over conducting the gilmore band. That was the golden age of american bands. There was no recorded music back then and very few symphony. Orchestras professional bands toured the country. And a lot of towns organized amateur bands. That is people who played for the love of it. The hero of every band was the cornet. Soloist

Gilmore Patrick Gilmore Patrick Victor Herbert Herbert
'In the Heights' and the New Golden Age of Musicals

Filmspotting

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

'In the Heights' and the New Golden Age of Musicals

"Early word about in the heights has been effusively positive in general and praising of star anthony ramos as a screen presence in particular if you get the film spotty newsletter. You already know that. This week producers. Sam wrote about seeing hints of ramos's potential in the filmed version of hamilton. So i thought we might want to start there atom to ask if this potential was realized for you in this screen adaptation of lin-manuel miranda's pre hamilton stage. Musical ramos plays whose navy de la vega twenty something new yorker. Who's taken over corner. Bodega from his late parents. But dreams of moving back to his native dominican republic. There two other main characters whom will get to but it's it's navy who introduces us to. His washington heights neighborhood in the movies. Bravura pre title sequence. Which is a chance for ramose to showcase his skills as a singer. Slash rapper as a dancer and just general screen presence

Anthony Ramos Ramos Manuel Miranda Hamilton SAM Navy LIN Bodega Dominican Republic Washington Heights Ramose
Humanity Brought to Its Knees With Hour-Long Partial Internet Outage

The Bugle

02:31 min | 1 year ago

Humanity Brought to Its Knees With Hour-Long Partial Internet Outage

"Top story this week the world was given a chilling peek behind the wireless cuts in all future chaos on tuesday when a global internet outage thoughts on this closed some websites for an hour It was truly harrowing for The planet's greatest species the human race with the loss of such sites as gideon website amazon. Read it and social media sites such as clank garbage g. o. p. o. j. toward la and ephemera where people post three second videos of themselves suffering existential angst Humanity was brought to its quivering. Nays and several major religions declared a full on magadan During the outage the uk government website went down which led to a fifty eight minute. Golden age of joy hope and productivity before normality was thankfully restored. Now i'm alex clearly this This is probably the most traumatic thing that's ever happened to The world How how did you both cope with with with a trauma. I found it a real relief and just the prospect that this was. The beginning of the end was quite a relief Most spent their whole time. Trying to identify which sites were up and down i started to separate doomsday cults and set them against each other. I don't know what you didn't have found one of the fascinating things was. Everyone had an opinion about what should be done or what was happening. Even nobody had any information about what was happening. It was revealed if nothing else that nobody knows how any of it works especially the people who think they do and definitely not the people whose job it was to make it work. My problem is that none of the good stuff that you want the internet to go down with ever goes down like my online mortgage payment went through which is really really painful. And i've had no internet for a couple of days because of the monsoon situation and we don't have any aeroplanes coming and going to india's you know which leads to the question. Maybe you guys know this now. The world with all its essential elements greed tiktok. That's still around. Alice and when we don't we don't really know that's the thing with internet outages is it does. It does lead to people questioning whether anything exists. If it's not being you know life blocked in some way

Magadan Amazon LA Trauma Alex UK India Alice
Hour-Long Partial Internet Outage Brings Humanity to Its Knees

The Bugle

02:30 min | 1 year ago

Hour-Long Partial Internet Outage Brings Humanity to Its Knees

"Was given a chilling peek behind the wireless cuts in all future chaos on tuesday when a global internet outage thoughts on this closed some websites for an hour It was truly harrowing for The planet's greatest species the human race with the loss of such sites as gideon website amazon. Read it and social media sites such as clank garbage g. o. p. o. j. toward la and ephemera where people post three second videos of themselves suffering existential angst Humanity was brought to its quivering. Nays and several major religions declared a full on magadan During the outage the uk government website went down which led to a fifty eight minute. Golden age of joy hope and productivity before normality was thankfully restored. Now i'm alex clearly this This is probably the most traumatic thing that's ever happened to The world How how did you both cope with with with a trauma. I found it a real relief and just the prospect that this was. The beginning of the end was quite a relief Most spent their whole time. Trying to identify which sites were up and down i started to separate doomsday cults and set them against each other. I don't know what you didn't have found one of the fascinating things was. Everyone had an opinion about what should be done or what was happening. Even nobody had any information about what was happening. It was revealed if nothing else that nobody knows how any of it works especially the people who think they do and definitely not the people whose job it was to make it work. My problem is that none of the good stuff that you want the internet to go down with ever goes down like my online mortgage payment went through which is really really painful. And i've had no internet for a couple of days because of the monsoon situation and we don't have any aeroplanes coming and going to india's you know which leads to the question. Maybe you guys know this now. The world with all its essential elements greed tiktok. That's still around. Alice and when we don't we don't really know that's the thing with internet outages is it does. It does lead to people questioning whether anything exists. If it's not being you know life blocked in some way

Magadan Amazon LA Trauma Alex UK India Alice
"golden age" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"golden age" Discussed on Shedunnit

"That made me think that that's a little bit like the last year interesting. Yeah didn't speak to the wall. I'm trying to think. I think a couple of the later ones did i think the set of ones that come out and forty four forty five so the reference it but largely naught and actually the year that she wrote three one of them was curtain which wasn't published until the seventeenth but she wrote in forty one they think and then had it put away as the last such a good bird got. That's very interesting. Forget really i'm goal is the sixties. Isn't it you know she did some key writing at point. I do think that awesome largest funny enough. The roof with routine the locked room. It is setting twenty times. I could really get away. Get away from that. Because i've been writing one every year. So she has locked dow with about else in book and the same time on a biggie of the next justice book which will be in the second bubbles begun to nine. That's where i've got to in that series and they're also have similarities. You've got to give justice to school with gas mask and and school suddenly seeming sort of different having different rules on and i am seeing alleges. Definitely yes psoriasis. Very interesting buy like all very lucky because we can't escape the what's happening into ichiro worldwide. I'm processor into whatever yeah helpful. Yes yes now i was. I was just very struck by what she said about how. Well i just had nothing to do about from. Which i think is probably what many of us have found everything that i wanted wanted to ask you. What to do justice on the fact that the born to hear about us the murders and there probably will be another hobby the book at some point but the next book for me will be the next booth book which will be in february and school the locked room..

february last year twenty times forty one three seventeenth forty four one nine second bubbles sixties ichiro forty five
"golden age" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

06:48 min | 1 year ago

"golden age" Discussed on Shedunnit

"Really does make you think as you say about from his mother who was kind of agents throughout It it's been actually putting my thumbs. If tommy tompkins in later years. I guess i do news quite a lot of back the fact that you know. They had that exciting moreton boston. What do they do now to stop. Its do nows to- actually. There is a little bit of in the books. If you look hard enough for it. But i guess i think like a lot of people as i get older. My idea of what is owed is guy gets out and older. Peggy is nineteen. You know jeeze quiet spring jagan. Another nice improvement you've made on the film with with this book is by making peggy's kara. A really fully realized carrying the several characters in the book. And i think there is packed tendency to make those people invisible in fiction and in tv and so unused on the opposite. Oh thank you on you like to talk about. My mom was adopted by karen. Healthy has no just such wonderful people and again. It's it's an interesting job because people come to it from such different places and like experiences that doing all sorts of different reasons yet. They're doing something that is hard work and and very hardware and but it's also airing so that they are particularly interesting people. I do think and you're quite right about in a way. The golden age. I always think of miss marple often says about some poor dead made. Oh alito. you know. That's all she gets. All the epa topsy gets in as a yes. You want to put out the figures that invaders who might be overlooked in that genre fiction definitely. Yes as a terrible tilak jesuit day. I'm a fan of You know that don't have time huge but there's an old phone line of breakfast. Our she says the citizen pathetic actor says kind latest idiot. Take a telephone message so yes. It's not breathe. Bad isn't songbooks. Say which i hope. Modern button crime fiction does have yes. I think definitely the. I've been looking into this alert. Recent either kind of the way seven saw just pop up literally furniture is definitely know how people right today and definite upgrade your characters. So you know. I suppose in a way this is this is as you say. A sequel strange diaries because hop into carries over. Are we going to meet any of the characters again in the future. Do you know. I had thought it would be thunder. Now i do think companies will appear against as she as he says. She appeared in dire. Isn't she appears again. Hey so i feel. She's got one more adventure in our lease and a few things. I'd like to do think it'll be interesting to follow her doing that. Say i had thought that they would about mcgann. But i've never missed his as much as i miss edwina benedict and nevada. So i don't know i said not. I'm obviously quite has done delays. 'cause i keeping my cactus backs i would say never had never been my idea. Is that the next hobby will be a holocaust actors and they only want. we'll go. we'll be hubbing. That's the idea but you never know. I can't see them teaming up to solve move arms and it wasn't quite a bit of an taking maybe short story about peggy before because you know as as we said she is central to number but she died quite early on so why maybe a short story about our would be fun. Yes to visit a pre- the events of does yeah. Well you'll recharge. And i have to ask you a little bit about your Your writing habits in your writing process because you're a very regular and as a fan. I could always rely on a mu ruth book and so you had you manage own of your different characters and your different series. Well i usually take an iq. I'm i'm quite a nasty published two to here and you know that that didn't stop in lockdown about about ray lucky to have back to escape to to be honest with you. I'm a time by every day. Reluctant my children are grown up and I do but a teaching but it released on gotta writing shed my god. Just i'm talking to you from. Yes so i usually do. Some us just mean with writing away i do. Usually despite of times. I wouldn't say write a book in the morning and the bright mystery after noon so i have to be in that place i guess on your sense just my children's theatre with justice because i sometimes watch chapter of our friday to chat myself up because industry join his books so that faculty treat. I give myself sometimes on friday but usually so i always had notebooks. I've an ruthless bullman nelson was boulware when when when the events of the books happened because opposed. Now i'm writing with fourteen actually moments the locked room and fourteen years of staff to remember usually quite good it but sometimes i can't beat also think. Did i say that you know in this in this by maturity has pledged to school reunion. And i knew. I told tabasco but somewhere it should be caught longtime defined by had so i will choose. Luckily add put quite a quite a bit of teasing thing about one of them. I was quite upset. So guess thanks to your past self. Yes thank you expand on that. yes so how. How long would you say it takes you to write to write novels. It's sort of like everything. Isn't it really so i as i say i'm going to try to two years at basically take six months or you stop one in january to finish july and start. The next flooding in august and finishing in january walks is about like that. I'm often editing automatic number that say. Hey it's the raiders. Getting the story. Down that i fell. I call due to at once iowa. That's more or what it takes me and but again like everyone about again. If i egg myself you know at some point i will take us off this treadmill and that be five years you knows but moment he does use the treadmill itchy. I was dating some research recently about tim. What agatha christie did during the second world war and looking and she wrote two books a year throughout the war and in one case she wrote three and she says in harrow to that she found she had so much more time once her husband was away with the armed forces and there was no social life. She was living in london but there was no social because everyone had left so she had nothing to do apart from right and.

london six months two years five years three edwina benedict january fourteen years two nineteen friday fourteen august today july one case karen second world war peggy Peggy
"golden age" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

07:14 min | 1 year ago

"golden age" Discussed on Shedunnit

"This episode of sheet on it is sponsored by dear homes a male based victorian mystery game in the. Us father's day is coming up very soon on the twentieth of june on this could be the perfect present feel mystery loving parent every week. You your chosen gift recipient will receive a real letter in the post that contains clues to help you solve a monthly mystery set in the victorian period. At the end of the month. Shallow combs himself will write to you and reveal his own solution to the puzzle. So your challenge as a detective is to beat him to it. How you choose to investigate is entirely up to you. You can make it a group effort like the sleuth in. The postscript mud is perhaps involving your friends and family in thrashing out the details of the case or you can go solo and unravel the case or by yourself. What could be more perfect for the she done it. Listener in search of a whodunit face. Distraction to give this as a gift or to join for yourself. Visit dear homes dot com. That's homes as in sherlock holmes h. o. l. m. e. s. and enter promo code sheet on it to get five dollars off your first order that stay-at-homes dot com. I'm code. She'd done it for five dollars off. This episode is also sponsored by thirteen always wolves behind them all and erie historical mystery by two time national book award fineness lower ruby based on a true story. It begins in chicago in nineteen forty one. When protagonist frankie's mother has died at. Her father has left her in an orphanage temporarily. He says years later. Frankie delves into her own post wanting answers about what really happened with the second world war in the background. She starts unearthing secrets. That should maybe have stayed buried in case. You need any more convincing on this. Highly readable creepy story. This book has had some absolutely great press. The new york times called it quote haunting and hopeful in equal measure and booklets said that it was stomach right now the audiobook of thirteen doorways wolves behind them. All by lower rabi is available at a special deeply discounted price at your favorite audiobook rita. So it's the perfect time to grab a copy and settling for some seriously spooky listening. That's thirteen doorways wolves behind them. All i lower ruby a now back to the postscript murders because place atmosphere as you said is something. That's very important to your books. And you've got two very distinct landscapes in your your different series and in this one all of the stuff about peggy and edward in their block of flats looking out to sea and reflecting on old age. And all that sort of thing. It's very active. And where did that come from. Is that will say from your aunt. I think it's a move. Isn't it that maybe one takes. That went in light it to maybe move into an apartment and edwin is quite so bad Scathing about the seaview house and he calls the new head preview housing preview of deaths. Things so as quite go to me about it. Is i get the impression that peggy so so it in a different way so it is as a new opportunity and so i think it is a part of your life when you often. Yeah you're thinking of the next stage. The state might be lost. Our my guests so i think he would look at them. I was addicted a bit like that. You know but marvan but also she loved it she really loves the the view lapsing Town is that she had good place for chronicle. Because a lot of the things that you need liking you really need a range of people. Is that usually a range of people in the side top. Wash up next to the answer to stay there. So you're often have by grant houses in this doesn't billionaires row which there is inviting massively band houses grotty combination big range but also the see. There's always a way of escaping and actually showroom is is based in shoreham shore by see as even apple which love is a little light zappa so people can only do this even get a plane so i think the ideal setting brooklyn is some alive at some balked range a social range and and also people with different backgrounds and histories and also wave escaping. Gives us a really good point. I suppose you've you've got to detective characters now onto different coasts of the uk. I i do yes. I do wonder about that. Something at any Victim i do think. Jin afraid to my william shows a really good crime rights by stupide davis when he was a journalist. Tackle about people live near seeing. There was some studies donald after asking body more eccentric the nearer. They got the see. And you could always see that so you get out of the station of writing station. The around brockton station. Missile jobs accounted this big. And as you get near the see you get to you. Get the funniest strangest shops and narrow narrative. The seed the slightly off john. Stranger things are so. I think that might be why i'm drawn to the and you're absolutely right about the social mix seaside town could people move there for all sorts of different reasons than they and one thing that i I'm sort of in my head thinking about as a trend. But i don't know if it is one yet but i feel like there's more and more crime novels these days that feature older characters of which the postscript murders is one and it's such a fascinating thing to do and you don't see it pops quite so much in golden age off with the exceptions of miss marple and so on. People tend to be sort of middle-aged active when they're involved in crime novel but there's the whole hidden history to a life that you can reveal. Is he doing this book. I wanted if if if you have new elections on the sad truth about the fact. I think i wrote this book got. This'll be really unusual. Group vo people solving cried and older people sobbing kind. Of course it came out to exactly the same time as which thousands that has really really enjoyed. It goes about it with people in old people's Complex solving crimes very very similar taught. That's actually quite disciplined books fund. It is it is under happen. All the time isn't it. You think this is a great idea. Somebody else has it. But you're so right about the golden age. I recently reread chris. His by the breaking of my thumbs. Which is it's a tommy in tompkins novel which they often bitch vh ignored are bay. But it's very good again. Very good at accent very creepy. But it's not often in all people and they keep saying that while also needed to put in an old people's have she was six state and you think oh my goodness tossed that his y'all now you know maybe it's blending fifties. I'm big enough but you know and then there's another. Oh well she's seventy so and nowadays seventy dollars. a donna. lumley autopay an glamorous people going around the world and it.

five dollars edward seventy dollars seventy Frankie thirteen edwin peggy brooklyn sherlock holmes two time marvan twentieth of june six state homes dot com donald first order uk chicago chris
"golden age" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"golden age" Discussed on Shedunnit

"Welcome to she done it. I'm caroline crampton golden age. Detective fiction is having a bit of a moment over. the last. Few years has been a resurgence of interest in crime fiction from the nineteen twenties thirties and forties with hard to obtain titles receiving new editions. A new tv and film adaptations in the works. But it isn't just in the books from that period that we see this effect. Today's crime writers are turning more and more to the details and tropes of the classic who done it whereas just a few short years ago. A publisher might have looked askance at a manuscript for mystery laden with references to the golden age today. It's becoming positively desirable for authors to show off their knowledge of the genres origins. It's in recognition of this fact that the sheet on book club has this month taking a break from reading books published in the first half of the twentieth century and is instead in june tackling a contemporary novel the crop with the traditions of the golden age. The book club is the community. That supports this. Podcast continued existence paying members help. The show remain independent and financially sustainable. So i can keep making new episodes for everyone. Each month club members vote on which book they would like to read and discuss together other perks. Joining include getting access to the two bonus episodes a month that i make just from members odd free episodes of the main podcast and admitted to the community forum. Where all things mysteries a disgust. There's more information at. She done it. Book club dot com slash. Join if you'd like to check it out anyway this month. The club has chosen to read. Postscript murders by ellie griffiths. This novel published in the last year is currently steeped in the traditions and tropes of the golden age of detective fiction and so is perfect for considering how these ideas are being refashioned by today's writers it follows four sleuths one police detective and three amateurs on their quest to discover who killed their friend. Peggy an elderly woman who loved reading murder mysteries on the surface. It doesn't seem like anyone have had a motive to kill a charming and old lady. Bought the close of the cortex. Look the more. It seems like the solution to the case lies in peggy's collection of classic crime. Novels elliott griffiths. Is the pen name. Dominika de rosa a writer based in brighton. Who is the author of mystery series. The dr ruth. Galloway novels about forensic archaeologists slash sleuth in present day norfolk and the brighton mystery series which set in dominykas hometown in the nineteen fifties. The postscript murders replies detective character ds hob decor from her standalone novel. The stranger diaries which one the twenty twenty edgar award for best novel. I'm delighted to welcome dominique. She done it to tell us more. about how. The postscript murders came together and about her own love of golden age. Detective fiction there are no major plot. Spoilers in this episode by the way. And don't forget if you'd like to join me to discuss the book. At the end of the month visit. She done it. Book club dot com slash..

ellie griffiths Peggy Dominika de rosa peggy three amateurs last year nineteen fifties four sleuths nineteen twenties thirties and first half of the twentieth ce elliott griffiths one police detective one Each month golden age Today caroline crampton Few years few short years ago this month
Amazon to Buy MGM Studios for $8.45 Billion

Morning Becomes Eclectic

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Amazon to Buy MGM Studios for $8.45 Billion

"MGM for a $0.45 billion MPR's mentally Del Barco reports. It's a second largest acquisition for the company after purchasing whole foods. Amazon already runs a film studio, prime video streaming service and a video game streaming site. But the MGM deal is its biggest move into entertainment. Amazon will assume MGM is debt, and it will also get the rights to the Golden Age Studios, film and television library. With its mascot Lion roaring logo, MGM made such movie classics as singing in the Rain and 2001. A Space Odyssey. MGM also owns the epics Cable Channel and runs a TV studio that produced the Handmaid's Tale and Fargo. Bond. James Bond. MGM also shares the James Bond movie franchise with a family that controls the double. Oh seven movies. Mandali del Barco. NPR News

MGM Del Barco Golden Age Studios Amazon James Bond Fargo Mandali Del Barco Npr News
HEADLINE CAPITALIZATION  NTSB Releases Preliminary Report on Fatal Tesla Crash Capitalize Words With Four or More Letters (Associated Press style) Capitalize Words with Five or More Letters (APA Style) Do Not Capitalize Words Based on Length (Chicago Manual of Style) Capitalize Major Words and Those With Four or More Letters (MLA Style) You are likely here because you need a headline checker to make sure your title and headlines are properly written. That's exactly what Headline Capitalization does. It's a free tool to make sure what you capitalize online for publications like blogs and news articles, or for academic papers, is correct. This headline checker should help you to correctly format all your titles in the future. It's important to accurately capitalize titles and headlines for articles and papers. Headline Capitalization is a free headline checker that correctly capitalizes titles for all your writing. Article Title and Headline Capitalization Rules When it comes to creating headlines and titles for articles, it can get confusing what words to capitalize and what words should remain lower case. There are several styles of title and headline capitalization which different publications may use. For the most part, there are general rules that all publications follow with a few minor deviations between them. For those who write, it's important to understand these rules about which words to capitalize when creating headlines and titles. Major Headline Capitalization Styles There are four major title capitalization styles. These are: AP Style APA Style Chicago Style MLA Style There is no single authoritative style guide when it comes to capitalizing headlines and titles, although some are used for certain types of writing. For example, the Associated Press Stylebook (AP Style) is often used by news organizations, the Chicago Manual of Style (Chicago Style) is more comprehensive for in-depth writing, and the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (MLA style) is used for academic papers. While this is where the different styles are usually used, it's not mandatory to use a particular style for a particular type of writing. If you are unsure of which style to use, the best method is to seek out which style the course, editor, or teacher prefers so that you know, and then use that specific style. If you're in a certain field, you should learn the style that's most prominent in your field. For example, the AP Style for those in journalism, and the MLA style if you're in academics. In all cases, it's best to ask for each project to make sure since each style has its own rules. General Headline Style Rule: Title Case How to write headlines and titles is usually referred to as "headline style" or "title case." As mentioned, all styles are not the same, but there are a few general rules they all follow. These are: Capitalize the first word in the title Capitalize the last word in the title Capitalize the important words in the title The first two points are clear cut and easy to follow. The next question is, what are considered "important" words in a headline? In most cases, they include the following words: Adjectives (beautiful, large, hopeful) Adverbs (forcefully, silently, hurriedly) Nouns (computer, table, manuscript) Pronouns (they, she, he) Subordinating conjunctions (as, so, that) Verbs (write, type, create) Words in Headlines That Aren't Capitalized The above words are the ones generally capitalized, so what words are usually written in lowercase when creating headlines and titles? These tend to be shorter words (under five letters long). The following types of words are generally not capitalized: Articles (a, an, the) Coordinating Conjunctions (and, but, for) Short (less than 5 letters) Prepositions (at, by, from) Alternative Headline Capitalization: Sentence Case One style of headline and title capitalization which doesn't follow the rules is Sentence Case style. This is where editors decide to write titles as if they were a typical sentence. In this case, the first word of the headline would be capitalized while the rest of the title would be in lower case, except for proper nouns. Below are a few examples of Sentence Case style headlines: How to properly write article titles A review of a hike at Grand Canyon national park The best value meal when eating at Chipotle Referencing Titles of Publications No matter what style of headline capitalization you decide to use in your writing, if you ever reference the title of a book, article, or journal, you should write the title of it as it has been written, even if it happens to be a different style than you're using for your writing. You should not change them to fit your style, and they should always be written as they appear in the publication. Copyright © Headline Capitalization 2021. All rights reserved.

Past Gas

01:21 min | 2 years ago

HEADLINE CAPITALIZATION NTSB Releases Preliminary Report on Fatal Tesla Crash Capitalize Words With Four or More Letters (Associated Press style) Capitalize Words with Five or More Letters (APA Style) Do Not Capitalize Words Based on Length (Chicago Manual of Style) Capitalize Major Words and Those With Four or More Letters (MLA Style) You are likely here because you need a headline checker to make sure your title and headlines are properly written. That's exactly what Headline Capitalization does. It's a free tool to make sure what you capitalize online for publications like blogs and news articles, or for academic papers, is correct. This headline checker should help you to correctly format all your titles in the future. It's important to accurately capitalize titles and headlines for articles and papers. Headline Capitalization is a free headline checker that correctly capitalizes titles for all your writing. Article Title and Headline Capitalization Rules When it comes to creating headlines and titles for articles, it can get confusing what words to capitalize and what words should remain lower case. There are several styles of title and headline capitalization which different publications may use. For the most part, there are general rules that all publications follow with a few minor deviations between them. For those who write, it's important to understand these rules about which words to capitalize when creating headlines and titles. Major Headline Capitalization Styles There are four major title capitalization styles. These are: AP Style APA Style Chicago Style MLA Style There is no single authoritative style guide when it comes to capitalizing headlines and titles, although some are used for certain types of writing. For example, the Associated Press Stylebook (AP Style) is often used by news organizations, the Chicago Manual of Style (Chicago Style) is more comprehensive for in-depth writing, and the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (MLA style) is used for academic papers. While this is where the different styles are usually used, it's not mandatory to use a particular style for a particular type of writing. If you are unsure of which style to use, the best method is to seek out which style the course, editor, or teacher prefers so that you know, and then use that specific style. If you're in a certain field, you should learn the style that's most prominent in your field. For example, the AP Style for those in journalism, and the MLA style if you're in academics. In all cases, it's best to ask for each project to make sure since each style has its own rules. General Headline Style Rule: Title Case How to write headlines and titles is usually referred to as "headline style" or "title case." As mentioned, all styles are not the same, but there are a few general rules they all follow. These are: Capitalize the first word in the title Capitalize the last word in the title Capitalize the important words in the title The first two points are clear cut and easy to follow. The next question is, what are considered "important" words in a headline? In most cases, they include the following words: Adjectives (beautiful, large, hopeful) Adverbs (forcefully, silently, hurriedly) Nouns (computer, table, manuscript) Pronouns (they, she, he) Subordinating conjunctions (as, so, that) Verbs (write, type, create) Words in Headlines That Aren't Capitalized The above words are the ones generally capitalized, so what words are usually written in lowercase when creating headlines and titles? These tend to be shorter words (under five letters long). The following types of words are generally not capitalized: Articles (a, an, the) Coordinating Conjunctions (and, but, for) Short (less than 5 letters) Prepositions (at, by, from) Alternative Headline Capitalization: Sentence Case One style of headline and title capitalization which doesn't follow the rules is Sentence Case style. This is where editors decide to write titles as if they were a typical sentence. In this case, the first word of the headline would be capitalized while the rest of the title would be in lower case, except for proper nouns. Below are a few examples of Sentence Case style headlines: How to properly write article titles A review of a hike at Grand Canyon national park The best value meal when eating at Chipotle Referencing Titles of Publications No matter what style of headline capitalization you decide to use in your writing, if you ever reference the title of a book, article, or journal, you should write the title of it as it has been written, even if it happens to be a different style than you're using for your writing. You should not change them to fit your style, and they should always be written as they appear in the publication. Copyright © Headline Capitalization 2021. All rights reserved.

"Groupie is often referred to as the golden age of rally racing. It was by the faa in nineteen eighty two and its rules gave birth to an incredibly powerful and ultimately dangerous new era of rally with very fee regulations to keep things in check. And just for those. Who haven't who. This may your first episode. Maybe this is the first thing you've ever heard about racing. Rally racing is not traditional circuit racing with multiple cars on track rallying point to point cars. Go one at a time. And their time into between the two points and over the course of event the team with the lowest time wins. Just a little background for you. I'm obligation requirements. Meaning the number of units per year that the car manufacturer was required to produce each year to enter a car were reduced to a paltry two hundred vehicles compared to the five thousand cars a year in group and and group a i take building materials. Were now allowed as well. As unrestricted turbocharged boost basically while previous rally regulations had tried to keep the cars somewhat close to production versions in group. B there are almost completely unleashed for example and the year before group groupie the average rally car produced about two hundred fifty horsepower but by nineteen eighty six the final year of group b. That average was up to five hundred

FAA
Hollywood Icon and Chicago Native Kim Novak On Her Relationship With Art

Q

01:53 min | 2 years ago

Hollywood Icon and Chicago Native Kim Novak On Her Relationship With Art

"That is the opening theme to the 1958. Hitchcock thriller Vertigo, starring Jimmy Stewart. And Kim Novak came out of what's known as Hollywood's golden age, but for many studio actors working at that time Things weren't always so golden. Kim Novak was one of Hollywood's top box office stars, which meant she faced a grueling work schedule. The studio system put huge pressure on her and she suffered abuse. Luckily, she had a coping mechanism. Hurt. Until one day. She left. Chemist now in her late eighties, And earlier this year, she put out a book of her paintings called Kim Novak, her art and life. I was so delighted. Get the chance to talk to Kim Novak from her home in Oregon. Kim, How are you? I'm five dogs. Thank you. I'm excited to talk to you today about art because people know you as a movie star, But I know art was your first love and you'd won scholarships to study fine art at the prestigious Chicago Art Institute. Wanted art give you growing up? Well, it gave me many things. But I would say mostly courage because I felt confident in my ability for one thing, but I felt confident. And being able to forge ahead with my own and trust my feelings and my instincts. And for me, it was always about feelings, because I I need to get that out of me. I don't like keeping in feelings locked in. I want them expressed. And every time I get a feeling a strong feeling, I'm at my easel. I've got Three easels going at one time, because sometimes I've got more feelings going on that one time I mean it For me. It has become such a wonderful experience, because no, I'm not in films. I could dedicate my whole life to it because it seems like you were on the

Kim Novak Hollywood Jimmy Stewart Hitchcock Chicago Art Institute KIM Oregon
For the first time in decades, vaccines are having a moment

Part Time Genius

08:48 min | 2 years ago

For the first time in decades, vaccines are having a moment

"Healthcare reporter at The Wall Street Journal. X for joining us, Peter Thanks for having me on Lot is being made right now about the vaccines were obviously going through the rollout. Things are ramping up. But, you know, I really have found very fascinating. The story of how these vaccines have come to be in the new technologies that were using. Obviously, the Fizer and Moderna vaccines are using this M or in a technology. We've never had a vaccine that has been approved before. And Johnson and Johnson, the new one that just got approved. They also are using new technology. There's is a little different. It's called viral vector technology. You know, these brand new things are showing a lot of promise and big hopes for Writing, you know, infections in the future, other pandemics, just other diseases. There's a lot of potential with all of these. So, Peter, tell us a little bit about your reporting on this. You know, Vaccines have been around for a couple 100 years, and for most of that time they used sort of tried and true method of making them and a lot of cases. That meant Taking part of the virus of the pathogen that you want to try to protect against. And using it in the vaccine itself to deliver that into the body to induce an immune response. And so those air still in use, But there have been efforts over the past few decades. Find new ways to make vaccines and the pandemic has really brought that out in the sense that, you know, even though some of these technologies were years in the making this pandemic has sort of been there moment to actually deliver, if not for the very first time, then In the biggest way possible for that. Vaccine technology and so As you mentioned the first couple vaccines used this messenger RNA technology and this Johnson and Johnson, one uses a viral vector technology and they're both Newer ways of making vaccines, and they both involved. Essentially delivering the genetic code and genetic instructions that tell the body to do certain things to induce the an immune response rather than deliver. The actual virus into the body that you're trying to fight against. We've talked about the M R D vaccines for a bit now only because they were approved first from Fizer, Moderna, Johnson and Johnson, as I mentioned recently approved They're using this viral vector technology. Tell us a little bit more about that. It's different from the old ways as you were describing, but they still use a virus that they kind of readjust to help do this. So how does the viral vector stuff work? There. That's a good point, because I don't want to mislead people to think that there's no viral material in these viral vector event vaccines, But the difference is that you're using a virus that has Essentially nothing to do with the disease You're trying to combat and the general concept for these viral vector vaccines is to take one harmless virus and to use it against more deadly virus. And so in the case of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine A couple others. They're out there for cove is like the one from AstraZeneca and University of Oxford is to take something called it in a dental virus, which is Relatively harmless virus that can cause common colds or conjunctivitis. And to tweak it in such a way so that if it's injected into your body, it's not going to cause disease is not going to cause the coldest fellow certainly not going to cause coverted. It serves as sort of a carrier, and it's modified in a way so that it actually then carries Edna that tells the body's cells. Make this spike protein that found on the surface of the coronavirus finding that right virus of such an interesting part of this story, Johnson and Johnson decided they were going to go this route. Viral vector technology, and they had to be on the hunt or the right virus because there was also concerns. You know you're using viral material. What if you build up an immunity to that specific virus, then could you build up an immunity to the vaccine itself? So they were on the hunt for a very specific one to use as well. That question of whether this viral vector or this sort of carrier that makes up the vaccine is going toe compose an issue and so in the past there have been in is where that's been a problem. And I think it's not been entirely solved. And so in the past, the problem was that when they tried using one of these dental viruses to be the sort of carrier in the vaccine in people who had pre existing immunity to that identify Iris that this common cold virus it's sort of interfered with The effectiveness of the vaccine against various diseases. And so what Johnson and Johnson had to do was sort of figure out. Okay, Well, we need to pick the right carrier that the right dental virus and you know, ideally one that is just not that common out in the world so that not as many people have pre existing immunity to it. But even the people who do have preexisting immunity to it. Maybe it's not going to be such a strong immune response against the carrier that would interfere with the underlying vaccine is trying to do Tell me a little bit more about Johnson and Johnson and the company. You know how they got into this because my understanding I'm obviously we know Johnson and Johnson for a myriad of products, but they're fairly new to the vaccine game. And they didn't achieve a little bit of success with an Ebola vaccine using this viral vector technology also, so you know how did that work out for them? And then obviously they transition into working on the covert virus. He's got the world well known brands that you alluded to band aid baby powder, and they've long had a very strong prescription drug business. So drugs like Remedy Cade that that treat people who are already sick and then there are major player but they've not been a major player in vaccines. And so about 10 years ago, they decided they wanted to get into vaccines. More so they bought this Such a biotechnology company called Crew Cell, and that's really where this viral vector technology came from that JJ is using, and so they kind of spent. Several years just designing vaccines against various infectious diseases and then running them through the regular series of tests, So this would be things like Ebola. Enrica. Then they were able to start testing they rebel a vaccine using this sector technology in Africa after I think first after that, the really big outbreak in West Africa five or six years ago and then more recently In the Congo, where there was another outbreak, and so they went through the whole series of studies for that vaccine, and then eventually got European Commission approval for it in the middle of last year. So now they do have this sort of platform that Could work not only against over 19 but also against Ebola's and then potentially additional infectious diseases the night in fact, they even have the vaccine and development for HIV, which is sort of been this Notoriously difficult virus to target in the form of a vaccine. I mean, it's so interesting how far we've come. How much we've learned about the human body so much so that you know we're hacking the genetic software. You know of the body to produce these things. You know all these insights into the immune system that we've gained have led us to this stuff. So what's the promise for these things Like, you know, what can we expect? I know they're working on Vaccines for other diseases. Gene therapies, There's a lot of promise with us Yeah, And it's in a way. It's sort of the convergence of a couple different strains that have been going on in pharmaceutical research and academic research. And that is The genetic revolution on the one hand, but also immunology, and that's immunology is kind of feeding into both. Vaccines to prevent disease but also ah, whole new class of drugs to treat disease by in some way affecting the immune system. And so I mean, there are people that Infectious disease experts who say that this is really the golden Age of vaccine ology that these advances kind of signal that and think that it really shows that there's promised to really target a lot of Other infectious diseases. And in the case of Ah, big emerging outbreak like we've seen To do it in a way that is really quick and can actually Have in effect in actually stemming of pandemic. While it's under way, you know, rather than just developed paintings and the normal timeline of many years that the pharmaceutical industry is used to Yeah, And in the

Johnson Moderna Peter Thanks Fizer The Wall Street Journal Ebola Astrazeneca University Of Oxford Conjunctivitis Colds Crew Cell Edna Peter Enrica Ebola's Cade West Africa Congo European Commission Africa
Ask Geoffrey: Chicago's Old Passenger Rail Stations

Chicago Tonight

05:29 min | 2 years ago

Ask Geoffrey: Chicago's Old Passenger Rail Stations

"Chicago's old passenger railroad stations for decades acted as the city's front door where people from all over the country arrived seeking a better life or just the thrills of the big city. Jeffrey bayer takes us back to the golden age. Rail travel in this week's ask geoffrey. Hey geoffrey good to see you paris all right so we have a question from larry gardner of skokie he says. Could you do a story on the old train stations that once stood in downtown chicago. Well of course we can. There is as you mentioned. The the late nineteenth century the early twentieth century this was the golden age of rail travel when people traversed the country on trains. And of course right at the center there at the hub of it all was chicago. It's hard to believe. But as recently as the nineteen sixties there were six passenger train stations in downtown chicago today. All passenger trains that come into the city from beyond the suburbs. Go through the last one standing union station which is now owned by amtrak. It's designed including this now. Demolished concourse was right along the river there and the colonnaded main building which is still standing right behind it. In this picture of those things recall the grandeur of rail terminals in those glory days of designed to wow the traveler of the way many airports do today met with. Certainly the goal of another neoclassical designed terminal. Check this one out owned by the chicago and north western railway you know classical buzzards and it stood at what is today. Ogilvie transportation center which is operated by metra. That station included ornate concourses. Waiting rooms even dedicated spaces for barbers and hairdressers. People traveling across the country The chicago north western railway traced its roots to chicago's very first railroad. The galena chicago union established back in eighteen forty eight. By chicago's first mayor actually will be ogden. Certainly the golden age of travel there and then another key player. Of course you hear references pop culture all the time the illinois central oh absolutely That country that company billed itself as the main line of mid america. It was a dominant player. Both in passenger and freight rail their main passenger terminal was called central station once stood just just south of grand part right on the lakefront there. The railroad built this mammoth terminal in one thousand nine hundred three in part to accommodate the influx of visitors. That were expected for the world's fair that year you'll notice almost all of these terminals have clocks or clock towers so people hurrying to catch trains didn't have to fumble around for their pocket watches that of course they had watches it. All central station was also an important point of entry for many african americans who came to chicago from the south during the great migration with like so many of its contemporaries central station met the wrecking ball. In this case in the mid one thousand nine hundred seventy s amtrak diverted there trains to union station but there is still an active platform. Eleven street serving the metra electric line and i gather it's the inspiration for that residential development around their central station. Which i believe. Richard m daley lived there for a while and not to be confused with grand central station. Of course right. That's right and yes. We had our own grand central station. here in chicago. Not new york's wasn't the only one ours was at harrison and wells on the western edge of the loop. Read along the river for about eighty years. It was just north of if you know we're river city's development is today Traffic declined grand central after world war. Two this photo with the board of trade there in the background was taken in nineteen sixty seven at the end of the stations life. It was torn down in nineteen seventy one and this is one of several places in the city. were abandoned. Railroad land is being redeveloped during construction of the new development on this old site buried. Stones from grand central station were actually unearthed and they've been re purposed for a river walk. One chicago train station of actually is still standing So in addition to union station is dearborn station. South loop although of course. It's on train station anymore. You can see its clock tower visible all the way from the north side of lube looking south down on dearborn but what happened to the top of that clock tower. Take a look at this early photo. And you'll notice it once had this huge wooden flemish roof on top of it but in one thousand nine hundred twenty two. It caught fire. Look at these incredible photos from the scene as crowds gathered. Luckily firefighters were able to save the building. But but not that tower roof. I the nineteen seventy s. Most of the train. Shed was demolished but the facade and portions of the terminal were preserved as part of a mall. Serving printers row by the building is still called dearborn station. In fact peres as you just pointed out. Many old stations live on in the names of new developments of the one. You mentioned central station. Just south of grand park word. Mayor daley used to live and then a new apartment building at harrison and wells is using the grim central name

Chicago Jeffrey Bayer Larry Gardner Geoffrey Ogilvie Transportation Center Galena Chicago Union Skokie North Western Railway Amtrak Richard M Daley Grand Central Station Paris Ogden Dearborn Station Illinois River City America Harrison New York Dearborn
Kristin Stultz Pressley On Dorothy Fields And Her Impact On Broadway Musical Theater

Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

05:35 min | 2 years ago

Kristin Stultz Pressley On Dorothy Fields And Her Impact On Broadway Musical Theater

"Well hello kristin welcome back to the podcast while it is so good to be back with you. Thank you for having me. I have thoroughly enjoyed watching your podcast as it has grown. You've done some really exciting things and talk to some incredible people and so it's been a real joy to watch it will relations by the way. Thank you for being a listener as well as a guest but yeah it's good to have you back and so what was it. That drew you to dorothy fields. And why did you want to write a book about her well. To be honest. I started studying. Dorthy fields a master's candidate at the university of kentucky and one of the bugaboos about graduate school. They expect you to have a research project and the real catch is. It needs to be something. No one else's ever researched before so it can be pretty tricky because If it's something that no one's ever researched before how are you going to know about it right. And how are you gonna find research about exactly so you're really starting from scratch. So i went to graduate school bride. Probably twenty three twenty four year old new. I wanted to study. Musical theater was in the theater. Department had no idea what that specific topic would be that. I would research for the next two years. Actually i was planning on doing a phd. So would have been the next four years. I knew it would be related to musicals. I knew what related to the golden age of musical. So i was thinking cole. Porter irving berlin oscar hammerstein. I loved lyrics and Each of these wrote lyrics so that was something that was already drawn to. But every time i talk with my advisor she was We know everything about quarter. Everything's been done about oscar hammerstein. There've been books written about and by irving berlin says she would just keep shooting down and rightfully so. Because i needed what was going to be my contribution right. What was what was going to be my something that i could add to the academy so to speak. And so as a person of faith. I literally prayed and prayed and prayed and prayed and one day in her office. It was as if i saw this blinding vision across my eyes and it just was the name dorothy fields and i knew nothing about dorothy fields. Except that i recognized her name from the show card from sweet charity. Nineteen sixty six charity And i had seen that show card. So much of course had the cd collection. So i am the the cd case very much like the show card. And so i just blurted out. What about dorothy fields adviser stopped. And said i don't know anything about dorothy fields and so that was two thousand three. I went home and it was the very early days of googling there. There was not much on the internet yet. But there was enough that i could see my goodness. This woman wrote the way you look tonight. This woman wrote. I'm in the mood for love. This woman wrote on sunny side of the street. This woman was the brain power behind any. Get your gun. She came up with the idea to do a show about any oakley. And so i went back to my adviser at a different class to that night and told her. What do you think about this. This is what i found out. She says let's do it so it's been almost two decades that i've been at this but i continued that work not only for masters but also for my doctoral dissertation which i ended up doing my phd at the university of georgia. But i took dorothy with me. When i went from lexington to athens. Dorothy came along for the ride. You basically were looking at her life from you. Know more academic educational standpoint. So what makes this different from those dissertations. That's actually a great question you know. It's funny because when people ask me what the book is about or have asked me over the past twenty years what. I was researching. And i would mention dorothy fields. And everybody's i don't know her but then you mentioned song titles you say hey big spender. She wrote that or pick yourself up. She wrote that or on the sunnyside of the street. She wrote that everybody gets that same. Like a ha. I know her but they didn't know that they knew her in my master's thesis. That's one question that i asked was why her name. Not as well known as porter and all of those men not only were they collaborators of hers they were very well loved colleagues who esteemed. Dorothy is one of them. And there's a couple of suggestions for that one is. She was never part of a team that that lasted for a long time. So by that. I mean rodgers and hammerstein that that is an iconic dua were Rodgers and hart even or irving berlin wrote music and lyrics cole porter music and lyrics but dorthy fields for it with eighteen different composers over a five decade long career so there was never easy to pinpoint her as. Oh well. that's i mean the closest would be jimmy. Mccue who was first collaborator of fields in. Bq song where it just it just there. That never happened with her. It never became a catchphrase. Another suggestion is because she was very self effacing. You know if she was asking an interview. Oh we'll tell us about this experience. Riding with arthur schwartz or whatever she would immediately turn it around and said well let me tell you how great. It is work with arthur. You know she would always shine. The spotlight on her collaborator And so that's another reason. Why perhaps she didn't seek the spotlight and it wasn't until later in her career. She became concerned with legacy and she hired a publicist at and that happened in the late. Nineteen fifties as. I think her her brother died unexpectedly. Her husband died unexpectedly her her dear friends and collaborators beginning to die and i think she realized at that point. Hey maybe i am concerned with being. And i do need help to accomplish that.

Dorothy Fields Oscar Hammerstein Dorthy Fields Porter Irving Irving Berlin University Of Kentucky Kristin Musical Theater Cole Berlin Dorothy Oakley University Of Georgia Lexington Athens Hammerstein Cole Porter Porter
"golden age" Discussed on Pressure Points

Pressure Points

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"golden age" Discussed on Pressure Points

"And i watched his so won't give away too many spoilers but i watched the documentary about the The study that he performed and she said that it. It wasn't like traumatizing for him. But it was an eye opening experience that he was just like. Yeah you know things have got to change and now i can probably finally get funding for my my experiment. Yeah i research so Not next week. That's aj's episode two weeks I'm going to be dropping his experiments. And what flight. Forty nine lead to In the summer of nineteen seventy-three which like fucking weird dude so it's referred to as sex raft experiment. Don't google it don't go. It don't honestly like you could But you can't stream the documentary anywhere if you want to buy go for it But yeah it's it's gonna be interesting. I'm looking for each a weird one. It's it's not as Wildly intensive this. It doesn't have bombs three plane hijackings. You're right just to yeah just to chadli. Yeah so. I know it's a short one this week No we we did. Good were found average bet But yeah so no. No tall you Activists out there Aj yes don't hijack planes if you wanna get your point across now some probably not gonna work out so great I nine fine. I know god fantastic. I honestly if you guys are interested in more of these fucking weird stories. It's like i said there was one per week for like twelve years. Yes i'm sure they are. Yeah either fucking look them up yourself or few on another upset like this. I'd happily do it some of the richest weird housing fuck So yeah yeah. That's a fantastic Episode i love. There's so many weird things like in the sixties and seventies like the The that was like that was right in the range of the golden age of serial killers. Yeah there was just a shitload of people murdering people all the time..

twelve years next week this week google one per week three plane each sixties Forty two weeks seventies nine episode -three seventy nineteen
"golden age" Discussed on Pressure Points

Pressure Points

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"golden age" Discussed on Pressure Points

"And it's like oh. Hey bro. what's what are you doing with this gun. They go. This is my. It's myra to carry it. This is my personal firearm. And and like tsa which wasn't tsa at the time. He's just like oh. Yeah like go no brom. Just don't shoot a hold on the plane and be on your way sir. So a lot of people boarded planes regularly with side arms. Which i can't even fucking imagine being on a plane right now and you turn in someone. That's not an air marshal even an air. Marshall obviously don't know but you see somebody with a gun you like oh fuck. This isn't going to end well for any ass beer break. That's that was a little beer break. So i'll join you. How sweet of you. So they turn the flight. Say we're going to. They're going to detroit and they demand. Ten million dollars in ransom. I in their time that they were going to detroit. They made a couple little stops. They got to detroit and then felt like i was getting clipping their Not good okay. Cool headphones being aware. Fucking how gotta love it. So they're making a couple of stops refuse to make sure that they can make it up there and they reached out to detroit and said hey we want a million dollars and the city of detroit was like us shit so they go in a kind of a panic mode and they reach out to a couple of different cities and basically approved five hundred thousand dollars to be given to these three guys and it was the first time in history that hijackers at blackmail the city which it's just like holy shit That's kinda record. I wanna hold one day. How well maybe on your next flight you got it now. I'm not going to be now now. I'm going to be randomly selected. You wanna do i list buddy. Thanks now the stops during the hijacking included. They're like nine different stops at these guys. Took a lot of them. Were like back and forth. Like they'd fly from detroit to lexington to chattanooga back to lexington to cleveland. I mean that's pretty smart. So they're going. They went from well of the places. Where like cleveland. Detroit chattanooga toronto toronto. Yeah and detroit. Detro- it and toronto i and when they landed in detroit detroit officers of fucking out somebody brings it out like. Hey we've got your five hundred thousand and the three say no. We don't want your five hundred k. If we don't get our ten million dollars were flying this fucking plane into a nuclear reactor in oakridge. So oh is that all. Yeah not a big deal again. It's fine it's an ain't nothing but a thing ain't nothing budgie thanks They request to speak with president. Nixon at the time which i assume he already had the phone tap so he was already listening on all the conversation. Yeah he definitely had. The phones tapped by then so They say we're going. We need to speak with president..

cleveland lexington five hundred thousand toronto Nixon oakridge five hundred thousand dollars chattanooga ten million dollars Ten million dollars detroit five hundred k. Marshall three guys three nine different stops first time Detroit chattanooga million dollars toronto toronto
"golden age" Discussed on Pressure Points

Pressure Points

05:19 min | 2 years ago

"golden age" Discussed on Pressure Points

"We'll probably have a little bit more information on the like in two episodes On his background and his like what. This guy does. Historian fucking honestly. I text my girlfriend earlier today. And i was like talking with bare. Went super well as he's basically just clone of aj. But from northland science smart yeah from north carolina and actually is almost always talk. Yeah knows what the fuck is doing. So he's gonna come on and talk about Oak ridge which. I don't wanna get too into it. I don't wanna spoil a lot of things but Oak ridge had a nuclear reactor there and so he'll he'll give all the details. I'm gonna grace over it a little bit in a couple weeks gonna talk about somebody else that'll talk about at the end little little foreshadowing there just to burn up time and to hype up the next honestly the next few weeks of episodes yeah my next week is going to be Not that well thought out. That's okay but you know horrible. More horrible okay. So starting out a few months after William and catherine in november nineteen seventy-two southern airways. Flight forty nine was gonna fly out from birmingham alabama to memphis tennessee and three guys. By the names of melvin. Lewis moore and henry jackson boarded now Louis moore and henry. Jackson were both and i mean all of the all. Three of the guys were Activists in detroit due to the detroit riots in nineteen sixty seven. I'll get into a little bit of that. But i wanted to a full episode on detroit which this is going to be the first one of well that's going to be one of the episodes linked because it's fucked so fantastic little backstory on detroit In one thousand nine hundred. Sixty seven The police were doing a lot of racially motivated. shutdowns and now seizures of African american owned clubs. Some of them were illegally. They didn't have like business licenses. But good luck getting a fucking business license in nineteen sixty detroit. When you're african american like fuck sakes terrassa so Louis and henry both were close friends and they had run into issues with the police. Were they had spoken about it..

William Jackson Louis Oak ridge three guys Lewis moore north carolina november nineteen seventy two episodes both melvin next week catherine bare jackson memphis tennessee birmingham alabama Louis moore earlier today African american
"golden age" Discussed on Pressure Points

Pressure Points

05:39 min | 2 years ago

"golden age" Discussed on Pressure Points

"I'm assuming in the seventies she's been sexually harassed about fifty times this week today who knows So she just she like grisly. Thanks puts it in her pocket and he kinda grabs her arm. Mcginnity goes no. I need you to read that note. She's like fucking and he goes. I have a bomb in a briefcase. That's at the notes she pulls it out and reads it which prosser for not losing your mind reads it out and She is she record saying it was in all caps and he was very nice penmanship. Hope good and it was just a. I have a bomb in my briefcase and my request is two hundred thousand dollars. I was at all as work. Yeah or he blow the plane up. Yeah so She doesn't lose her shit and her response is can i see it. So he opens every as out on his opens his briefcase and he's got. She said there were like five. Like red cylindrical. Things in there. They look down and she's like. Oh this fucking serious. Probably threatening all the time she's like. Oh my god. I never won. This has been going on for ten fucking years so She after she was like after they landed. She was interviewed and she has. Yeah he was just a really polite soft spoken dude when i sat down. He ordered a bourbon soda. Beautiful and just politely. Finish them sadness. He did his thing and after she sees the bomb he orders another bourbon and soda and he pays his drink tab in full offers to request meals and bhai them for the entire flight crew during the seattle stop. because they're going to fly into seattle not leave will stop. He'll get his money they'll take off. They'll be followed by a bunch of planes and then whatever app. It's nice of him. i know they were. They were so polite back then. Now it's like if somebody threatens appointed like shoot it out of the fucking sky like how many civilians are on board..

two hundred thousand dollars ten fucking years five seattle this week seventies today fifty times
"golden age" Discussed on Pressure Points

Pressure Points

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"golden age" Discussed on Pressure Points

"With the airplane businesses going out of business. I still can't afford it an airplane ticket. So you don't have to worry about god and those prices are just going to get better and better all. Yeah as the more and more go out of business and then they all the broken planes from before back to surveys on this week. I got a haircut. Fancy did it. Yeah and the first time i saw. Aj since we recorded last he comment on it. So this is me formerly resigning from my post points of pressure. Because he doesn't even care about. Maybe no i got it. 'cause i looked more shitty than i always do. Oh yeah i got an accent. It's good to say yeah. You got a little battle acuity there but yeah i was like i'm going back in office. I should probably look slightly normal slightly. I should not ask quarantine as i did before. Yeah look fucking awful. I'm planning to fix that this this coming week. Yeah i hope so. We'll see goodness. So what's new. Oh you know hijack an airplane. Oh good didn't do anything nothing crazy. Nothing crazy man. Well since literally nothing has happened. I'm gonna be honest. The past two weeks have been kind of boring and it is such good a nice change of pace so i can finally focus on my depression and anxiety. I don't have to worry about what's going on just on the planet. Even though there was you know that coup that have been just really though At glacier destroyed a damn somewhere in india and killed a bunch of people but nothing happened to me personally so it's fine to a couple of on eventful week since it's a nice change of pace. I do need to formally apologize on what you in everyone else for last week for being the most sleepy host in the history of podcast just to sleep in the chair the whole time. Shit dude the last half of that episode. I was just like. I can't tell you i should have counted but i would have fallen asleep in forgotten. How many yawns. I made it was a lot. It was so many. And i was like. Oh i was dying. I fell asleep. Like right after i got home. So let's get into it and let's get going. Aj hijack the plane. And we're gonna talk about the golden age of high jacking airplanes From like nineteen sixty one to nineteen seventy-two. There was an average of one plane hijack per week in the united states just in the united states so started off going to do a little bit towards the end and a lot of people. Go on my yet. Another fucking episode about db cooper. This is not all about db cooper. That's not where my focus is That's a sigh side effect. Just eases my first one. Everybody knows about him. Fuck it and talk about anyway for those. Who don't know so. Dan cooper nine november nineteen seventy-one bought a ticket from portland to seattle. And this was generally about a thirty minute flight. Which i've been on a forty five minute flight myself and it feels like the most pointless thing in the world. I could have driven this in like six hours. Whatever i flew from like jfk to boston. And i'm not even getting dude we take off and they're like We've reached out the tude. And i was like okay cool. I unbuckled police buckle backup. We're beginning our descent into boston. I was like are you fucking kidding. Me look at. It was the stupidest flight in the world. So db cooper is out doing me and paul thirty minute flight Once aboard he grabs his flight attendant and he puts a note in like in her hand..

Dan cooper seattle portland india six hours forty five minute boston last week nine november nineteen seventy thirty minute this week paul united states one plane db cooper first one first time past two weeks this coming week a thirty minute flight
Growing Up In Style: "Patterns of the Past" by Susan Choi

Vogue Podcast

08:03 min | 2 years ago

Growing Up In Style: "Patterns of the Past" by Susan Choi

"I'm here to introduce a series of original essays titled growing up in style writers on discovering fashion in america in this one the novelist susan choi author of the national book award winning novel trust. Exercises writes about her love of fabric patterns as a child in south bend indiana here susan reading her essay patterns of the past. I hope you enjoy. Historians of fashion seem to agree that by the time i was born in nineteen sixty nine. The son was already setting on the golden age of sewing. But there were few signs of this decline where i was growing up in south. Bend indiana my mother like so many mothers owned a sewing machine and knew how to use it how this come to be. I asked her recently. She gave a verbal shots over the phone from houston where she lives. Now if you read the directions and follow the pattern it would come out all right. She recalled she didn't even remember perhaps because they were as ordinary to her as grocery shopping. Our trips to the fabric store. Oh the fabric store. Even now decades later when google those words and look at the photos my heart thumps with desire to be clear. These are not photos. A fabric for sale online but photos of the interiors of actual physical places where one goes to touch bolts of fabric cards of rick rack buttons buttoned to a stiff cardboard backing or tumbling loose in a jar dispenser displays of threat arranged by color the spools curved surfaces gleaming like candy and every kind of beautiful ribbon in every color and texture and pattern the fabric store. Unlike the grocery store made me hungry the for. What exactly wasn't clear at the time. It was something much larger and much less defined than the outfits. My mother would make me from the items. We chose the fabrics and notions and trim but the outfits i loved with my whole heart and remember as clearly as if they still hung in my closet. The ruffled pinafore made from a white on white print of tiny flowers trimmed with red rick rack and finished with the application juicy. Strawberries on the bib. The shirtdress of multicolored cotton printed with patterns resemble embroidery the truly glamorous halter dress with a triple tiered skirt of pastel. Blue pastel pink. Pastel yellow says my mother now in her eighties on the other end of the phone. I lovingly describe her creations. She is impressed. I remember so while she has zero memory of sowing the any of these things though she does remember making herself address with extremely big sleeves. They were in style that year. She says she wore it a few times and decided the sleeves looked so stupid that she tore them off and wore. The dress sleeveless the fact that unlike me my mother is white exceedingly pale small boned blue eyed and with the cheekbones of film star both oppressed me throughout my childhood. And lay somehow outside of thought even to articulate it now feels uncomfortable but the facts were and remain that my pale blue eyed mother never matched my black haired brown eyed dark skinned self always far darker as a child than i ever get now because i was outside all summer. In an era before sunscreen in elementary school in indiana. I was cast as the lone indian in the thanksgiving play more. Generally i was constantly looked at especially or at least so it seemed to me when standing next to my mother. We didn't match. I harbored a fantasy fearful half escapist that i would turn out who've been adopted from some faraway land. Even my father who really was from a faraway land only explained my appearance without removing. My anomalous miss. He was to novelists himself ends that hunger. I felt at the fabric store. Larger than any one outfit could satisfy for the choosing of the fabric and the notions and the trim was always secondary to the choice of the pattern and the choice of the pattern was never i understand. Now about the pattern it south. It was about the girls the winsome the willowy and the overwhelmingly with token exceptions white girls who modeled the pinafores and shirt dresses and halters the tiered skirts and even the full body. Pajama like halloween costumes. On the outside of the rectangle envelopes housing the patterns. Remember those remember how they were often filed in boxes so that your fingers walked through them as they would later walk through. Lp's at the record store. When i think of patterns my mind says butterick. And i bet that the majority of the close my mother made me were from patterns put out not by simplicity or mccall's but by the butterick company which also produced vogue patterns having licensed the name from conde nast bruising those patterns of my past online where especially at sea they abound as if the golden age of sewing never ended. I have to wonder if i always chose butterick patterns on the strength of the package illustrations alone. The simplicity girls are oddly wooden and slightly mis proportioned the mccalls girls look like cartoons but the butterick girls still quicken my heart. I recognize my secret childhood. Self that lanky limb d- flush cheeked auburn-haired spirited white girl. I was deluded enough to imagine. I might be twin sister to anne of green gables. No less than two miniature area clock recognizing that hopeless longing to be entirely unlike myself delicately white as affirmed by one hundred percent of my world is a part of moving past it and perhaps even a part of reclaiming those buttons and bows those bullets at every possible fabric delicious all on their own after concluding online photos that it might well be the store of my childhood. I called stitch in time in south bend but it had only opened in nineteen ninety. Three there was a fabric store back then an ireland road by the old scottsdale mall. The woman who answered stitch in times phone told me. When i explained where i lived fashion fabrics that turned out had opened in nineteen seventy one just in time for my first toddler outfits and closed just under two decades later having withstood. Even the machine made onslaught of gloria vanderbilt. I know about that story. Because i worked there. The stitch in time woman went on. But before i could exclaim that maybe she'd helped me choose buttons or ribbons. She politely ended the call. An actual customer having arrived looking. I imagine for the modest but real transformation that a pattern and some fabric can provide.

Susan Choi Bend Indiana Pastel Yellow National Book Award South Bend Indiana Rick Rack Susan Houston Butterick Conde Nast America Google Mccall Green Gables Scottsdale Mall Auburn Gloria Vanderbilt
"golden age" Discussed on List Envy

List Envy

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"golden age" Discussed on List Envy

"I really enjoyed the story. Of how john commack pulled an all nighter and basically recreated the side scrolling thing that they had in mareo that was previously impossible to do in a pay say because of the way memory worked and stuff and he he figured it out and i just the the code or in me loves that story of loves that moment of being able to figure out like oh if i do this remove these pixels will track disposition hair and all that kind of stuff i just yeah i i really any kind of made me appreciate mary more. Even though you know Of never really really. You know played mario car and enjoy that and i have mario call my switch. I don't think i've ever to my memory actually played any of the super. Mario's data is amazing to me. Honestly i mario has become Nintendo's used him for like as far as recognizable video game characters. He maybe he may be well over pacman at this point. I'm not sure But that that's part of the problem too is like these original games Lots of people still love them. But people associate mario with so many other things at the same time that they may not may be that many people. Don't i take it for granted. I thought everybody do these. Original mario games and you should absolutely try out at some point especially the The sides the traditional side school is the ones they still make like the new super mario brothers they call them Those are very similar and absolutely worth trying. I think you get most of the same experience there that you would in these original like super my brothers from nintendo And it's even more fun because it's multiple players so you can kill each other like you can knock each other off the platforms and Just arrange into somebody gets killed by a monster. If if you want to work cooperatively to beat it. I don't know i think that stuff is is is a lotta fun but yeah i mean for mario. It was like it was part of our language back. When i was kid. You know. I think by by the time i go into fooling real opinions about consoles and the ps within them. I think i'd already built up. A bit of tribalism around saiga. And as i got older and as i got into my teenage years that tribalism only solidified only calcified more and so when it came to the dreamcast. My mate. a friend of mine into this whole thing of just he As a young lad with his pocket money he just picked up every console that he could Every sega console so to my memory he had every single one.

mario john commack nintendo pacman Mario mary sega