28 Burst results for "Gloria Steinem"

"gloria steinem" Discussed on ESPN Daily

ESPN Daily

05:05 min | 5 months ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on ESPN Daily

"And she said, she did not watch the replay of that game for 30 years. And she had recently watched it, and she noticed then for the first time that Howard Cosell never spoke about her ability, he didn't want to talk about my accomplishment. Her championships, her domination of the sport. He spoke about her looks. And sometimes you get the feeling that if she ever let her hair grow down to her shoulders, took her glasses off. You would have somebody vying for a Hollywood screen test. There she is. And then there's all the sexist commentary about her charging around the court like a man. She wins and so the only way they can explain it is that she's more man like than.

"gloria steinem" Discussed on ESPN Daily

ESPN Daily

06:41 min | 5 months ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on ESPN Daily

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Rewards issued is none with robo free beds or site credit. Free bets expire in 7 days from issuance. Excludes Michigan dissociated persons. Please give a responsibility gambling problem. Call one 800 next step in Arizona. One 805 two two 4700 in Colorado, Washington D.C., Louisiana, Nevada, Wyoming, and Virginia. Call one 802 7 zero 7 one one 7 for confidential help in Michigan. One 800 gambler in Illinois, Indiana, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and West Virginia, or one 800 bets off in Iowa. In New York, called 8 7 7 8 hope or text hope and why it four 6 7 three 6 9 in Tennessee called the red line at 808 9 9 7 8 9 and Mississippi go one 88 7 7 7 9 6 96 sports betting is Vogue prohibited. Promotional offer is not available in Nevada. So Don, one thing you explore in the film is an event that was sold to the public at the time as activism as progress for women. And it was called the battle of the sexes. The 1973 tennis match between Billie Jean King and Bobby Riggs. When we roll back the tape and look at it, it just hits differently in these modern times. How did revisiting it compare to your memories of it? This was something I actually remembered as a little girl. This was a huge, huge spectacle. Howard Cosell, the famed sportscaster, moderated this. It was the largest indoor audience for a sporting event. So Bobby Riggs had been a tennis champion and after he retired, he began kind of celebrating being what he called a male chauvinist pig. Mister Riggs, I think you owe Miriam an apology. What for? Until you lost him, Bobby. He wanted to sign you up as a charter member of his new club. What's that? What's a new organization? He's forming to celebrate his manhood. It's called a male chauvinist of America. Otherwise known as Riggs pigs. So, you know, if you think about when this is happening, it's in the very late 60s or early 70s, it's just like the women's movement is really picking up steam. People like Gloria Steinem, other activists are making their voices heard or demanding equality for women are pointing out inequality. Now, thanks to the spirit of equality in the air into the work of many of my more foresighted sisters, I no longer accept society's judgment that my group is second class. So Bobby Riggs challenges the women's champion Margaret court and he beats her. And he delights in beating her. Marvin is the greatest sport I've ever played again, and I'm going to specialize in women's tennis from now on. I'm going all over the world, and challenge the number one tennis player in every country in the world to win or take all Nash. I think I've discovered my new thing in life. He's going to make it his goal to beat the best women because no women could ever be a man. And so Billie Jean was definitely an eyes on the prize activist. She was not concerned with Bobby Riggs. But he kept following her around. He followed her around for two years, calling press conferences, challenging her to a match. The male is king, the male supreme, and the women should know that. I plan to bomb Billie Jean King. Women's live movement about another 20 years. And when he beats Margaret court and he continues to crow and talk about women's inferiority, Billie Jean has kind of had enough and she realizes the symbolism that is kind of circling around this conversation. If you think a lot's at stake, for women's lib. The one thing I can't stand is what Bobby has to say that men are supreme and all is this a bunch of baloney. It's a huge huge match. Live from the astrodome in Houston, Texas, the tennis battle of the sexes, Billie Jean King versus Bobby Riggs. What a scene it is. It's tens of thousands of spectators. It's on prime time TV. Probably more than 30,000 people are in the arena for an all time record tennis audience anywhere in the world. Hello again, everyone I'm how it goes. So Bobby Riggs is a big theatrical kind of guy. Riggs asks if Billie Jean would come in on a Cleopatra, if she would come in and kind of play up the theatrics and Billie James known for being serious, athlete. And she to their surprise says, sure, I'll do that. And here comes Billy Jean King. And she's got the fans here tonight. Lobby is taught so much as the number one male chauvinist in the world that there is unquestionably overwhelming sentiment for Billy Jean King. It was literally termed the battle of the sexes, as if people could not contemplate that a woman could ever compete with a man of any age. So Billie Jean wins, she wins decisively. And so this is what it's come down to. Here in the Houston astronaut equality for women. Equal rights. It was Billie Jean who puckering equal pay for women in the U.S. one thing that really, really struck me that Billie Jean said in our interview, do you have the audio from power to sell? I've been talking about always talking about our looks. Billie Jean King wearing a new gown for knock down a cost skirt for this occasion and lucky. Very much like Billie Jean King always looks a very attractive young lady..

Bobby Riggs bet MGM Billie Jean King tennis Ben MGM Michigan Washington D.C. Wyoming West Virginia Louisiana Billie Jean Mississippi Iowa Indiana Tennessee Mister Riggs Pennsylvania Arizona Nevada
"gloria steinem" Discussed on ESPN Daily

ESPN Daily

06:04 min | 5 months ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on ESPN Daily

"Why did you want to pair these two women specifically? So the series is four hours traces pre title 9, two today and the present. And through all of the research we did, we did a lot of research, Billie Jean keeps showing up. She's there starting professional women's tennis. It's been a year. Since we first had our first Virginia slims invitational in Houston. And we're bad little girls, but that's where it all started. But then she's there, advocating for title 9. The feminist thing, how important is that, Billy? The woman's movement is important to me. As long as it stays practical and I think that the women's movement is really making a better life for more people other than just women. And then she's there for a pro women's basketball. And now she's a part owner in women's professional soccer. The club made headlines for its majority female ownership, led by some of Hollywood's biggest stars and sports legends, such as Abby wambach, Mia Hamm, Serena Williams, and Billie Jean King. Makes me really happy. We're at a tipping point. These are a lot of the dreams coming true that I used to dream as a younger person. Billie Jean is really kind of an unsung hero of title 9 because she just has led by example in always supporting women. She's always thinking about what's next. How can I make things better? And then Gloria Steinem as one of the four most thinkers about rights for women who also is always sharing the spotlight and also is always thinking about what she can do to help other people. It just felt like they really set a stage for a theme that we didn't know was going to emerge, which is a lot of the women's movement has been about women helping women and looking forward, not just looking to their own place in history or what they were going to achieve for themselves, but thinking very intentionally about the next generations. And those two women exemplified that, you know, just to a T. I love your description of Billie Jean. It sounds like the Forrest Gump of advocacy. She is the forest girl. She's forest out. Yeah, exactly. Can you tell us just for folks who don't know, as simply as you can, what title 9 is? Title 9 is a civil rights law. The law itself is 37 words, which hence the title that was inserted into a very large education bill. Every year there's an education, the government allocates money for education. And so this law, which gives equality for women in education is what title 9 is. Over the years, that has been interpreted to protect many, many different equality assertions. Title 9. No person in the United States shall on the basis of sex, be excluded from, participation in, be denied the benefits of or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity, receiving federal, financial assistance. So the most well-known is equality in sports. And equality of opportunity to play sports. But title 9 is far broader than that. It is equality in opportunity. And so you get protections against sex harassment because if you are being harassed in school, you can not have an equal opportunity to get your education. If there's one thing we'd like to get across is an ESPN really encouraged this is for us to lean into the story of title 9 as a civil rights law. Yeah, I think there is a deep misunderstanding of what it is and isn't. Before we leave Billy in her origin story, there's a wonderful anecdote in there about how she went to her brother's baseball game. And it was instead of being sort of an inspirational moment. It was like this devastating moment. Can you talk us through that scene a little bit? Sure. And this is a story that many women of a certain generation tell, which is they had a natural affinity for certain activities. So for Billie Jean, she had a natural affinity for baseball. She loved baseball. She was good at baseball. She also loved basketball, and she, when she was about 9 years old, she went to a professional baseball game with her family. And she looked out on the field and she saw that every player was male. I played all team sports and I have a younger brother, Randy Moffat. We played ball together. We did everything together. But I was 9 years old when we went to a baseball game at Wrigley Field in LA, which looks just like the one in Chicago. It's not there anymore. And it was triple-A. California did not have a major league team. At this time. And I was watching in my heart saying, because it was the first time I realized,.

Billie Jean Abby wambach Mia Hamm Billie Jean King Billy Serena Williams Gloria Steinem basketball tennis Houston Virginia baseball soccer Hollywood ESPN United States Randy Moffat Wrigley Field LA Chicago
"gloria steinem" Discussed on ESPN Daily

ESPN Daily

03:32 min | 5 months ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on ESPN Daily

"The United States. The law guaranteed women and girls protection against discrimination in any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. So it's that activity part that meant title 9 basically created women's sports in America. We were really hoping that it can set the tone and really create that legacy for women in sports. I'm Allison Glock. I spent the past year in change, immersed in all things title 9, including ESPN films, four part documentary, 37 words. Part one is directed by my friend Don Porter, and in it she shows what life was like for women and what sports was like for women before title 9 became law. You have to understand that, to understand what the fight for title 9 was all about. One of the centerpieces of the documentary is a sit down with two icons of women's rights. One is Billie Jean King, the former world number one tennis star with 39 titles under her name. The press labeled us, you know, women's lib. And I thought it was funny. I didn't even think about it. All I knew was I didn't feel tennis was right. And then there's Gloria Steinem, the journalist activist and one of the matriarchs of the women's movement. While Billie Jean was winning matches all over the world, Gloria was leading the march for women's equality across all sectors of society. I wouldn't have admitted the inequality in my own life, even though I was continually discriminated against in journalism. Both of these women kept women's rights in the spotlight for decades, but they'd never sat down together just the two of them until DOM Porter made that happen for this film. I'm going to listen to Gloria in this one. This is my chance to learn more with Gloria. Again. I was stop it. Stop it. I was learning so much from you. No, I'm not kidding. Plus serious. But we don't know where we're going to go with this. So no, we don't. What Don got is the inside story of how and why sports joined forces with the movement for women's rights. And that's what I talked to her about. Hi, John. Hi Allison. Tell me in our dear listeners. About how 37 words opens. You know, the hardest thing to do is to start a film, so you never know how it's going to actually start. It's actually one of the most terrifying and the best feelings when you finally figure out how it should start. So we had planned this session with Billie Jean King and Gloria Steinem to have them in conversation. What I didn't know at the time is that they had never done that before. So as soon as Gloria walked in the room, Billie Jean just, they just started talking. And we were just rolling on all of it. But this is sweet. All right, yeah. And that's how we start the film. All right. Okay, this is a presentation here to women in conversation. And their respect for each other comes through their humor comes through and it just felt like this is such a great way to start because that's really how the women's movement started with women in conversation. We are linked not ranked. We're in a circle not.

Allison Glock Don Porter Gloria Billie Jean King United States Gloria Steinem tennis DOM Porter Billie Jean ESPN Allison Don John
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:01 min | 8 months ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"You launched your second makeup line in 30 years. Your brand new beauty brand, Jones road. Is it true you got the name from the waze app? Yes. Because when you're sitting there deciding what to name this company and I can't use my name, which is totally fine. Did that. We couldn't agree on names. We asked Reuters that we know cop, we hired copywriters. I even had Gloria Steinem working on names because I did a job with her. She goes, oh, I'll come up with a name. So what did she recommend? You know what? If I could only find that list because she wrote it on a piece of paper in her hand. I know, right? So, but then one day, my husband, who was my biggest supporter in all of this, said to me, you got to come up with a name. I said, I know, but this one's not available, and he said, we can't even think of launching until. And we're starting to run out of time. So we were driving to the Hamptons, and my husband likes to look at Google Maps and ways because God forbid we're in traffic when there's a back road. And I put my head down and I looked at it, I said, Jones road, beauty, and he said, what? And I said, doesn't that sound great? He said it actually sounds awesome. And I called the team. I said, put me on speaker phone. They said love it, and it became Jones road beauty, and for me, it was like, okay, Jones road reminds me of a bespoke brand in the UK and I'm a total anglophile. It also was like, okay, well I can't use Brown, I'll use Jones. I like it, 'cause I actually thought it was like, I have a Jones for something. And that was the last one. And everyone has a Jones for beauty. Exactly. Exactly. So tell us about the brand and your various signature products. Well, for some of which I'm wearing. Well, first of all, you know, working on it, it is a clean brand, which just means it's a brand of now, because there's 2700 banned ingredients that you can not have if you want to be a clean brand. You said 2700. 2700. And that's the truth. So, you know, I wanted to create the best products. I wanted to make this different kind of makeup because what happened to also while I was still at the brand when you're part of a big brand in a big corporation, you have many people to please and you have to come up with these products for different parts of the country and I had to approve at the end of my stay, products that I just didn't like. And you know, I was pressured into it, you know, where I never would have had to do that earlier. And I just don't like makeup that is so heavy and strong. You know, things were changing while I was still at the brand. The digital brands, the direct to consumer brands, but my personal makeup style on myself and on the people I was making up was changing also less makeup, more fresh, more skin, healthier, and I just wanted to have makeup that you could put on that instantly made you look like that. I was always frustrated with some of my artists that couldn't understand what I wanted because it made everybody look like they had a makeup face. I don't like a makeup face. So working with chemists and a couple product development people, I created these products that I was like, oh my God, these are amazing. Amazing. Where I, you know, somehow named things like, we named the pencil the best Brown pencil. We named an eyeshadow, the best color in the world. You know, I just, I was so enamored and excited and the miracle bomb, which is our hero product. It was a happy mistake creating it, and it literally instantly makes everybody look better. Why was it why was it an accident? Because I asked the chemist to create something that I wanted to make, and it came back completely not what I wanted. And instead of saying, ah, I just tried it. I stuck my hand in and I put it on. I'm like, oh my God. So I wanted something that was more like a foundation. So it would have been more skin color ish, but it ended up to be this miracle balm that you put on your face. That's a hybrid skin care tinted makeup that you don't really even need a foundation when you put it on or just need it on parts. And if you did wear foundation at major foundation, look so much better. And that was the first product that we said we could launch a company with just this product. Is it true that the miracle bomb has a wait list of 20,000 people? It did. It did because we didn't know how popular it was going to be. So, you know, we launched on the day my non compete was up. One week prior to the presidential election in the middle of a pandemic where I did The Today Show on my zoom, you know, with basically a blazer on top and shorts on the bottom, then I did a Wall Street Journal, and then I did Elvis Duran, so I hit three different medias from my office, and that's how I launched it. Incredible. I didn't know and realize number one, how interested people were that I was back. And how much they loved the products. So we thought we'd have enough for 6 months, and we sold out of two of the colors in three weeks. So there was a huge weight list, and then the coolest thing happened, someone called me and said, oh my God, we just found 25 hundred.

Jones Gloria Steinem Reuters Google Brown UK major foundation Elvis Duran Wall Street Journal
"gloria steinem" Discussed on The Endless Honeymoon Podcast

The Endless Honeymoon Podcast

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on The Endless Honeymoon Podcast

"Response to the guy that was disgusted by his wife's burks When i was a teenager i was head over heels in love with the girl that was really punk rock and she was very confident and one of the ways he expressed. That confidence was by burping really loud all the time. And ever since then. Whenever i hear a beautiful woman barrack really loud it gets me hot and i bite my lip a little bit. I dunno different for different folks. I'm in the food that and that's my secret okay interesting. I like it because that's a good personality. He's attracted to a strong woman. Told it well that's true too. Maybe like open your mind to more. I'm you know. I don't need to open my mind to it are open to it. My my burp is when you close a major hollywood deal. I get so turned on every time you let your let rat in the kitchen every time. What do you think about a woman. Burping someone who sneezes incredibly loudly. Listen okay. I'm of two minds first of all it's it. I'm of three months okay. It's not for me. But i don't know how gender i mean i'm sure on some level at somewhat gendered but i'm definitely not into it when a man does it either. The person we talked about when the burping came up was a man. And i don't like that. And i have two male friends in my life that are chronic burgers. And i don't like it but there's something about when it's a woman i know the type. He's talking about the punk rocker. That doesn't it feels. It feels not only the regular grossness of of chronic burping. But then there's also a performance aspect of like. Yeah you got that right buddy. I'm doing it for gloria steinem. Feminism because they wanna they will. They feel like it. All i'm saying is an. I hope i'm not offending anybody. That chronic burping period is gross. But it feels like when a woman is a chronic burger with allowed in like making eye contact with you especially if they're a punk rocker. It's it's a it's a it's a. it's a statement. It's not just a neutral like oh gastrointestinal stuff. It's also like a yeah. I'm doing it. I do it. I'm a woman who birth. I am woman hear burp. Well i think some people just naturally do it. They grew up doing it. And i don't think it has to be gendered like you're saying but he said it was a punk rock girl so there's no way it wasn't on purpose it's gross. What burping makes me really uncomfortable. Especially when the person seems like they're enjoying it. It's like do that alone all right. Let's take another secret all right. Hey so i have a pretty messed up secret Never told anybody this ever ever ever when my niece was a daisy i I think i was eleven and my sister was breastfeeding her. All the time. And you know kinda curious about it. Whatever so i went in to wake up my niece Well she was away. She was a baby. she's probably six seven months. Something like that Picked her up but moving her mouth and she looked up at me. Like what the fuck. Who are you. And i immediately. I was like what am i doing. super off my my tiny little pre pubescent dube and Yeah pretty weird secret. I mean she's twenty five now never told her and never told my sister never told anyone so have at it by wait. How old is she when she's doing this. Okay the problem with telling them is. It would be fun one night to tell them but then it would be awkward for like years. You think it would stay awkward for years. She might feel like she would if they took it wrong. Or i don't know or could especially like i don't know i just think it's why go there this is. My kind of secret is why. I like the secrets hotline. Because it's a a. It's a deep dark because like any secret you've never told anyone and you've just been living with it by yourself like you need to tell someone and i love that. She was able to tell and this one so simple like this is so easy like when you think about this you don't have to even wonder like was this wrong or evil. The answer is yes you are deeply fucked up and you need to turn yourself into chop protective. You're permanently damaged and what you are is is evil and you're probably a democrat. If i'm being honest with know what i really think is this is kind of like. I don't wanna say natural. Because i've never heard of anyone doing this and it's completely i loved it because i feel like little kids. Eleven year. old breastfeed maybe not like all the way to touch the touch. The baby touch the breast. No baby latched. Yeah no she laughed. But i just think at eleven years old like this is like it's kind of okay like pretty young. You know when it stops being okay. Seventeen well yes for sure on that but you know when it stops being okay when this secret goes like this high. Here's a pretty fucked up secret. When i was young. I was eleven. I was really curious about my my sister breastfeeding so i went into my nieces room and i put her on my little titi and then i was like what the fuck my doing but then a week later i was like i gotta feel that again so i went in again and that started the process of over a decade of me. Dry feeding now that right. You're so right as long as you're able to like that. what am i.

burks barrack gloria steinem hollywood dube
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Remove islam remote christianity. Would the will change. I don't think so perhaps not you're bringing up such a good point that i felt for a long time because i was raised pretty religious and i am not now but i i find that the way that it works most beautifully because i do think religion is is beautiful and can do a lot for people's heart and souls and collective communities is fusing religion with this element of critical thinking an analyst station. I think in a lot of these religious scripts there's the message to the people and then there are messages in a specific context ages addressing that specific thing that is happening at that time. So i think separating the two is important but again you know if if a script is for everybody then everybody should have a chance to interpreted in their own way rather than you know one or two men taking the tards that you know they are the ones to tell us how we should see it and we should interpret it. But i'm just very curious. Kristen like you know you have two daughters and you have done so much and you are there you know. Sort of changing the one. Do you often worry about how they're going to be fully aware of their rights. How do you see your role as parent to visit him up as sort of feminist women who believe in themselves. Well i guess. I'll start by saying check your ego when i say this answer but it is because of examples like you and examples of people that have chosen to tell their story also the very specific part of converting it into a children's book which you did. The magic pencil is something. We read a lot. My girls love it and these stories about women that people are writing and putting into the context for children. Make me a whole hell of a lot less nervous about my girls going out into the world like your book. Glorious voice from gloria steinem. Rpg's book and also there's a series called good nights stories for rebel girls which really normalizes girls who have had a knee jerk reaction against patriarchal behavior and it's a one page on each woman and they learn about the fight for lack of a better description from warriors like you were speaking the original malala to people now who have simply accomplished something. So based on the exposure my children are getting and the the sort of glory which we hold these stories in our house. I'm a lot less nervous. As i'm seeing their behavior developing and they are very outspoken. About everything everything in comparing it to your story..

Kristen gloria steinem
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"They are <Speech_Female> going to be <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> so proud <Speech_Female> of them even though <Speech_Female> they have nothing to do with <Speech_Female> it. <Speech_Female> Take that <Speech_Female> credit. <Speech_Female> You take some ownership over <Speech_Female> that but it was. <Speech_Female> It was <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> lineal. Oh <Speech_Female> yeah all the names <Speech_Female> get passed <SpeakerChange> down <Speech_Female> through the mother <Speech_Male> that so great <Speech_Male> that you come from their <Speech_Female> this wonderful. We <Speech_Female> should meet their yet. <Speech_Female> Now that we're best friends <Speech_Female> and i'm going to call you out. <Speech_Male> I love being on <Speech_Male> houseboats and going <Speech_Male> through the waterways. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> And <Speech_Female> it's so beautiful. <Speech_Female> I would love for <Speech_Female> you to take me on. A journey <Speech_Female> to carol <Speech_Female> and my twin <Speech_Female> spirit will come <Speech_Female> as well. <Speech_Female> I didn't want to insert <Speech_Female> my office <Speech_Female> waiting to be invited. <Speech_Female> But i'm not gonna. This <Speech_Female> seems like a very special <Speech_Female> trips on the <Speech_Female> guys i could <Speech_Female> carry. <SpeakerChange> The bags <Speech_Female> are <Speech_Female> not <Speech_Female> been as grownup <Speech_Female> to caroline <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> was only four years <Speech_Female> old. <Speech_Female> I have very little <Speech_Male> memory. it's wonderful. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> it's absolutely <Speech_Female> wonderful. <Speech_Female> I'm really after prioritize. <Speech_Female> Making <Speech_Female> that happen for <Speech_Female> sure. I'm watching <Speech_Female> the sun setting <Speech_Female> behind you in <Speech_Female> this gorgeous. <Speech_Female> Looks like to <Speech_Female> be honest <Speech_Female> set decked <Speech_Female> version of what beautiful <Speech_Female> if i was like <Speech_Female> hiring crew to <Speech_Female> build a beautiful house <Speech_Female> and i don't know who your <Speech_Female> friend is but it's beautiful <Speech_Female> where <Speech_Female> you're staying. <SpeakerChange> Is this <Speech_Female> your bedroom. No <Speech_Male> i'm sitting at <Speech_Male> the dining room table. <Speech_Male> I'm <SpeakerChange> so <Speech_Female> lucky to be here <Speech_Female> but do you have your <Speech_Female> own bedroom. <SpeakerChange> Where you bunking <Speech_Female> with someone. No <Speech_Female> i have. I have my <Speech_Female> own bedroom <Speech_Female> okay. <Speech_Male> <hes> there's there's a <Speech_Male> a friend who comes <Speech_Male> in occasionally <Speech_Male> stays and works <Speech_Male> here and <Speech_Male> there are people <Speech_Male> were sort of <Speech_Male> all <SpeakerChange> in our <Speech_Male> own isolation <Speech_Male> here <Speech_Male> you because <hes> <Speech_Male> if it's a ranch <Speech_Male> for hundred acre <Speech_Male> ranch and <Speech_Male> so i can <Speech_Male> walk to see the horses <Speech_Male> every morning and <Speech_Male> say hello <SpeakerChange> to the horses. <Speech_Female> It's wonderful <Speech_Female> have you been keeping <Speech_Female> busy. Are you playing <Speech_Female> any games at night <Speech_Female> or anything. <Speech_Female> We've been playing <SpeakerChange> a lot of <Speech_Female> cards so <Speech_Female> much. No <Speech_Male> busy is not <Speech_Male> my problem. <Speech_Male> Busy is so not <Speech_Male> my problem. I mean <Speech_Male> i have <Speech_Male> a book. I'm <Speech_Male> supposed to be writing. <Speech_Male> I had three <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> zooms <Speech_Female> today. <Speech_Female> You know <Speech_Female> girl you gotta get <Speech_Male> through <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> you know. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Oh <Speech_Female> my gosh you're <Speech_Female> making me feel very <Speech_Female> unaccomplished <Speech_Female> because <SpeakerChange> you're still <Speech_Female> writing books. <Speech_Male> We're all i'm not. <Speech_Female> I mean i'm i'm here <Speech_Female> running my mouth <Speech_Female> instead of break. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> We'll got <Speech_Female> we appreciate <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> that. You procrastinate <Speech_Female> adam. Grant says sometimes. <Speech_Female> Procrastination <Speech_Female> is what you need. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Well and also <Speech_Male> it's wonderful. I mean <Speech_Male> i. I wish we <Speech_Male> could be together <Speech_Male> with all five <Speech_Male> senses because <Speech_Male> back to <Speech_Male> empathy and so but <Speech_Male> this is the next best <Speech_Female> thing. <SpeakerChange> I'm so <Speech_Female> glad to see you. That's <Speech_Female> really <Speech_Female> do you still <Speech_Female> love dogs. <Speech_Female> I read that you love dogs. <Speech_Female> Oh yes <Speech_Female> okay. <Speech_Female> Yeah i just wanted to. <Speech_Female> I just wanna feel <Speech_Female> again because <Speech_Female> so many guys <Speech_Female> planned the trip and <Speech_Female> baraci inserted <Speech_Female> myself. I just <Speech_Female> wanna say like dogs. Ohio <Speech_Female> you know <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> oh my goodness <Speech_Female> we appreciate <Speech_Female> so much. <Speech_Female> You giving us a <Speech_Female> lot of your time <Speech_Female> that you should be using <Speech_Female> to write your <Speech_Female> book and help change <Speech_Female> the world even <Speech_Female> more than you already have. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> We appreciate <Speech_Female> you <Speech_Female> know. Well it's fun <Speech_Female> talking to you. <Speech_Male> I really enjoy it <Speech_Male> and email. Me <Speech_Male> things i should know <Speech_Male> or do <Speech_Male> or you know. <Speech_Female> Let's stay <SpeakerChange> in touch <Speech_Female> after ellie <Speech_Female> right. I got <Speech_Female> you 'cause we've put <Speech_Female> you on <SpeakerChange> this pedestal. <Speech_Female>

Ohio Grant ellie hundred acre today five four years twin baraci
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Well the reason i wrote it really was because in wandering around the country and speaking and our sense of ourselves is women especially not only but especially as women. I mean just lacking confidence was so clearly part of the problem and so i started looking for books to give to people but the books that were about self esteem behaved as if the problem was internal and the books that were about politics behaved as if all the problems were external so i was just trying to create a book that said no. It's a continuum that we'd need to understand that we're not better than anybody else. We each are unique. And you know everything we now know but it took a while before this book to find itself. I think it was the year you originally wrote it. It was the seventies your dedication. I'm gonna read. I'm gonna read you your own. Which is the best. The best thing i could possibly do. It says this book is intended for everyone. Women men children and nations whose power has been limited by a lack of self esteem. It is inspired by women of all races who self esteem is making the longest deepest and most peaceful revolution and is dedicated to anyone who values the unique self inside every child. Just love it so much. Jeez louise you're a good writer will came clear to me that it was a problem of nations to there were entire nations. Didn't think they were equal to other nations because they'd been colonized. Oh absolutely that's so much of the race issue as well you know. My parents are from india. A colonized country of course and you know even color ism within you had the darker you are the less value we are you know and i think. Hopefully that's changing. But that's a real. Marker of how colonization has impacted confidence of an asian. I think it was. Oh an even before the british. I think that the more fair skinned so called aryans or whatever coming over the himalayas have. Yeah it which makes no sense at all especially when you consider terra. Uh-huh that's where my family's from really. Oh that's my favorite. Is i mean i don't mean to be but it seems to me the best so i only went there once when i was four. I haven't been back since. My dad is trying very hard to get my whole family to go on a family trip. I would really like to obviously. We'll have to wait 'til kovic is the one place in india. That has no been really. Oh i didn't know that that was true. As of a couple of months ago i they had maybe one case or something because i was looking at all the female-headed countries islands like new zealand. Because they were doing better not because women are so smart necessarily but they seem to have a more family oriented idea of healthcare so they were doing way better in the cova department. And at that point i think gerald only have one case. Oh my gosh. I told my parents..

india one case four new zealand gerald each couple of months ago once himalayas seventies one place louise kovic asian british aryans
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"I believe that the most universal punishment all over the world is isolation in ancient parts of africa. What are people were shot under set aside for a while but then when they came back into the culture there was a long ritual amount of time in which every person who knew that person told them every good thing they ever did so they were knit back into the culture now. We we could do that but unfortunately we isolate in prisons but we don't get them back into the culture very well so sad failing there. I had a personal question. So you've talked pretty publicly about your mom. And i love the way you described we. We both listen to your interview with terry gross. Will you have had multiple interviews with her. Which i loved the one that kind of compiled them all because it was like going through a time machine. It was so cool to like here the evolution of losing my memory so i should get. Yeah no. it's great. It is a really good lesson. It is has become like early nineties and then two thousand four and then in gaza fifteen they compile all of them in your interior really. But you say in one of those interviews that your mom struggled with a lot of stuff but what it boils down to in your opinion that her spirit was broken. And you were witnessed to that. That's a lot to be a child of the. You know to be seeing that. And i wondered you know we talk a lot about on armchair expert about aces adverse childhood experiences which being a child in an environment like that would be definitely considered multiple aces. And i was wondering if seeing all that and seeing your mom's spirit broken is part of what has made you challenge the status quo. Has that been a driver for you. I'm not sure. I've felt the movement motives in the beginning. It was a personal motive not to live the same fate as my mother and end up as a woman by herself with a child not able to do the work she loved so it was a personal motive but it probably took me longer.

two thousand africa both gaza fifteen one of those interviews terry gross four one early nineties
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Dinner in this social media culture. where if feels pressurized. You're not being loud. it's gonna look like you don't care. I think we need to get out of this mentality of. Everyone should be doing it. The exact same way you know. I have such empathy for how you deal with because i did not grow up in the social media era. It's on the one hand great advantage to women or people with less power because supposing that you at least have enough money for a computer which is a big supposition is a lot of. The world doesn't even have electricity but anyway then for women especially. I think it's a way of learning and discovering and organizing in safety from home and that's very good but another level it is up to us to sort out what we care about and don't care about the closest thing. My generation had to as teenagers were personality books in school. They would put the name of the person at the top of each page of a student and then people would right underneath anonymously. You know cute but knows it things like that. Oh wow cute. But but it was the closest thing to the anonymity and the ability to just pass judgment closest thing to the comments section in brian. Stevenson's book just mercy. He talks a lot about proximity being the necessary. Element to activate deep empathy. And you had this experience in india where you saw so many different things outside your circle. I had like a modicum of experience where i lived in brazil for three months when i was nineteen years old and i was volunteering over there and i saw a world that was completely different than what i had experienced. It was nothing i ever had. In my bubble in michigan and it formed a lot of opinions about the world and my perspective but in the age of social media is proximity of the internet bringing us closer to seeing other people's stories or is it driving us further apart. Well that's a good question. I think it is a way of learning intellectually. That's very important. But we can't empathize unless we're present with all five senses the tolson. The tendon befriend hormone. That you're holding a baby male or female your flooded with oxytocin. If you see somebody having an accident you wanna help. Even if you don't know them that actually told some. I asked my friend neurologist in new york if we could experience oxytocin online and she said no. You have to be there. I mean it's very valuable. You can learn intellectually. You can find people but probably without all five senses. you can't really fully empathize. there's something lacking well. That's what's so fascinating when you think you're getting oxygen toasted because you're actually getting a dopamine hit because it's that casino or the the slot machine longtime ago ooh berry ooh varying who the hunter gatherer. Like that's what you're getting. But it's not the german casinos. I never thought it was that great. If you've sat in knows exactly well it's the thing you like the quarters coming out. I was going to say. Did you ever hit a jackpot because when you win even if you only win five nine but it's all in dimes. If feels like a lot really tricky. It's a good trick. But i do think it's really important to make that distinction. Because nobody is when they see a like you know they do get the dopamine hit and it feels like love. Oh somebody loves me..

brazil new york india michigan three months nineteen years Stevenson brian five senses five nine each page one oxytocin german
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"I said yes but frame. Bridge is so affordable and the quality is one hundred percent perfect and i love it. All you have to do is go to frame dot com and you upload the photo right they'll send you packaging if you need to mail an old picture. And they have impeccable customer service there so so helpful so fast they'll deliver directly to your door ready to hang and there's so many different kinds of frames. It is an incredibly easy service. And if you had told me like ten years ago like people will frame things for you online. I'd be like yeah right but a lot of things can happen online. Now in frame bridge makes your life so much easier and you can get started today by framing your photos or sending someone the perfect gift you can go to frame bridge dot com and use promo code glass to save an additional fifteen percent on your first order go to frame bridge dot com promo code glass. We are supported by hellofresh manu Made a hellofresh meal just last night. You bet we did for the whole gang It was so delicious. I cook mainly vegetarian. And i'm always looking for vegetarian dishes. That don't just seem like a side of carrot exaggerates your meal and this was a flat bread and it had like any and tomato and a lemon ricotta got yeah and chili flakes and honey and there were so many tastes and it was delicious and everybody that we never could've made it up. That flavor profile is far too elevated. And it's just quick and easy and they're like fifteen or twenty minutes to make all of them. It's so easy. They have fifty menu and market items each week including reading eat..

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Feel when you stick up for women's rights relieved. I think and i had not been working in a group. I haven't had a job. I was being a freelance writer. And so i had to learn how to be part of a group and the women's movement or political movements altogether helped with that because the model was an is a circle where each person gets to talk in turn and everybody else has to listen. It is the native american model of democracy. It is the model of democratic circle. You know even if you go into a classroom. I notice you know where they have those chairs that you can move around if instead of putting them in rows you put them in a circle. It changes everything. I've recently been applying that when my girls have a problem and we talk it out a call family triangle so that the three of us have to sit with our toes together so that they're it's sort of like our version of a circle so they have to look at each other and i find so much more comes out of those conversations when i'm trying to get these tiny people to talk about big emotions because they're having to face one another. It's a powerful thing the circle. No that's great talking about empathy and narcissism and i know that people in power. Don't wanna give it up. So that's part of the issue. But how do we get those people on board with talking to circle and not talking from a pedestal. How do we convince people who are benefiting from inequality to join the cause. I guess i'll say like. How do we reach those people because we do need them. Well there are a lot of answers. But i do think ridicule is very helpful riot. Okay because who wants to be isolated i th. I think women may know this a little better because we get to see worlds by going out with the men in them so by going out with rich white guys. I discovered barring even as the guy wasn't boring the circle was boring..

three each person american
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"I understand that it's right and the democracy of it but to say white doctor. Because i've just said black doctor it's important to do yes and we're living in a world right now. We're we're trying to almost erase specificities. And you know some people are like. I don't see color. You know all these things and i struggle with that you have but anybody who says they don't see color is just lying because we see caller when we look at flowers. Why would we see when we look at people. And it undermines the struggle of a group of people. And i feel that about women as well and then you know we're in this weird kind of political correct time where you have to be careful about labelling gender even starting this podcast. There was a question of like. Does this feel like were leaning in into female. When right now people are trying to make gender so neutral then a goal is more to be open to the numerous categories that exist. I'm always fascinated with the way the brain works. There was this invisibly podcast about categories and it was all about how we have this urge to clearly define categories. It saves you so much time and effort as a human being because if you can walk into a room and you see couch and you know couch is not going to hurt you or hurt your children or take your food. Then you're safe and you know those things about couch. There's this sort of antiquated software in our brains. That makes us box people in. I just don't believe that because we don't learn from sameness. We learned from difference. If i'm with a group of people who all looked like me i know i'm in the wrong place but it depends on the culture. I think because as far as i know from cherki friends and so on the kind of started events by addressing all four directions and the earth and the sky the winged and the four foot of the two leg of you know just as a routine because they were addressing the whole earth and all living things..

earth cherki four foot two
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Thanks for joining us. Thank you so nice to see your faces. I wish we were in the same place but this is the next best thing i know. Well actually we kind of wish you were happy. You aren't in the attic because there's an egg salad over there that's creating a not so great. Smell got exposed wires. It's not the tidiest in truth. I think we wish we were your house because you where you are absolutely lovely. Do you know who i am. Because i'm not in new york. I'm in california undisclosed location in california. I spent the first three months of quarantine in my new york apartment. And then i had the opportunity to come here to my friends ranch. Where i'm in a wonderful old farmhouse. And i can walk around in the sunshine I've been here since april. I think that's the way to do it. My heart has definitely gone out to a lot of people that live in studio apartments in any big city where they're being told to stay indoors. I'm like everyone's gonna be scratching at the walls. It's true although writers are so used to feel comfortable in in isolation yes no no no. I've never had a job in my life. I've never gone to an office. You know so. I'm better prepared than most probably that's true you know. We have the magazine office but then it was our office. You know so it was different. We didn't have to be there nine to five and you didn't have to wear a suit or anything. No you're making your own rules making the rules for the rest of us to thank goodness yet. Could you be in charge of just all the rules. Just take rules from here on out. I felt the way we work is going to change. Don't you think because people now have become accustomed to working on a different way. I think so too. I think it'll become a lot less formal moving forward. I hope yeah. And i think also some good things will come out of it where it won't be so regular that we see everyone that will sort of cherish that a little bit more especially when we get back into it. I've for a very long time. Thought a lot of things could be done over zoom and no one took me up on that. I'm mike von to fly to new york to do the show just like sat me in. I'll be here..

new york mike von california april first three months five nine
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Delicious and right now peter. Jerry's is giving away a free dozen eggs to the first one hundred and fifty listeners. Who go to pete jerry's dot com slash shattered glass to claim your free dozen eggs. Go to p. t. a. n. d. g. e. r. r. y. s. dot com slash shattered. Glass they are available nationwide. Check them out. Okay boobs with a lot of people have them. We're four the between us. And i like them all i love i love big ones. I love small ones. I wear them with pride and we are sponsored by third love. You were just saying that you need to replace all your bras yeah. Unfortunately i'm not feeling the cups anymore guys. So i'm gonna have to go down size and it is confusing sometimes to know your actual bra size and about this third love. I had the measurements. And i put it on. It was perfect because they have so many different sizes. You can like really get a perfect fit. Yeah you have access to three x can get exactly what you need. And their sleepwear. There's lounge where they have like a feather lace collection. They've a t shirt bra. That's amazing love t shirt bra. And there's like an interactive quiz that focuses on not just your rib-cage size but your breast shape because let's be honest. We got a lot of different shapes. We got bowling. Ball's we got ski. Slopes we got triangles..

A Conversation on Our Post-Coronavirus Future

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

02:05 min | 1 year ago

A Conversation on Our Post-Coronavirus Future

"In today's episode. We want to examine the strand looking at the impact of the pandemic and ask writers and thinkers for their thoughts are post covid future. One particular aspect that will be discussed is gender equality in the time of covid nineteen now. I'm joined by everyday sexism founder. Laura bates leads a series of discussions around motherhood and the ways covid nineteen has impacted upon that lower. Thanks so much for joining us. Now you've been involved in. Hey for a long time. How do you feel about the digital festival opening up the event globally reaching people who otherwise might not get to enjoy events and enjoying important discussions. Well thank you so much for having me is great to be talking to you again. I think it's a wonderful thing while of course like everybody else. I was absolutely heartbroken. At the loss of the physical festival and the wonderful omega indescribable atmosphere of redesign thinkers and writers. Coming together. there was a wonderful opening of of new possibilities in horizons actually in the realization that same spirit of communing and of discussion and investigation and mutual curiosity and exploration and new ideas sparking that all of that could actually happen on an international stage. Virtually and while of course. We mustn't make the assumption that that virtual space is accessible to everybody nonetheless. There was a massively increased accessibility about it. And the mir. It came so vibrantly clearly to life. When i was lucky enough to do a kind of event as part of that festival with gloria steinem and suddenly realized that i think may ten thousand people around the world with an listening with us joining us in that conversation interacting taking asking her questions and sending in seoul and an sharing on social media and and that was just completely incredible so i think something really beautiful and positive has come out of it as well.

Laura Bates Gloria Steinem Seoul
Yogi Assignment: Discipline by Kino MacGregor of KinoYoga

Optimal Living Daily

07:25 min | 1 year ago

Yogi Assignment: Discipline by Kino MacGregor of KinoYoga

"Yogi assignment discipline by keno mcgregor of keno yoga dot com. I used to be a perfectionist. Or rather i used to think i had a true chains being perfect or getting all the things right. All the time somehow headed naive notion that if i just visualized hard enough and trained my vibration to be high enough that i never experienced any lows ever again. I live in some bubble of peace love and happiness. My life had something else in store for me this last year alone. I've stumbled and fallen so many times and made so many bad decisions. I can hardly be into account for them all failure or the recognition that. I did something wrong or that. Something i did was not good enough to meet the cut or that. I simply do not achieve. My goals is something that has been a hard and sometimes bitter pill for me to swallow. Perhaps you like me were raised with the narrative that you can do anything you want. If only you set your sights on it just think good vibes and be positive all the time and everything you want will magically come into being. I was told that. I was simply manifest my reality well while i have certainly accomplished a lot. There is so much more that i've tried and failed at and so much more that i experienced that did not go. According to my vision. I spent a good deal of time wondering how to reconcile the desire to stay in a continuous state of peace and harmony with the reality of continually falling out of that sweet spot lately of come to see the moments of failure as loving discipline rather than harsh punishment. While it'd be nice if we could always get it right. The reality is that we don't when we aren't able to stay on the path and make every decision according to the highest truth. Then it's important that we remain open to being rebuked disciplined educated enlightened both by the universe and by god and also by other people within our community is a necessary correction along the journey of life if the spiritual community seems to have a bit of payroll tax reading through the average list of spiritual quotes found. Online is evident that there is ample discussion on how to keep your oracle. Lean how to think only good vibes and how to remove toxic. People or situations bows often missing is how to process. He'll evolve and grow from the moments when feeling good vibes is simply not an option after admit that i get triggered sometimes when people respond to negative feedback by blocking the heaters and surrounding themselves with good vibes. Only i guess one of the reasons. I get triggered is because i know that no matter how hard i try just can't live in the bubble of good vibes. Only while i'm overall a general positive peaceful person who loves to laugh my also get angry. Sad to press anxious. I get things wrong. Mike often and all the time and when i do. I'm often sensitive to criticism. Almost like something inside of me. Feels like i should have done better. At keeping. The bubble of positivity defense at work design environment for growth. Though to assume that you will get it right. One hundred percent of the time and have no need for discipline is to assume that you already are perfect and they have no need for any further guidance. Sure sounds like hubris to me. It takes a very high degree of self confidence and spiritual strength to process negative feedback and grow from it. If you are a well intended spiritual person living a life committed to peace and love. It can feel truly unsettling if someone called you out on not living up to your integrity. If feels wrong. He had called out of your protective bubble. You may have inadvertently surround yourself. With an echo chamber that reinforces your beliefs about yourself. When those beliefs are questioned or challenged it can feel like a direct and personal assault. You may wanna lash out or even zone out. He may not want to put in the emotional labor required to work through all your stuff. But if you choose to dig your head in the sand you will be depriving yourself of an opportunity to grow from the experience much like a child who disciplined cannot grow from the experience while discipline is not always optional. Growth is of course optional. You can choose to disregard the voices of people who call you out as heaters. You can bolster your case of good person hood where he could pause reflect research and study the issue. He also say with your own feelings of discomfort until you come to clarity and compassion. It has been said that the truth will set you free but i it will piss you off by feminist gloria steinem among others. We face truth and feel angry. Lean into your rage especially when it's reactionary don't project or act out your anger until you fully processed it. Discipline or negative feedback is so vital to growth. Imagine if you're working at a new job and the boss was unhappy with your performance instead of telling you that your work wasn't up to the level required your boss has told you that you are awesome imperfect but then one day that same boss fired you. You'd be left feeling truly confused. If however your boss gave you the negative feedback that your work wasn't up to standard and listened ways. You might improve. It'd be up to respond in a way though at either ensure your evolution or demonstrate your ineptitude for the position me the way you actually need the negative feedback to grow. Life is an interested in whether or not your feelings get hurt. life is interested in helping you grow. You put all your heart into something only to have it fail or even worse. Blow up in. Your face is getting disciplined from the word is not meant to be punitive or harsh instead. It simply meant to be feedback giving you the opportunity to grow and learn and eventually rise up to meet the challenge that life is presenting to you. I kind of feel like our life lessons. Return and repeat until we get them like the universe is infinitely patient with us while we try over and over again to get the same lesson right. if we don't immediately get it. We have years to repeat man. Learn them all over again. This week's yogi assignment is disciplined. Change the way you view negative feedback instead of taking it personally. Recalibrate the story you tell about it. Think about negative feedback as an opportunity to reflect on your path if think about failure as the discipline of a loving force in the universe perhaps it shines light on a turn that you took in wrong direction or perhaps it makes you more sure about the direction that you are going either way. Remain open to experience of discipline that comes in the form of life lessons. Reflect on any recent negative feedback that you may have received or many recent failures. What can you learn from each of those experiences. Search for the life lesson contained within the discipline and seek to grow from it practice giving negative feedback to someone else. If you can phrase your words with as much love as possible and be sure that you truly do not come from hate yet if you notice that. Something is out of alignment. Whether in a person or organization and you choose to remain silent you may be depriving the person from an opportunity to grow and evolve

Keno Mcgregor Oracle Gloria Steinem Mike
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

"Enough rather than saying cia agents at in the nineteen sixties infiltrated and did something with gloria steinem to create some sort of engineered event to to do something that specific. I believe in specific things. But i don't think there's a general group that all of a sudden it's like a membership. We have this membership and you know..

nineteen sixties gloria steinem
To future generations of women, you are the roots of change

TED Talks Daily

05:42 min | 2 years ago

To future generations of women, you are the roots of change

"Yeah salah. Hello hello hello one trill to have this opportunity when we ask all of our ted community many of them. Who would you like to hear from. If we're going to look forward on word when it comes to women in the world unanimously. The answer was gloria steinem. Now i know you're way too modest to accept that easily. So before we move onward. May i go back a bit since we have known each other for a long time and talk about those early days when you were building a movement challenging stereotypes moving beyond call four norms. You must have had some manifestation a fearless and your life. What were what were your fears. And how did you overcome them now. I certainly had a lot of fears and chief among them was speaking in public. Just like i am now because you know we choose to express ourselves in the way that is most natural and i became a writer. Because i didn't wanna talk. So the first thing i had to overcome was the fear of public speaking and because i was afraid to do it by myself i asked a friend to do with me. Dorothy pitman hughes and then flow kennedy anyway so we became in that way somewhat accidentally white woman one black woman speaking together which you know was very helpful to express. The movement was for everyone in those early days when you were becoming not only a really powerful public speaker in spite of your fears you were also normalizing and creating response to a word that became the anthem for so many of us literally changing lives standing in front of crowds and saying feminism is for every woman and i see now as as you do that there are still ways in which feminism is not understood as a concept misunderstood criticized. Sometimes where killed. How do you describe feminism. It's just the radical idea that human beings are all equal and we can dispense with the labels of gender and class and race and begin to realize our unique individuality Of course feminism was misunderstood in the beginning as if it were about female superiority or It was a movement for lesbians only not for all women. I mean you know. There were all kinds of of Misunderstandings not to mention ridicule. I hope that that's passed. I used to just send people to the dictionary to look. Feminism very helpful. How do you feel the new generation. The next generation of young women. What is their relationship with the word and the concept of. There's still a lot to be done to reach that equal stat. Yeah well. I don't think that i mean the the the word is still there woman. Ism women's liberation the role kinds of words But i think it's much more about content and not worrying too much about form so black lives. Matter was started by three young black feminists that was their creation that has is beginning to change much that needs to be changed And they just assumed that of course they were there as three young black feminists and you mentioned a reality that has just happened for all of the women in the united states. And that is this national presidential election in which the data is showing a great difference. Between the way white women voted. Black women voted and we know that women are not monolithic but the divide and the differences among us in every way. Not just racially. But where we live economically and culturally and almost. Every way has been deepened in the last few years. How do we as women began to bridge these differences well. I don't know if it's actually been deepened. But in any case. I mean the the thing that is different about us is that we have wombs or it and we all have wombs and there is in patriarchal forms of government and governance and just Culture an effort to control our bodies in our minds in ordered to control reproduction. And if there is racism is there is than there is a another motive which is to try to keep racists separate that is a racist motive and to perhaps try to influence one race to produce more than the other. Which actually you can see now in in White racist movements so it is just very basic and the reasons for our unity are very basic because the simple revolutionary statement is that we get to make decisions over our own bodies. How great is that

Dorothy Pitman Gloria Steinem Salah Hughes Kennedy United States
Traveling To Medellin

Travel with Rick Steves

07:26 min | 2 years ago

Traveling To Medellin

"Let's open today's travel with Rick Steves travel writer Dave Seminar. He took his whole family to many in Columbia which used to have a reputation as the headquarters for a dangerous drug cartel. Our interview was recorded just before the global lockdowns kicked in. Hey. Thanks for having me on the show wreck. So you went to Medigene I, mean the image of Medina's like scariest a generation ago is one of the most dangerous cities on the planet. That's right. But but it certainly isn't any longer. I mean these days the murder rate in Medellin is lower than New Orleans Saint, Louis Chicago and several other cities as well. It's an amazing turnaround and. Tourism. Is a booming part of the economy I was just there. My son loves it so much. He bought a condo there and I was there for years this last year with him and we were standing on his balcony and and everybody was blown up fireworks and My son had a Colombian friend there with him and and we were talking about. It and when the Colombians see those fireworks, they remember in the days of Pablo. Escobar. That's what they would explode when they made a deal in the United States with the with the drug trade they're not making deals with the drug trade anymore with the Pablo Escobar outfit that's just celebrating. So they've gone from supplying America's cocaine habit to actually building A. City on live biting entrepreneurs. That's true. They I Columbia is still does produce eighty percent of the cocaine I mean to be frank. However look I went there with my ten and twelve year old sons and my wife, and I would never take them to a place that I thought was too dangerous. So I really consulted with a lot of different people before. Going, there, however, my parents and several other people said, Columbia. You're taking your sons to Columbia you nuts but I did my research and I talked to enough people who had had great experiences there that I felt comfortable doing it and we spent two weeks traveling all around the country and I felt very safe. The whole time tell us about the public tour. It was interesting. You know my wife said Pablo Escobar to are you sure that that's appropriate for our sons who are ten and twelve years old side I called one of the tour companies that had good reviews on trip advisor and he said Oh yes our tour is good for children aged six and up said really okay. Well, let's do it. We thought maybe we can teach them. Okay. He's a bad guy you know here's the. Evils of drugs and teach them a little bit about why the drug violence in and I thought maybe they a lot of it might go over their head but I thought well, they'll learn something. Let's do it but you go through a you goes through your neighborhood community thirteen, which is now trendy. It's filled with street art and is just a festival of good living not good living. It's still a poor area but a festival of happiness. Community Thirteen is sort of an interesting area I've I've found it to be one of the more disappointing stops to be honest with you on the tour I mean, it doesn't really have much to do with Pablo Escobar although it was a neighborhood that was wracked by gang violence, and then in two thousand eleven, the government installed a series of escalators there the idea was. Allowing people to be able to move safely through the community, get from their hilltop neighborhoods down to where jobs and transportation and things of that are. But when I was there in July about the experience maybe if you traveled at a different time of year, you might have an off more authentic experience, but it was absolutely full of tourists which really shocked me because here is. Sort of an impoverished neighborhood that has all credit to them. I. Think it's wonderful. They found a way to turn the violence of the neighborhood into a marketable commodity, but it was absolutely crawling with tourists and I sort of felt like, wow I really don't like going to places that are too full of tourists. So for me, it fell a little bit flat to be. Quite honest. But maybe if I visited another time of year, I would have I would have liked more. No, I don't think. So I mean I was there in the winter but to me, it was a former violence ridden gang ridden community that now is a kind of a tourist trap and it just like an amusement pier in San Francisco, almost or something like that. And what was really fun was the street art I mean, the street art was like it's like going through an art gallery and it's all this edgy colorful tropical kind of street art and you've got it all together by escalators I can imagine before those escalators came you know ten years ago you would have desperately poor people and You'd have the intimidation of the gangs and all of that and and the high murder rate and today there's there's not a hint of that and the escalators let people connect and I think you know the way Columbia has invested in its infrastructure has given poor. Barrios the confidence and the feeling that this is progress and changes possible and and one thing great about going to Medine is you write these cable cars because the city is in a very mountainous area and the poorest communities are pushed way up the mountain sides. But these cable cars, they're just like cable cars had a ski resort. They connect the people in the poor neighborhoods with the good jobs and the good shopping and the good entertainment down in the valley floor and writing these cable cars was just a kind of a celebration of community to me what was your experience on those cable cars? Well I love the cable cars just like you know I took the cable cars up to the park. RV. which is it's a long ride as interesting things that you take two different sets of cable cars. You can take one set of cable cars, which sort of goes through some of the rough hillside neighborhoods, and that one is actually fairly quite cheap to go through and actually when you're. On that first cable car, you're actually getting ordinary people who live in those neighborhoods coming on and off of your Gondola but then to go on the second. Gondola. which takes all the way up the mountain up to the park RV, which is just fantastic and I do recommend that that significantly more expensive so that that second cable you know Gondola is more for tourists in it's it. Would be too expensive for people who live in the humble neighborhoods. But as a traveler, it's worth it's worth it to do both at the lower part words the transportation for the community you you get a sense of the community and you get to talk to people. It's Kinda cool because you're floating above all of these barriers and then after the top city, stop you sort of plateauing you. Go across this amazing lush forest in a giant National Park and they're the only people still on the cable cars are tourists who can afford that but you get to the terminal point way in the middle of the park and I think the locals will come in there by bus, which would be much cheaper because it is a a wonderful jumping off point for for hikes in this nature reserve. Yeah. So the neighborhood that Pablo built I mean now it's called Barrio Pablo Escobar, Pablo Escobar's. But it was originally called million sin to a jury US medicine without shantytowns and the idea was he was really trying to improve his image in the country and he built about three hundred and sixty six humble homes in this neighborhood for people who are down on their locker many of them were homeless and actually living in a garbage dump area and in that region and you talk about street art they're. So there's a number of murals celebrating Pablo. Escobar would say that most Colombians despised Pablo, Escobar and everything he stood for. However in this little neighborhood and I met some of them. There are people who still revere him as quite a small minority of Colombians I would say, but you see mural several murals right in this borrow Pablo Escobar. Depicting. El Patron the hero, the Robin Hood that you're talking about in and some of those people, and there are some young hustlers there who are very interesting entrepreneurs. One of them has created, which you'll find in in the middle of this neighborhood is a Pablo Escobar memories. Museum now there was another Pablo Escobar Museum that was run by Pablo's brother, which was actually shut down and it wasn't in this neighborhood with the government closed that one down. This one is sort of a homemade sort of museum that some young hustlers in the neighborhood of made, and they also sell visits to the US through some of the homes where you can tour the homes and. It's kind of it's bizarre but yeah.

Barrio Pablo Escobar Pablo Escobar Pablo Escobar Museum Columbia United States Murder Rick Steves Medina Cocaine Robin Hood Dave Seminar Writer Medellin America San Francisco New Orleans Saint Barrios A. City National Park
Travel To Medellin

Travel with Rick Steves

05:32 min | 2 years ago

Travel To Medellin

"Let's open today's travel with Rick Steves travel writer Dave Seminar. He took his whole family to many in Columbia which used to have a reputation as the headquarters for a dangerous drug cartel. Our interview was recorded just before the global lockdowns kicked in. Hey. Thanks for having me on the show wreck. So you went to Medigene I, mean the image of Medina's like scariest a generation ago is one of the most dangerous cities on the planet. That's right. But but it certainly isn't any longer. I mean these days the murder rate in Medellin is lower than New Orleans Saint, Louis Chicago and several other cities as well. It's an amazing turnaround and. Tourism. Is a booming part of the economy I was just there. My son loves it so much. He bought a condo there and I was there for years this last year with him and we were standing on his balcony and and everybody was blown up fireworks and My son had a Colombian friend there with him and and we were talking about. It and when the Colombians see those fireworks, they remember in the days of Pablo. Escobar. That's what they would explode when they made a deal in the United States with the with the drug trade they're not making deals with the drug trade anymore with the Pablo Escobar outfit that's just celebrating. So they've gone from supplying America's cocaine habit to actually building A. City on live biting entrepreneurs. That's true. They I Columbia is still does produce eighty percent of the cocaine I mean to be frank. However look I went there with my ten and twelve year old sons and my wife, and I would never take them to a place that I thought was too dangerous. So I really consulted with a lot of different people before. Going, there, however, my parents and several other people said, Columbia. You're taking your sons to Columbia you nuts but I did my research and I talked to enough people who had had great experiences there that I felt comfortable doing it and we spent two weeks traveling all around the country and I felt very safe. The whole time tell us about the public tour. It was interesting. You know my wife said Pablo Escobar to are you sure that that's appropriate for our sons who are ten and twelve years old side I called one of the tour companies that had good reviews on trip advisor and he said Oh yes our tour is good for children aged six and up said really okay. Well, let's do it. We thought maybe we can teach them. Okay. He's a bad guy you know here's the. Evils of drugs and teach them a little bit about why the drug violence in and I thought maybe they a lot of it might go over their head but I thought well, they'll learn something. Let's do it but you go through a you goes through your neighborhood community thirteen, which is now trendy. It's filled with street art and is just a festival of good living not good living. It's still a poor area but a festival of happiness. Community Thirteen is sort of an interesting area I've I've found it to be one of the more disappointing stops to be honest with you on the tour I mean, it doesn't really have much to do with Pablo Escobar although it was a neighborhood that was wracked by gang violence, and then in two thousand eleven, the government installed a series of escalators there the idea was. Allowing people to be able to move safely through the community, get from their hilltop neighborhoods down to where jobs and transportation and things of that are. But when I was there in July about the experience maybe if you traveled at a different time of year, you might have an off more authentic experience, but it was absolutely full of tourists which really shocked me because here is. Sort of an impoverished neighborhood that has all credit to them. I. Think it's wonderful. They found a way to turn the violence of the neighborhood into a marketable commodity, but it was absolutely crawling with tourists and I sort of felt like, wow I really don't like going to places that are too full of tourists. So for me, it fell a little bit flat to be. Quite honest. But maybe if I visited another time of year, I would have I would have liked more. No, I don't think. So I mean I was there in the winter but to me, it was a former violence ridden gang ridden community that now is a kind of a tourist trap and it just like an amusement pier in San Francisco, almost or something like that. And what was really fun was the street art I mean, the street art was like it's like going through an art gallery and it's all this edgy colorful tropical kind of street art and you've got it all together by escalators I can imagine before those escalators came you know ten years ago you would have desperately poor people and You'd have the intimidation of the gangs and all of that and and the high murder rate and today there's there's not a hint of that and the escalators let people connect and I think you know the way Columbia has invested in its infrastructure has given poor. Barrios the confidence and the feeling that this is progress and changes possible and and one thing great about going to Medine is you write these cable cars because the city is in a very mountainous area and the poorest communities are pushed way up the mountain sides. But these cable cars, they're just like cable cars had a ski resort. They connect the people in the poor neighborhoods with the good jobs and the good shopping and the good entertainment down in the valley floor and writing these cable cars was just a kind of a celebration of community to me what was your experience on those cable cars? Well I love the cable cars just like you know I took the cable cars up to the park. RV. which is it's a long ride as interesting things that you take two different sets of cable cars. You can take one set of cable cars, which sort of goes through some of the rough hillside neighborhoods, and that one is actually fairly quite cheap to go through and actually when you're. On that first cable car, you're actually getting ordinary people who live in those neighborhoods coming on and off of your Gondola but then to go on the second. Gondola. which takes all the way up the mountain up to the park RV, which is just fantastic and I do recommend that that significantly more expensive so that that second cable you know Gondola is more for tourists in it's it. Would be too expensive for people who live in the humble neighborhoods. But as a traveler, it's worth it's worth it to do

Pablo Escobar Columbia Dave Seminar New Orleans Saint Rick Steves Medellin Escobar Medina United States Pablo Louis Chicago Medine Barrios Government San Francisco
Travel To Medellin

Travel with Rick Steves

05:32 min | 2 years ago

Travel To Medellin

"Let's open today's travel with Rick Steves travel writer, Dave Seminar. He took his whole family to many in Columbia which used to have a reputation as the headquarters for a dangerous drug cartel. Our interview was recorded just before the global lockdowns kicked in. Hey thanks for having me on the show wreck. So you went to Medigene I mean the image of Medina's like scariest a generation ago is one of the most dangerous cities on the planet. That's right. But but it certainly isn't any longer I mean these days the murder rate in Medellin is lower than New Orleans Saint Louis Chicago and several other cities as well. It's an amazing turnaround and Tourism. Is a booming part of the economy. I was just there. My son loves it so much. He bought a condo there and I was there for years this last year with him and we were standing on his balcony and and everybody was blown up fireworks and My son had a Colombian there with him and and we were talking about it. And when the Colombians see those fireworks, they remember in the days of Pablo Escobar. That's what they would explode when they made a deal in the United States with the with the drug trade, they're not making deals with the drug trade anymore with the Pablo Escobar outfit that's just celebrating. So they've gone from supplying America's cocaine habit to actually building a city. On live biting entrepreneurs that's true. They I Columbia is still does produce eighty percent of the cocaine I mean to be frank. However, look I went there with my ten and twelve year old sons and my wife and I would never take them to a place that I thought was too dangerous. So I really consulted with a lot of different people before. Going there however, my parents and several other people said Columbia, you're taking your sons to Columbia you nuts. But I did my research and I talked to enough people who had had great experiences there that I felt comfortable doing it and we spent two weeks traveling all around the country and I felt very safe. The whole time tell us about the public tour. It was interesting. You know my wife said Pablo Escobar, to are you sure that that's appropriate for our sons who are ten and twelve years? Old Side I called one of the tour companies that had good reviews on trip advisor and he said Oh yes. Our tour is good for children aged six and up said really okay. Well, let's do it. We thought maybe we can teach them. Okay. He's a bad guy. You know here's. The evils of drugs and teach them a little bit about why the drug violence in and I thought maybe they a lot of it might go over their head but I thought well, they'll learn something. Let's do it but you go through you goes through neighborhood community thirteen, which is now trendy it's filled with street art and is just a festival of good living not good living. It's still a poor area but a festival of happiness yeah. Community Thirteen is sort of an interesting area I've I've found it to be one of the more disappointing stops to be honest with you on the tour I. mean it doesn't really have much to do with Pablo Escobar though it was a neighborhood that was wracked by gang violence, and then in two thousand eleven, the government installed a series of escalators there the idea was. Allowing people to be able to move safely through the community get from their hilltop neighborhoods down to where jobs and transportation and things of that are. But when I was there in July about the experience maybe if you traveled at a different time of year, you might have an off more authentic experience but it was absolutely full of tourists which really shocked me because here is. Sort of an impoverished neighborhood that has all credit to them I think it's wonderful. They found a way to turn the violence of the neighborhood into a marketable commodity, but it was absolutely crawling with tourists and I sort of felt like, wow, I really don't like going to places that are too full of tourists. So for me, it fell a little bit flat to be. Quite honest. But maybe if I visited another time of year, I would have I would have liked more no I don't think so I mean I was there in the winter but to me, it was a former violence ridden gang ridden community that now is a kind of a tourist trap and it just like an amusement pier in San Francisco. Almost or something like that. And what was really fun was the street art I mean the street art was like it's like going through an art gallery and it's all this edgy colorful tropical street art and you've got it all together by escalators. I can imagine before those escalators came you know ten years ago you would have desperately poor people and You'd have the intimidation of the gangs and all of that and and the high murder rate and today there's there's not a hint of that and the escalators let people connect and I think you know the way Columbia has invested in its infrastructure has given poor barrios. The confidence and the feeling that this is progress and changes possible and and one thing great about going to Medine is you write these cable cars because the city is in a very mountainous area and the poorest communities are pushed way up the mountain sides. But these cable cars, they're just like cable cars at a ski resort they connect the people in the poor neighborhoods with the good jobs and the good shopping and the good entertainment down in the valley floor and writing these cable cars was just a kind of a celebration of community to me what was your experience on those cable cars? Well. I love the cable cars just like you know I took the cable cars up to the park RV, which is it's a long ride as interesting things that you take two different sets of cable cars. You can take one set of cable cars, which sort of goes through some of the rough hillside neighborhoods, and that one is actually fairly quite cheap to go through and actually when. You're on that first cable car. You're actually getting ordinary people who live in those neighborhoods coming on and off of your Gondola. But then to go on the second Gondola, which takes all the way up the mountain up to the park RV, which is just fantastic and I do recommend that that significantly more expensive so that that second cable you know Gondola is for tourists in its it. Would be too expensive for people who live in the humble neighborhoods. But as a traveler, it's worth it's worth it to

Pablo Escobar Columbia Cocaine Murder Rick Steves Medina United States Dave Seminar Medellin Writer America Advisor New Orleans Medine Louis Chicago San Francisco
'The Glorias' follows Gloria Steinem's fascinating life

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

'The Glorias' follows Gloria Steinem's fascinating life

"On how a new movie about her life helps to correct history. A very timely movie out today, The Gloria's, which follows the life of feminist icon Gloria Steinem and her role in fighting for equal rights for women. I want to write about the winds move, Steinem says. The film couldn't come at a better time. It's about a movement and the movement is what we continue to need. And it also shows the reality of the women's movement, which meant that it was disproportionately women of color and especially black women. But she says, those women of color rarely got there do at the time in the film helps correct that the Gloria's is out today on Amazon Prime Video,

Gloria Steinem Amazon
Meghan Markle cold-called voters with Gloria Steinem to advocate for voting

Radio From Hell

01:31 min | 2 years ago

Meghan Markle cold-called voters with Gloria Steinem to advocate for voting

"Meghan Markle and Gloria Steinem cold call the U. S citizens and encourage them to vote and I said to myself, So so. And I thought, Well, I'll read this story just to see if my Tepid reaction to that headline is is warranted. And this is Gloria Steinem and Meghan Markle cold called US voters together during their first meeting. The first thing we did and why she came to see me. We sat at the dining table here where I am right now, and we cold called voters, Gloria Steinem said in a video interview. And said Hello. I'm Meg and hello on Gloria, are you going to vote? Steinem also said that the Royal Meghan Markle is also challenging the princess stereotype. By being political. She came home to vote. So lots. Where are you being like that Lots of celebrities are doing this. They're trying to help Patton Oswalt's doing it like if Meghan Marco and or Gloria Steinem called and said, Hi, this is Megan Gloria, I'd say. Who Oh, Meg, Magda Marchal and Gloria Gloria Steinem. Oh, yeah. I know who you guys are. I'm just calling to urge you to vote. Okay? They wouldn't say so. You would come on the show and say, Guess what experience I had yesterday. Meghan Markle. The duchess called my house. And I would say not and and I would say, And to what end? Did they do that? So what?

Gloria Gloria Steinem Meghan Markle Royal Meghan Markle Megan Gloria Meghan Marco MEG Patton Oswalt United States Magda Marchal U. S
Delores

PODSHIP EARTH

06:06 min | 2 years ago

Delores

"C. Safeway or yes we can is a rallying cry for justice freedom and dignity that was born from the heart and mind of civil rights revolutionary. Dolores wet the chant of Si Se. Puede his been taken up by many movements. From Barack Obama's two thousand eight presidential campaign to the fight for climate justice to the continued struggle for workers rights to Spain's anti austerity campaigns of 2019. Martin Luther King Junior said that the arc of the moral universe is long but it bends towards justice we all know that it only bends towards justice because of individuals willing to put themselves on the front lines of the Civil Rights Struggle Laura Sweater who turned ninety on April tenth. Twenty twenty has never left the front lines. She's a force of nature that has transformed the lives of those who grow and harvest the food that sustains each of us creating the phone welcome movement with Cesar Chavez she is the mother of the modern labor movement also came up with the idea that consumers have the power to shape and push industries like great growers to improve farm worker conditions. She then that. Labor negotiations to memorialize will can benefit in the nation's first of their kind collective bargaining agreements. Deloris is a fearless and incredibly effective advocate legislation. She championed the landmark building nineteen sixty to allow people to take the California driver's examination in Spanish. And and she's never stopped last year. She helped enact leads to create California's Fund for safe and affordable drinking water Quetta who describes himself as a born again feminists consciously incorporated feminism into her fight for workers rights and push Gloria Steinem and the one thousand nine hundred sixty s to expand the feminist movement to include issues of race thereby helping make feminism and Movement for all women not just white women from the beginning. Dolores wet has also been an environmental champion fighting to protect workers from harmful pesticides sanding shoulder to shoulder with native Americans at Standing Rock and picking up litter after every rally she led. I Talk About a fiftieth anniversary with my hero and living legend Dolores Wetter Kelly. Working Fourteen hour days with Heff Foundation to make sure farmwork has have access to protective equipment food and benefits during this pandemic. And if you thought you knew everything about Delores also talk about why she loves burning man. Dolores where are you right now all right now? I'm in the belly of the beast. I'm in Bakersfield California Bakersfield and all of Kern county. You are going through really rough times right now. Dolores is a lot of people that have been laid off. I think it's over a thousand oil workers that have been laid off. One of the company is completely. Shut Down Lager. People EARN EMPLOYEES CIVILLY TRAGIC. But we know at the same time. And that's why we see that our air is a little cleaner a usually here in Kern county. We are women the worst areas of pollution for air pollution in the country. And we know that that air pollution really affects not only the physical health especially if the children but also the mental health of children. Here we have Not only to freeways that can make your highway ninety nine and highway five of but then we have all of the pollution that comes from the Agricultural Industry Caesar industrial growers that have not really converted their tractors They're so easy in a lot of diesel. It's a big struggle and when you try to bring to the attention they consider this to be an attack instead of thinking. Okay what do we have to do to make them more economically friendly jobs for people so these are the challenges that we have ahead of us as we try to convert all of the fossil fuel industries into industries. That are more friendly for everybody. So deloris in the late fifties and sixties when you have founding the farmworker movement and and really bringing those issues to the full when whether environmental issues like drinking water and air quality and pesticide runoff. How did those issues fest? Come to your attention right at the beginning at the very beginning you know. I grew up in Stockton California which is also like a cultural area. I was in a field in. I see this what I thought was fog rolling in but I thought how can you have fog in the summertime? Well it was a pesticide residue. That was rolling in. That was one of the first things that farmer who's complained about about the effects of Pesticides. And so we had so many cases of pesticide poisonings. Sometimes Terry crews like thirty. Forty people would been poisoned at the same time. How can this happen? Slow regard for the health farm workers so one of the first contracts that I signed a day. Employers tell exactly how many pesticides they were going to spray and where they were going to be spread out and then we passed legislation to make sure that the appeals are posted of when they sprayed some of these dangerous pesticides and then we work very very hard to get some of these dangerous pesticides restricted and banned forever and unfortunately a lot of pesticides we had because like Didi they were then shipped to Mexico to Latin American countries. And so here but we had all of these farmers could children that. Were being bored with these horrible deformities being born without arms without legs so horrific here you had children in Mexico and parts of Latin America. That were having exactly the same type of affection disabilities that were coming from pesticides

Dolores California Kern County Dolores Wetter Kelly Dolores Wet Twenty Twenty Barack Obama Martin Luther King Si Se Mexico Deloris Cesar Chavez Spain Gloria Steinem Laura Sweater Quetta Heff Foundation
It's Sundance Time Again

The Frame

06:03 min | 3 years ago

It's Sundance Time Again

"Welcome to the frame. I'm Steven Cuevas in for John Horn. But he's actually sitting right here beside me because by the time you hear this. He'll be at the Sundance Film Festival. John Thanks for taking time before you pack your bags my pleasure. I love the fact that I'm here but I'm not here John. There are dozens of feature films film screened at Sundance. Of course tell me about some of this year's most anticipated entries. I'M GONNA lean towards documentaries if you look at the movies that are nominated for the documentary feature academy me where this year three of them premiered at Sundance a year ago. American factory honey land and edge of democracy. And if you look at the very first night at the Sundance Dance Film Festival. There are new documentaries from producers. You might have heard of Barack and Michelle Obama. They've called Crip camp which is about the disability rights movement. There's another documentary about Taylor swift and about why. She is becoming a little bit more political and that's just in one theater in one night. Well one of the documentary entries premiering at Sundance that I wanted to ask you about It's when it's trying a lot of controversy and that's the Kirby Dick and amy during documentary on the record. It focuses on the sexual assault allegations against hip hop mogul Russell Simmons. The film was being executive. Co produced by Oprah Winfrey set to be released on Apple. TV then Winfrey suddenly. He withdrew support and some say. It was under pressure from Russell Simmons. She denies this and says it's because of questions arising from one of the alleged victims. What's to become come of this documentary on the record? Well it is going to show at the festival I mean I think there is the question whether or not Sundance was going to pull it The fact that Oprah Winfrey withdrew her support that apple. TV Hit pause in. The documentary is very unusual. And Kirby and amy have said listen. We think we've made a really good good film. We don't understand what they are complaining about. All of the edits and suggestions up until the time. The picture was locked where minor little things it does feel feel like Russell. Simmons complained to Oprah about the documentary. It's unclear if Oprah thought it was unfair or that featured one woman story over others the Booze GonNa show but for a film to go to the festival with this much. Uncertainty is highly unusual. Yeah not to get too far afield on this but I wonder if Oprah pulling away from this the project could somehow damage her own brand in this in this era of me too. Well I think she has said that. She believes the women who are accusing Russell Simmons of sexual assault and harassment. So I don't think she's saying I am not believing them anymore. I think she has to her. Mind legitimate questions about the documentary. Yeah it is important that she is on board or not on board because her producing does suggest that there is a level of quality ability and credibility to it and the fact that she's leaving it does ultimately damage. I think the standing of the film Another film to ask you about. Was this four part documentary. On Hillary Clinton Clinton. It'll be available on Hulu. She will also be attending Sundance for the first time to do promotion for this film. What you know about it and you know any any buzz around it? I guess I know a fair amount about it I'm GONNA be doing. QNA With Hillary Clinton at the festival is a four part series. That has a behind the scenes footage of her running against against Donald Trump. But it's really about her political career and about how things stand today so words at all. Hillary is a participant in this documentary. It s you said she'll be at the festival and she'll be talking with me. She says a lot of the documentary. I hope she says even more when we sit down to have a conversation. There's one other film I wanted to ask you about. And that's a a little film called feels good man and it's an indie production looking at the rise of of this comic pepe the frog that was actually created by L. A. based cartoonist and it sort of became an emblem for the outright. Who took this image and kind of started using it for antisemitic means racists memes all kinds of really nasty stuff? What do you know about the film and Are you going to see it? Yeah I'm definitely going to see. The artist is named fury. And it's about how something something becomes an icon for hate. And how the artist behind that I contract reclaim it and I think if you look more broadly at a lot of the documentaries that are playing the festival a lot of them are about what's going on in the world right now. There's a new documentary about the kids who survived the park. Land shooting about what they're doing to fight against against Gun. Violence US kids. I think that there's another documentary called early. Bird it's about the helicopter news pilot Zoey Tur and about what her works has about the tabloid of news and the Oj. Trial Voice State is a documentary about seventeen year. Old Boys a thousand from Texas says who join up to build a representative government from the ground up so wherever you look Especially in documentaries. There are a lot of films about the current state of the country. And what we might do to fix it. And what are some of the feature films. You're looking forward to checking out. I know that things that are kind of top of our sundance card include downhill. This is a remake of the movie force majeure a Foreign Language move from a couple years ago it stars. Julia Louis Dreyfuss Will Ferrell. It's made by nat facts and Jim Rash. Who did a movie called called way way back not that long ago Vigo Mortenson who is one of my favorite actors hell yeah written directed stars in a movie called following that I think is partially in Spanish? So there's nothing Vigo can't do. There's an Anthony Hopkins movie based on a play called the father. There's a movie about Gloria Steinem in many different iterations directed by Julie. Taymor you might know her from the Lion King. You know the other thing that we should talk about our number of movies that are going to sundance that are looking Ford distribution and one of the things that a lot of people forget is that Sundance is not only a film festival. It's a film market and it'll be really interesting to see given how a poorly some of the movies from last year as well at the Box Office if the checkbooks will be open s much as they were a year ago.

Oprah Winfrey Sundance Russell Simmons Hillary Clinton Clinton Kirby Dick Assault Apple John Horn AMY Steven Cuevas Gloria Steinem Jim Rash Vigo Mortenson Anthony Hopkins Julia Louis Dreyfuss Donald Trump Barack
Director Greta Gerwig on 'Little Women' and Louisa May Alcott

The Frame

10:25 min | 3 years ago

Director Greta Gerwig on 'Little Women' and Louisa May Alcott

"Start with a new film that opens this Christmas Day. It's an adaptation of Louisa May alcott novel Little Women and it is a lovely little gift of a movie yourself theory someday. So you'll need me. You'll wish you have behaved better. Thank you so much for your employment and your many kindnesses I intend to make my own way in the world. No no one makes their own way. Not really we civil woman. You'll need to marry. Well you are not married. Because I'm rich wjr. The film is from writer director. Greta GERWIG stars. Sir Sha Ronin. She played the lead in Greenwich Direct. To`real debut lady bird and the rest of the march sisters are played played by Emma Watson Elisa scanlon and Florence pugh Laura dern plays their mom and Meryl Streep is they're wealthy aunt March gerwig has been thinking about little the women for a very long time well before she even found out that producer Amy Pascal was developing a new adaptation of the novel. Here's Greta Gerwig little women and has been a book that I have loved my whole life in a very deep way to the point. Where my memories? And the memories of the March sisters were intertwined in that way that I think books of your youth can means something even beyond being books because th- they they're the they become part of your family I think that's that's the magic of Reading when you're a child is the the distinction between fiction and reality is thin for you or it. It was for me anyway But I hadn't read it since I was about fourteen or fifteen and then I read it in my early thirties when I turned thirty and I All this stuff came out at me in the book that I it not. When I was a child I can passion get so savage could hurt anyone and I enjoyed it? You remind me of myself never angry. I'm angry nearly every damn I li- reading as an adult. I heard all of these different things. I saw it as much touch spike easier and sadder and stranger and almost more triumphant in a certain way and also just is this kind of being aware of an author was another layer of it for me that Joe both wants to be an author but then Louisa as author and so even though Joe March march by the end of the book says she stops her ink well and stops writing and gets married and has children opens a school Louisa though wrote and she wrote that book and we know what. Because there's the book you know. I just sort of had an idol saw about well if I made this. I'd want to center center on this. I'd WanNa Center on all these themes that I felt I hadn't really seen yet about it which was ambition and money money and women an art and I heard in passing my agent said at a dinner. Oh they're interested making little women again again and I was like what I have to go. I have to talk to them. I have an idea and I hadn't made anything at that point. But he got me a meaning and I I went and I talked talk to them and I told them some version of what I wanted to do and And I said I want to direct it and they wanNA write in Iraq and I hadn't had nothing to really show that I could do that so but they very luckily hired me to write it. And then I wrote my draft in in two thousand fifteen two thousand sixteen and then I went away and I may lady bird and then by the time I was finishing that up they said well what what do you think about making little women and I thought I said well I knew you'd ask. I'm ready but it was a it was one one of those for two. It's turns events. I want to ask about that perspective that you had a reading the book as an adult versus as a young woman woman sure and the perspective you have as somebody who is a creative person gas writing movies and making movies because so much of the movie and certainly in the book as well is about the challenges of being a creative person and how you value your own art how you compromise with people who are financing it and how you find your voice even in those parameters that's right now there's a you you picked up all the cards I put down. No it's a it's funny. It's that the opening scene between Joe March and her publisher Mr Dash would which the majority of it is actually word for word from the book when she says took care to have a few of my sinners repent and he says people want to be amused not preach that morals. Don't sell nowadays. That could be me talking to a studio head about something. I WANNA do But it was. It was all there for me to be discovered. I didn't invent it like like I said that. That scene is a scene from the book but it felt too so relevant to right now and then beyond that when when I was researching Louisa Mail Cart and it became clear that that who Lewis male caught was was equally the subjects that I was interested in and then you learn about her life. Is You know unlike Joe. She never got married. She never had children and but she kept writing and she did keep her copyright copyright of little women which is a you know huge thing that she did and I mean there are so many things about her life and what she did. It felt eerily familiar and I think even even in the fact that Her publisher sure and even herself but her publisher truly didn't know what a hit he had. And I find that happens all the time that there's a constant underestimating of audiences that are not the same audience of the people who are in charge of publishing or whatever that may be the the first half of little win because it is really to books as written ends so group. The curtain falls upon big. Joe Beth and amy whether it ever arises again depends upon the reception given to the first act of the domestic drama called little women death. It's almost like she's saying I've got a a sequel but I hope people by the I know she's She's a business lady no she and and and it it. It's worth saying that the the initial printing sold out in two weeks and it has not been out of print for one hundred fifty years in one thousand nine hundred four. There was a story. Little women leads poll novel level rated ahead of Bible for influence on high school pupils. Yeah that's nice. I mean I mean it's just nice for her and it raises his other question like what people take away from the book because you can interpret it in very different ways. I'm going to give you two prominent women who have thoughts. That's about it. The first is Gloria Steinem. WHO said in Nineteen ninety-two? Where else could we read about an all female group who discussed work art and all the great questions or found girls who wanted to be women and not vice versa? Oh that's beautiful found girls that wanted to be women not the versa. And here's the author meal Paalea who says the whole thing is like a horror movie. I know I think if you have an idea in your head of the it can be of little women. It's usually from the first book. It's the kind of Christmas to Christmas structure. And the you know the second half of the book Louis Male jokes. She should've called the wedding marches. Because they all got married and truly British version is called good wise exactly zoo you know. It was in this to book structure which is part of why I is structured the film I did starting with them as adults Because I wanted to start with the second half but I also think there's two books embedded in it because if you you just read the book on its face value with this. Kind of pre Victorian morality of Domesticity in virtue tied to femininity communitty. And all of these kind of tidy bows put on each chapter. Then I think you miss what's really roiling roiling underneath and if you read it that way of course Camille Paglia is completely right. It is something that would be a horror show if that is all you're seeing but I'd the way I look at it is if you can take the ending of the book where she felt she must marry Joe off to someone because that's what the readers demanded and she made this economic decision. That's what she would do Because she had so books then if you if you read everything through the Lens of will she had to make it all kind of tidy for the time time then if you take away the tidiness what's left is a whole bunch of am Bishen and mess and anger and lust and craziness and things things that don't fit neatly into any box. And so what I wanted to do was not update the text. The text doesn't need updating. I wanted to take away the constraints constraints of the time in some ways. Because that's what was interesting to me and even in those constraints. Louisa really did do her best to try. I to imagine what what would in a gala -tarian marriage look like. What would something that was? Not Essentially INDENTURED SERVITUDE BE As a marriage and I feel that you know Gloria Steinem being one of them with a Simone Tip Avar Patti Smith Orlando Toronto or J. K. Rowling rallying. There's a long list of women for whom this book meant very specific freedom an ambition and what I wanted to do was make a film film that was in the tradition of why that inspired them. Because it's there's gotta be a reason more than she got married to Professor Bear Sogo to see you. Thanks for coming as really

Louisa JOE Gloria Steinem Joe March Publisher Greta Gerwig Amy Pascal Wanna Center Greenwich Direct Sir Sha Ronin Meryl Streep Camille Paglia Iraq Professor Bear Sogo Emma Watson Elisa Scanlon Joe Beth Simone Tip Avar Patti Smith J. K. Rowling Writer