28 Burst results for "Gloria Steinem"

A Conversation on Our Post-Coronavirus Future

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

02:05 min | 2 months ago

A Conversation on Our Post-Coronavirus Future

"In today's episode. We want to examine the strand looking at the impact of the pandemic and ask writers and thinkers for their thoughts are post covid future. One particular aspect that will be discussed is gender equality in the time of covid nineteen now. I'm joined by everyday sexism founder. Laura bates leads a series of discussions around motherhood and the ways covid nineteen has impacted upon that lower. Thanks so much for joining us. Now you've been involved in. Hey for a long time. How do you feel about the digital festival opening up the event globally reaching people who otherwise might not get to enjoy events and enjoying important discussions. Well thank you so much for having me is great to be talking to you again. I think it's a wonderful thing while of course like everybody else. I was absolutely heartbroken. At the loss of the physical festival and the wonderful omega indescribable atmosphere of redesign thinkers and writers. Coming together. there was a wonderful opening of of new possibilities in horizons actually in the realization that same spirit of communing and of discussion and investigation and mutual curiosity and exploration and new ideas sparking that all of that could actually happen on an international stage. Virtually and while of course. We mustn't make the assumption that that virtual space is accessible to everybody nonetheless. There was a massively increased accessibility about it. And the mir. It came so vibrantly clearly to life. When i was lucky enough to do a kind of event as part of that festival with gloria steinem and suddenly realized that i think may ten thousand people around the world with an listening with us joining us in that conversation interacting taking asking her questions and sending in seoul and an sharing on social media and and that was just completely incredible so i think something really beautiful and positive has come out of it as well.

Laura Bates Gloria Steinem Seoul
Yogi Assignment: Discipline by Kino MacGregor of KinoYoga

Optimal Living Daily

07:25 min | 4 months ago

Yogi Assignment: Discipline by Kino MacGregor of KinoYoga

"Yogi assignment discipline by keno mcgregor of keno yoga dot com. I used to be a perfectionist. Or rather i used to think i had a true chains being perfect or getting all the things right. All the time somehow headed naive notion that if i just visualized hard enough and trained my vibration to be high enough that i never experienced any lows ever again. I live in some bubble of peace love and happiness. My life had something else in store for me this last year alone. I've stumbled and fallen so many times and made so many bad decisions. I can hardly be into account for them all failure or the recognition that. I did something wrong or that. Something i did was not good enough to meet the cut or that. I simply do not achieve. My goals is something that has been a hard and sometimes bitter pill for me to swallow. Perhaps you like me were raised with the narrative that you can do anything you want. If only you set your sights on it just think good vibes and be positive all the time and everything you want will magically come into being. I was told that. I was simply manifest my reality well while i have certainly accomplished a lot. There is so much more that i've tried and failed at and so much more that i experienced that did not go. According to my vision. I spent a good deal of time wondering how to reconcile the desire to stay in a continuous state of peace and harmony with the reality of continually falling out of that sweet spot lately of come to see the moments of failure as loving discipline rather than harsh punishment. While it'd be nice if we could always get it right. The reality is that we don't when we aren't able to stay on the path and make every decision according to the highest truth. Then it's important that we remain open to being rebuked disciplined educated enlightened both by the universe and by god and also by other people within our community is a necessary correction along the journey of life if the spiritual community seems to have a bit of payroll tax reading through the average list of spiritual quotes found. Online is evident that there is ample discussion on how to keep your oracle. Lean how to think only good vibes and how to remove toxic. People or situations bows often missing is how to process. He'll evolve and grow from the moments when feeling good vibes is simply not an option after admit that i get triggered sometimes when people respond to negative feedback by blocking the heaters and surrounding themselves with good vibes. Only i guess one of the reasons. I get triggered is because i know that no matter how hard i try just can't live in the bubble of good vibes. Only while i'm overall a general positive peaceful person who loves to laugh my also get angry. Sad to press anxious. I get things wrong. Mike often and all the time and when i do. I'm often sensitive to criticism. Almost like something inside of me. Feels like i should have done better. At keeping. The bubble of positivity defense at work design environment for growth. Though to assume that you will get it right. One hundred percent of the time and have no need for discipline is to assume that you already are perfect and they have no need for any further guidance. Sure sounds like hubris to me. It takes a very high degree of self confidence and spiritual strength to process negative feedback and grow from it. If you are a well intended spiritual person living a life committed to peace and love. It can feel truly unsettling if someone called you out on not living up to your integrity. If feels wrong. He had called out of your protective bubble. You may have inadvertently surround yourself. With an echo chamber that reinforces your beliefs about yourself. When those beliefs are questioned or challenged it can feel like a direct and personal assault. You may wanna lash out or even zone out. He may not want to put in the emotional labor required to work through all your stuff. But if you choose to dig your head in the sand you will be depriving yourself of an opportunity to grow from the experience much like a child who disciplined cannot grow from the experience while discipline is not always optional. Growth is of course optional. You can choose to disregard the voices of people who call you out as heaters. You can bolster your case of good person hood where he could pause reflect research and study the issue. He also say with your own feelings of discomfort until you come to clarity and compassion. It has been said that the truth will set you free but i it will piss you off by feminist gloria steinem among others. We face truth and feel angry. Lean into your rage especially when it's reactionary don't project or act out your anger until you fully processed it. Discipline or negative feedback is so vital to growth. Imagine if you're working at a new job and the boss was unhappy with your performance instead of telling you that your work wasn't up to the level required your boss has told you that you are awesome imperfect but then one day that same boss fired you. You'd be left feeling truly confused. If however your boss gave you the negative feedback that your work wasn't up to standard and listened ways. You might improve. It'd be up to respond in a way though at either ensure your evolution or demonstrate your ineptitude for the position me the way you actually need the negative feedback to grow. Life is an interested in whether or not your feelings get hurt. life is interested in helping you grow. You put all your heart into something only to have it fail or even worse. Blow up in. Your face is getting disciplined from the word is not meant to be punitive or harsh instead. It simply meant to be feedback giving you the opportunity to grow and learn and eventually rise up to meet the challenge that life is presenting to you. I kind of feel like our life lessons. Return and repeat until we get them like the universe is infinitely patient with us while we try over and over again to get the same lesson right. if we don't immediately get it. We have years to repeat man. Learn them all over again. This week's yogi assignment is disciplined. Change the way you view negative feedback instead of taking it personally. Recalibrate the story you tell about it. Think about negative feedback as an opportunity to reflect on your path if think about failure as the discipline of a loving force in the universe perhaps it shines light on a turn that you took in wrong direction or perhaps it makes you more sure about the direction that you are going either way. Remain open to experience of discipline that comes in the form of life lessons. Reflect on any recent negative feedback that you may have received or many recent failures. What can you learn from each of those experiences. Search for the life lesson contained within the discipline and seek to grow from it practice giving negative feedback to someone else. If you can phrase your words with as much love as possible and be sure that you truly do not come from hate yet if you notice that. Something is out of alignment. Whether in a person or organization and you choose to remain silent you may be depriving the person from an opportunity to grow and evolve

Keno Mcgregor Oracle Gloria Steinem Mike
To future generations of women, you are the roots of change

TED Talks Daily

05:42 min | 9 months ago

To future generations of women, you are the roots of change

"Yeah salah. Hello hello hello one trill to have this opportunity when we ask all of our ted community many of them. Who would you like to hear from. If we're going to look forward on word when it comes to women in the world unanimously. The answer was gloria steinem. Now i know you're way too modest to accept that easily. So before we move onward. May i go back a bit since we have known each other for a long time and talk about those early days when you were building a movement challenging stereotypes moving beyond call four norms. You must have had some manifestation a fearless and your life. What were what were your fears. And how did you overcome them now. I certainly had a lot of fears and chief among them was speaking in public. Just like i am now because you know we choose to express ourselves in the way that is most natural and i became a writer. Because i didn't wanna talk. So the first thing i had to overcome was the fear of public speaking and because i was afraid to do it by myself i asked a friend to do with me. Dorothy pitman hughes and then flow kennedy anyway so we became in that way somewhat accidentally white woman one black woman speaking together which you know was very helpful to express. The movement was for everyone in those early days when you were becoming not only a really powerful public speaker in spite of your fears you were also normalizing and creating response to a word that became the anthem for so many of us literally changing lives standing in front of crowds and saying feminism is for every woman and i see now as as you do that there are still ways in which feminism is not understood as a concept misunderstood criticized. Sometimes where killed. How do you describe feminism. It's just the radical idea that human beings are all equal and we can dispense with the labels of gender and class and race and begin to realize our unique individuality Of course feminism was misunderstood in the beginning as if it were about female superiority or It was a movement for lesbians only not for all women. I mean you know. There were all kinds of of Misunderstandings not to mention ridicule. I hope that that's passed. I used to just send people to the dictionary to look. Feminism very helpful. How do you feel the new generation. The next generation of young women. What is their relationship with the word and the concept of. There's still a lot to be done to reach that equal stat. Yeah well. I don't think that i mean the the the word is still there woman. Ism women's liberation the role kinds of words But i think it's much more about content and not worrying too much about form so black lives. Matter was started by three young black feminists that was their creation that has is beginning to change much that needs to be changed And they just assumed that of course they were there as three young black feminists and you mentioned a reality that has just happened for all of the women in the united states. And that is this national presidential election in which the data is showing a great difference. Between the way white women voted. Black women voted and we know that women are not monolithic but the divide and the differences among us in every way. Not just racially. But where we live economically and culturally and almost. Every way has been deepened in the last few years. How do we as women began to bridge these differences well. I don't know if it's actually been deepened. But in any case. I mean the the thing that is different about us is that we have wombs or it and we all have wombs and there is in patriarchal forms of government and governance and just Culture an effort to control our bodies in our minds in ordered to control reproduction. And if there is racism is there is than there is a another motive which is to try to keep racists separate that is a racist motive and to perhaps try to influence one race to produce more than the other. Which actually you can see now in in White racist movements so it is just very basic and the reasons for our unity are very basic because the simple revolutionary statement is that we get to make decisions over our own bodies. How great is that

Dorothy Pitman Gloria Steinem Salah Hughes Kennedy United States
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

06:59 min | 10 months ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Of travel with Rick. Steves. We're revisiting some of our favorite guests interviews in her autobiography. My Life on the Road Gloria Steinem explains how being a frequent traveler from a young age cultivated a more open way of viewing the world and one another and how it gave her the confidence to confront inequities in our society. Thank you for inviting me to be part. Of what is the first travel show I've been on and you know how did that happen? What could be more appropriate? Well, it's great and reading your book. It is clear. You are an enthusiast not just about travel about travel as a way to broaden our perspective and and help us engage in the world and you write about the definition of adventure and adventurous tell us about that. Adventurer we know as some the daring attractive occupation exploring adventure S. if you look in the dictionary find, it's someone who takes advantage of other people for money and physician. So even in the words, there's a problem. So the road really is masculine turf unless people speak up and and open it up to the other half of the world. Isn't it? Yes it it has been, which is ironic because from DNA studies, we understand that women have been more likely to travel than then but mainly because of cultures that were Patra local. So when traveled to marry into other cultures Otherwise, the road is viewed as dangerous for women often, and there are still places in the world especially in the Middle East where women are not allowed to leave their own homes, much looser countries without male permission or the company of a male. So it has been male turf I think in a literary sense to it's been melter. Jack Kerouac mystique must have been so interesting for you to. Back on over five decades of of hard work and lots of travel, you wrote that for the first decades, your longest stretch at home was eight days and my longest consecutive. Spach at home was eight days and that was a shock even to me. that. The road is the place you feel most at home. How can that be? Well, I had not planned to start this book with a chapter about my father, but once I sat down to write it it was the first thing I found coming up because as a child. I did grow up until the age of ten or so most of the time, a house trailer my father was a gypsy and his spirit. He had a little summer resort in southern Michigan. But when it got cold, he immediately put us all. You know my sister, my mother, the dog in me into a trailer and we started to win our way working. Our Way by selling antiques and jewelry, and so on along the way to Florida or California and warm weather so that meant that I actually live most of the time in my early Childhood in a house trailer I understand from your book. You know he'd leave home without enough money to get back home and he would just say, well, let's see what will happen. He always used to say if I don't know what will happen tomorrow, it could be wonderful. So he affirmatively didn't want to know what was going to happen. And that must have had a impact on because as a a young woman of twenty two, you head out for India. And I found it interesting glory that you dedicated the book to a British doctor who at considerable risk himself helped you out when you were on the road to India's a young woman. I. You know I was partly escaping getting married I. Have Been Engaged when I was a senior in. College. And so when I was working as a waitress in London waiting for a visa to get to India I realized that I was pregnant and I had all the notions of throwing myself downstairs or you know. Completely. Naive, notions, but fortunately, I found his name in A. In the phone book actually in the neighborhood where I was living and he turned out to be very wise and kind person who was willing to risk his livelihood. By signing paper for me to go and seek a an unfortunate legally, and then he took a promise out of you didn't he which I think is very powerful. He said as I say in the dedication knowing only that had broken engagement at home to seek an unknown faith he said you must promise me two things. I. You will not tell anyone my name second you will do what you want to do with your life. So I say instead occasion. Dear Dr. Sharp. I believe you who knew the law was unjust. Not Mind if I say this so long after your death. I've done the best I could with my life this focused for you I'm sure he he would be. He would endorse what you've done with your life, but it's almost A. That trip must've been like a springboard to a life of activism because you were heading for India how did India impact you and when you look back on it how did it make a difference in your work over all these decades? I would not want to say that I knew what I was doing and even after I was there for a year and loved it and stayed on for another year I still didn't understand how much it was changing me or how what I was learning there would be relevant. You know somehow I think if we just. Proceed. One step at a time doing what excites us in interest us. It begins to fit together like a puzzle and of course, they had just managed the first big peaceful revolution in gaining independence and Ghandi's philosophy was very much key to that and influencing the world. So it just took me a long time to to realize that what I was learning there about organizing the change came from the bottom up that the way you conducted yourself determined your ends the ends didn't justify. The means the means. Dictated the ends it took me a while to realize that this was true pretty much everywhere and certainly in in this country too. So you were there and sort of in the wake of all the exciting nonviolence and route changed from Gandhi Indian, you learned about talking circles how did that help you? Circles are. It's what are native Americans base government itself government on. It's actually what our Constitution is based on. I didn't know it at the time, but it starts with a group of people. Group not so big everyone can speak and everyone can listen. In which consensus and listening to each other as more important than time. We probably have been sitting around campfires, telling our stories for all the time that human.

India Gloria Steinem Middle East Rick Jack Kerouac Gandhi Indian Patra Michigan Ghandi Dr. Sharp London Florida California
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

06:59 min | 10 months ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Of travel with Rick Steves. We're revisiting some of our favorite guests interviews in her autobiography. My Life on the Road Gloria Steinem explains how being a frequent traveler from a young age cultivated more open way of viewing the world and one another and gave her the confidence to confront inequities in our society. Thank you for inviting me to be part of. What is the first travel show I've been on and you know how did that happen? What could be more appropriate? Well, it's great and reading your book. It is clear. You are an enthusiast not just about travel about travel as a way to broaden our perspective and and help us engage in the world and you write about the definition of adventure and adventurous tell us about that. Adventure. I think we know as some the daring attractive occupation exploring adventure S. if you look in the dictionary find, it's someone who takes advantage of other people for money and physician. So even in the words, there's a problem. So the road really is masculine turf unless people speak up and and open it up to the other half of the world. Isn't it? Yes it. It has been, which is ironic because from DNA studies, we understand that women have been more likely to travel than then but mainly because of cultures that were Patra local. So when traveled to marry into other cultures Otherwise, the road is viewed as dangerous for women often, and there are still places in the world especially in the Middle East where women are not allowed to leave their own homes much looser countries without male permission or the company of a male. So it has been male turf I, think in a literary sense to it's been melter. The kind of Jack Kerouac mystique must have been so interesting for you to to look back on over five decades of of hard work and lots of travel. You wrote that for the first decades, your longest stretch at home was eight days and my longest consecutive. Spach at home was eight days and that was a shock even to me. That the road is the place you feel most at home. How can that be? Well I had not planned to start this book with a chapter about my father, but once I sat down to write it, it was the first thing I found coming up because as a child. I did grow up until the age of ten or so most of the time, a house trailer my father was a gypsy and his spirit. He had a little summer resort in southern Michigan. But when it got cold, he immediately put us all. You know my sister, my mother, the dog in me into a trailer and we started to win our way working. Our Way by selling antiques and jewelry, and so on along the way to Florida or California and warm weather so that meant that I actually live most of the time in my early. Childhood in a house trailer I understand from your book. You know he'd leave home without enough money to get back home and he would just say, well, let's see what will happen. He always used to say if I don't know what will happen tomorrow, it could be wonderful. So he affirmatively didn't want to know what was going to happen. And that must have had a impact on because as a a young woman of twenty two you head out for India. And I found it interesting glory that you dedicated the book to a British doctor who at considerable risk himself helped you out when you were on the road to India's a young woman. I you know I was partly escaping getting married I have been engaged when I was a senior in college. And so when I was working as a waitress in London waiting for a visa to get to India I realized that I was pregnant and. The notions of throwing myself downstairs or you know. Completely. Naive notions, but fortunately, I found his name in A. In the phone book actually in the neighborhood where I was living and he turned out to be very wise and kind person who was willing to risk his livelihood. By signing paper for me to go and seek a an unfortunate legally and then he took a promise out of you didn't he? Which I think is very powerful. Yes. He said as I say in the dedication knowing only that I had broken engagement at home to seek an unknown faith he said you must promise me two things i. you will not tell anyone my name second, you will do what you want to do with your life. So I say instead occasion. Dear, Dr Sharp. I believe you who knew the law was unjust. Not Mind if I say this so long after your death. I've done the best I could with my life this focused for you. I'm sure he he would be. He would endorse what you've done with your life, but it's almost A. That trip must've been like a springboard to a life of activism because you were heading for India. How did India in you when you look back on it? How did it make a difference in your work over all these decades? I would not want to say that I knew what I was doing and even after I was there for a year and loved it and stayed on for another year I still didn't understand how much it was changing me or how what I was learning there would be relevant. You know somehow I think if we Proceed. One step at a time doing what excites US in interest us? It begins to fit together like a puzzle and of course, they had just managed the first big peaceful revolution in gaining independence and Ghandi's philosophy was very much key to that and influencing the world. So it just took me a long time to to realize that what I was learning there about organizing the change came from the bottom up that the way you conducted yourself determined your ends the ends didn't justify. The means the means. Dictated the ends it took me a while to realize that this was true pretty much everywhere and certainly in in this country too. So you were there and sort of in the wake of all the exciting nonviolence and grassroots change from Gandhi Indian. He learned about talking circles how did that help you? Circles are. It's what are native Americans base government itself government on. It's actually what our Constitution is based on. I didn't know it at the time, but it starts with a group of people. Group not so big but what everyone can speak and everyone can listen In which consensus and listening to each other as more important than time We probably have been sitting around campfires, telling our stories for all the time that human.

India Gloria Steinem Rick Steves Middle East Jack Kerouac Gandhi Indian Patra US Michigan Dr Sharp Ghandi London Florida California
Traveling To Medellin

Travel with Rick Steves

07:26 min | 10 months ago

Traveling To Medellin

"Let's open today's travel with Rick Steves travel writer Dave Seminar. He took his whole family to many in Columbia which used to have a reputation as the headquarters for a dangerous drug cartel. Our interview was recorded just before the global lockdowns kicked in. Hey. Thanks for having me on the show wreck. So you went to Medigene I, mean the image of Medina's like scariest a generation ago is one of the most dangerous cities on the planet. That's right. But but it certainly isn't any longer. I mean these days the murder rate in Medellin is lower than New Orleans Saint, Louis Chicago and several other cities as well. It's an amazing turnaround and. Tourism. Is a booming part of the economy I was just there. My son loves it so much. He bought a condo there and I was there for years this last year with him and we were standing on his balcony and and everybody was blown up fireworks and My son had a Colombian friend there with him and and we were talking about. It and when the Colombians see those fireworks, they remember in the days of Pablo. Escobar. That's what they would explode when they made a deal in the United States with the with the drug trade they're not making deals with the drug trade anymore with the Pablo Escobar outfit that's just celebrating. So they've gone from supplying America's cocaine habit to actually building A. City on live biting entrepreneurs. That's true. They I Columbia is still does produce eighty percent of the cocaine I mean to be frank. However look I went there with my ten and twelve year old sons and my wife, and I would never take them to a place that I thought was too dangerous. So I really consulted with a lot of different people before. Going, there, however, my parents and several other people said, Columbia. You're taking your sons to Columbia you nuts but I did my research and I talked to enough people who had had great experiences there that I felt comfortable doing it and we spent two weeks traveling all around the country and I felt very safe. The whole time tell us about the public tour. It was interesting. You know my wife said Pablo Escobar to are you sure that that's appropriate for our sons who are ten and twelve years old side I called one of the tour companies that had good reviews on trip advisor and he said Oh yes our tour is good for children aged six and up said really okay. Well, let's do it. We thought maybe we can teach them. Okay. He's a bad guy you know here's the. Evils of drugs and teach them a little bit about why the drug violence in and I thought maybe they a lot of it might go over their head but I thought well, they'll learn something. Let's do it but you go through a you goes through your neighborhood community thirteen, which is now trendy. It's filled with street art and is just a festival of good living not good living. It's still a poor area but a festival of happiness. Community Thirteen is sort of an interesting area I've I've found it to be one of the more disappointing stops to be honest with you on the tour I mean, it doesn't really have much to do with Pablo Escobar although it was a neighborhood that was wracked by gang violence, and then in two thousand eleven, the government installed a series of escalators there the idea was. Allowing people to be able to move safely through the community, get from their hilltop neighborhoods down to where jobs and transportation and things of that are. But when I was there in July about the experience maybe if you traveled at a different time of year, you might have an off more authentic experience, but it was absolutely full of tourists which really shocked me because here is. Sort of an impoverished neighborhood that has all credit to them. I. Think it's wonderful. They found a way to turn the violence of the neighborhood into a marketable commodity, but it was absolutely crawling with tourists and I sort of felt like, wow I really don't like going to places that are too full of tourists. So for me, it fell a little bit flat to be. Quite honest. But maybe if I visited another time of year, I would have I would have liked more. No, I don't think. So I mean I was there in the winter but to me, it was a former violence ridden gang ridden community that now is a kind of a tourist trap and it just like an amusement pier in San Francisco, almost or something like that. And what was really fun was the street art I mean, the street art was like it's like going through an art gallery and it's all this edgy colorful tropical kind of street art and you've got it all together by escalators I can imagine before those escalators came you know ten years ago you would have desperately poor people and You'd have the intimidation of the gangs and all of that and and the high murder rate and today there's there's not a hint of that and the escalators let people connect and I think you know the way Columbia has invested in its infrastructure has given poor. Barrios the confidence and the feeling that this is progress and changes possible and and one thing great about going to Medine is you write these cable cars because the city is in a very mountainous area and the poorest communities are pushed way up the mountain sides. But these cable cars, they're just like cable cars had a ski resort. They connect the people in the poor neighborhoods with the good jobs and the good shopping and the good entertainment down in the valley floor and writing these cable cars was just a kind of a celebration of community to me what was your experience on those cable cars? Well I love the cable cars just like you know I took the cable cars up to the park. RV. which is it's a long ride as interesting things that you take two different sets of cable cars. You can take one set of cable cars, which sort of goes through some of the rough hillside neighborhoods, and that one is actually fairly quite cheap to go through and actually when you're. On that first cable car, you're actually getting ordinary people who live in those neighborhoods coming on and off of your Gondola but then to go on the second. Gondola. which takes all the way up the mountain up to the park RV, which is just fantastic and I do recommend that that significantly more expensive so that that second cable you know Gondola is more for tourists in it's it. Would be too expensive for people who live in the humble neighborhoods. But as a traveler, it's worth it's worth it to do both at the lower part words the transportation for the community you you get a sense of the community and you get to talk to people. It's Kinda cool because you're floating above all of these barriers and then after the top city, stop you sort of plateauing you. Go across this amazing lush forest in a giant National Park and they're the only people still on the cable cars are tourists who can afford that but you get to the terminal point way in the middle of the park and I think the locals will come in there by bus, which would be much cheaper because it is a a wonderful jumping off point for for hikes in this nature reserve. Yeah. So the neighborhood that Pablo built I mean now it's called Barrio Pablo Escobar, Pablo Escobar's. But it was originally called million sin to a jury US medicine without shantytowns and the idea was he was really trying to improve his image in the country and he built about three hundred and sixty six humble homes in this neighborhood for people who are down on their locker many of them were homeless and actually living in a garbage dump area and in that region and you talk about street art they're. So there's a number of murals celebrating Pablo. Escobar would say that most Colombians despised Pablo, Escobar and everything he stood for. However in this little neighborhood and I met some of them. There are people who still revere him as quite a small minority of Colombians I would say, but you see mural several murals right in this borrow Pablo Escobar. Depicting. El Patron the hero, the Robin Hood that you're talking about in and some of those people, and there are some young hustlers there who are very interesting entrepreneurs. One of them has created, which you'll find in in the middle of this neighborhood is a Pablo Escobar memories. Museum now there was another Pablo Escobar Museum that was run by Pablo's brother, which was actually shut down and it wasn't in this neighborhood with the government closed that one down. This one is sort of a homemade sort of museum that some young hustlers in the neighborhood of made, and they also sell visits to the US through some of the homes where you can tour the homes and. It's kind of it's bizarre but yeah.

Barrio Pablo Escobar Pablo Escobar Pablo Escobar Museum Columbia United States Murder Rick Steves Medina Cocaine Robin Hood Dave Seminar Writer Medellin America San Francisco New Orleans Saint Barrios A. City National Park
Travel To Medellin

Travel with Rick Steves

05:32 min | 10 months ago

Travel To Medellin

"Let's open today's travel with Rick Steves travel writer Dave Seminar. He took his whole family to many in Columbia which used to have a reputation as the headquarters for a dangerous drug cartel. Our interview was recorded just before the global lockdowns kicked in. Hey. Thanks for having me on the show wreck. So you went to Medigene I, mean the image of Medina's like scariest a generation ago is one of the most dangerous cities on the planet. That's right. But but it certainly isn't any longer. I mean these days the murder rate in Medellin is lower than New Orleans Saint, Louis Chicago and several other cities as well. It's an amazing turnaround and. Tourism. Is a booming part of the economy I was just there. My son loves it so much. He bought a condo there and I was there for years this last year with him and we were standing on his balcony and and everybody was blown up fireworks and My son had a Colombian friend there with him and and we were talking about. It and when the Colombians see those fireworks, they remember in the days of Pablo. Escobar. That's what they would explode when they made a deal in the United States with the with the drug trade they're not making deals with the drug trade anymore with the Pablo Escobar outfit that's just celebrating. So they've gone from supplying America's cocaine habit to actually building A. City on live biting entrepreneurs. That's true. They I Columbia is still does produce eighty percent of the cocaine I mean to be frank. However look I went there with my ten and twelve year old sons and my wife, and I would never take them to a place that I thought was too dangerous. So I really consulted with a lot of different people before. Going, there, however, my parents and several other people said, Columbia. You're taking your sons to Columbia you nuts but I did my research and I talked to enough people who had had great experiences there that I felt comfortable doing it and we spent two weeks traveling all around the country and I felt very safe. The whole time tell us about the public tour. It was interesting. You know my wife said Pablo Escobar to are you sure that that's appropriate for our sons who are ten and twelve years old side I called one of the tour companies that had good reviews on trip advisor and he said Oh yes our tour is good for children aged six and up said really okay. Well, let's do it. We thought maybe we can teach them. Okay. He's a bad guy you know here's the. Evils of drugs and teach them a little bit about why the drug violence in and I thought maybe they a lot of it might go over their head but I thought well, they'll learn something. Let's do it but you go through a you goes through your neighborhood community thirteen, which is now trendy. It's filled with street art and is just a festival of good living not good living. It's still a poor area but a festival of happiness. Community Thirteen is sort of an interesting area I've I've found it to be one of the more disappointing stops to be honest with you on the tour I mean, it doesn't really have much to do with Pablo Escobar although it was a neighborhood that was wracked by gang violence, and then in two thousand eleven, the government installed a series of escalators there the idea was. Allowing people to be able to move safely through the community, get from their hilltop neighborhoods down to where jobs and transportation and things of that are. But when I was there in July about the experience maybe if you traveled at a different time of year, you might have an off more authentic experience, but it was absolutely full of tourists which really shocked me because here is. Sort of an impoverished neighborhood that has all credit to them. I. Think it's wonderful. They found a way to turn the violence of the neighborhood into a marketable commodity, but it was absolutely crawling with tourists and I sort of felt like, wow I really don't like going to places that are too full of tourists. So for me, it fell a little bit flat to be. Quite honest. But maybe if I visited another time of year, I would have I would have liked more. No, I don't think. So I mean I was there in the winter but to me, it was a former violence ridden gang ridden community that now is a kind of a tourist trap and it just like an amusement pier in San Francisco, almost or something like that. And what was really fun was the street art I mean, the street art was like it's like going through an art gallery and it's all this edgy colorful tropical kind of street art and you've got it all together by escalators I can imagine before those escalators came you know ten years ago you would have desperately poor people and You'd have the intimidation of the gangs and all of that and and the high murder rate and today there's there's not a hint of that and the escalators let people connect and I think you know the way Columbia has invested in its infrastructure has given poor. Barrios the confidence and the feeling that this is progress and changes possible and and one thing great about going to Medine is you write these cable cars because the city is in a very mountainous area and the poorest communities are pushed way up the mountain sides. But these cable cars, they're just like cable cars had a ski resort. They connect the people in the poor neighborhoods with the good jobs and the good shopping and the good entertainment down in the valley floor and writing these cable cars was just a kind of a celebration of community to me what was your experience on those cable cars? Well I love the cable cars just like you know I took the cable cars up to the park. RV. which is it's a long ride as interesting things that you take two different sets of cable cars. You can take one set of cable cars, which sort of goes through some of the rough hillside neighborhoods, and that one is actually fairly quite cheap to go through and actually when you're. On that first cable car, you're actually getting ordinary people who live in those neighborhoods coming on and off of your Gondola but then to go on the second. Gondola. which takes all the way up the mountain up to the park RV, which is just fantastic and I do recommend that that significantly more expensive so that that second cable you know Gondola is more for tourists in it's it. Would be too expensive for people who live in the humble neighborhoods. But as a traveler, it's worth it's worth it to do

Pablo Escobar Columbia Dave Seminar New Orleans Saint Rick Steves Medellin Escobar Medina United States Pablo Louis Chicago Medine Barrios Government San Francisco
Travel To Medellin

Travel with Rick Steves

05:32 min | 10 months ago

Travel To Medellin

"Let's open today's travel with Rick Steves travel writer, Dave Seminar. He took his whole family to many in Columbia which used to have a reputation as the headquarters for a dangerous drug cartel. Our interview was recorded just before the global lockdowns kicked in. Hey thanks for having me on the show wreck. So you went to Medigene I mean the image of Medina's like scariest a generation ago is one of the most dangerous cities on the planet. That's right. But but it certainly isn't any longer I mean these days the murder rate in Medellin is lower than New Orleans Saint Louis Chicago and several other cities as well. It's an amazing turnaround and Tourism. Is a booming part of the economy. I was just there. My son loves it so much. He bought a condo there and I was there for years this last year with him and we were standing on his balcony and and everybody was blown up fireworks and My son had a Colombian there with him and and we were talking about it. And when the Colombians see those fireworks, they remember in the days of Pablo Escobar. That's what they would explode when they made a deal in the United States with the with the drug trade, they're not making deals with the drug trade anymore with the Pablo Escobar outfit that's just celebrating. So they've gone from supplying America's cocaine habit to actually building a city. On live biting entrepreneurs that's true. They I Columbia is still does produce eighty percent of the cocaine I mean to be frank. However, look I went there with my ten and twelve year old sons and my wife and I would never take them to a place that I thought was too dangerous. So I really consulted with a lot of different people before. Going there however, my parents and several other people said Columbia, you're taking your sons to Columbia you nuts. But I did my research and I talked to enough people who had had great experiences there that I felt comfortable doing it and we spent two weeks traveling all around the country and I felt very safe. The whole time tell us about the public tour. It was interesting. You know my wife said Pablo Escobar, to are you sure that that's appropriate for our sons who are ten and twelve years? Old Side I called one of the tour companies that had good reviews on trip advisor and he said Oh yes. Our tour is good for children aged six and up said really okay. Well, let's do it. We thought maybe we can teach them. Okay. He's a bad guy. You know here's. The evils of drugs and teach them a little bit about why the drug violence in and I thought maybe they a lot of it might go over their head but I thought well, they'll learn something. Let's do it but you go through you goes through neighborhood community thirteen, which is now trendy it's filled with street art and is just a festival of good living not good living. It's still a poor area but a festival of happiness yeah. Community Thirteen is sort of an interesting area I've I've found it to be one of the more disappointing stops to be honest with you on the tour I. mean it doesn't really have much to do with Pablo Escobar though it was a neighborhood that was wracked by gang violence, and then in two thousand eleven, the government installed a series of escalators there the idea was. Allowing people to be able to move safely through the community get from their hilltop neighborhoods down to where jobs and transportation and things of that are. But when I was there in July about the experience maybe if you traveled at a different time of year, you might have an off more authentic experience but it was absolutely full of tourists which really shocked me because here is. Sort of an impoverished neighborhood that has all credit to them I think it's wonderful. They found a way to turn the violence of the neighborhood into a marketable commodity, but it was absolutely crawling with tourists and I sort of felt like, wow, I really don't like going to places that are too full of tourists. So for me, it fell a little bit flat to be. Quite honest. But maybe if I visited another time of year, I would have I would have liked more no I don't think so I mean I was there in the winter but to me, it was a former violence ridden gang ridden community that now is a kind of a tourist trap and it just like an amusement pier in San Francisco. Almost or something like that. And what was really fun was the street art I mean the street art was like it's like going through an art gallery and it's all this edgy colorful tropical street art and you've got it all together by escalators. I can imagine before those escalators came you know ten years ago you would have desperately poor people and You'd have the intimidation of the gangs and all of that and and the high murder rate and today there's there's not a hint of that and the escalators let people connect and I think you know the way Columbia has invested in its infrastructure has given poor barrios. The confidence and the feeling that this is progress and changes possible and and one thing great about going to Medine is you write these cable cars because the city is in a very mountainous area and the poorest communities are pushed way up the mountain sides. But these cable cars, they're just like cable cars at a ski resort they connect the people in the poor neighborhoods with the good jobs and the good shopping and the good entertainment down in the valley floor and writing these cable cars was just a kind of a celebration of community to me what was your experience on those cable cars? Well. I love the cable cars just like you know I took the cable cars up to the park RV, which is it's a long ride as interesting things that you take two different sets of cable cars. You can take one set of cable cars, which sort of goes through some of the rough hillside neighborhoods, and that one is actually fairly quite cheap to go through and actually when. You're on that first cable car. You're actually getting ordinary people who live in those neighborhoods coming on and off of your Gondola. But then to go on the second Gondola, which takes all the way up the mountain up to the park RV, which is just fantastic and I do recommend that that significantly more expensive so that that second cable you know Gondola is for tourists in its it. Would be too expensive for people who live in the humble neighborhoods. But as a traveler, it's worth it's worth it to

Pablo Escobar Columbia Cocaine Murder Rick Steves Medina United States Dave Seminar Medellin Writer America Advisor New Orleans Medine Louis Chicago San Francisco
"gloria steinem" Discussed on I Weigh with Jameela Jamil

I Weigh with Jameela Jamil

03:21 min | 10 months ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on I Weigh with Jameela Jamil

"Gloria Steinem, you are an activist and author and one of the truly truly the greatest feminists of all time, and it's an honor to have you here at the Iowa. Caucus thank you for joining me. It's a great honor to hear you say that, but I am not the greatest feminist. I'm very lucky because I get to do what I love in really care about and that's a gift. It is indeed and I think what I have grown to find some inspiring about you in my own work is not only the way that you make sure to send to the work of other people the way that you that you are fallible and you will apologize fuel mistakes or the things that you do not yet know you were always open to learning I mean even when we sat down together at the hotel, I moderated your book launch. She were talking to me about how during the audience. You hope to learn from the audience This gift of the discussion time after any lecture or any talking circle. It's a gift. I. Mean we don't learn from Sameness, we don't learn from Echo Chamber while we're talking we learn while we're listening. Yeah absolutely, and also sustained devotion to the cause that I think makes you so inspiring to me because. I can say now for my experience of offended activist for about fourteen years but it's really been the last three years that I've been in the middle of mainstream scrutiny an it is a very exhausting and taxing existence. It's one hundred percent worth it hundred and ten percent worth it, and it's not it's vital and it feels like more of A. Duty Than anything else but it is exhausting I. Don't know how the fuck. Lewis. Disagree. It's exhausting but I think it does get a little better because. People believe you more as you continue to be in the same place if you know what I mean yeah. So or maybe you just wear them down I don't know. But I I do think that trust is a very important. Feeling and when you've been consistent for quite a long time, people are more likely to trust you And I know that people doubted you a lot especially in the beginning and sometimes people would say that you had to attractive to possibly be allowed to engage in feminist discussion and well the the hurtful thing was that I was only being successful or recognized to the degree that I was because of my looks. But if you hang in there long enough you get old and then they can't say that anymore. I mean. I still look blood. Great. But I do hear what you're saying I. Think it's also. Because they can't kill US anymore. They like to discredit us, and that seems to be the weapon used against women. Now, it's more incendiary there. There was one woman I remember who stood up in an audience and kind of saved my life vice saying it's important that somebody who can win the game and win says the game isn't worth Shit I said Oh thank you. Now I have. A function Oh. That's great. I. Love Their. Well..

Gloria Steinem US Echo Chamber Iowa Lewis
'The Glorias' follows Gloria Steinem's fascinating life

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:36 sec | 10 months ago

'The Glorias' follows Gloria Steinem's fascinating life

"On how a new movie about her life helps to correct history. A very timely movie out today, The Gloria's, which follows the life of feminist icon Gloria Steinem and her role in fighting for equal rights for women. I want to write about the winds move, Steinem says. The film couldn't come at a better time. It's about a movement and the movement is what we continue to need. And it also shows the reality of the women's movement, which meant that it was disproportionately women of color and especially black women. But she says, those women of color rarely got there do at the time in the film helps correct that the Gloria's is out today on Amazon Prime Video,

Gloria Steinem Amazon
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:37 min | 10 months ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Relegated to writing lifestyle or fashion pieces at first glorious career was no different. She frequently tried to suggest political ideas but editor shut her down time and time again then in nineteen, sixty, three, Gloria gained national attention. When show magazine hired her to go undercover at a playboy club to report on the working conditions there Well, they were taking anything. Disaster is job and ISO, and I wrote an expose of of being about about the working conditions and and what started out as a joke actually became. Something that was not so funny even though this was before I was. involving. At the time waitressing at playboy clubs was advertised as glamorous exciting career opportunity for young women. But glorious expose I was a playboy bunny revealed the sexist underpaid overworked nature of the job. Though this legendary article Made Gloria, a household name, she initially struggled to be taken seriously as a reporter after it's release. Despite the challenge glorious strive to build her career and nineteen, sixty eight, she helped found New York magazine. As an editor and political writer at New York magazine Gloria covered campaigns, and social issues like the Women's Liberation Movement. But her involvement in the movement quickly went beyond that of passive reporter in Nineteen, sixty nine she spoke publicly at an event advocating the legalization of abortion in New York. Florida became a sought after Speaker Women's liberation protests and events. She became a spokesperson for the movement and a tireless advocate for women's rights. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy feminist activists staged an eleven hour sit in on the magazine ladies home. Journal one hundred women marched into the office and protested the majority male staffs sexist writing and refusal to cover women's rights issues after this landmark event Gloria knew there was a place for a women's Movement magazine she teamed up with fellow journalists. Patricia Carbine, and Letty. Cotton POGREBIN TO CREATE MS magazine in Nineteen Seventy One news was initially an insert into New York magazine but by nineteen seventy, two, it became an entity of its own. Lori would be a writer and editor for the magazine for fifteen years. Gloria toward the country as a speaker led protests and teamed up fellow feminists like Shirley, Chisholm, and Betty for Dan to create the National Women's Political Caucus. The NWPP raises money provides training and gathers volunteers for women, candidates, state, and local levels. Gloria also helped found organizations including the women's Action Alliance the Women's Media Centre voters for choice, and the News Foundation for women. She also helped create take our daughters to. Work Day in the nineties, which was an effort to show variety of career opportunities to young girls. Gloria has written several books including the best selling memoir my life on the road, the book details, Glorious Childhood, and Development as an activist alongside the burgeoning women's liberation. Movement Gloria has received many honors and accolades for her activism in two thousand thirteen President Obama granted Gloria the Presidential Medal of freedom speaking of game changers. As a writer, the speaker, an activist she awakened a vast and often skeptical public to problems like domestic violence. A lack of affordable childcare unfair hiring practices. Because of her work across America around the world more women are afforded the respect and opportunities that they deserve. But she also changed how women thought about themselves in two thousand seventeen rutgers university created the Gloria Steinem endowed chair in media culture and Feminist Studies Gloria Steinem is a prominent and passionate activist for women everywhere who's helped to expand the opportunities available for women and girls across the country. This episode concludes our month all about activists. But Join US tomorrow October first for the beginning of a brand new. Holiday. For more on why we're doing what we're doing check out our newsletter Manica weekly follow us on facebook and Instagram at Encyclopedia. Will Manteca. Follow me directly on twitter at Jenny M Kaplan. Special. Thanks to my favorite sister and co-creator was Catholic. Talk to you tomorrow. I WanNa tell you about another podcast. I. Think. You'll love we hear about Trans People in the news all the time, but we almost never hear trans people telling their own stories. The Trans Slash podcast with Mr, Jones is changing that by creating a space that centers the voices of Trans People in conversations about. Politics and culture. It's hosted by Amara Jones a peabody and Emmy Award winner. She's also a Black Trans Woman and journalist and tomorrow understands that Trans people telling their own stories and having a voice in the conversation that affects them. We'll save trans lives. So if you're trans and looking for a news and culture show centers, you or an ally who wants to learn more check out the Trans Slash podcast, you can hear a new episode, every other Thursday subscribe to the Trans Lash podcast wherever you listen..

Gloria Steinem New York magazine Women's Liberation Movement National Women's Political Cau Movement magazine editor reporter MS magazine writer Glorious Childhood Amara Jones Emmy Award US writer and editor New York Florida twitter NWPP Patricia Carbine Lori
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:02 min | 10 months ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Hello Wonder Media, network I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is encyclopedia were Manteca. Including this month Manteca with a feminist icon known for her incredible reporting skills and tireless activism. She created several organizations that still provide vital work for the support of women, and she continues to be a voice for women's rights today. Let's talk about the unstoppable Gloria Steinem. And now the new form of obstructionism into is to say what was over. You know just to keep you from doing anything more. It's so just begun. Gloria Steinem was born on March twenty, fifth nineteen, thirty four until Lido Ohio her father was a traveling salesman which meant Gloria. Didn't regularly attend school when she was young instead her mother tutor her on the road and encouraged glorious love of books. When Gloria was ten years old her parents divorced her mother soon started suffering from a mental illness that caused hallucinations and difficulty functioning this required Gloria to become a full time caretaker. Gloria. Leader remarked that her childhood caused her to grow up too soon and instilled a determination to overcome every obstacle. Glorious. Returned home after graduating from high school to help take care of their mother allowing fifteen year old Gloria to attend Smith College Massachusetts where she studied government. After graduating with honors in Nineteen fifty six, Gloria earned a fellowship that allowed her to study in India for two years. Glorious Time in India was the catalyst for her love of grassroots activism there she traveled with local women to fight against injustices like selling low caste women into marriage, and she absorbed the writings of Mahatma Gandhi. When Gloria returned to the US she started working as a freelance journalist in New York, this was an era when newsrooms and editorial desks were run almost entirely by. White men.

Gloria Steinem Gloria Manteca Jenny Kaplan Mahatma Gandhi Lido Ohio India salesman Smith College Massachusetts US New York
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:12 min | 11 months ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Ten only. Now you have your own apartment, you can reach the light switch. You know. Hopefully. Have a little money so that you can. Do what you want. There is as I was saying then of a whole different country after sixty, but you never tied to those gender roles. anyways you didn't need to be. A well, we're all tied to those generals. I don't think there is not like you had the children who are now out of the house. So now like you have, that's true. No that that's true. It wasn't. It wasn't tied to the life cycle of of a child, but it was tied to hormones and sexuality and affairs, and how you looked and none of us. Escapes this completely nor should we escape it necessarily? What does being in? You're eighty symbolized you now if you told us a little bit. Shocking West Fan I I stopped people in the street and tell them how old I am because I try to make myself believe it I mean eighty one is an age that I think is someone else's age you know it's quite bizarre and part of it is I think because we don't have role models of people going ahead of us. I don't have I've very few. Role Models of women, my age who are doing what I'm doing, and in fact, the the people I work with every day in love and you know our my current chosen family. In terms of numbers are probably. I duNNo. At least forty years younger than I am and even my friends from. Ms. And so on. At least ten years younger than I am. Gloria Steinem great to talk with you again. Thank you so much. Thank you so much Gloria Steinem speaking Terry Gross in Twenty fifteen when her memoir, my life on the road had just been published. Next Wednesday Amazon prime video presents the glorious a new movie based on that. Memoir. Coming up I review the new season of the fx Anthology Miniseries Fargo, which premieres Sunday and stars Chris Rock..

Gloria Steinem Amazon Chris Rock Terry Gross Ms. And
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:48 min | 11 months ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Fresh Air

"This may sound strange but I try to say it short but. That actually I wasn't I was less afraid of dying than of aging or not of aging exactly. I didn't know how to enter the last third of life because there were so few rules because when I first heard this diagnosis I I thought. Ironically oh so that's how it's GonNa end you know and then I thought to myself is if it was welling up from the deepest part of me I've had a wonderful life and I treasure that moment you know it it meant a lot to me but on the other hand, it also made me realize that in this culture women, we know how to be in the central plateau of life. And I'd been there a terrifically longtime because I. I'd become a grown up too early because my mother being an invalid. So from about ten to fifty two or so I'd been in the central Plateau now I was entering a whole new place. It was like falling off a cliff because I couldn't see enough people ahead of me you know in the last two or three years of of really. How shall I say if kind of paying more attention to my own inner life I've realized that this? aging in the last third of life or whatever is a new country I've I. Now actually feel excited about it because because you. As. Caroline Heilbronn has pointed out. So brilliantly in in writing a woman's life women become ourselves after fifty. You know we leave behind this female impersonator role and drop a lot of baggage and really become much more true selves. You know what I find particularly interesting about hearing you. Thinking about about about the latter part of your life is that I think for a lot of women is the end of your life where you're supposed to be punished for the freedoms that you've taken during the first parts of your life. You know like if you've decided to be independent or not be married or not have children or something you're punished for that in the end because you're supposed to look forward to an old age where you're you're lonely, you're alone there's GonNa be with no one to take care of you I mean I think that's that's been really instilled in all of Yes it's. It's sort of the secular version of hello and And and and like the religious version of hell, it has nothing to do with real life. That was Gloria Steinem on fresh air in nineteen, ninety two and I just did the math and I think you were fifty eight when that was recorded. So. Now thank you for playing that because it's fascinating to listen to your earlier. So. So just what you said then still ring. True. Yes. It does and I realized that I realize more now that I'm past that stage that fifty was a very difficult birthday because it was the end of the central years of life. But Sixty, which I was just entering. When I was speaking then was like entering as I was saying a new country and that means that all the demands of gender the spread from something like twelve to something like fifty. And are something of a prison sometimes are gone and suddenly you're free. Here's here's my comparison. Now remember when you were nine or ten, and you were this independent little girl climbing trees and saying I, know what I want. I know I think. That was before gender descended for most of us as Carol Gilligan has has pointed out in in her work. After fifty. You've S theoretically according to society had kids raised them. So, your gender role is over. And Ironically, I found by sixty your free again. So you're the same person you were at nine or.

Gloria Steinem Carol Gilligan Caroline Heilbronn
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:02 min | 11 months ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Fresh Air

"What were there? Some of the things you had to do for her when you were still a child yourself. Well, it depended on, you know the ups and downs of her moods but. I would make her meals or the child's idea of meal. and. I kind of always worried about what I would find when I came home from school you know because She might be. Really depressed or she might have retreated into another world or She might. Be Convinced that of war was happening outside the House and be. Around in the street I, you know talking to other people whose parents were say alcoholics and who also kind of didn't know what they would find when they came home. has made me realize that it's It's not. I mean it's hopefully uncommon, but it's certainly not unique experience. She was called the crazy lady of the neighborhood. Once you had a neighborhood. What was your reaction to that and didn't make you think of her differently than you did before? I. Don't didn't make me think of her differently she was. She was. How can I say I? mean she was a loving wonderful woman who? recited. Poetry by heart and. Was, you know certainly super loving short toward me but sometimes, she was just in another world and I didn't know when that would happen. Are you still convinced that you mother was suffering from Patriarchy as opposed to. A mental illness of some sort in bipolar depression. Now I am because later on after. I was in college, and therefore my sister, my older sister was taking care of her and discovered that she just couldn't do it and keep her job so. She found a very good mental hospital where my mother was for a couple of years which should have happened probably long before and I asked the doctors. They are very expert doctors there what was wrong and they said she had an anxiety neurosis. And I said, would you say her spirit was broken and they said, yes, you know I mean she. I don't think there was anything organically wrong. She did get hooked on tranquilizers. And that became part of the problem not the solution. During the ten years that your family was on the road, did you have any friends? I had a couple of very good girlfriends in the summer. and. One was the daughter of a farm family and I used to go to her house and. Another was in a nearby small town. So I had always had a couple of good girlfriends. When we were on the road, I would make friends with other kids in the trailer parks along the way. What was it like when you started school after you were ten having not been in school before whereas all the other kids in school had been in school before I had been somewhat in school because I would go till. It got cold. You know had been every year I'd been a couple of months in school I kind of knew what school was but one. I went for my first year I discovered a I didn't know how to do long division I. Didn't know the multiplication tables although I'd been in many states I had no idea what the map looked I. It was a big deficit. I'm not sure I've ever made up for, but I had a huge vocabulary because I've been reading all the time grownup books, kids, books, everything. And I soon learned. Two things one that that could compensate in a lot of ways and get me through school and the other was that I shouldn't. Indulge in this enormous vocabulary too much because it was seem strange to the other kids. Gloria Steinem speaking to Terry Gross in two thousand fifteen..

bipolar depression Gloria Steinem Terry Gross
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:55 min | 11 months ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Fresh Air

"With the glorious a new movie based on the life of feminist activist, Gloria Steinem premiering next Wednesday on Amazon prime. We're listening back to some of Terry's interviews with her. This one is from two thousand fifteen when Gloria Steinem memoir my life on the road on which this new movie is based was first published Gloria Steinem welcome back to fresh air I want you to start by reading the dedication of your new book. This book is dedicated to Dr John Sharp of London who in nineteen, fifty, seven a decade before physicians in England could legally perform an abortion for any reason other than the health of the woman. Took the considerable risk of referring for an abortion at twenty two year old American on her way to. India. Knowing only that she had broken an engagement at home to seek an unknown fate, he said you must promise me two things i. you will not tell anyone my name second, you will do what you want to do with your life. Dear Dr Sharp I. Believe You who knew the law was unjust would not mind if I say this so long after your death. I've done. The best. I could with my life. This book is for you. Thank you for reading that dedication to your new book When did you first speak about your abortion? The. Thing was that it took me. So long there was no women's movement it was supposed to be. A secrets women didn't share in the same way. So it wasn't until many years later after New York magazine had started and I had gone to cover an abortion speak-out Helton of in a church downtown in New York? City. And suddenly I heard other women standing up and talking about what it was like to have to go out and seek an illegal abortion. This was actually an alternate hearing to one that the New York state legislature was holding on the liberalisation of abortion law. In New, York State. This was before the Supreme Court ruling and you know a group of of early feminist just. Said wait a minute. You know in New York in the legislature, they asked fourteen men in one none to testify. You can't make this up. Let's..

Gloria Steinem New York Dr John Sharp New York magazine Terry Dr Sharp Amazon York State India Supreme Court London England
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:21 min | 11 months ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Fresh Air

"From whyy in Philadelphia, this is fresh air. I'm David Being Cooley in for Terry Gross today are interviews with Gloria Steinem. She's the subject of a new bio pic based on Steiner's memoir, and that memoir was dedicated to the doctor who helped Steinem get an illegal abortion when she was twenty two. In return, he asked Steinem to promise to things I will not tell anyone my name second you will do what you want to do with your life. She'll tell us about the choices she made in her life a life that has profoundly influenced women around the world. We'll also hear about her unconventional childhood until she was ten, she spent half of each year in a trailer often on the road with her parents spending months at a time out of school. And I'll review the new season of Fargo. On fx which stars Chris Rock..

Gloria Steinem David Being Cooley Steiner whyy Terry Gross Chris Rock Philadelphia
Meghan Markle cold-called voters with Gloria Steinem to advocate for voting

Radio From Hell

01:31 min | 11 months ago

Meghan Markle cold-called voters with Gloria Steinem to advocate for voting

"Meghan Markle and Gloria Steinem cold call the U. S citizens and encourage them to vote and I said to myself, So so. And I thought, Well, I'll read this story just to see if my Tepid reaction to that headline is is warranted. And this is Gloria Steinem and Meghan Markle cold called US voters together during their first meeting. The first thing we did and why she came to see me. We sat at the dining table here where I am right now, and we cold called voters, Gloria Steinem said in a video interview. And said Hello. I'm Meg and hello on Gloria, are you going to vote? Steinem also said that the Royal Meghan Markle is also challenging the princess stereotype. By being political. She came home to vote. So lots. Where are you being like that Lots of celebrities are doing this. They're trying to help Patton Oswalt's doing it like if Meghan Marco and or Gloria Steinem called and said, Hi, this is Megan Gloria, I'd say. Who Oh, Meg, Magda Marchal and Gloria Gloria Steinem. Oh, yeah. I know who you guys are. I'm just calling to urge you to vote. Okay? They wouldn't say so. You would come on the show and say, Guess what experience I had yesterday. Meghan Markle. The duchess called my house. And I would say not and and I would say, And to what end? Did they do that? So what?

Gloria Gloria Steinem Meghan Markle Royal Meghan Markle Megan Gloria Meghan Marco MEG Patton Oswalt United States Magda Marchal U. S
Delores

PODSHIP EARTH

06:06 min | 1 year ago

Delores

"C. Safeway or yes we can is a rallying cry for justice freedom and dignity that was born from the heart and mind of civil rights revolutionary. Dolores wet the chant of Si Se. Puede his been taken up by many movements. From Barack Obama's two thousand eight presidential campaign to the fight for climate justice to the continued struggle for workers rights to Spain's anti austerity campaigns of 2019. Martin Luther King Junior said that the arc of the moral universe is long but it bends towards justice we all know that it only bends towards justice because of individuals willing to put themselves on the front lines of the Civil Rights Struggle Laura Sweater who turned ninety on April tenth. Twenty twenty has never left the front lines. She's a force of nature that has transformed the lives of those who grow and harvest the food that sustains each of us creating the phone welcome movement with Cesar Chavez she is the mother of the modern labor movement also came up with the idea that consumers have the power to shape and push industries like great growers to improve farm worker conditions. She then that. Labor negotiations to memorialize will can benefit in the nation's first of their kind collective bargaining agreements. Deloris is a fearless and incredibly effective advocate legislation. She championed the landmark building nineteen sixty to allow people to take the California driver's examination in Spanish. And and she's never stopped last year. She helped enact leads to create California's Fund for safe and affordable drinking water Quetta who describes himself as a born again feminists consciously incorporated feminism into her fight for workers rights and push Gloria Steinem and the one thousand nine hundred sixty s to expand the feminist movement to include issues of race thereby helping make feminism and Movement for all women not just white women from the beginning. Dolores wet has also been an environmental champion fighting to protect workers from harmful pesticides sanding shoulder to shoulder with native Americans at Standing Rock and picking up litter after every rally she led. I Talk About a fiftieth anniversary with my hero and living legend Dolores Wetter Kelly. Working Fourteen hour days with Heff Foundation to make sure farmwork has have access to protective equipment food and benefits during this pandemic. And if you thought you knew everything about Delores also talk about why she loves burning man. Dolores where are you right now all right now? I'm in the belly of the beast. I'm in Bakersfield California Bakersfield and all of Kern county. You are going through really rough times right now. Dolores is a lot of people that have been laid off. I think it's over a thousand oil workers that have been laid off. One of the company is completely. Shut Down Lager. People EARN EMPLOYEES CIVILLY TRAGIC. But we know at the same time. And that's why we see that our air is a little cleaner a usually here in Kern county. We are women the worst areas of pollution for air pollution in the country. And we know that that air pollution really affects not only the physical health especially if the children but also the mental health of children. Here we have Not only to freeways that can make your highway ninety nine and highway five of but then we have all of the pollution that comes from the Agricultural Industry Caesar industrial growers that have not really converted their tractors They're so easy in a lot of diesel. It's a big struggle and when you try to bring to the attention they consider this to be an attack instead of thinking. Okay what do we have to do to make them more economically friendly jobs for people so these are the challenges that we have ahead of us as we try to convert all of the fossil fuel industries into industries. That are more friendly for everybody. So deloris in the late fifties and sixties when you have founding the farmworker movement and and really bringing those issues to the full when whether environmental issues like drinking water and air quality and pesticide runoff. How did those issues fest? Come to your attention right at the beginning at the very beginning you know. I grew up in Stockton California which is also like a cultural area. I was in a field in. I see this what I thought was fog rolling in but I thought how can you have fog in the summertime? Well it was a pesticide residue. That was rolling in. That was one of the first things that farmer who's complained about about the effects of Pesticides. And so we had so many cases of pesticide poisonings. Sometimes Terry crews like thirty. Forty people would been poisoned at the same time. How can this happen? Slow regard for the health farm workers so one of the first contracts that I signed a day. Employers tell exactly how many pesticides they were going to spray and where they were going to be spread out and then we passed legislation to make sure that the appeals are posted of when they sprayed some of these dangerous pesticides and then we work very very hard to get some of these dangerous pesticides restricted and banned forever and unfortunately a lot of pesticides we had because like Didi they were then shipped to Mexico to Latin American countries. And so here but we had all of these farmers could children that. Were being bored with these horrible deformities being born without arms without legs so horrific here you had children in Mexico and parts of Latin America. That were having exactly the same type of affection disabilities that were coming from pesticides

Dolores California Kern County Dolores Wetter Kelly Dolores Wet Twenty Twenty Barack Obama Martin Luther King Si Se Mexico Deloris Cesar Chavez Spain Gloria Steinem Laura Sweater Quetta Heff Foundation
It's Sundance Time Again

The Frame

06:03 min | 1 year ago

It's Sundance Time Again

"Welcome to the frame. I'm Steven Cuevas in for John Horn. But he's actually sitting right here beside me because by the time you hear this. He'll be at the Sundance Film Festival. John Thanks for taking time before you pack your bags my pleasure. I love the fact that I'm here but I'm not here John. There are dozens of feature films film screened at Sundance. Of course tell me about some of this year's most anticipated entries. I'M GONNA lean towards documentaries if you look at the movies that are nominated for the documentary feature academy me where this year three of them premiered at Sundance a year ago. American factory honey land and edge of democracy. And if you look at the very first night at the Sundance Dance Film Festival. There are new documentaries from producers. You might have heard of Barack and Michelle Obama. They've called Crip camp which is about the disability rights movement. There's another documentary about Taylor swift and about why. She is becoming a little bit more political and that's just in one theater in one night. Well one of the documentary entries premiering at Sundance that I wanted to ask you about It's when it's trying a lot of controversy and that's the Kirby Dick and amy during documentary on the record. It focuses on the sexual assault allegations against hip hop mogul Russell Simmons. The film was being executive. Co produced by Oprah Winfrey set to be released on Apple. TV then Winfrey suddenly. He withdrew support and some say. It was under pressure from Russell Simmons. She denies this and says it's because of questions arising from one of the alleged victims. What's to become come of this documentary on the record? Well it is going to show at the festival I mean I think there is the question whether or not Sundance was going to pull it The fact that Oprah Winfrey withdrew her support that apple. TV Hit pause in. The documentary is very unusual. And Kirby and amy have said listen. We think we've made a really good good film. We don't understand what they are complaining about. All of the edits and suggestions up until the time. The picture was locked where minor little things it does feel feel like Russell. Simmons complained to Oprah about the documentary. It's unclear if Oprah thought it was unfair or that featured one woman story over others the Booze GonNa show but for a film to go to the festival with this much. Uncertainty is highly unusual. Yeah not to get too far afield on this but I wonder if Oprah pulling away from this the project could somehow damage her own brand in this in this era of me too. Well I think she has said that. She believes the women who are accusing Russell Simmons of sexual assault and harassment. So I don't think she's saying I am not believing them anymore. I think she has to her. Mind legitimate questions about the documentary. Yeah it is important that she is on board or not on board because her producing does suggest that there is a level of quality ability and credibility to it and the fact that she's leaving it does ultimately damage. I think the standing of the film Another film to ask you about. Was this four part documentary. On Hillary Clinton Clinton. It'll be available on Hulu. She will also be attending Sundance for the first time to do promotion for this film. What you know about it and you know any any buzz around it? I guess I know a fair amount about it I'm GONNA be doing. QNA With Hillary Clinton at the festival is a four part series. That has a behind the scenes footage of her running against against Donald Trump. But it's really about her political career and about how things stand today so words at all. Hillary is a participant in this documentary. It s you said she'll be at the festival and she'll be talking with me. She says a lot of the documentary. I hope she says even more when we sit down to have a conversation. There's one other film I wanted to ask you about. And that's a a little film called feels good man and it's an indie production looking at the rise of of this comic pepe the frog that was actually created by L. A. based cartoonist and it sort of became an emblem for the outright. Who took this image and kind of started using it for antisemitic means racists memes all kinds of really nasty stuff? What do you know about the film and Are you going to see it? Yeah I'm definitely going to see. The artist is named fury. And it's about how something something becomes an icon for hate. And how the artist behind that I contract reclaim it and I think if you look more broadly at a lot of the documentaries that are playing the festival a lot of them are about what's going on in the world right now. There's a new documentary about the kids who survived the park. Land shooting about what they're doing to fight against against Gun. Violence US kids. I think that there's another documentary called early. Bird it's about the helicopter news pilot Zoey Tur and about what her works has about the tabloid of news and the Oj. Trial Voice State is a documentary about seventeen year. Old Boys a thousand from Texas says who join up to build a representative government from the ground up so wherever you look Especially in documentaries. There are a lot of films about the current state of the country. And what we might do to fix it. And what are some of the feature films. You're looking forward to checking out. I know that things that are kind of top of our sundance card include downhill. This is a remake of the movie force majeure a Foreign Language move from a couple years ago it stars. Julia Louis Dreyfuss Will Ferrell. It's made by nat facts and Jim Rash. Who did a movie called called way way back not that long ago Vigo Mortenson who is one of my favorite actors hell yeah written directed stars in a movie called following that I think is partially in Spanish? So there's nothing Vigo can't do. There's an Anthony Hopkins movie based on a play called the father. There's a movie about Gloria Steinem in many different iterations directed by Julie. Taymor you might know her from the Lion King. You know the other thing that we should talk about our number of movies that are going to sundance that are looking Ford distribution and one of the things that a lot of people forget is that Sundance is not only a film festival. It's a film market and it'll be really interesting to see given how a poorly some of the movies from last year as well at the Box Office if the checkbooks will be open s much as they were a year ago.

Oprah Winfrey Sundance Russell Simmons Hillary Clinton Clinton Kirby Dick Assault Apple John Horn AMY Steven Cuevas Gloria Steinem Jim Rash Vigo Mortenson Anthony Hopkins Julia Louis Dreyfuss Donald Trump Barack
Director Greta Gerwig on 'Little Women' and Louisa May Alcott

The Frame

10:25 min | 1 year ago

Director Greta Gerwig on 'Little Women' and Louisa May Alcott

"Start with a new film that opens this Christmas Day. It's an adaptation of Louisa May alcott novel Little Women and it is a lovely little gift of a movie yourself theory someday. So you'll need me. You'll wish you have behaved better. Thank you so much for your employment and your many kindnesses I intend to make my own way in the world. No no one makes their own way. Not really we civil woman. You'll need to marry. Well you are not married. Because I'm rich wjr. The film is from writer director. Greta GERWIG stars. Sir Sha Ronin. She played the lead in Greenwich Direct. To`real debut lady bird and the rest of the march sisters are played played by Emma Watson Elisa scanlon and Florence pugh Laura dern plays their mom and Meryl Streep is they're wealthy aunt March gerwig has been thinking about little the women for a very long time well before she even found out that producer Amy Pascal was developing a new adaptation of the novel. Here's Greta Gerwig little women and has been a book that I have loved my whole life in a very deep way to the point. Where my memories? And the memories of the March sisters were intertwined in that way that I think books of your youth can means something even beyond being books because th- they they're the they become part of your family I think that's that's the magic of Reading when you're a child is the the distinction between fiction and reality is thin for you or it. It was for me anyway But I hadn't read it since I was about fourteen or fifteen and then I read it in my early thirties when I turned thirty and I All this stuff came out at me in the book that I it not. When I was a child I can passion get so savage could hurt anyone and I enjoyed it? You remind me of myself never angry. I'm angry nearly every damn I li- reading as an adult. I heard all of these different things. I saw it as much touch spike easier and sadder and stranger and almost more triumphant in a certain way and also just is this kind of being aware of an author was another layer of it for me that Joe both wants to be an author but then Louisa as author and so even though Joe March march by the end of the book says she stops her ink well and stops writing and gets married and has children opens a school Louisa though wrote and she wrote that book and we know what. Because there's the book you know. I just sort of had an idol saw about well if I made this. I'd want to center center on this. I'd WanNa Center on all these themes that I felt I hadn't really seen yet about it which was ambition and money money and women an art and I heard in passing my agent said at a dinner. Oh they're interested making little women again again and I was like what I have to go. I have to talk to them. I have an idea and I hadn't made anything at that point. But he got me a meaning and I I went and I talked talk to them and I told them some version of what I wanted to do and And I said I want to direct it and they wanNA write in Iraq and I hadn't had nothing to really show that I could do that so but they very luckily hired me to write it. And then I wrote my draft in in two thousand fifteen two thousand sixteen and then I went away and I may lady bird and then by the time I was finishing that up they said well what what do you think about making little women and I thought I said well I knew you'd ask. I'm ready but it was a it was one one of those for two. It's turns events. I want to ask about that perspective that you had a reading the book as an adult versus as a young woman woman sure and the perspective you have as somebody who is a creative person gas writing movies and making movies because so much of the movie and certainly in the book as well is about the challenges of being a creative person and how you value your own art how you compromise with people who are financing it and how you find your voice even in those parameters that's right now there's a you you picked up all the cards I put down. No it's a it's funny. It's that the opening scene between Joe March and her publisher Mr Dash would which the majority of it is actually word for word from the book when she says took care to have a few of my sinners repent and he says people want to be amused not preach that morals. Don't sell nowadays. That could be me talking to a studio head about something. I WANNA do But it was. It was all there for me to be discovered. I didn't invent it like like I said that. That scene is a scene from the book but it felt too so relevant to right now and then beyond that when when I was researching Louisa Mail Cart and it became clear that that who Lewis male caught was was equally the subjects that I was interested in and then you learn about her life. Is You know unlike Joe. She never got married. She never had children and but she kept writing and she did keep her copyright copyright of little women which is a you know huge thing that she did and I mean there are so many things about her life and what she did. It felt eerily familiar and I think even even in the fact that Her publisher sure and even herself but her publisher truly didn't know what a hit he had. And I find that happens all the time that there's a constant underestimating of audiences that are not the same audience of the people who are in charge of publishing or whatever that may be the the first half of little win because it is really to books as written ends so group. The curtain falls upon big. Joe Beth and amy whether it ever arises again depends upon the reception given to the first act of the domestic drama called little women death. It's almost like she's saying I've got a a sequel but I hope people by the I know she's She's a business lady no she and and and it it. It's worth saying that the the initial printing sold out in two weeks and it has not been out of print for one hundred fifty years in one thousand nine hundred four. There was a story. Little women leads poll novel level rated ahead of Bible for influence on high school pupils. Yeah that's nice. I mean I mean it's just nice for her and it raises his other question like what people take away from the book because you can interpret it in very different ways. I'm going to give you two prominent women who have thoughts. That's about it. The first is Gloria Steinem. WHO said in Nineteen ninety-two? Where else could we read about an all female group who discussed work art and all the great questions or found girls who wanted to be women and not vice versa? Oh that's beautiful found girls that wanted to be women not the versa. And here's the author meal Paalea who says the whole thing is like a horror movie. I know I think if you have an idea in your head of the it can be of little women. It's usually from the first book. It's the kind of Christmas to Christmas structure. And the you know the second half of the book Louis Male jokes. She should've called the wedding marches. Because they all got married and truly British version is called good wise exactly zoo you know. It was in this to book structure which is part of why I is structured the film I did starting with them as adults Because I wanted to start with the second half but I also think there's two books embedded in it because if you you just read the book on its face value with this. Kind of pre Victorian morality of Domesticity in virtue tied to femininity communitty. And all of these kind of tidy bows put on each chapter. Then I think you miss what's really roiling roiling underneath and if you read it that way of course Camille Paglia is completely right. It is something that would be a horror show if that is all you're seeing but I'd the way I look at it is if you can take the ending of the book where she felt she must marry Joe off to someone because that's what the readers demanded and she made this economic decision. That's what she would do Because she had so books then if you if you read everything through the Lens of will she had to make it all kind of tidy for the time time then if you take away the tidiness what's left is a whole bunch of am Bishen and mess and anger and lust and craziness and things things that don't fit neatly into any box. And so what I wanted to do was not update the text. The text doesn't need updating. I wanted to take away the constraints constraints of the time in some ways. Because that's what was interesting to me and even in those constraints. Louisa really did do her best to try. I to imagine what what would in a gala -tarian marriage look like. What would something that was? Not Essentially INDENTURED SERVITUDE BE As a marriage and I feel that you know Gloria Steinem being one of them with a Simone Tip Avar Patti Smith Orlando Toronto or J. K. Rowling rallying. There's a long list of women for whom this book meant very specific freedom an ambition and what I wanted to do was make a film film that was in the tradition of why that inspired them. Because it's there's gotta be a reason more than she got married to Professor Bear Sogo to see you. Thanks for coming as really

Louisa JOE Gloria Steinem Joe March Publisher Greta Gerwig Amy Pascal Wanna Center Greenwich Direct Sir Sha Ronin Meryl Streep Camille Paglia Iraq Professor Bear Sogo Emma Watson Elisa Scanlon Joe Beth Simone Tip Avar Patti Smith J. K. Rowling Writer
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Hysteria

Hysteria

08:20 min | 1 year ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Hysteria

"We all have Magic Lori Senators. We just got it off the street. It's very dangerous. We'll get sick. Maybe we'll get sick. We're GONNA get it's worth. It was totally worth it. We're back with the part of the show where we take really strong stances about things that don't matter at all. It's the Hillsdale Diane. Let's get started with our Listener Hill. This is allison from Baltimore Maryland and the hill that I will die. Diane is one that John Lubbock has actually brought up. But I promise I've been dying on longer. The baby onboard stickers. That go on cars are the dumbest. I missed pieces of shit that ever have been created. I am not driving around looking. Oh who am I going to run over with my little Honda fit up not not them.

Hillsdale Diane Listener Hill Lori Senators Honda John Lubbock Baltimore allison Maryland
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Hysteria

Hysteria

09:45 min | 1 year ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Hysteria

"Oh yeah if it's a girl it's pink but that's not gender that's I yes sex but they call it agenda because they don't want to say sex because they're all day a stag party about their child but we're gonNA focus and even at the level of sex there are children who are born into right so I I mean I'm just eh you know what I would love to see. A gender reveal party where they cut open a marble cake I know like. Oh the baby's okay well X. X. Y.. That's an okay thing the baby's going to be great with it. Reveal is baby human yes. I'll greatest imagine going to a gender reveal party and they're like kittens going. Yeah that's a party. I want to go to go to a kitten as I'm thinking about this. We are so honored to have you here today. And then you come in and we ask you these like pretty heavy questions. Do you have her tire that like. Do you ever go to an interview and be like just ask me what I like to eat and drink. No that's it's kind of boring. I mean I'm glad to tell you but it's not that interesting. You know. I think this is to me. It's infinitely interesting because it is Hopeful it's connected to everything you begin to see that we don't have to be in a hierarchy. We could be in a circle. That's the you know primordial way of organizing why not It's it's the It provides the answer to all kinds of things that currently don't have an answer like uh what I don't know what is the best way of stimulating. The economy you know when people go to Wall Street actually the best way would be equal. Pay because we're going to spend it. You're not going to put it. In a Swiss bank account you know so equal pay by race insects would be. But it's it's. It's not just not not discussed or when we're looking at a groups. In other countries in judging who they are and should we have relationships with them and so on if they're jetway wage gender polarized. We know they're violent. If the less gender polar terrorist groups are always very gender if they are void less gender for they're they're more likely to be democratic. Okay so Gloria does not shoot the shit in your book. You're talking about Speaking of gender polarization position you talked about The happiest groups of people being married men and unmarried women We know we have a lot of male listeners. So how can men help make that feel a little bit more equal if they care about their female partners well they can be partners. You know I mean they can be equal parents. I mean the way that men get to be a whole human beings as little boys and as grownups is to develop those human qualities that are wrongly called feminine and the way we get to behold people develop the ones wrongly called masculine. Because they're all human so Actually if men develop all those human qualities we figured out once that they would live five years longer. This is not a bad offer because the the the deaths that are associated associated with the masculine role of speeding violence and guns and you know whatever tension. If you do away with them they would live longer. We gotTA STOP PUTTING PSA. So we I can. Do you WanNa live five years long. Car salesman chill out more and more men are but there is this Third of the country or you know role addictive race superiority addicted group that I mean they didn't invented it. They got born into it but they can't seem to get out of it and probably only attrition will make the difference so i WanNa talk about. You were talking about the the Newsweek cover and it made me. We Really WanNa hear you dish a little bit about public figures that you've interacted with over the years. Are there any in particular that stick out as being very disappointing into you like you had expectations and then they just came away underneath. They bought a lot of them. I don't know if people remember I mean David Susskind does anybody I remember. David is going to know the name out to. Yeah no I mean there. There are lots of of male allies to you know Darren Walker who has headed. The Ford Foundation is definitely a male ally. Frank Thomas who used to be head of the way it was a male ally Th there are you know assholes concentrated and Fox News true in and around the White House. I like that for their tagline Fox News asshole concentration hundred percent concentrated as I mean I think about There've been a couple of times where I've met male politicians that were supposedly like on women side and can I just remember getting vibe in them that it was all like a show you know like when I was in a conversation with them I could feel like okay. Little Girl Vibes Vibes emanating off of them Do you feel like that's still something that we see a lot among supposedly progressive politicians. That are men. Yes yes I think so. Yeah because they see it politically but they don't see it in their own lives. You know I mean I remember sitting in a Senate Senate hearing and I've forgotten exactly who the panel of senators were but there was the daughter of one of the senators sitting next to me. It was very shy and and she would tiptoe every few minutes or hour up to her father and say you make an whisper in his ear. You make me shame. The families can have a job. He was always shy. She couldn't do it in public but he knew he knew incredible. Why didn't I also if you if you look at In families of inherited wealth is. It's striking what happens to that wealth Because the family business and the power in that family generally speaking goes to the brothers uh-huh and the women have some money but the question is who and if there's no brother than the family influences to get a brother to get a son-in-law who runs the business and there are tons of businesses and I think sometimes the New York Times in restaurant and soda that are inherited in this way in a completely patriarchal way they pass through women and men get them Yeah I mean it's you had a quote in here and I WANNA I wanna get it exactly right. 'cause I remember reading it and being like Holy Shit basically I'll paraphrase you. You said that inherited wealth robs people of the dignity of hard work. Can you expand a little bit on what that means. Yeah I mean in general just I in my own acquaintance I would say I've seen more people damaged by inherited wealth than helped by inherited wealth. I think my life would have been Different and not as good if I had inherited money. You know you you learn from the crazy jobs you do and having to survive and you meet people and you know I really think inheritances viewed as a blessing when it's often curse I if you really look at the people in what happens to them. Generation Upon Generation Gloria. I want to close by asking you if you could impart one piece of knowledge. Three Hundred Years into the future to assure that it would just be beamed forward in time. What would that be well? I'm sitting here thinking because I'm here with two comics and my okay you know. Life's ambition is to stand up. We can make this happen. You show up and get them staged David pretty much anywhere that I would say that would be helpful to remember that laughter is actually the the only free emotion I mean. Obviously you can make people afraid. Clearly you can also believe you're in love if you're dependent I and Mesh long enough because you in order to survive you in Mesh with someone but laughter just happens and therefore You know what happens when two things come together and make a third when you have an idea when Feinstein supposedly said that he had to be careful while he was shaving living if he had no idea he laughed and cut himself. So I I would say in honor to both of you. All of you That if we just remember not to go any place or with any people who won't let us laugh that we will be following freedom freedom but is great Okay Gloria Steinem non sarcastically. Thank you so much for coming by today and Megan also. Thanks joining us for the conversation. We're going to take a break. We'll be back with the hills will die on..

Gloria Steinem David Susskind Fox News David Ford Foundation Newsweek New York Times Feinstein Darren Walker Senate Megan Frank Thomas White House
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Hysteria

Hysteria

12:56 min | 1 year ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Hysteria

"We're back from a break. And I want to spend as little time as possible just making small talk and bullshitting. Because I'm really excited for episode today. Like mega excited like I couldn't sleep last night. I was excited so so I I want to introduce the lovely women who are sharing the table with me today. I up up. We have a comedian whose first album my dad paid for. This came out this month. It's Meghan gaily. Hello everybody so glad for you to be. Yeah I I've never seen you like this. I know and the thing is I was with will Smith last week and I was fine and then shock at Nordstrom Nordstrom and how do cheesecake factory bag and was like any other Sunday. But today I'm I'm I'm really say that I'm more excited than for my own wedding. Coming up congrats on that next. She's a comedian. Who came out in college? How you doing? I'm great is eh also very excited. You can't tell right now but I'm holding my town finally a guest. You needs no introduction in but I'll give her one anyway because this is an audio medium. She's an activist writer speaker. ICON and you can buy her new book. The truth will set you free but I will piss you off. It's Gloria Steinem. Hello Welcome Gloria Low. Hello and I'm excited. Am I allowed to be young. We love that Gloria. You're the first guest we've ever had whose name I use hyperbole and arguments when I'm being sarcastic like okay. Gloria Steinem okay. I just want to know if you win. The argument always almost always always if I get to an okay glorious so Gloria your new book the truth will set you free but I will piss you off. It's a a collection of kind of quotes and wisdom that you've amassed over your long career. What inspired you to write this book? Now Well I love quotes. It's you know I think you can take a good quote pour water on it and it becomes a novel And I also have quotes from friends in there The quotes are useful for marching with. And I think we need to march a lot right now And I thought well why not and I am. I wrongly thought it would be easy. Well he all these quotes I can just put them in a book. No wrong I had to do an introduction for the whole book essay for each chapter. It turned Out to be much more work than I thought but there's also a couple of blank pages at the end so absolutely everybody can put their own quotes and their favorites. Yeah it seemed into thoughts as I was reading it first of all. These are some great free signs for the next women's March her. Secondly I feel like you invented tweeting like like you invent a being good at twitter. Does it ever feel like that because so much of what you wrote was always so simple and clear and concise sites. Do you ever think of yourself as a little bit like the mother of twitter. No I don't I don't want that on your back. Although they did they did allow me to put one twitter quote in there. I don't know if you noticed which is Sort of directed at trump which is twitter the past tense of twitter. As taught you idiot. I liked that so I WANNA get into it right away. Because as there's reading your book I kept wanting to like have a conversation with the like I want. And then this so in your book you write about the importance of working with people in different age groups. oops I think that you put it as like you have pairs of jeans older than some of the women that you work with. Yes absolutely right. And I don't even believe my own age but but I but I do think it's very important in that age segregation is as bad as any other kind of segregation a for a lot of very simple reasons. I mean one is that that I probably have more hope than a lot of the younger women. I work with all the time because I remember when it was worse. And they're mad as hell. Oh because it's bad now and we need each other and You know I worry that. There are age segregated communities for instance. And there's so much in our society that does that Yeah I was thinking about it in light of have you heard of the phrase okay boomer yes but yours are all right. Yeah right it's it's sort of. It's sort of become a dismissive catchall for young people to express their resentment for older generations. And it's become really Zeitgeist st right now because it seems like. There's a lot of builds up resentment among younger generation toward an older generation that they think Dell does the hand of cards. That is not very fun for us to play. So how do you as somebody who aspires to work with people who are of different age groups. How do you overcome that sort of built in resistance? Will you get to know each other. First of all you know if you're younger and you're going to an event which no older person would ever are being able to experience. Invite an older person. And if you're older and you're going to some elevated events that no young people are at invite a younger person. I mean there's no magic to anything anything except actually knowing each other and there's I mean there's a lot of I don't know this is exactly relevant but it makes me think of Khanate of American groups that say that the very old and the very young half the most in common because they're close to the unknown I mean there's something mystical Michael about it. Well let's pivot to the current state of America. I just finished Margaret Atwood's testaments this week read it and under twenty four hours seven texting Megan. Megan read that. But anything by Margaret. Atwood it has to be good when I was reading it. I was reading in your book. Like back to back and Atwood's Atwood's The the country in the book is obviously a very cynical scary place and your the feeling I get from. Your book is very optimistic. So here's a quote from Atwood's latest book. How tedious is tyranny in the throes of enactment? It's always the same plot. Do you feel like doc. You're watching a tyranny in the throes of enactment now. And how do you maintain optimism through that. Well I I'm not sure that we are completely completely and tyranny because it's only a third of the country that supports the current regime and we must remember the trump lost by six million votes in these only there because the electoral college. Now we're getting rid of you know we're not quite there yet but I think she's absolutely right and everything she says because tyrannies begin all of them begin with controlling women's bodies as the means of reproduction from our. You know the right-wing Dwayne here too you know the right wing in Brazil to Nazi Germany. Nazi Germany. Yeah that that We we we somehow think of women's issues as narrow as opposed to connected to everything so the first step is always controlling women's bodies in order to control role. How many workers how many soldiers which and to keep races separate or casts as an India separate and therefore it really a serious I mean that is she's right that is where tyranny begins I mean how do you maintain a sense of optimism. Among all that though I mean why why on Earth would we let people take hope away from us. Hope is within our control. Hope is a form of planning. I believe is a quote in there so it it would be insane and suicidal. You know to to to give up. Hope it's ridiculous right within our control. Fuck them around how do you how do you take care of yourself in terms of like being fatigued from everything. Because I feel at times that like we're in we're in a place where the news and the bad news is so is so overwhelming that it is hard to hold onto that hope so like well we are the majority. I'm sitting here with you. This is how I take care of myself. I mean you know. They're literally at most. It's the third of the country that wants to live with the old hierarchy. The rest has gone along with and learned from and been expanded by all of the Social Justice Movement. So now if you look at the public opinion polls you know. There's an agreement and the environmental movement and so on but that's more or less third. I really were born with an old hierarchy. They are mad. You know there's the the typical kind of middle middle aged white guy who says to me when I'm on the road You know a black woman took night job all right and I always say to him who said it was your job. You know because it's a sense sense of entitlement. That is the problem but worries me is that we will stew ourselves into whatever while watching the bad news and not know we are the majority Jordy if we get the majority out or we will become obsessed with converting because women the idea of of governance kind of visit the family and you. Don't you know reject anybody out of the family. So we become obsessed with thinking we have to convert other people when in fact we have the majority already and if we organized and move with majority we win you talk a lot about being on the road and all four of us here. We're all mid Western gals that have have been sprinkled about and we ought to hi We've got a Pennsylvania Gonzalez Continent Indiana here and so we we all now live. The three of us live in Los Angeles. We've lived in New York some of us as well and do you think when you're when you're quote unquote on the road it it helps you restore your hope because sometimes I'm afraid that we get stuck in this bubble on the coast and we were right and we're the only ones that are right right but then when I go back to Indianapolis sometimes I'll meet people and I'm like. Oh yeah actually. There's a lot of really wonderful people that are fighting in these red states. That are doing a lot more important work than I'm doing telling jokes in Los Angeles. Well I don't know I mean I would argue with you. The jokes are truly revolutionary. But but it is. It is important I think and specifically in the election that we go back to the states where we came from and we know Oh and helped the good folks there who are probably the majority to to get out the vote and do whatever they need to do we need to keep those connections because we have an understanding at that place we came from and we have credibility there That's so good to hear because it is so easy to just cut those people off like I haven't spoken to so many folks back from right like Pennsylvania in years. Because I've just just speak to my fiance. I only only other person of color that you knew growing up. We played basketball together. But it is so important because I've kind of just like just through social media in seeing their opinions I've written them off completely and instead of reaching out and having a conversation yeah just decided to be like no well I mean. Just as for instance the last time I went back to Toledo Ohio come from The high school I went to do which was an enormous big mid western high school. where the only clear rule was you had to stop playing football when you were twenty two? Because they are so obsessed this was football and they had the best team and they played Texas every year. And so okay so now. What is the problem sex trafficking girls from that high school all are being loaded into cross country trucks and sex trafficked? Oh and you know there are women in the Ohio state legislature. Working on this. You know so you know wherever we go. The current problems are current and if we know the people in the community pretty you know we can be more effective there. How do you see like I think? There's a lot of conversation about reaching across the Aisle speaking to other folks who have opposing views to you. But how do you kind of negotiate sitting down with someone who doesn't see your humanity and like is it worth that emotional labor to try and sit in comic convert them to your sort of thinking. Well I don't know I would trust your instinct on whether it is worthwhile or not. You know because you kind of sense whether you can communicate with this person or not like I'm thinking of like when Trevor Noah sat down with Tommy Me Tommy Lauren on the daily show and everyone applauded that as such amazing opportunity to reach across the aisle..

Margaret Atwood Gloria Steinem twitter Gloria trump Nordstrom Nordstrom Gloria Low Meghan Ohio Los Angeles Smith Nazi Germany Megan basketball football Jordy India America
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Hysteria

Hysteria

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Hysteria

"Hello and welcome to hysteria. I'm Erin Ryan this week. We asked the following burning questions. How many guys can Gordon Sunland? Donlan throw under a single bus. What's the future of the equal rights amendment and most importantly? What is Gloria? steinem thing about all this Eliza Master Monico Tian Trans State Senator Senator Jennifer McClellan and Gloria Steinem. Yes the real one. Tackle these questions this week and more. So so the Gordon problem is just as big a problem as the trump administration feared as. We're recording this right now. Gordon Sunlen is throwing trump officials under the bus. It's the bottom of the eighth inning. And he's got a no hitter going. Devon Nunez has fastened his thinking cap on so tightly that it's cutting off circulation to his brain Nikki Haley's weird book tour flexible not intervening to prevent trump for ruining America. Last week. Seems even dumber now but there are other things going on in the world as well for example women's equality did you know that despite despite one TV show in two movie reboots of Charlie's angels women still aren't constitutionally guaranteed equality and. Did you know further that we're one state away from ratifying the equal rights amendment and did you know further that one of those states Virginia just flipped from red to blue very interesting here here to help me break this down in more is former White House. Deputy Chief of operations under President Obama and the garden of Weed Enjoyment Eliza Master Monaco Hey Eliza Hey Aaron hold on while I Mute Gordon Sunlen. You're like the only one in America. Muting him him today. Only because I'm talking to you otherwise he'd be at a volume ten out of ten. I feel very special I was just I like prepping to record for the last few minutes. Has He accused. Cardi Cardi B. being involved yet. No but I'm waiting for that shoe to drop and even that yes. Let's talk about that. We weren't planning on talking about impeachment just because because you know it's it's kind of everywhere but something big happened this morning. Do you mean when he got in the bus backed it over. All the president's it's men and then drove over them yeah. It was sort of a like fried green tomatoes to Wanda type moment. It really was. Yeah I mean here's what I'm thinking I what's going to happen now. What can happen now? Will I mean I before anyone tweets at us for. We're not like saying he's a hero or anything he's just finally telling some fucking version of the truth and more like you're for it But I think I mean. Don't you think that the southern district of New York Literally has their engines running to go get rudy. I mean this is like to me. This is it's damning terrible for the president but it's the end of really truly early on me. Yeah it's here's the thing like He. He paints a very clear picture. And yesterday I remember I was on the crooked media stream on Tuesday and I just remember it being very repetitive like it seemed the Republicans defenses like. Yeah but did he say the name of the crime while he was doing it. No crime your honor But here it's sort of like they've they've kind of abandoned all of it. I I watched or listened to Devin. Nunez's is opening statement. And it was it was sort of. I felt like I was standing. Like I feel like if I worked in a place and Devon Nunez soon as came in saying those things I'd be like Sir you need to leave and I'm calling mystic. I'm calling secure calling security possibly a doctor. Do you need some help Sur. Also I feel like today's high day fashion like not to Undo George Kens. Bow Tie. But it's like Gordon Sahlin came for the show. Oh I mean he's got some like Glorious Royal Navy Sudan and Devin unions literally tried to dress like bugsy so. I don't know what's going on. Yeah but there's more stuff going on. Melissa I want to talk about some of the kind of uplifting stuff because I think at the core of this impeachment is this. I've the sinking feeling that even though all of this is coming out none of the Republicans Republicans are going to do anything about it because they're all completely members of the trump called But I do think that there's some hopeful pieces as of news that are kind of floating out there and one of them is that there's a bill that's about to be introduced in Virginia to ratify the era. What does he hurry stands for? You know what it stands for those who are listening who may not know equal rights amendment. Okay thank you. They will rights amendment which was introduced Decades ago and sort of quietly died. Thanks to the efforts of like anti feminists such as Zip Phyllis Schlafly. I can't say her name. It's it's Mr. It sounds like how she makes me feel which is lasting schlafly. But the the amendment failed but it failed with Three states left not necessary to ratify it and added to the Constitution Illinois Nevada recently ratified the the era. And we're down to one and that one could be Virginia. It's an exciting time forty years later. Do you think we should call the state senator. Who's going to introduce the bill and we could learn a lot from her? I feel like we could do senator. McClellan was elected to the Senate of Virginia in January twenty seventeen prior to her election to the Senate Jennifer. It was a member of the Virginia House of delegates. For eleven years. She holds the distinction of being the first pregnant delegate in office in Virginia which is awesome and also I. I wish that there had been more and before her. Because that seems like a pretty late time in estates age to have a pregnant delegate. But I digress. And she's about to introduce a new. Yeah Bill in Virginia to ratify the equal rights amendment. Let's give her a call. Cre- high.

Virginia Devon Nunez Senator Senator Jennifer McCle Gordon Sunlen Gloria Steinem Gordon Sunland America Devin Eliza Master Monico Tian Gordon Erin Ryan Phyllis Schlafly Senate Virginia House Gordon Sahlin Nikki Haley White House
"gloria steinem" Discussed on The Ron Burgundy Podcast

The Ron Burgundy Podcast

14:21 min | 1 year ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on The Ron Burgundy Podcast

"And I'd like to enjoy the simple pleasures in life like Reading Carolina's diary and just laughing and laughing or bragging to the grocery store clerk looks about my new velvet suit and when I get to do those things with a coors light in my hand I know I'm really chilling out but I've learned that bringing your own coors light to the grocery store or is generally frowned upon they sell it they're not to bring your own celebrate responsibly. 2019 coors brewing company Golden Colorado Hey Good Morning Angels Good Morning Charlie what's going on with that I thought we could do episode of Charlie's Angels Today instead of the podcast thought it that it could be maybe switch gears a little bit we talked a legal bounded by today's actually a big interview so we should stick to the script okay yes yesterday is a big day our topic is feminism mm-hmm and we will have Gloria Steinem on the phone today Gloria Steinem seen her picture she wears a nice pair of aviator glasses as a a cashmere turtleneck tiny little cowboy hat perched on the top of her head I think she got it from doll one of those things is not true but yes we're talking to worry scientists she's calling in I'm excited and I'm a little bit nervous nervous okay why are you nervous I o R U read your speech Impediment Might Act up I don't I don't have a speech impediment no it's that thing gets really high and annoying Thatt's I think that's just my voice oh sorry well the good news is at least you're not on the radio you're just on a podcast maybe you can just we can try a different voice on that's easier to listen to back to our guest today on our voices a small little singing bird had an evil crow as a sister one that grows and grows until little children scream and run into their homes okay let's go back to our guest today Right Carolina is nervous about talking to Gloria Steinem I'm not but Carolina is I'm actually more despite you talking to glorious put my Wi- relief because my voice is an annoying it's smooth like a like a Coltrane Solo your voice is like if one handed a bunch of eight-year-olds some clarinets and told them to blow as hard as they cast. This is why I'm nervous about you talking to Corey Steinem I just can't stress what an important figure she has to the feminist movement and you can just be I can be what oh I can be Bosley from Charlie's angels we'll talk to legal Oh can't play Charlie's angels this episode Anyway Gloria Steinem is a woman who has worked her whole life for the feminist movement and and can be a little misogynistic how dare you how dare you call me that that word that what does that word mean in English French we run is when you act prejudiced against women I know what that word means in writing it down on your notepad with a question mark next to it and you and you spelt wrong oh I bet that is misogynous misogynists not listen sometimes you just treat women differently hope so police I'm interested after our first season wrapped all the guys cigars right and all the girls Susan Ballerina slippers yes man I got size eleven for you big feet Carolina you're welcome by the way those ballet classes coming better than that African drumming class you took it the why I just want you to recognize that they're equal men and that our interests aren't necessarily whatever the patriarchy is deemed feminine yes right is that patriots you're writing down no I'm I'm writing something else I'm writing Saint Patrick's Day hey remember when saint don't forget Saint Patrick's day this year that's what I'm writing so you saw the appea- Patrick the state who drove all the snakes out of Ireland let's just try and keep an open mind today Carolina so nervous to talk to Gloria Steinem very she's just really I get I am I am well I'm not that's the headline here okay GonNa go in and we're GONNA go toe to toe very well but has she tangled with Ron Burgundy no the journalist I don't think so okay I don't think so all right we'll see what happens you're not talking to some piece of wallpaper we're here now you're you're formidable fix I'm GONNA I'm GonNa get in there and I'm going to give as much as I get okay right yeah once we I'm back from Commercial Oh yes Gloria Steinem watch out Ron Burgundy here I wanNA talk to you about my go to beer when I wanted just chill coors light you know since I started my own ruggedly eligible podcast have come to learn quite a lot about people who listen to podcasts people listen when they WANNA learn some interesting facts about dogs and mailed me and what to do if you ever encounter sasquatch or how to do serious investigative journalism leg I do but most importantly they listen when they will on a chill that's why I'm talking to you in such a soothing voice right now so you can just chill and while you're soaking up all this burgundy wisdom and chill even harder by cracking open is cold coors light burgundies official beer of chill and get your podcast on celebrate responsibly twenty nineteen girls brewing company Golden Colorado and we are this is Ron Burgundy on the Ron Burgundy podcast and as promised we are joined by feminists dicon Gloria Steinem Gloria I just have to ask you this coming out of the gate what's my lady it's a an honor you let me look at my notes here you you you name as Gloria you went to Smith College I believe and that's located in New Mexico at Close Massachusetts Oh oh not close at all sorry Smith College I want to ask you in today's world of a I and robot what's replacing all of us is there any value anymore and a liberal arts education it's valuable just to sit in the same room with other people because it turns out that we can't empathize or really learn on a screen or without all five senses so whatever the experience is we need to spend at least as much time with each other as we do looking at a screen for listening with all due respect to this listening we're trending towards avoiding human contact but but we have to somehow maintain that there's a reason why solitary confinement is torture we are communal animals we have to be together all kinds of bad things have bounded since we've been looking at screens depression sadness suicide we need to spend at least as much time with other people as we do with objects do you hear that Carolina so you need to stay off your but it down yeah put down your iphone our screen TV exactly no more screen time let's make eye contact for future yes well I totally agree with you Gloria I mean luckily for me I don't even have any sort of cellular device I still have a hard line in a rotary dial phone so I'm contributing positively I pick Laura yes I'm here I'm here okay I want to you so after college you spent a couple years in India is that is that correct yes that's right and what was that like the craziest spring break ever is that when the longest the longest in the craziest but it turned out to change my life in all kinds of positive ways although to be honest I was escaping getting married I was engaged aged okay needed to go very far away Gotcha so I chose India and you talk about taking the train in India and that being certain revolutionary experience right yes because first of all the train system is is very good and the third class cars especially the women's third-class cars are like traveling dormitories or women's groups the the women you know looked after me we got an endless difficult conversations difficult mainly because I couldn't speak Hindi no it was and I spent a couple of days you know going down the coast in a train in that car well if you can take solace I can't speak Hindi either so I would have been in the same boat are trying or train yes Gloria you worked undercover as a playboy bunny when you're a journalist during that experience did you run into any misogyny Michelle Missa misogyny well probably not because they were not smart enough to know what the word was so tell me about it it was it was just wall to wall exploitation it was an assignment to write an article and expose I had invented a background of being a secretary and wanting a more interesting job because the advertisements for being a bunny said that this was a glamorous wonderful job but the bunny other who interviewed me said honey if you can type you don't WanNa work here Oh that should have been warning that should have been warning was that in was that in Chicago no here in New York Okay and yet I don't know if people even know what Playboy magazine is nowadays as you know I'm I'm sorry to say that that now here in Manhattan a playboy club has just opened even though it was given up as yes totally out of date even by Hefner three I'm not quite sure how the one here is able to call itself a playboy club but it's pretty crazy that they just opened a few months ago well I used to have I had a subscription for as long as I can remember and I'm not just saying this because I'm talking to you I read it strictly for the articles you know they had a formula even the articles that in no way were women allowed to win I mean that was was hefner's formula you know whatever was printed or whatever was photographed it had to be clear that men were dominant wow holy smokes yeah you in a satin pajamas well I do think he was kind of pathetic it can insecure what I once got in a fistfight with him at the playboy mansion no kidding that's my car the Valet lost my car and so I had to spend three weeks at the playboy mansion It was worth it was the worst three weeks life because of all the Misogyny Yeah Glory you're you're part of the effort in conjunction with MS Foundation for women to institute a take our daughters to work day Let me ask you this do you think gambling bookies should be taking their daughters to work or drug lords in a why did you start such a dangerous holiday well now that you say that I think it might not be bad for kids to see the terrible things their parents are doing shock maybe they would help to reform their parents and we actually we started at just because we wanted girls to feel at home in the workplace and actually there was no other hey devoted to girls no national day devoted to girls at all it turned out to be one of the few things that girls had that boys wanted so now it's take your child to work day boys to you know I I had a son later in life Walter Burgundy and I shoulda brought him work more often you'll left him in the car I left him in the car lot which is which is not the right thing to do Gloria you got in trouble with with Sanders supporters during the twenty sixteen presidential race because you said the boys are with Bernie and with him running again would you say the boys are back in town no actually I.

Gloria Steinem Charlie Carolina Corey Steinem coors Thatt Wi Golden Colorado Bosley three weeks eight-year
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

12:36 min | 2 years ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"It and how do you move between those spaces. When you're when you're moving into that space that's just in the half age bracket above you in the half age bracket below you as an observer. How do you begin to run in those circles and and get into them in the first place to to begin to right right well it just you just go where your interests carries you and where there are people you trust and mean to this day. A most of the women say who I worked with at MS magazine were younger than I and you know now. We're old editors. We have have dinner once a month but they're still younger than I am so you just you know age is kind of an accident so you just go where your interest sir now at this point in your life when you're in all of these arenas how how often are people asking you. Why aren't you married. Do you WanNa get married thought thought to myself and may have said I'm going to do that. I'm definitely doing that just not right now so it isn't as if you say this is my future. It's your it goes in increments and then and then thanks to the women's. I discovered this revolutionary thing then not. Everybody has to live the same way. Oh that's great numbers she right. I remember seeing you say in an interview that you know. I think it's great. I just keep pushing it off two more years girl same too yeah me too. I and I started to joke with people when they would ask me. I'd go why don't you ask all the men when they're going to grow up and where the partner is because when they are like Holler at your girl the best answer which I heard a stand up comic give and I wish I knew who it was so I could attribute but I is I can't made in captivity which then became the title of the Ester Parral Book which is interesting she wrote. She wrote that book meeting in captivity. Which I think is incredible? you you say are you you have said and I would imagine continued to say that you really identified with Audrey Hepburn character in breakfast at Tiffany's with holly golightly the and and that like her. You really didn't want to be put in a cage and also if you remember even in the movie I mean the the Truman Capote's stories aureus is goes much deeper but even in the movie you see that she came from a kind of poor white trash family and she marries a much the older man in order to have her brother who has kind of learning disabilities taken care of and everyday she reads magazines and everyday she walks on the dirt road a little further and one day she doesn't go home and you know that was her background and then she came to New York and kind have created herself later on also I read I mean I think there was a whole book about breakfast at Tiffany's as a film and it turns that we were not totally crazy to loveth because it was the first film ever in which a woman was allowed to be sexual unmarried and not come to a bad end. Wow it was absolutely the first which I didn't realize until I wrote about it and it's interesting to think about the films made prior to it because whether or not they said overtly if a woman has agency over her body is sexual you know for herself off shall die or this is bad or it was the Hays Office code I think but he would just true of women's magazines they couldn't run a stories in which woman had sex before marriage and didn't come to a bad end or didn't have I mean there was a formula which really marks how revolutionary your apiece on birth control was because for for it to be as you said you know unsexy to really talk to women about the science of of their bodies and their experience with their sexuality and how to take control of that you know I think we now take that for granted. Yes we should. I hope so but when you're saying that also what I'm thinking is okay we're here on Manhattan Island before the Europeans showed it up the cultures that were here as far as we know and many are still here. were circular not out hierarchical where Egalitarian women totally understood how to use herbs abortifacents timing. Have children not have children. They were no not patriarchal or at least a lot of them. Were not patriarchal cultures and all my friends women friends in Indian country make jokes about what did Columbus call primitive evil women actually I sent away for his letters Columbus letters and he's writing with with astonishment about why it is that the local women object to being taken as sex slaves for his crew so he can understand that it seems Mr so it's important to remember that we've been denied the history of the land were on yeah we mostly study it from Columbus forward. That's changing a little bit but we've been denied the history of how we evolved to your point in a circular Egalitarian Alexandrian society pre- ownership agricultural slavery Patriarchy where women and you know when when you hear about the cultures with elders and the grandmothers and the women they go to for the medicine you you know you look at indigenous culture in the Amazon and the way that they have ultimate reverence for mother earth and her systems we haven't always been raised no no and and I think although any historian probably would have a fit at my. I sang that that say it anyway. It feels as if for a series of reasons patriarchy developed in Europe and since that meant compelling women to have children they wouldn't otherwise have head Europe got over populated and had to invent racism and colonialism in order to invade other people's countries and bring goods back so I think colonialism and Patriarchy are very connected pats a really interesting theory when we talk about you know Columbus sledders his astonishment that women didn't want to be sex slaves who knew in in the era in which you know you began working as a journalist it would and were now having so many of these conversations and even more forward weighs about what's happening to women in the workplace you you talk about how then there was no word and for sexual harassment. It was just called life if your boss pressed up against you or or as you said you know your boss would give you the the option like do you you. WanNa go to a hotel with me for the afternoon or you. WanNa you know male all my letters as though those two are equally weighted options When did you realize realize that you weren't crazy at the way that you felt and what you were observing from. This page is I was lucky enough. I was freelancing so there was not a job could be fired from so. I was lucky that I didn't have to submit in some way but I thought thought it was just something that you had to do. You had to sort of jolly along your editor without going to bed with them and still getting assignments. You have to figure out you I know how to do that tight rope walk yeah and when other women came to New York we would always share our lists of editors. You could work with and editors you couldn't union there was always an underground those helping each other but the actual term sexual harassment came about in in the early seventies very early seventies when a whole lot of women from Cornell University I think had been at summer our jobs and they were trying to describe what happened to them and summer jobs then we did we miss magazine did a cover story on sexual harassment which the supermarkets took off the stands. It was too controversial. Even though we used puppets on the cover to illustrate sexist you know in order not to be too shocking but anyway anyway they took it off the stands then Catharine MacKinnon are great feminist legal mind wrote Sexual Harassment Into Sex Discrimination Govt Law then there were three cases brought because of sexual harassment all black women I mean that's you know it not only black women have always been a disproportionate part of the leadership and the numbers of the women's of certainly clear there yeah we you should always be fine black women and so so that you know that was kind of progression and with Anita Hill's testimony at entered into the public dialogue. Even though of course she was wrongly disbelieved though there were two other women he had sexually harassed waiting to be to testify and they wouldn't call them so that you can see the progression and now of course we have off time's up and me too and you know it's it's it's global yes but interesting to your point you know the leadership of black doc women has always been at the forefront yes. I I say in the in the very first year of Life Miss Magazine we did a a public republished a public opinion poll by Louis Harris that I later learned a woman and his firm had done he but anyway and it turned out that they were asking about the women's movement or feminism and issues and something like sixty percent of black women supported it and only thirty seven percent of women and that was in seventy two so it's we should not be surprised at the results of the last presidential election but unfortunately what's happened is that the women's movement has been regarded as white to some extent and the the civil rights movement as black men to some and black women have not in either case been seen as the leaders that they always have been so. There's you know we're trying. I'm working with two friends on a book and lots of people are trying to say wait. Wait a minute. Let's tell the story of who really just personally I learned feminism more from black women than from White Women Flo Kennedy with my speaking partner. She was a decade older than me funny and smart and a lawyer and outrageous and how did you meet Gosh. I don't remember exactly. Is She. Lovely when you have someone in your life and you feel like they've always been there yeah I. I'm sure meetings or movement things or something she she's been part of now and then she gave up on now and she also gave up on the law does she was well trained lawyer. Civil rights lawyer showy you always said the law is a one acid time proposition and what you do is have to stop the ringer so she became an activist and we travelled and spoke together for a long time and how do you think you to influence each other. I think she influenced me more than I influenced her. Although oh you know probably both of us together could go places that neither one of US could could go separately but I'm so grateful to her and I and I there is a woman from the University of Maryland. Who's written a play about her which is going to be a help? Performed was performed once in New York as well and I hope with comes comes back and plays for it's a wonderful play. Can you talk to me about your friendship with Dorothy as well..

harassment New York editor Tiffany partner MS magazine Europe Audrey Hepburn Columbus Truman Capote US Manhattan Island Ester Parral Book Amazon Catharine MacKinnon Flo Kennedy University of Maryland Hays Office
"gloria steinem" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

14:09 min | 2 years ago

"gloria steinem" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Hi Everyone Sophia Bush here welcomed a work in progress where I talked to people who inspire me about how they got to where they are and where they think they're still going cannot believe. I'm about to say this to you but the first guests on my podcast is Gloria Steinem. My hero is here to talk all things journalism activism community organizing and more and while. I'm sure you know about Gloria just in case you don't she is a writer political activist and an organizer founder.

Gloria Steinem Sophia Bush Gloria founder