35 Burst results for "Global organization"

US election to have far fewer international observers than planned

The World

04:41 min | 4 months ago

US election to have far fewer international observers than planned

"There are lots of theories and predictions about the various things that could go wrong with the U. S November election that makes the role of election observers perhaps more important than ever, especially international election observers who could beam or impartial than American citizens. As the world's Rupert Chinois reports. These monitors have just started their mission in the US The Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe or OS Sea, is the largest international body charged with monitoring elections It wanted to bring 500 observers for the upcoming US selections. Instead, there will be about 130, mostly because of covert concerns. Fewer people than expected volunteered to come to the U. S. The major thing that we're going to have to make an adjustment on is thie actual in polling station Election Day observation That said All other aspects of the mission remain effectively unchanged. That's the leader of the S. C. E s mission in the US Polish senator and European Parliament member Ursula got sick at the end of the day. I'm so certain it's going to be accurate Gonna be a true reflection and impartial reflection objective of though what's been happening here in the United States gets sick, will lead a 30 member team that will issue an interim report in three weeks. We're following legal developments were following the camp. Pain and as much as the environment. The atmosphere of the campaign were following the postal ballot just before the election get. 16 will be joined by 100 additional monitors from 30 countries. They'll deploy in pairs under a mandate of strict non interference. They'll be watching things like voter registration, mail in ballots and access to the polls. We'll also look at media coverage, including intolerant rhetoric gets sick, says the monitors will attempt to compensate for their smaller numbers by observing a quote representative sample of polling locations. What we're having to go to do on Election Day is pick our places well, but it will be, I would say the analysis there will be more anecdotal because the sample group will Regrettably, be too small, and that is not anybody's fault. The S C E typically observes elections in developing countries, but like all other 56 members of the global organization The U. S. Has also obligated to invite international election observers. Those observers on Lee started coming in 2002 after the messy Bush v. Gore election of 2000. Not all states have allowed the monitors. In those this year, just 28 States and the District of Columbia have invited international observers. There's also the added complications of President Trump's repeated questioning of mail in ballots, claims of a rigged election and evasion on whether he'll respect the results of the election. Get sick, refused to comment on what she called those hypotheticals at this stage of can't prejudge, you know, I mean, I'm hearing that there are concerns, but then we need to have evidence space We need to see. You know, we need to see the fact we need to see whether things really do or do not go wrong. But those concerns are white, so important tohave international monitors, says Judith Kelly, a professor of political science and dean of Duke's Sanford School of Public Policy. What I find striking is that the United States In many ways was the driving force behind the creation ofthe The whole idea of international election observers and have fostered that movement throughout the world observing elections worldwide, and it is rather inconceivable that we're finding ourselves in a situation now. Where we legitimately appear to be having a need for them ourselves in developing countries, she says. International monitors have been instrumental in shoring up public confidence in elections, but Kelly says they may not have that effect this time. I am skeptical. That they will have any impact. In the United States specifically in this election. Not because they don't have the potential to do so but because they won't be given the opportunity to do so. The day after the election, the S C E team will hold a press conference to talk about their initial findings afterward. As usual, they're prepared to stay to monitor the counting of ballots and whatever court process and they play out to decide the election. Roughly two months later, they'll issue a final report with recommendations for what could have been done better

United States LEE Judith Kelly Rupert Chinois Europe Os Sea S C E Pain District Of Columbia European Parliament S. C. E S President Trump Gore Ursula Senator Representative Bush
Mark's Cougar Conundrum

Eyes on Conservation Podcast

05:59 min | 5 months ago

Mark's Cougar Conundrum

"Welcome to the is on conservation podcast. I'm Gregory. Hatanaka and today for this is on conservation. We have none other than the one the only serene assignments, how you doing Serena I'm great. I also really appreciate the way that introduce people on the show I appreciated the last introduction that you did. So Nice. So. Nice of you. I really appreciate that well I just want to do the best I can to make sure that everybody knows who the real experts are which is. No secret. Not Me so. No you're one of them for sure. Did Watts Oh. Yeah. Oh Yeah. I even know that L. No no I'm just I'm just an enthusiastic cheerleader that's really what it is and the feeling is mutual. Absolutely absolutely mutual. I'm really excited to jump into this interview that you did with Mark L. Brock. Why don't you tell listeners who this is what we're going to be listening to? Yeah mark is amazing and he the the one thing that I really appreciate about mark is he's so articulate. It's it's it's kind of crazy. It's sort of like he knows how to talk to the public and talk to stakeholders all the things that we're GonNa talk about in the interview he's really good at communicating people and communicating all his efforts and his research and and. I don't just from a management perspective as someone who is a wildlife manager everything that he said made a lot of sense and I think it would make a lot of sense to people that don't know a lot about the subject So I was really impressed with him. Mark is a researcher focuses on mountain lions or Pumas cougars whatever you WANNA, call him, and he has been working in this field for. A really long time. So he's really gotten to know the species their behavior and a lot of the conflicts that come with them and living alongside large carnivore like mountain lion. So he wrote an he's written several books but his most recent book is called the Cougar Conundrum and the Cougar conundrum kind of outlines these bigger picture and with great examples, case studies and examples of basically the history of our. You know what he calls a conundrum, which I think is the best word to use this huge problem. That we have been experiencing north, America, surrounding these animals for for hundreds of years. So it's it's really it was great getting to talk to him and I learned a lot You know not just reading the book, but also just talking him and again he has a way with the way that he speaks that it just makes sense and he's very measured and I can just really tell that he he has invested a lot of time. You know working trying to problem solve, but you have to he he's he's the perfect person because he is so measured and listens and I I just think he's he's the best possible person to do what he does. So I'm really excited to have you guys listen to our conversation. That's awesome. Yeah. He's very well spoken and this book if I'm not mistaken, you had a sneak peek at it should be coming out the day after this episode airs Yes. So I, got a sneak peek at it and I got to read it ahead of its release which will be released on August thirteenth. So yeah, the day after this episode gets. and it will be available at any bookseller He mentioned that it would be great. If you know you WANNA contact your local bookshop see if you can get a couple of copies into the store, but it's also available online and wherever you normally get your books. Well, that sounds amazing and let's just jump right into this interview. Why don't we start by you just introducing yourself your name and a little bit about your background. Sure. My Name's Markelle Brooke. I'm a father. And a working biologist and I live in western Washington on the Olympic peninsula where I am part of a massive collaboration with five tribal nations to study mountain lions on the peninsula and how they crossed the interstate five corridor. I also worked for Penn. Thera. I'm the director of the PA- Program Outline programme, whichever were you prefer? and. So I help sort of create new projects identify need identified the conservation issues for mountain lions across their entire range. So we have projects ranging from up here in Washington State all the way down to the southern tip of South America. Wow. So it's a huge I know panther is a huge. Organization it's a global organization. I mean and I know you probably get this a lot. But how did you? How did you get involved with Panther and how did you get involved with mountain lions? Indeed it's You know it's all dumb luck. Great. panthers a as he said, it's a global organization. We work to conserve wildcats and they're landscapes around the world. You know it's How ends up doing what I do is. Is Sort of a circuitous journey. One never really has plans or at least if you do they tend to go out the window and and life happens. So I tell folks because I get asked this a lot. You know you must have always planned to be outlined biologist, and now here you are. Say absolutely not you know you. Have a plan. In the field of wildlife, you may have a goal and what generally happens is an opportunity comes up and you decide to take it or you don't so

Mark L. Brock Hatanaka Serena Washington Watts Markelle Brooke America South America Researcher Penn Director PA
China Opposes Taiwan Participation in U.N. After U.S. Tweet

Pittsburgh Works

00:44 sec | 9 months ago

China Opposes Taiwan Participation in U.N. After U.S. Tweet

"The United States has tweeted its support for Taiwan's participation in the United Nations provoking a sharp protest from China which claims the self ruled island the tweet from the U. S. mission to the United Nations says the one hundred and ninety three member global organization was founded to serve all voices welcome diverse views and perspectives and promote human rights it says barring Taiwan from setting foot on U. N. grounds is an affront not just to the proud of Taiwanese people but to you and principles China's U. N. mission stressed that there is one China and Taiwan is an inalienable part of it the decision by the U. S. to suddenly raised the Taiwan issue follows president Donald trump's criticism of China over the corona virus

United States Taiwan United Nations Donald Trump U. N. President Trump
Interview With Jenny Ma About The  Center for Reproductive Rights

Worst Year Ever

12:49 min | 9 months ago

Interview With Jenny Ma About The Center for Reproductive Rights

"All right well. Today we are joined by Jenny. Ma who was a senior staff attorney with the Center for Reproductive Rights? Hi Jenny how are you doing okay? Are you for hanging in there? Thanks so much? We're really grateful to you for taking the time to speak with us. We know you're very very busy but we're very excited to hear what you are working on over there. I'm sure most of our listeners are familiar with your organization. But can you start by telling us a little bit about the center and what it does sure The Center for Reproductive Rights is a global organization so we work on domestic as well as global matters and we use the power of the law to advance reproductive rights as fundamental human rights around the world and my role as litigator is to lift in state and federal courts to ensure that unconstitutional laws. Do not go into back across the United States. That's really concise answer. It seems like you've done that before. A mission with everything going on right now. We're seeing that. It's really easy to lose track of all the different ways that you know. Governments are using corona virus as a cover to chip away at rights for example. We've seen a lot of states trying to shut down or shutting down abortion clinics saying that it's an interest of public safety. Bite that being very counterintuitive and. I know that that is something that you're currently really meshed in and we would love to. Have you walk us through? What's happening you know from before the virus have until now and all the stuff that we should be aware of. Yeah absolutely Hopefully some of your listeners have heard what's been going around Across the United States with regards to abortion. And what's been going on with? Nineteen but If I can backtrack just a little bit. The center did have this Case argued before the Supreme Court. It was called. You'd Medical Services Verses Reso- way back when which seems like a lifetime ago back in March for five years ago in March one hundred years ago a century ago. And you know coming off of that. It's really really thought that we were going to enter. In to a time where we would just watch the state legislatures in see if they would pass bans or other restrictions. That's what we do in a normal year every year state legislatures need. Sometimes they'll be proactive bills to protect reproductive rights but oftentimes as you guys have homeless in the media. There's bands being on promulgated twenty week bands sixty bands fifty week bands like the and most recently last year you saw Alabama which I like basically a total ban on. Yes so that's what we track normally and it gets to a point where those Bills Become Law. We go ahead and bring our lawsuits in court so our state team very much tracks. Those laws are litigation team goes to court and try walk those laws and that's kind of the the bread and butter of what I do. Now when Corona virus and cove in nineteen crisis began As many of your listeners are out there We began to work from home and we started to see basically that first week Several states pass Either through their governor's executive orders or through the Health Department. These notices and basically there were very differently worded. You know across the different states. But it said something like no. You're non-essential your elective or minor. Procedures would have to be postponed now. I want to emphasize that makes total sense right. Like if you have your nose job scheduled you should probably hold off right. Nope oh talks right now. Plays right exactly the hold off on that. But then we saw You know none of these orders had the word abortion in it you know. We saw some. That had actually proactive measures. that resulted from. Illinois. New Jersey Massachusetts. California Michigan The stage for a lawn saying but definitely not for pregnancy related care definitely not Okay including abortion so we saw stomach ulcers now of course you know your Spidey Sense. Kinda tingles when words like this right and And this is not us being paranoid Clearly time has shown. That's exactly what certain states did. But we started tracking Kind of the actions of different governmental actors in certain states. That are the what? I'd like to call market leaders in Abortion Resign Cambridge. So it's the typical group of folks in these states and we saw the first one out we were tracking star roles states in the south and the Midwest and we saw Ohio's governor on at Saturday after their executive order issued publicly. Go out there and say well. Of course. Abortion is nonessential or non time-sensitive. Nastase stop. Because you know you can stop a pregnancy. Yeah that's not time sensitive. We only have Bans for time sensitive bands. But it's not time sensitive isn't time sensitive F. Yeah exactly it's like you can put pregnancy on a shelf right so no that's not without delay due date just hit the bus so obviously alarmed a lot of lawyers so we got together with a lot of our litigating friends out. There are so we work a lot with planned parenthood. Aclu and the learning projects along with my organization the Center for Reproductive Rights. We decided okay. We're going to start tracking what's going on here since. Ohio clearly put us on high alert. There were certain states that we were pretty sure Would Act similarly all suits so he can imagine Texas was high up there and guess what went on there but So that's kind of what we started to see 'em then we started seeing more and more public displays by Attorney General's by governors by different health department officials saying. Yeah you know what abortion is going to be banned for this time period and we're going to say that it's nonessential we're GONNA say it's not time sensitive and you're GonNa have to halt During this time now I want to just say that you know. There's some intuitive appeal to this. I want to make it clear to you all on your listeners right yeah. Pregnancy is not static. I think that's basic principle and these states. You can save all sorts of the equipment that you need during this pandemic you know and you should just put it on hold because it's not essential and I wanted to make clear two things one. The states that are saying this are the same vendors have tried right. I wanted to be clear that it's it's not like Mary. Transparent right it's it's what's been clear and they are putting press releases out there saying they're gonNA shut down clinics and they're making their role as explicit as possible like the purpose is so clear when they're out they're just putting it out there in the public. It's it's pretty wild and then I just want to also emphasize the science right. Forget the lawyers like my job is to make arguments for our clients but science has weighed in here and immediately and I wonder what I rightly know. The American Medical Association truthfully had not weighed in on abortion for the longest time out there that this is not a time for politicians to be deciding what is time essential on what is not like those are for the doctors and provide professionals to decide rain events basic concept and the American college obstetricians gynecologists which is the leading medical group for Obgyn's explicitly said and then they came out almost immediately when they started seeing this initial trend in Ohio and Texas. And they said Look. This is not abortionist. Absolutely time-sensitive care. It is necessary if you are pregnant. Go either get. Ob Care if it's a wanted pregnancy and absolutely get your abortion if it's an unwanted pregnancy abortion is do you remember the date that that happened. When when people I started to notice this was happening it was a little bit over a month ago and I think if you kind of Google are friendly there we could not but it's around. I would say we started March march sixteenth. That gap of sixteen than really kind of picking up That week and so it's been a little bit over a month and of course I've mentioned two states Texas and Ohio but Not just them right now. We have eight states that have been explicit. And I just want to emphasize here before we if you WANNA go into detail about those states like those are the ones that are lawsuits on alright. I Call Leagues and the Litigating Groups. I mentioned were also monitor training and preparing legal. I in several states that have had these stop goes like there. Were these public. Statements knows a withdrawal and and so they're way more than eight states kind of odd about using this opportunity and down to ban abortion care. These eighths eighths Like I said are the worst offenders before we move forward. I just wanted to clarify when we talk about these states Announcing these these bands you know stops are. They're saying that it's temporary. Are they putting out? Are they saying that? I'm assuming they are for now but as the same are stay at home orders. Just keep getting extended. I'm wondering if they're saying it's just for a few weeks. Or what have you and you can wait a few weeks. Is that kind of what we're seeing so in some states. Yes right. So they're not cut copy and paste stage so in certain states. There are okay. It's going to last till the end of the month in certain states. They'll be like oh if but it'll get extended if necessary some states actually. Don't have anything. Some states actually stay until further notice which is actually even more offensive because it's so early and right But I just WanNa be clear that Abortion terrorists incredibly safe but it is more safe if you get it all right. There's no reason to delay healthcare in any capacity and for a state legislator and state officials to be saying you know what even though this is considered essential health care by the AMA and all believing health and public health officials. That are out there. Yeah you still want you to stop. We still want to wait a month or wait even longer than that because no one knows how long this is going to go right and so on the surface. This is infuriating. But it's even more so when you start to think about who specifically this is affecting The majority of people that require abortions. I don't have the statistics but I know I know that they're you know. Maybe the people that are single mothers or you already have children and they are low income and now they are without work or their now in charge of the daycare for their existing children or God. Even there's people that are sheltering in place in environments with. They aren't safe to communicate with their partner. Maybe they're sheltering with their abuser and they don't have anybody that can reach out and talk to about this stuff and and this guy's of saying that this is for public health and public. Safety is so backwards because the opposite happens yes. People might take matters into their own hands or they're going to try to go out of state to find treatment and a lot of these people are in states in states that are surrounded by other states that also have abortion bans. Or what have you? Yes so this is absolutely true. You've hit upon so many burdens that we see from our clients patients all the time in normal

United States Reproductive Rights Center For Reproductive Rights Texas Ohio Jenny Executive Attorney Cambridge Alabama MA Midwest Massachusetts Illinois Supreme Court Aclu
PGA tour announces mid-June return in Texas

WAOK On Air

02:57 min | 9 months ago

PGA tour announces mid-June return in Texas

"Golf as the PGA tour announced yesterday that it hopes to be back in action by June the PGA once the plate fourteen more vents are for the twenty nineteen to twenty twenty season starting with the Oct Charles Schwab classic at the colonial club in fort worth Texas on June eleventh through the fourteenth and end up with the tour championship at east lake in Atlanta September fourth through seven that will end and then we'll get the twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty one season started with the U. S. open the Ryder Cup and the masters who has a lot to squeeze in you know when you're talking about September fourth the seventh now we know the masters is set their target date as the same weekend as is Tennessee Georgia right early part of November okay obviously the U. S. open Ryder Cup that's all going to be figured out PGA championship that will happen before the R. tour championship at east lake so that's covered we know that the British open is canceled so they're not rescheduling that so really the idea would be you'll get a one major before the tour championship and then you'll start to pick up you know a couple of majors at the end of this year and then get back into a normal schedule where you'll play the masters in November you're playing again in April you'll play the U. S. open I don't know when I mean I don't I don't think they have any idea about when the U. S. open is trying to to get back on board let's say it's sometime in October maybe let's say let's just for crafting it'll say sometime in October that will push the U. S. open you know to what when they don't play that made it June or something like that may or what have you have you know that that that usually I you know they've they've convinced all these majors now because they try to squeeze a man to make sure that they're in a reasonable time frame with the PGA within the a tour championship at the end of the quarter quote season if you at least for the golf season for all of it so the and the pastor who is the PGA tour chief tournaments and come our competitions officer and senior vice president and chief of operations tattered dentist discuss the tourist plans for the rest of twenty twenty in a teleconference with the media yesterday so they would say with a hundred percent certain that there will resume less than two months from now but he said tour officials are quote unquote very confident that we'll be able to play that second week in June our first and foremost concern throughout the resumption of the PGA tour schedule will be the safety and well being of everyone connected to and not just the PGA tour but those communities where we play we will play only when we are certain that is safe responsible to do that we aren't these the same monitoring very closely all the developments at the local city state and federal level and given that we're a global organization with members all over the world will also play very close attention to what's happening outside the borders of the

Golf
The search for a coronavirus vaccine and the challenges we're facing

Coronacast

06:51 min | 10 months ago

The search for a coronavirus vaccine and the challenges we're facing

"Norman. Let's start with the World Health Organization. Us President Donald Trump says America is going to halt funding to the. Who and he reckons. It's because what he calls. Its failure to move faster when the virus was first emerging in China. What does this mean well? The United States of America is the largest donor to who? It's hard to know. Exactly what it? W budget is because there's a global budget for W. H. O. And in different parts of the World Health Organization gets separate budget lines like for HIV AIDS and malaria. And there's different programs in it but it's it's about the size of a large advanced country teaching hospital you'd several is maybe five or six billion dollars and America is the largest donor. It's hard to calculate. Exactly how much America gives because they get assessed for a certain amount of money. America historically is usually behind in its payments. So it's historically over many years being in arrears and so it's unclear just how much it owes. Who but it's a significant. Hit the caveat. Here's is really how much they've been giving actually being given W. H. over recent times but it's a significant hit the World Health Organization needs. Its money most. What is the value of having a global organization? That's overseeing health. At a global scale motel fog comes into its own and crises like these such as boiler and pandemic such as this humanitarian crises. And it really comes into its own in countries which are poorly resourced which don't have strong health systems which need intervention need expertise. And you coordinate. That expertise also can coordinate across borders. And it's not as if w shows above criticism. They probably withheld criticism of China. China's also a big donor to. Who and there's legitimate criticism to be made of W. H. Show? They went soft on China. Just after. The pandemic can notice critical. They probably should have been but the whol for all its faults is the major organization. That's going to help large numbers of people billions of people throughout the world through this so credit cost is a podcast answering your questions about corona virus and one of the questions. We've been getting a lot on is about. Antibodies immunity so we know that the body's response to an infection is really complex. Antibodies are a big part of these. What do we know about what? Antibodies are developed in the in the body infection and whether we could harness that to provide immunity to people who haven't been infected yet. We're two different types of immunity that are essentially so our immune system is essentially the army that we muster to fight foreign invaders and there's two aspects to that immunity. One is the white blood cells in our body in our blood and some of these white blood cells are like tanks which attack the foreign invaders themselves to the. T. Cells and then you've got other white blood cells called B. Cells and they're the ones that produce the antibodies and it's a coordinated attack and for viruses like SARS covy to the B. Cells produce antibodies. So they recognize that there's a foreign invader and these B cells they don't attack the virus itself they produce. Antibodies and these antibodies find. Part of this virus is foreign invader that they can latch onto and they latch onto that and the fact that they've latched onto that alerts the rest of the immune system to say there's an invader and the cells coming and attacking trump up the virus or attack it directly through through various means. There's another white blood cells called macrophage which can trump up white blood cells and CHOP FOREIGN INVADERS. And so there's a whole series of attack mechanisms. Antibodies with viruses of the first line of defense that really whistle up the rest of the immune system. It's a bit more obviously a lot more complicated than that. But the antibodies where one of the first elements of the immune system that modern medical science discovered. And so do we have a test that can detect them for guided. They're developing tests. So the core of of an antibody is called IMMUNOGLOBULIN and there's different kinds of immunoglobulin and so there's an annual g. m. so just just the code name for it and that's an early antibody response and then there's an antibody which is a late antibody response and these two antibodies can tell together can tell whether you've been infected either recently or more distantly from the covered nineteen virus unlike HIV. The covered one thousand nine hundred probably not going to be very good for diagnosis. They're going to be much better for testing the population to see who's been infected. Who hasn't and work out. What the pattern is now? You ask them didn't answer your question but does everybody deb January antibodies. And how long do they last for? Which is key to both developing a vaccine and how long your immune system alerts to these foreign invaders and it's a very mixed picture with SARS one. It looked as off. You've got to live infection with SARS. One probably lasted about a year or so sometimes longer than that but the common cold viruses which are also corona viruses. They sometimes only lasts a few months. So it's not really fully known yet. How long antibodies will last two covered nineteen? The thinking is maybe a year but it could be less than a year so it could be that. If you got it you become immune for a little while or even if we could get a vaccine to work we might. It might not be a lifelong vaccine. Almost certainly will not be a lifelong vaccine The there's no question that the best immunity you get is when you get a live infection oversee. That's not what you want with. Nineteen and second-best will be the vaccine and the question is just how long that will ho how long that will last and that's yet to be determined and it's one of the conundrums with a vaccine is first of all. Can you generate an immune response? Antibodies are these the right antibodies that will attack the virus. And then how long do they and other side effects from these antibodies or the way the alert the immune system which is what happened with SARS? One they're over activated the immune system and win the monkeys that got this vaccine were challenged with the actual virus. They developed a very strong immune response which started attacking the the monkeys on body which is in fact what happened with SARS. And that's how SARS could you and it's actually how covered nineteen. You says a long way to go to make sure these vaccines are effective last losing one time and

World Health Organization China America B. Cells T. Cells Donald Trump United States Norman. President Trump Aids W. H. O. W. H.
Trump teases announcement on World Health Organization after threatening funding

Sisters In Law with Janice and Davida Mathis

00:24 sec | 10 months ago

Trump teases announcement on World Health Organization after threatening funding

"Amid the ongoing pandemic president trump wants to cut funding to the World Health Organization the president says he'll have more to say about that next week but argues the WHL has treated the United States very unfairly the president notes the U. S. gives the global organization up to five hundred million dollars each year the president calls the W. H. O. very China

Donald Trump World Health Organization President Trump WHL United States
Coronavirus is a totally different disaster for philanthropies to handle

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

09:16 min | 10 months ago

Coronavirus is a totally different disaster for philanthropies to handle

"Darren Walker. Thank you very much for coming back to the PODCAST. I'm happy to back on them. So you're every year you send out a New Year's letter in this in this year's letter was entitled how we move forward during the year ahead and in it you decry how we're losing ground on a whole host of issues that democratic values and institutions remain in retreat as a quote from the letter. You also say in the letter quote. This is a time to step up not check out a time to reenlist. Re-engage and reconnect. And you ask a question that is pretty remarkable given where we are right now you wrote quote what new crisis needs to befall us before we together are spur to collective action is covert nineteen that new crisis that will spur collective action. I hope it is. I hope that out of this horrific calamity. We can emerge a stronger nation. A more empathetic people a society where we realize that we have a shared destiny that we realized that our future is one future a future that is dependent on our willingness to act as one our willingness to engage as one and our belief in the idea of equal status them. You know you have been either in your role at Ford or your previous role when you're at The Rockefeller Foundation. You've been a part of many calamities. Both Mother Nature created and manmade I seem to remember there was Detroit bankruptcy there was a new orleans rebuilding after Katrina up. Have you seen anything like this? That we're going through right now. There has never been anything like this virus to hit the world. There's never been a a calamity of this scale and scope and intensity and every crisis I've been involved in where there's been some terrible act of God or whatever you WanNa call it In in it usually place based in some part of the world there is some terrible thing ebola or so Nami in Southeast Asia and the rest of the world can rush to help because the rest of the world is stable prosperous and doing very well generally speaking and this case the entire planet is on edge the entire globe is impacted by this Kobe. Nineteen hours there is no place on earth where one can seek refuge from this and believe that you won't be impacted and so the question for us is. How do we respond in a circumstance that truly does require that we build a consensus that Necessitates a global response not just a response at the country level and particularly response that recognizes that the inequality that we see in the world and in our society will be exacerbated by this corona virus crisis. If we don't as we design how we get out of this and we work through this we are paying attention to the inequality that existed before this virus hit us. We're going to actually make things worse for the very people who are most vulnerable and most at risk. I WANNA get into a little bit deeper into that in a moment but as president of the Ford Foundation. Correct me if I'm if my memory is failing me here but you have a major presence in India and just recently. A India went on a national lockdown. We're talking about one point. Something Billion People on what? How does that impact the work? That Ford does while in a country like India. Our work is focused on civil society and strengthening civil society supporting the rights of women and Dulles Indigenous People until those communities are absolutely impacted because these lockdowns basically impact their ability to earn a living. And most of these folks earn a living As garbage pickers as day laborers people living off of cash and so they are absolutely impacted but on the other hand it's important that India as a nation have a uniform standard way of approaching. This and I think the prime minister has done that. Interestingly we also have an office in Beijing so our China office closed in January as a result of the virus hitting Beijing where we have an office and Within days our office closed. What's very interesting? Is that this week. Our office in Beijing opened. And so we've got a reopening of an office and the a ten offices of Ford in other parts of the world are all closed now so we have this almost this this reversal and so in some ways. What we've seen in our office in Beijing May Portend Our future in that. That office was closed for ten weeks before was able to be reopened and we'll see if We follow a similar pattern here in the US. So let's dive into what you said Just a moment ago about you know how we design the response to Covet. Nineteen will determine whether the societal issues that countries were dealing with before. Kovac's nineteen whether they're exacerbated and I don't mean this as as a partisan question but it is it is a question that has been lurking in my mind. I sort of troubled. By the fact that the United States is not in the forefront of leading in terms of responding to cope with nineteen can can the United States can nations get past this without concerted driven fact based Response from leadership leadership is essential here and the importance of leadership has never been more elevated And felt at at at at anytime in my lifetime than this moment. We're in most certainly the work of global organizations like the WHO is essential and working with them on global strategies and global approaches. Is the only way we're going to actually Get on the other side. If you will I I I don't think it's a secret to say that the US has not sought leadership in many global fora the traditional Seats at the head of the table that we assumed and that we championed global ideas The this is not a part of who we are today in terms of and I think something we have to really consider Do we want the United States to be a a global leader a global organizer a global. Convener I believe we do. I believe it is in our national interest for the US to be engaged in the world and to set a standard and an example of excellence of Democratic Participation Of OF COLLEAGUE SHIP.

Ford Beijing United States India Darren Walker Ford Foundation Rockefeller Foundation Southeast Asia Reenlist Ebola Detroit Dulles Prime Minister Katrina President Trump Kovac China
"global organization" Discussed on This is Product Management

This is Product Management

04:11 min | 10 months ago

"global organization" Discussed on This is Product Management

"Expertise. A full range of banking products and create that magic combination to explore early stage markets in early stage growth concepts so the basic structure of the program is on my team. We HAVE PORTFOLIO MANAGERS. That are kind of exploring problem spaces within the banking world particularly oriented around. Get a new emerging growth patterns that we see These kind of signals in the market of were there might be scaling kind of trend and those portfolio managers are are kind of managing a set of bets in the form of organic product development to kind of explore space. Then we have entrepreneurs in residence that are connected to that work in my team and the common denominator among them is. They've gone through the product development cycle in kind of startup world. They've got that sense of what it takes to develop a product particularly in an early stage market. Which is that expertise. That frankly doesn't sit you know. There's not a lot of that at city because you're dealing with kind of a scam with your business so we take the PM's and we take the entrepreneurs in residence on my team. We pair them with people with intensity that have great product ideas and really kind of a strong knowledge of the customer pain points existing solutions existing marquette and then kind of create this Combo to generate new concepts and test them invalidate them in market. We do that by going through kind of disciplined venture cycle of investment. So even though these are internally sourced ideas right what you know. Kinda derived from this Combo of like city personnel with subject matter expertise entrepreneurs on the outside we make them go through a process. That's pitching a startup. So you begin with an idea of a kind of a market need and then like any startup team. Do GonNA validate that market. Need then you you get some money to basically kind of validate that market. The there's some capital that invested in just that pure exploration then. It's like okay. I have a solution. I kinda deemed that this is a valid market. It's one that city wants to place a further bet on now. We want to kind of identify. A product market fit right. What's the solution we can provide that kind of meats this market name and then test into that and doing all the kind of tools that you do use rapid prototyping piloting minimum viable product discipline to kind of test? That in market. And that's kind of your think of it as another round of investment assuming that you've now validated the market and you've kind of validated. Some product market fit. Then I think a unique aspect of large institutions in general is even though you might have a market need a product market fit. Doesn't necessarily mean you have a franchise. Fit and franchises were were scale and institutional processes come in there are tons of startup products that get developed out there. The achieve market kind of market need and product market fit. And they kind of go through this entire cycle of growth and die before they're even relevant to large institutions so this franchise fit phase is super-critical right. And that's where we're looking at is it complied it. Does it be kind of regulatory scrutiny? Is it scalable? Enough on scope. That would be meaningful to city and audio products and distribution channels. If you've cheated them market validation product market fit validation franchise validation then is now a matter of then scaling within the context of Global Organization like city and through existing channels existing markets to existing ways in which we can truly kind of turn a great or great solution into a you know come globally leading product or even a sector so that kind of gives you a sense of how evolution works all of that stage gated with that discipline that you would apply to startups in venture capital. We'RE DOLING OUT INVESTMENT BASED UPON. Evidence. There's achieved through those state gates and then just pairing city personnel with entrepreneurs who kind of compartment.

product development Global Organization
Harnessing the Power of Stem Cells with Christopher Kennedy, President at Elixell Therapeutics

Outcomes Rocket

11:56 min | 11 months ago

Harnessing the Power of Stem Cells with Christopher Kennedy, President at Elixell Therapeutics

"I WANNA welcome Christopher and Chris if you can Say Hi and fill in any other blanks of the intro. That may be. I may have missed that. You want to educate the listeners. Great thank you for hosting this morning and I and I look forward to a really good discussion. Yes so exciting. Time for us here in Kansas City as you mentioned Our offices actually at the Bio Science and Technology Center that's Housed on Kansas University Medical Center campus here in Kansas City. Kansas so this area is essentially set up perfectly for collaborative organization like ourselves. We're really trying to pull in best in class. Researchers best in class practices when it comes to the laboratories themselves the clinical work excited or and so we feel like. We're kind of in a hub here in Kansas City. Even though sometimes we don't think of the midwest of being a hub of innovation. Things are changing here in Kansas City. So I'm excited to represent the the eulex style therapeutic specifically but in the greater community as well. Well I think it's awesome and Christopher the work that is happening outside of those traditionally thought of focal centers like Francisco or Boston or where a lot of the effort seem to be happening. There's more happening in in the flyover states and being in Chicago. Lot happening here. That maybe doesn't always hit the radar so. I'm glad you're plugging in the word for your neck of the Woods Casey. So what exactly inspires your work in healthcare. Yeah so just before we move onto that question saw just kind of highlight what you just mentioned there Interestingly enough we have thirteen patents and our Ip actually comes from the Towers Institute which is based here in Kansas City. And before I moved to the area I also was not as aware of the great technologies that have come out of this particular geography but the Stars Institute for for listeners. That aren't familiar with. It is a global research institute. It's a six hundred thousand square foot facility here in Kansas City. And this is one of the first license out license technologies. That has come out of there. That eulex therapeutics has the privilege of working on. But Yeah it's to your point as well. I mean I grew up in the Chicago area. Also another great hub of innovation and ironically on this project that I'm working with there's actually a Chicago footprint as well as a Kansas City footprint. So yeah more than ever my wave in the Midwest flag so love it represents you get to your question about what inspires healthcare. I I find it interesting when I think of your title so outcomes rocket my career has been really focused on patient outcomes and I I love the term. I know that it's probably becoming more and more use potentially over using some regards now on the healthcare circle but I love it because it really aligns with a scoreboard right like a performance scoreboard where we at and where we going and he looks. Therapeutics was constructed on the premise of we can go further when it comes to stem cells particularly the advanced themselves sciences and when. I say themselves from our perspective. I'm talking about poetics. Themselves with adult stem cells versus the embryonic stem cells. That are in the media today so H. SC's are the focus for us because there is so much potential around the therapeutic side of what can be in the future in a lot of our umbilical cord banks throughout not just the US but worldwide and so- outcomes are clearly are focused. Here's walls. We feel that we can utilize a new technologies to really impact the patient at the bedside here in the near future. Yeah that's interesting and appreciate the differentiation there. Christopher what would you say? The business is doing specifically to add value to the healthcare ecosystem. Help US diving deeper and understand what the value prop is. Yeah and I think. This is a benefit to watching a company in twenty twenty to be frank right that we've been able to capitalize maximize the opportunities that exist. Now you mentioned earlier on the intro. Some of the work that I had done the telemedicine virtual care space and never. Is that more important in. Today's I think clinical time but also when it comes to clinical research so we're global organization and we have ties to Asia Europe. And then of course here in the US but our researchers are really in a full term of collaborative research together. And so we've cut down. I think a lot of the time. Line that traditionally this taken to get all the parties set up and ready to go when I come. You know for clinical work for example or just on a project in general and working with academic institutions large research institutions like the University of Chicago or Kansas University of Kansas and being able to transition Ip out and then get the research up and running is really been something that we focused on early on and successfully. I feel that we are implementing that and the proof point of that right. The outcome of what I just mentioned would be our scientific advisory board so traditionally in my experience. The Scientific Advisory Board for Big Pharma Small Pharma Biotech Med device and all of those spaces is very critical in the direction organization. Takes but just on our scientific advisory board. We've got six globally world-renowned research academic type Individuals who I think in years past without the you know. The advent of some of our current technologies would have taken a lot longer to get together and working on the same project so institutions like Penn. Yeah we have University of Chicago Ball University of Indiana researchers from University of Kansas. That I mentioned earlier Stars Institute all sitting on our advisory board and it allows for us to cut down the time it takes potentially to have a novel concept or an idea in them tested on the laboratory taxi tested in our early clinical phase. To See if it's viable or not and then to get feedback from a global perspective from the SAB. The Scientific Advisory Board has been instrumental. So the right now. We know the to pass. The Ron have the best chance to reach their outcome at the end for patients. Love it so if you think about what makes what you and the company does different and better than what available today. What is it so let's talk about the technology rising when to that ASPECT OF HSE STEM CELL? Topic is big. And there's essentially what I feel some sort of a race going on for getting technology into the marketplace that allows us to really recognize all of the stem cell opportunities within Belco cords themselves. Right so just says as a layman that I was entering into this project really understanding of the D. N. A. M. R. N. A. Aspect of of how life is working and uncovering the researchers that we have the privilege to interact with on our team published a really important and I would definitely classify this as a breakthrough paper and this was specific to and cell research the suppression of success a reader. Which is the White Dwarf to that? We're focused on under these. This category of an fix a reader and six say reader modulators essentially an expression of of Mres right so when we talk about DNA and the communication channels within cells. There's a communication that happens that really specific to stem cell fate determination. And what we've done is uncovered that with whites. Hdf to Professor Lynne. Hanley in Schwann. He both uncovered the fact that when you knock out whites. Hdf to all of the sudden we start to see a really successful stem cell expansion so one becomes two to become a three and so on and so forth and this stem cell expansion allows us to take potential biblical cord banks that are out there today and really go head into the challenge of having limited cells that are available and these banks. So you have all these blood cord banks that are out there. But the issue is both uncovering the actual cells themselves. So how many cells are stored right within the blood cord and then getting them so that we can have more of them essentially and what we're learning now on what's going on in our lab is how do we use this white T H D of. Two knockout or blocking mechanism to then help those cells. We already have in a bank expand and they'd be more therapeutically viable for diseases. Let's talk about oncology. For example where one of our first pipeline products is currently underway. Also from an orthopedic application when you think about cartilage regeneration so stem cells and set them themselves allow us to have the potential to really impact in a really large number of different disease states. And I think we're on the cutting edge of being able to recognize how powerful discoveries like this can be and that's our big differentiation. Salt as you know and my stays being a part of an early stage biotech. We pivot often. So we're we're starting right now. We've already moved a few places to the left or to the right to get to our early clinical work but that's our differentiation. Today is definitely the publication that kind of expresses what we're doing under why Tgif to interesting and so appreciate you you're honing in on that Whitey HD F two and it's basically this isn't my specialty but it's a protein right that basically encodes a gene and potentially is responsible for some of the diseases. Were seeing cancer will. What we know is. The setback forced themselves their piece today. Is it's hard to get the volume of a number of cells and into the correct location. Potentially do their job. And because of that that limitation. It's almost a self limitation of pure numbers. Race is on to find out well. How do we unlock the potential for those souls that we currently have banked become more and so when you block white t? Hdf to their allows in a particularly in the actual article that was published by Lynne. Hanley and Sean. He led the more than tenfold increase and the bench. So big you're looking and then when you look at measuring evidence no you can't no it is a From a scientific terminology standpoint. It's an say reader. But there's a modulation aspect of that right because these in Marin as when you essentially modify or work with the actual Ima- reader than the the results can happen like we're seeing in this clinical work. Now we still have more more work to do on this front right. And so that's where research is currently going on and the human element of things but in the animal models It's really impressive. And so where we sit today were versus where we'll sit even twelve. Eighteen months from now is exciting and every day. We're looking at Trends right and so I feel like you know again back to our term outcomes. That's the common language between layman like ourselves. That aren't biochemist right or molecular biologist and for us to hang in conversations with our backgrounds on more the business side of healthcare we all can agree upon is. What are the outcomes that we're looking for in the clinical work in what our objectives are overall? And so we've done that. I think successfully Here in the early stages to kind of keep us on track and also we've been very very fortunate to sit on University of Kansas medical centers. Campus where we are working with. It's called Ami if you're here locally but it's Institute for Advancing Medical Innovation at Ku and this group is essentially a gold standard for what we've been talking about in this call so so far and that is taking best in class practices and taking a true collaborative approach to getting something that was discovered in a laboratory getting through clinical trial work. And then. Really getting out to patient bedside. Where it's driving these outcomes so I think that's been refreshing for me to see not just like the theory of how do you launch a biotech company but then to actually being a place where these resources already set up and it's really helping our

Kansas City Christopher Chicago United States Kansas Advisory Board Scientific Advisory Board Stars Institute Bio Science And Technology Cen Kansas University Medical Cent University Of Kansas Medical C Professor Lynne Kansas University Of Kansas Hanley Midwest University Of Kansas
Givelify - Bi-Lingual Customer Success Specialist

My Career Fit

04:14 min | 11 months ago

Givelify - Bi-Lingual Customer Success Specialist

"So my name is Stephanie Miller talent acquisition manager would be a really high priority need for bilingual customer success. Specialist person is dedicated to our mission of increasing. Land therapy by growing Race relieffactor on morning and ongoing success support so specific. Arnovitz is that we need a Spanish English speaking inside sales ish type of person who is able to connect with various churches of all sizes of the nominations in order to manage those customers with their pastors and back offices Looking for that person to be goal and revenue driven with the ability to exhibit a high level of team more support current and future customers in a high growth environment in Stephanie Disposition. Serves as a subject matter expert on Products Technology in the sales. Approach that Gabala. Fai takes Is this a standard enroll or part of a larger team? It's part of a team for sure. we do have a couple of Spanish speaking success coaches and within sales But as we're growing within the Hispanic stays we need that person who is dedicated to working with the those those churches in organizations that were adding. Yes so the position really is responsible for things like developing an understanding of customers fundraising goals helping them cultivate relationships. Coaching your customers with support information and things like that. Can you tell us? Sort of what the data days going to be like for this person so it One Who has yes on the phone with With our current customer base kind of account managing wealth And then also Sharing other reasons on Or other other ways on how we can enhance your your donations at your church and having those conversations with the pastures back offices. I'm also looking for this person to go to some of the conferences as well and being able to engage face to face with others While at these conferences and just educating Educating people about our APP and how to download and how to use it and how pretty easy. It's just tap give done and And that's that's the brand being able to effectively are read. Write and speak. The Spanish language is highly needed for this position. Not just conversational but being able to just understand deeper dive in having different conversations with with people Versus hold on. Let me get my let me Google. This and you know doesn't so being able to flow. I'll that's that's definitely important and not being a really good teammate. We have a great team in place and just being open to ideas and sharing your ideas and being a part of a greater good and really strong team in place already. You'll find a lot of people who joined by come from larger global organization around And this is such to a different environment and and the people right for me. It's always about the people and that's exactly why joined by Is is the people they care about what they're doing the our mission our vision and we care about each other

Stephanie Miller Stephanie Disposition Gabala FAI Arnovitz Google Products Technology
Facebook to help combat virus misinformation

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 11 months ago

Facebook to help combat virus misinformation

"Facebook says it will work hard at digging out fake corona virus information mark Zuckerberg says the social network is stepping up its efforts to combat virus related misinformation by giving the World Health Organization free advertising sucker but adds the company is working with national health ministries and global organizations to get out timely and accurate information on the virus and also to he says give support and millions more in credits to unspecified groups Facebook has previously taken out measures to fight virus hoaxes and misinformation including removing false claims and conspiracy theories I'm Charles the late this month

Facebook Charles Mark Zuckerberg World Health Organization
Default male bias makes for generations of invisible women, author tells UN audience

UN News

11:06 min | 1 year ago

Default male bias makes for generations of invisible women, author tells UN audience

"Although women make up half the global population they are often disregarded in the increasingly important world of big data uh-huh from measuring economic growth to disaster response and recovery or key public transportation planning on award winning author said at the United Nations on Friday. Friday Caroline Creo peress shared some of the findings from her book. Invisible women data bias in a world designed for men during a presentation nation at the UN bookshop in New York following a morning retreat with senior leaders focused on gender equality Nala Valgy the US. I Senior Gender Gerrad Pfizer in the executive office of the secretary. General asked Miss Creo Peres would inspired her to write the book and how the Global Organization can learn from her research on default male bias. The book came about because of how I became a feminist. How I became a feminist was discovered that default mail was going on in my own head and Prior to that I'd actually been pretty hostile to feminism. I I feel that women had a quality and that feminism was just an excuse for women's complain about them not really putting in the effort them not choosing to strive them not being interested in politics in leadership. I had a very low opinion of my sex and it wasn't until I went to university as a mature student when I was twenty five. You've got to engage with ideas agenda and so I started thinking about representations women and I started thinking about how I had been taught basically the about mental my life. The history lent was about men. The books I was told to read were Bouman Batman When I was told about science it was presented to me as if all the discoveries had been made by men and so I think we'll look at it that way as any surprise that I had this loan opinion of women so I got very interested in how important it was for women to see women who so that they didn't internalize this misogyny Vat a cultures so infested with but then I started to see that actually existed in these more even more damaging ways I mean I think obviously it's very damaging for women's women sense of self but then I started noticing? Well this actually is how large tar economy is structured for example. GDP this number that that we hold up as the representation of the economy. This is what's going on. It is a number that we don't question. This is how the economy in this country is and gets missing the entire amount of unpaid work. That women do which is a huge contributed to the economy and without which the former economy would not function. You know it requires that childcare is done that the house is cleaned. The groceries are picked up that the clothes are washed. That lunch is made you know all these things that happen invisibly actually have an economic value in fact when the decision was being made about what. GDP was going to look like there was a discussion about whether women's on page work should be included in. It's never been disputed that it has an economic value but ultimately it was decided and this is a really repeated impeach theme. I came across in my research that it was too complicated to Mecha- and that really is something. came up again and again and again women are just too complicated. Our body's are too complicated. Our Web Passan's achieve complicated or travel patterns too complicated everything about us. It's too complicated then. I discovered refugee policy says. UN declaration on refugees. Which is obviously this incredibly historic important documents which was drawn up with the best of intentions? You know after World War Two the idea being that no one should ever be rendered stateless again and you shouldn't have have to stay in a country where you being persecuted but when you look at this you know. Gender neutral presented an agenda neutral way document you realize that they're only stipulations that will affect men and women differently for example having to flee the country that you are being persecuted in before you can claim asylum will. That's so much more difficult for a woman than a man Dan and what if the person that she's being persecuted by the person who's meant to be accompanying her then women even does manage to leave. You can't just walk up and say hey I'm being persky excutives giving me asylum. You have to be able to prove that you'll be persecuted for set number of reasons and those including sexuality political affiliation but the number one reason and women will give you for weathering Husky to this because there are about something on FDM because of their political beliefs but because the female so you are here at the United Nations nations and of course Refugee Work Humanitarian Assistance Development. Peace and security. These are all critical areas of the work that the does and you write specifically about peace and security in post conflict you also write about host disaster rebuilding. Can you tell us a little bit about what are the implications of the male. The default bias with regards to post conflict recovery with regards to disaster in and post-disaster and what does that mean for our work. One of the frustrations about post conflict in place. Disaster is that there is a set of general consensus often. That that we're in a crisis pay the ladies. Just shut up and let us get on with it. You know this idea. That genda is a distraction from you. Know the main issue that this little side thing that we can deal with later you know. There's that very famous as we'll get to the women after the Revolution A.. And that's basically the way that we seem to often act in a crisis mode we retrench. We go back to traditional ways of doing things you know if you don't think about it very hot. It seems reasonable. Yes we've got more important things to be worrying about whether the women are included like trying to save lives here. The problem with that is that lives. Life's are more likely to be lost if you don't address gender in these marlins because actually women's lives are most vulnerable in a post-conflict situation Russian on most vulnerable in Xausa situation and that is not because women are inherently weaker. It's because the societies that we live live in position women in ways that mean the less likely to be able to survive and they're more likely to be heavily impacted for example. I am that the site planes in in I was I think it was in Bangladesh. Beat for the book. I'm a disaster relief specialist and she was explaining to me why women were more likely to die died. It was this series of things that had nothing to do with with biologically. It was all to do with social reasons so festival women women weren't even getting the warning disliked warning why because the settling warnings were in public spaces. And so the women were reliant on the men to come back and say hey. There's a slight phone. You better get to the shelter Delta and they went getting. The message is a simple. As that they just didn't know second dyslexic shelters themselves would not built with with an idea about gender so they were just these big spaces mixed-sex and if the women went in there they were getting sexually assaulted they were seen as easy women. Because they're mixing with the men on or they wouldn't go in that because they didn't want to have a bad reputation they choose between saving my life saving my reputation which can be the same as saving your life in the in the off often the off to survive. Does it worse surviving. If you're going to be ostracized for the rest of your life. They didn't provide a animal. Shelters in these cycling's faces and animals were the responsibility of the women into the women would stay to the animals and then after in the the disaster relief officer the claim they built these homes and they built them without kitchens and they built them without animal shelters again both these areas that women are responsible for and so you see from the beginning to the end from surviving the cyclone to being able to live in the post disaster scenario. If you haven't accounted for genda these ridiculous things happened that make women more likely to die. Made them unable to pick up their lives and carry on often as you say in the book that there are three ways in which the male default bias misses. The experiences of women one is Women's experiences of violence smoke in the other is the fact that women give birth and the third is unpaid care work and This morning and the retreat. You gave an example of the way in which missing the the unpaid care work Implicates itself in policy And as a result of that in public transportation policy can you tell us a little little bit about the show the example that that I was talking about with two straight the importance of not just collecting sex disaggregated data. But it's also very important. How you analyze it and to question the assumptions that you may have before you start to analyze the data so entrenched will the traditional away? That's transport data has been segregated has been transferred. Paid employment is all put together in one big block and then you have. These are the sections like in trump's book for education Transport for shopping transport for escorting. And what this transport planet in Madrid dread realized was that what was happening. There was all the travel that women did for the unpaid care. Work was being split up into these separate categories and mixed up with Lesser Travel and women's on pay cabinet travel is lost in all those on smaller areas. And you've got so women going grocery shopping which is unpaid unpaid work. is mixed up with like I don't know some guy going and buying a sports car payments. See what she did was. She took the unpaid care. Work Travel. That was separated. Take a mixed in with the leisure travel and she put it all together in one block as well and she found therefore that there was almost as much travel for women's coach. I was for paid employment and also it was the number one reason that women were traveling. The unpaid care work has to get done. It's non-negotiable and the reality is that it. It is mainly still women. Doing it. Women seventy five percent of the world's unpaid care work. They do something like three times as much childcare fulltime housework. And unless you account for it's this in your infrastructure that is your public transport but it still so you'll zoning near where is the business district where is the residential district where all the doctors surgeries you want helping them into combine. They're paid and unpaid work and if he died help women to do that. They drop out of the paid employment system.

United Nations Miss Creo Peres Caroline Creo Global Organization United States Executive New York Secretary DAN Xausa Bangladesh Officer Donald Trump Madrid
"global organization" Discussed on The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

10:26 min | 1 year ago

"global organization" Discussed on The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

"Pasta doing body slam work arounds. Everything you can to be AH hero to the customer at that point right. That's exactly right because you don't WanNa go to Seattle After new business. I don't have time to look backwards. A campy happy support. Because they're in their job is really to solve break fix issues and it's a different work mode and not having a relationship customer and it's not product because they I need to go build. They need to go launch new features and so it really is this role that was birthed by keeping the customer will cost. What can we learn? But here's the thing we found at salesforce. Obviously you gotta move beyond the firefighter mode because that's costly. It's not great for the customer worst. Yeah Yeah Hype High Burnout Job. So then didn't data data becomes important piece here. What are we learning? One of the reasons why customers are staying or leaving. And that's where I would say we've taken in this so much further. So we'll talk a minute Jeanne but the roles that they had at Badge Ville host Jigsaw and salesforce. You know that was really starting to advanced this. Profession advance our relations with customers. How do we become proactive proactive? And then when I was chief customer ops guess reunion I got to know each other at a company. Uncalled blue knows that was starting to build technology around role of the customer success professional and what data learning about help keep customers customers murs minute oracle certainly as a data company. Data's in our core. That's when I'd say I'd I'd say we are now developing the PhD in customer success. Well thank you by the way that was a really great fascinating journey through the evolution of customer success. Because you lived. Did I mean you were there at the beginning when it was a term and a body slam like you said Through the evolution and the sophistication of it before before we dig into your Oracle. Let's talk about the intersection or the the marriage of customer success in customer experience because because it continues to be baffling to people right So why don't you hum a few bars on your on that absolutely. So here's here's the interesting thing is. I've been gosh with so many different. Mark Tech companies have a tech and my background working with marketers has been a big part of my journey in SAS cloud. And what I found is that it's interesting. The data and the knowledge. The customer success has the intimacy of being a firefighter. Learning what's happening with the customer. Their feet on the ground working in the offices in side by side side with customers learning but it is the scale of the marketer. It is wired to really build out an amazing experience. And so this partnership ship I would say is central to accompany any company improving. The customer. Experience is so few things just from my point of view as released to be a customer success zest executive and leader than how do you incorporate marketing great many leaders that start to scale the organizations find. There's there's no no way we can start to really build a business around hugging our customers in the door. And just that Christner you love to eighty. You'd love to have that intimacy so we know this and then we start taking in the data. Okay what do we know about this customer. How can we help them be more successful gigging things we're learning and then how? How do we know we need to stave off turn? How do we keep them from leaving us? So collection of data but then we need to start scaling and that's where leaders customer success leaders in started to buy for Kate. What do customers that are very small or even customers that quite frankly don't want to have this massive hand holding it's okay? I don't need that I've got it. I just WanNa have a digital experience. I want you to know me. Teach me in the moment within your applications as I work with everybody your company you know how can I have. This digital experience helped me get to where I want to go want that and then separately gently we start customers. Of course they want the white glove right. Get on your plane come visit me no me. But everybody's still needed access to that data and there's always this level of the digital experience that we need to drive and pats where this relationship marketing has to be there. And you're saying marketing equals customer experienced. Kevin when you're saying marketing just I would. They're great great point money. Let me actually put further. We know that it's more than just marketing. We know. Oh it's the entire organization the whole company that has to embrace this because the where it resides is one thing and what it does another thing so I just don't want us to get wrapped around the axle. I love this silo versus the discipline. If that makes sense now I it's true. I think what we found is a lot of these massive customer experience transformations you know and you probably not gene from talking with a lot of folks in a lot of it is being driven out of the opposite the CMO or the opposite the Sierra and certainly to the opposite CEO. And what. I'm finding customer. Success is that customer success leader is also you know starting to earn more that the table death rates I had about executive role as a customer success leader. I am chief customer officer which you know you. Obviously you've held at an. I told to yes well and so thank you. This is. This is the perfect convergence of of A couple of things and thank you for that Catherine Number One. The evolution of the customer success role has has moved from owning department right because in the beginning I remember people in and there was so much conversation about what I need to own. This ornette. No it is. You may lead the F.. The force the field force out with the customer But it's it's having a seat table of driving cross company. Transformation not limited to owning department. That's out in the field. Would you say that's accurate. That is absolutely accurate. I I think that there here is that moment. Where you have operators I would say in some ways little tey of transformation? We're in transforming my team to be better than where we got started as firefighters fighters or as you know traditional marketers Both sides but then as you drive your own transformation that big T- arrives. We've got the changes as a company. I'm going to herald the cheese. We need and then it is that moment of where you drive that massive company in the end we all have to be on this. We all have to be customer centric. That's right okay. Second Point then we'll dig into your Your current role but I think that for folks who are struggling with this. I would love love to have you think about everybody out. There is let the titles fall away because I think that's where we're getting wrapped around the AXLE CEAC success SASS whatever. There's almost in my point of view too many titles and we've got too much badging. That's making it more difficult. Cutting complicating almost but but be around the mission. This is what I love about. Fully evolved customer success executives. Such as yourself. Catherine is that you're measuring measuring from the standpoint of did the customer achieved their goals. Are we tracking what their goals are which are different than articles. Are we putting people in a position to deliver on those and can the customer stay back in their own words. What achieve because they've been with us right? Isn't that right eight the perfect. I mean that to me I think is just such a a wonderful articulation. And that's why I love this term success because its customer success from the the customers point of view not have we kept that customer. Yes that's right and I think as big part of that customer success leader. You're all right gene to drop the titles but I but I think I think the thing though has been interesting with the arrival of this. This role had gotten a new who point of view around. Exactly what you're saying that. Have we help the customer achieve success and that fully evolved. And you're very kind. Gene that fully evolved head of customer. Success knows you keep pouring string on that and it doesn't take to realize that it is way more than a my department. It's way more because I can't keep customer can't help a customer be successful if we're not all in it together as right. That's exactly right so I I again a really fascinating conversation and again for everybody out there. I I am not against the naming of these roles. It's just sometimes. Ah I've been an advocate of C- CEO's or CFO's or for me it's less about the role of the title and more about the body of work that it encompasses right which is delivering respect a foundation of reliability and peace of mind and then the ability for the customer to be able to really achieve their goals and build the operating engine of the business around that achievement. Right yes so let's Dig into your current role if we could. It's what what. GDP GDP GDP me. And I don't know everybody's acting share yes. It's our acronym for group Vice President Okay and that means at the US level the the group is US yes. The group is yes that's correct but again global impacting global. So you had this role for four years and three months one one of the things that I find interesting and I know our viewers due to is a little bit about the beginning the middle and now the maturity of where. You've taking the role so if you could walk us through what you found when you walked into the role and how you assess it and Napa. Let's just start there because I think this is very very interesting absolutely so I joined the company four years ago and Change. It was at a moment where I joined the Oracle Marketing Cloud team and at the time it was a separate business unit widely. Wasn't that long. After after we had quickly acquired.

chief customer officer Oracle executive Catherine Number salesforce US Seattle Jeanne Mark Tech Christner CEO Kate Napa Kevin ornette C- CEO group Vice President CFO
"global organization" Discussed on The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

10:06 min | 1 year ago

"global organization" Discussed on The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

"Hi everybody on the show. Today is Katharine Blackmore. Who is the head of SAS customer success at Oracle for all of the United States but also impacting the global standing up of the customer success function role and purpose at Oracle? If you are a customer success leader no matter what your industry you want to hear the show today because because Catherine's going to walk you through the evolution of the purpose of customer success how to develop your people evaluate them and put them in a position to succeed. This is a show you you won't want to miss really really powerful value. Valuable conversation from Catherine who's lived through personally the evolution of this role as a key player in it. Thanks everybody hi. Everybody and welcome to the chief. Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show where we talk to leaders about how they unite their companies to achieve customer driven growth as the duct tape of their organization. I'm your host gene bliss so be sure to catch us on itunes stitcher at customer bliss dot com slash. podcast today. My friend Katherine Blackmore is in the House. Hey Katherine Hateem so glad to have you here for everyone who does not or may may not know Katherine Katherine is the head of SAS customer success at Oracle Globally Right Catherine or is it. US face us. Your focus is us it is us. But I will tell you the things that we are working on our caller global so while my operating responsibilities and North America strategy is global perfect. Okay Great Yeah. It's always it's interesting when folks have a role but you do. All the work is global now. So I'm I'm grateful for that. Hey you have got got a rich rich background that led you to this very senior role at Oracle. So take us as far back as you could. And you want to people love the breadcrumbs crumbs because in these right brain left brain jobs as you know Catherine. It's the the the collection of skills that make you successful in doing this. Very broad comprehensive Change Management leadership operational role which is a very weird hybrid of uncommon to a lot of other roles out there. So take as far back as you'd like absolutely one looking forward to this because you're right it is right brain left brain and who knew knew that when I I was in college that I would actually applying my major and my minor doing every day just really wanted to go about the wave machine. I graduated from the University of Washington with degrees in communications and business which makes sense. Yep and psychology. I'm seeing that and you know what it's always really interesting because we've had people who are in archaeology and all of these really interesting sciences. Play such a very interesting role in that and by the way. I'm sitting in Bellevue Washington. I didn't realize you went to the U.. Dub So very cool. Oh yes dogs. The I wanNA Combo so so walk us through and and your psychology will keep popping up. I'm sure in addition of course in business so let's keep going absolutely so I started up now. This may seem also very strange and weird. But I think this makes sense in terms of what I've been drawn to which these massive transformational jobs a shifts in how we think about customers doing business in so the first massive acid transformation. I took part in little. Did I know happened right out of college. I was recruited to work in consumer packaged goods. And what was interesting about that time. Is it Walmart Walmart. We'll know Sam Walton Story. He was going on tear of disrupting the relationships. The power that manufacturers have so I worked for big companies like Nestle and Kellogg's and we no longer had the power consumer like we did in the heyday of where we would just back up our trucks and load whatever product. We won into our retailers. And they would. I'd sell it now. I'm being very general of course but but the shift in power became more about managing costs. We know this about Walmart. Yes and customers customers. How do you compete in that environment? My goodness we know we can talk a bit about what's happening now Amazon. But it's very similar. Customers were drawn to a low oh price experienced so they could obviously a manage their budgets. But then what did that do. The manufacturers is complete compression on price and so what we found ourselves the transformation had to be much much more than just again backing up the trucks. We had to understand the customer. We had to help are retailers. Be Successful many of them are coming to manufacturers asking us. How do I compete against Walmart and really did become about knowing the customer and in some cases it was certainly in you know? We did large transmission initiatives around supply. Chain take cost out but it was really more about helping retailers compete and that's where that formative experience of learning through the eyes of our customer What did they meet from us as brand you know what are they what are they? You Wonder Mom's wanting to feed their kids you know what. Do Shoppers once In in helping retailers be more successful in appealing to those consumers competing on personalization competing on what that customers wanting so so that was early days. Gene that was that was where where I would say. All of those lessons learned got started and I would also argue being data centric understanding. Not just your customer through stories but what is all about rich data. Tell us about the customer. Why are they coming back? Why are they leaving? How can we keep? It's fascinating the forcing function that you know. Got You to go deep and build that skill set isn't it and it's interesting as I'm listening because this is in a way the corollary to what happened when social media came on in in the marketplace and once again brands didn't own the message even of how they define themselves. Now it's about how customers are defining you it's brand. That's exactly right and it is that power shift. Yes and and that's really gene. I'd say what ultimately my the CEO that created treated me with little startup called Jigsaw. That became a part of SALESFORCE DOT com. This was gosh over ten years ago. Two thousand seven to two thousand ten link. Dennis telling me that is a declaration. You've got it looking. You'll keep me honest. You're on the dates but but think about that. Jean what was happening in two thousand seven when the IPHONE was introduced. I think in two thousand six. You know we didn't have the APP store yet. It was just starting. I mean what a different time that was. You know a little over a decade ago but that being said we knew we knew this shift to cloud was happening thing. You know what we're finding is customers. Were leaving software vendors because we made all this shift in making technology analogy so much easier to consume us. Stand up but my goodness what we didn't anticipate was in fact. The customers could easily leave. That's right well because of the shift in the options and the contracts had to change. You didn't have what I call captive loyalty as much right absolutely. Not No you really. You really didn't. And that was obviously. The attraction of white companies were making ship. Applaud companies were birth and cloud getting started started in the cloud because of innovation customers wanted and be able to move quickly and rapidly and again choices a big part of that for sure. Sure okay so after salesforce. You had a couple other gigs. Before you you got to wear you are want to walk a couple of those sure I would say. I got my masters in Customer Success at at at definitely at salesforce while mark. BENEF- doesn't I would say. He didn't necessarily put forward a service at the time around or teaching and educating the market on how to be a great customer success manager because this is all new Ryan when I we were we were groping in the dark right. I remember I was talking you about that and it was like yeah. Let's figure this out. It was very interesting fascinating right absolutely. It was definitely a startup. A startup in terms of our profession. Right and that's where I would say taking a lot in that we're experimenting because arguably had one of the first customer success teams on a planet at Jigsaw. You look at Lincoln at that time. You Reference Link. Did I think you'd had much beaches. It was really more of like a Web a Web crawler. Aw than you would see. You would see job posting sales force. That's it we knew nothing so when I say I got my masters in Customer Success Marks Paneth salesforce really put forward the first customers disorganization at scale and really started. Operation is a role training people in how to do this job. And that's where I would say I got started with this profession. But there's so much more now that certainly gene Vance through my later experiences at all talk about but at its core. What we found was this role was created by and large versus foremost to help keep customers and that burst job? That we've seen and I don't care I mean it's really you see it now even. It's not that I'm ten plus years later the role has changed where we're no longer on calling firefighter. What I've found is you have to be a firefighter to start because the job start with about keep the classroom all cost? We don't know enough to be intelligent. Just this right. You're you're doing your throne.

Customer Success Walmart Oracle salesforce United States Catherine Katherine Blackmore Katherine Katherine Katherine Hateem Katharine Blackmore Bellevue Washington gene Vance North America University of Washington Officer Sam Walton Nestle Amazon CEO
Decentralization Philosophy Part 1  From Buddha to the Conquistadors

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

09:34 min | 1 year ago

Decentralization Philosophy Part 1 From Buddha to the Conquistadors

"I've been trying to figure out how to talk about this topic for a while because cryptocurrency is this really kind of strange flat structure. That has all of these little hierarchical structures built on top of it and you can take that analogy and you can really really zoom in on it or you can really really zoom out on it as kind of still true really regardless of how you're looking at it and I think a lot of this has to do with just the nature and sort of the oddness oddness of crypto currency and a Bitcoin as a community right as a movement and as technology that also is attached to people getting rich. Sometimes today I WanNa talk about a topic that I've been calling catalysts and CEOS and take a look at what the crypto currency space looks like. Today what it looked like in the past. Ask Talk about some of the different attributes that got us to where we are today. So Toshi said an interesting precedent. They led with their ideas and to a lesser extent their code and the early sparked a was association that contribution catalyzed first Bitcoin and then the crypto currency movement at large those who believed in that vision given an opportunity to get rich in some cases crazy rich rich and that combination of factors lead. I all coins coins than ICO's SAFT'S STO's and I don't think even talked about on the show before and who knows what will come next because clearly the path of innovation that's occurring here is not over at all but it also created what feels like a strange legacy that we're going to explore today as simply put are charismatic leaders who emerge from that flat structure that is the bitcoin protocol more or less dangerous more or less problematic more or less notable than the mark Zuckerberg's the Elon Musk's Jeff bezos. Goes and Steve. Jobs who really lead their movements. There's not that much of a difference between Associate Akimoto and a Jeff bezos except for the way that they fundamentally went about not inciting the change that now has kind of swept the world in one case kind of the e commerce site of and the other case this digital currency cryptocurrency or blockchain bitcoin movement. Or whatever you WANNA call it. Today's conversation is about decentralized catalysts and centralize CEO's the first thing I thought of when you said SA- Toshi contrasted to Jeff bezos. US was the difference. Between a certain personality type blended with introversion versus extroversion an extroverted rated person who is very smart and capable and intelligent and can see the future almost but wants credit and wants to be the face of an organization and is is comfortable in that role. You end up with someone. Like Jeff bezos. WHO's out there? And he's totally comfortable with that even though he retracts heat sometimes but but she didn't want the credit souto she wants to be behind the scenes and gets everything they needed from just being the mastermind. Mind who's kind of silent and letting other people be the face and I think that's really interesting. If you study personality types. Maybe even like the Myers Briggs. Souto Souto she is like your classic. I N T J personality type. They're like the mastermind architect but they don't need the credit and they don't need to be the face. Jeff Bezos as US would be like an E. N. T. J. who's like the CEO and the leader and wants to be the public face. I think that's a really interesting point. But I think that there's another factor here. Maybe okay which is that. Was it a choice. For Satoshi to take the type of catalyst like behind the scenes never revealed role or was that a factor of the not just the disruptive potential but what was being disruptive of course it was a choice. I mean Saito. She clearly thought through the implications of what they were doing carefully but if they really wanted credit they would have justified some way to take the credit and to be public about it. I think you always have a choice. I think another pretty good way to differentiate so Toshi from Jeff bezos is one of them make several hundred million a year contracting with the CIA Eh and the other one was never heard from one someone spoke to the CIA. I don't know who's point that supports but I think the big different factors that there was a legal path for Jeff Bezos to do what he did and even if he was an introvert. It still a good choice for him to do it. If it winds up that he has all the resources and success. I don't think we see that in practice very often where you have a founder. Who Comes in catalyze is a thing and then leaves before it actually becomes successful and their contribution bution isn't largely replaced by what comes after? I don't think it's so cut and dried that. What Jeff Bezos was doing or wanted to do with there was a legal path for him him? I mean he was doing something that nobody had ever done before. What was that avoiding state sales tax? This is another good point. Jeff bezos has been really interested in Star Trek. He wants to create a star trek future and some of the things he's been doing are totally unprecedented. And so it's not as though you can really say. Oh they're definitely legal because there's never been a legal precedent to establish that they are legal. You could say oh well Ijaz doing things that are a gray area or questionable. But he's he's not asking for permission and that's an admirable quality so you're talking about different levels of challenge and so with Jeff Bezos thing and with examples like like Uber. And other things like that. You are talking about companies that are doing very disruptive things but the question is who are they disrupting and in both of those situations the person or the entity. That's it's being disrupted their state governments and so if you're like a national company and you have presence in many many states that actually gives you the ability to play a bit of a game there. The thing that Uber did is kind of the reverse of what happened with napster. Napster was a decentralized network for file sharing then hit a bunch of national and even global organizations that suited everywhere but it was ultimately fighting these national or global organizations whereas Uber. They weren't fighting any global or national organizations they were fighting lots and lots and lots of little regional monopolies and it's to a lesser extent. Sure about Amazon to every state where they weren't collecting sales tax. Well that was an individual a fight so it's not like they had a problem with the United States. They had a problem with each individual state. Look at what's happened with projects in the lead up to the invention of Bitcoin and all of those centralized charlize alternatives. They were competing with the federal government for fundamentally monopolized right in the right to issue currency and control sort of the dynamics of the money that we all use news. And that's a place where it seems like you couldn't have done this as a CEO because people tried that and they basically all wound up getting arrested or getting all their assets season in many cases giving customers assets assets seized two so as we can see. There are definitely reasons why people do decentralized and centralized organizations whether it's from personal reasons just because they don't want the credit in some cases or in some cases because having the credit is dangerous and on the other hand the advantages of taking on that leadership role. Well the thing about a flat structure is that it's a flat unstructured. So even if you're on top of it still major basically at the same level as everybody else but organizations you know. Companies these are hierarchies for the most part and so if you have that role at the top of that structure well. It's a lot higher than you'd be if you were at the top of a flat structure. All of this comes back to one of my favorite books. It's really short and highly recommended. Did starfish and the spider by Rod Beckstrom Ori Brachman. I read it actually before I became interested in Bitcoin and it was really kind of formation book for me. We've talked about on the show before but it's been like five five years so I figured it wasn't a bad topic to bring up again. The subtitle of the book is the unstoppable power of leaderless organizations. And if you're a fan of decentralized technologies but I've never read it I cannot recommended amended highly enough quoting from the book. A spider is a creature with eight legs coming out of its central body. It has this tiny head and usually eight is. If you chop off the spider's headed headed dies and that's exactly what happens with centralized organization a centralized organization has a clear leader. WHO's in charge? And there's a specific place where decisions are made if you get rid of the leader. You paralyzed realized the organization now. This contrasts with a decentralized organization. which is a fundamentally different animal? It's actually a starfish. At first glance at starfish looked similar to a spider appearance but the starfish is decentralized. starfish doesn't have ahead. The major organs are actually replicated through each and every arm and in reality. starfish is a neural network work. Basically a network of cells instead of having a head like a spider the starfish functions as decentralized network and you can even in nature see situations where a starfish fish has been wounded and for example in arm or even several arms have come off what tends to happen is that actually both pieces will then grow into a complete starfish and it's another another method that they can reproduce. You might say that that's inefficient from a biological perspective to duplicate or pent-up locate editor. How you even and say that word but to make five copies of all of your major orders and neural tissue? GAFFER's them this great advantage of being able to regenerate just from from a small piece it means that while starfish might not have perhaps some of the advantages that a spider does it also isn't vulnerable in the same way. That spider is to damage to you. Know very small parts of it because again it's just not centralized we're GonNa talk about this concept in a different way a little bit later. But what other comparisons do you like besides this kind of starfish in spider for decentralized and centralized organizations and kind of broader question that I wanna come to his how many companies do we actually think or how many any projects do we actually think like rough. ballpark percentage in crypto actually are starfish versus. How many might be using a network that is a starfish but in reality the are themselves

Jeff Bezos Sa- Toshi CEO United States Souto Souto Cryptocurrency Mark Zuckerberg Napster Steve ICO CIA Myers Briggs Rod Beckstrom Ori Brachman Amazon Satoshi Saito Ijaz Founder
"global organization" Discussed on The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

16:40 min | 1 year ago

"global organization" Discussed on The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

"They in back with Martin Detroit pool the wants together that with where we thought we were GONNA have. SPANK for Bach and customized forward. So it wasn't a a recreation reaction. It was really a hominoid of what was happening at a few bits. But then I guess aggregating together on the Hell we WANNA move forward in customers costumer gotta be front and Center. And that was. We're going to roll this role these ads through the markets over the course of the next. Let's digest three months tomorrow a year year food year and a half where I am today so fascinating because what you're saying is there was already a large part of the engine working But you were you know part of the reason we call this the human duct tape show as you were looking at it across and able to then aggregate and say here's a totality of what we're doing. Let's identify the few. You focus points where we can really get the biggest bang for our effort and input. Is that fair. Is that fair carried Cana- characterization yet I think And this is I guess everyone listening. I think at that point. Also you really need to have a good assessment of what the appetite for changes. Yes So again my previous role. The appetite was enormous. I think the appetite at this point was because there are a lot of moving parts at there. It wasn't sort of nature and expectation to revolutionize this new thing it was. Let's old mint what we're doing and incrementally bring the new pieces that you could bring venue choose new personality organizations. I thinking in an outside in approach. So how did you package and present that and did you present it to the C. Suite of the organization. I in that that whole engagement of you had this team you own you also needed to unite it for the C.. Suite right a lot of people in a C- coo role don't realize that a big part of their role is uniting the C. Suite of the sector of the business you're part of yet so the auto for APEC is very small tape so there's five of us the packaging. The original one was sitting down with a volleyball sues the WHO was on the MDC Asia Pacific Nick and crafting at the ID's. I had with him to Alon Human Dilemma Board with where I thought we could really move forward and take the business to the next level and and that was not a sort of a one time one and done. I think I think being prepared for that You don't WanNa go in there with guns blazing end and hype. That everything's GonNa land. There was some corrections that natives fitting his guidance on where the organization was more was ready for early I think also gets you quite grounded because again for me is based on really passionate refi energy level so I want to go off things like a bullet out of the garden and would well in our passion gets US really excited to do perhaps more expansive than what the company's ready for able to do at that at times so you need that course correction right agree and it's just it's not sort of a a an Renault. It's just bullets. That's just tuned Ryan. Let's see what we can get in terms of some momentum and then like I wanna think about it being that consistent with both roles it's the momentum of the Queens and those successes successes that I've been a lot more does Dan Road and at the end whilst we will have Rates of different shapes and sizes icon. Emphasize is enough to get those early credits. On board and use those micro winds are referred to them as as wise of taking the bigger places on the journey as you go forward okay so a couple of things you just said that are really critical number. One understand the company's capacity ability and understanding of change change and to get the quick wins and three no creek. Early critics are right I call him. Advocates are outliers at they exist in every organization. So let's let's unpack each of those things. How did you understand the company's desire ability to change was it through for those conversations with the CEO or were there other things you did change management guy so I would imagine you have a methodology around that you think a couple of things I think one is? It's it's an ongoing journey So you continue to learn and get more and more Richard sorts as you spend more time with people at all. I mean where it's sort of a regional more of an influencing influencing roles so there's not really a commodity control or an ownership perspective In markets so the time that we spend we the various countries is trying to learn understand with eye on where that Apple Totti's and play with that apply inside that side. You can bring the best of you to the role and hopefully hopefully bring some value to them but what will happen with that is is some will be more ambitious to go and stretch and some sort of like the revolution versus is the evolution. Some what some incremental stuff some will want some wow factors and I think even today I'm still learning so I'm still trying to find some Vecchi. Market's way that law sandy's you start early. Start Small you collaborate you work with bring some smaller new staff or strengthening some with the existing onto you start to get a lens understanding that is Napa take on it so not you know one one size does not fit all you. You You you came up with ideas and then started. Engaging market by market was that with the Franchisee groups or when you say market by market was at the in your people in the markets the Franchisee Gibson city owners of the Brandon h markets That's where we typically work that APP because we're dealing with different company. Can you think tarps terrifically different shapes and sizes. So we've got some markets that I've got big dawning so you go in and sit down and eight others. They are predominantly delivery. Tie Coutts at this does a quite small. And then you've got a mix of Big digital plays and more physical plays in different markets besides the landscapes quite diverse and in your spot on uconn going cookie cutter. Approach it's Let's Nedlands Day in with Iowa where the people are where the businesses and join this would ford united fit for purpose talk around the different markets any examples there and or that that you can talk about to bring this to life a little bit and and how you presented it. You know people love tactics right. Did you do a brainstorm ensure with them or did you come in with a straw man. So how. How did you address bringing things to light market Ariza's specific market that? You have a good example but you can tell us about yeah. I think there's a there's a handful of examples actually One of the more recent ones we had One particular the market where they sort of with a few changes.

Bach Detroit MDC Center Cana APEC Ariza coo Alon Human Dilemma Board Iowa Tie Coutts Renault Apple Totti Ryan CEO Queens united Napa
"global organization" Discussed on The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

12:55 min | 1 year ago

"global organization" Discussed on The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

"Yeah so so. It was a newly created role so so we do have ED chief customer Global Chief Customer Officer based in Dallas and she's Lachey responsible for Oh really building the Across the tate's mind I'm one of those. We have another one in the UK and Europe one for Africa the Middle East and the Latin America region and so the role across all pizza hut globally. Did that get initiated. Around the time you you got your roller. was she in the role. Previously she was in the role. It'll Ilia than me maybe about a year and a half I believe and I was one of the first or second subsequent ones that were out in the regions. Okay very good and I think that's not only fascinating but important because now you all can come together as a sort of board of directors and compare and contrast and learn from each other I would imagine is that correct absolutely of a the the application of the the industry work in. There's definitely a lot of synergy and having that common roll across the regions And also nuances announces that can provide different learning opportunities that might be culturally based which does differ from parts of the world but understanding? I guess on the underlying behaviors with the Cullman cullman roles that we have certainly provides will constant opportunities to learn from each other absolutely. Yeah it's always fascinating when I talked to A. CEO's goes in one part of the world that are acting almost separately from other than I think it. What a missed opportunity to Oh really learn from each other and to your point I think you have a global platform for some things which is important so that you're not reinventing the wheel especially from a technology standpoint and some of those things so let's let's get? Did you say something to that tour. I apologize that no I agree. I I think I was just going to add things like like one of the things that we've been waking his concept around the customer journey pace wrought the the the infrastructure and and the deployment application of those is a constant leverage. Point that we can pull from each other and then needs utilization of the market around different personas cultures that exist right then becomes the the tweaking and you call the localization of the common models that way we can really get great. Incitement wouldn't start to build that capability woody locally around the world and h various regions. Yeah powerful because there are these fundamentals that would be core to everyone but then the localization of it becomes what you're doing so let's let's dig into your role when you first got the role and we're one year nine months. How did you do two things? Assess the work. Let's start with assess the work to be done and also build those critical relationships that are going to earn you. The right to doing the work right. I think that one of the first things that I was pretty much joint pizza. Hut was to go at an in my stripes in stores so I had spent more or less the first twelve weeks in the UK a a Singapore and Malaysia in the restaurants doing everything from making doug cooking pizzas cleaning auditing cooking serving. Can you name it. I withdrew moist jobs in all aspects of the channels in Sri markets and the first three certificates. I guess that you typically get. If you're a shift supervisor a restaurant manager or what we call an area coach someone that might obviously a few few restaurants today role to really be grounded rounded in what is happening at the coal face Be At that. I'm new to the industry and really get a good sense of What's on the ground and agree more? I you no this whole thing of I call it getting dirt under fingernails. It gets you more credibility than almost anything you can do right agree one hundred percent. It was It was one of those things to come back and say now I've now I've seen it and again with the strength and the breadth of the Brando's able to see it in a few different markets. I be able to aggregate title inside and pulled together with you know into some similar actions in some ideas and thoughts on how we could move forward so your first three months. Walk US through it. Yeah so I was about two weeks after I joined. I was sent straight to London and had a whole list of stores that were variation of delivery stores said he's really small restaurants that focus predominantly on Delivering to customer. So obviously the drive is the bikes Alexa going out to consumers or Taya carry out so the footprint of the stores is quite small And there's a lot of emphasis on obviously high volumes and speed particularly around the dinner. Times comes to dawning sweet sorrow. I did my time in donning stores in downtown London where I spend a Lotta time on the front So actually Cervi Nice. Yep so I was able to Graham the tablet welcome in great customers. lethem Dan clean tables stood take their orders and get a sense of what the front look like when there was immediate customer interaction as well as in the back where we were doing things like In the morning voting we have our plan for the today full costing the kind of Food demand that was expected that particular die and obviously when the lunchtime it came in we move through the various stations in what we call the back of House so the the food is prepared and cooked And then over to the auditing sitting side so food safety is a huge thing for pizza hut on Yom more broadly so getting to sit down with the auditors and really go through every dot point in every aspect aspect of the restaurant to understand the elements of food safety and in all the areas that may analysts standards that were applicable and and had a message in on a store to ensure that the consumers would not getting great sieves great food but the food And the service that they could trust and it was Saif and Yeah Consi- Sorry Court company that holds that very very hard makes sense so let me ask you a question because I want to hear more of how you packaged. You're learning from those verse. Three months did this experience of going deep in the operation. Impact what you wanted people in the organization to do to then in terms of their listening of being out there in the world of the customer because sometimes people are so dislocated from the actual world of the customer that it's it's all powerpoint decks and conversation versus getting out there eyeball to eyeball and feeling seeing it and like you said holding that pad talking to customers being being part of the team yet. It's a great point Jane and I'll tell you so we and for a few seconds the the actual business model is we. We have a almost one hundred percent franchised business world so for us your points spot on so we typically don't interact directly clearly the customers we we partner with Franchisees that capability in an unhealthy obviously achieved. ABC described targets and and make. This is great for consumers that that can be a little bit of an ivory tower. All if you don't afford yourself to get there and get amongst the various regions I thankfully the businesses chronic good Practicing place where we go and meet with all the various markets rod across the region. We go into stores in every visit and we spent time on the ground with teams and always quite quite fortunate because the team I inherited Had A wealth of experience at the stool levels of these these guys goes had been out there that manage those restaurants. They in which when the grandma good and my item our team so I think one of the fortunate things was that the team that was part of my Ramey when I joined We're already nick deep and it was not so much building new things in my role. It was really getting the back end of the great work I had done and help accelerate l. a. right that and maybe look at new wise to augment the great work that was happening into some new areas as we move forward with with the brand in some of the new ideas that are coming through ran the customers. So and thank you for that in those three months beyond besides going out there and getting your fingernails dirty. What else did you do to understand and assess the work to be done? Yes so I I spent quite a bit of time with their at digital teams. Not Looking just at the physical elements of stole which I I spend a lot of time on but also meeting some of the digital and technology teams in the UK. And also. I mean age to understand where we were In the broader spectrum Timothy and how we will offering those types of experience to customers outside of the physical aspects and the product of the business And then I guess also just taking it back in where I could particularly in the markets where I sort of. IDC around the Asia Pac region just getting the landscape of the environment because the sort of Qsr's we called the Quick Service restaurant industry is is hot. Competitive said is a wealth of competitors is. There's some big brand names in the pizzas spice particularly. It's quite unique in the same. That only about twenty five percent of global sales worldwide are are covered by big brains. The other seventy five percent is non branded largely really all like mom and pop p. year. Who Love Pizza? It's at right and just making pizza. Isn't it fascinating. Yeah that's that's a little new to me from a macro level so You know there is a massive massive variety in what's provided Hallett's provided and from an experienced police and united going into a moment pop shop in whether it's the pizza restaurant or whether it's cafe for example something else I think largely Stereotyping a little bit. But they accessible by that. personalization is Asian goes on quite passionate about that particular. That's one of those areas. You can really differentiate in any talk or any level of competition in any industry the yes well in the mom and pops in especially if they lean toward being Italian or or I say this December talion. You know you're going to get all that all that comes comes with all of that especially as well I would imagine agree. It's trying to reach that into a Aspects of it where you can make little unique get your brains and bring that out through the people that serve and then create some form of A different experience than what they'll get for. Maybe some of the other brands so so it sounds like one of the first things you also needed to do was level set for the organization the variants of experience. That people are comparing you to correct and it was good to understand where we were in the broader spectrum of things. And that's where I think's right away the The wealth of insights from the customer feedback that we have a global plug will platform where we get that. One point. Eight million I think is your back feedback points for you so it's exhaustive and it's At its own outside of it's easy to get lost in the Diet. But it's quite good in the sense of picking out some of those gold nuggets and looking at inherent where he can leverage those respective markets that you work with Shui by stat welcoming do more better for our customers. It gets him to come back and come back moral. Let's be the tagline for US l.. Come back and come back often yes. It's sort of a very sad business. Growth is more customers more often. Yeah perfect okay. Okay so I want to ask you a question because this is always really a pivot point for people new in the role. You're out there. You're listening you're doing. At what point did you package it up For the leadership team and your team to say. Here's our current state. Here's where we need to go At least in the short term and and then and how did you pack up because the storytelling at this pivot point is critical. Yet is an and I think One of the things. I learned Through this journey just somebody interactions. I had it was very different to my approach in my previous role and again I think a lot of that's going to do with the business model that I'm in a UH in my previous role it was. Let's set up a strategic long-term agenda. Bright that Danny the pot size. John's let's start with yet vision culture culture and moves through the various places in Queens into a number of different areas to grow us into that future elements away. We wanted to be given that we had everything under control and we had it was one business country. This was a little bit different. In a sense. There was a lot of those elements that.

UK London Global Chief Customer Officer Cullman Dallas US Alexa Middle East Europe Lachey tate A. CEO Latin America Africa supervisor Brando Danny Jane partner
"global organization" Discussed on The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"global organization" Discussed on The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

"Hi everybody today. Show is with Troy. Barnes he is the Chief Customer Officer of Pizza Hut for the Asia Pacific region really fascinating donating conversation today. This is troy second chief customer officer role he began his background in. Lean Sigma and Change Management. You will hear that all the way throughout the conversation really fascinating especially for those of you who go out to the field and work with Franchisees but in general the conversation about change management and leadership chip is very very valuable. So thank you to try and I know that you will enjoy all of this. Thanks so much hi everybody and welcome come to the chief. Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show where we talk to leaders about how they unite their companies to achieve customer driven and growth as the duck tape of their organization. I'm your host gene bliss so be sure to catch us on. I itunes stitcher and add customer bliss dot com slash podcast today coming all the way away from Singapore right dry..

Chief Customer Officer Troy Officer Pizza Hut Asia Pacific
"global organization" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"global organization" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"New deal. Thanks very much. Karen, Stacey from the financial times. You make criticisms of this administration's policy on immigration on trade and said extended the governing style governing by crisis. Do you think there's a risk that the Republican party loses its reputation as being the policy for business? Oh, I didn't think I spend a lot of time. Criticizing the administration. We supported the administration on the judicial appointments on deregulation on the tax policy on energy issues. And we we like the basic direction of trying to improve the trade agreements. And the and the people following the rules on the trade agreements that we have we had some differences of opinion on how you make that happen. We have some differences of opinion about dealing with global organizations, but I would think that we've been pretty supportive of the administration when they're doing the nation's business and. And I'm happy to keep working with them. Okay. Right there. This is where she's been radio programming from Thursday. Thank you. I will Maldon the Wall Street Journal. I just wanted to ask a little bit about the NAFTA or United States Marine corps. Sorry. That's how I remember what they called it. And. It may have a different name by the end of the year. But I'm just wondering. How you see passage of that going in an ideal world, you you we have prominent Democrats who said they want to reopen it or amend it. You have incoming chairman of the finance committee saying yesterday that that, hey, if they do that maybe we should just pull out of the existing deal as a way to to move things forward. How do you see your role in getting this done? And what's what's what's possible powder? Ondrej you could get this done as election pressures. Well, first of all we're going to get it done. And I'll give you a couple of reasons for that. But you know, the idea that some members of the congress are saying well, the Senate saying, well, we should pull out of one to force. You know, if you pull out of it. What you do you start a six month clock where you're back in the original agreement, and the congress has that amount of time to consider what their view is about what you're doing the reason I think we're going to get this done. And that we shouldn't pull out we're talking about fourteen million American jobs now, I'm not saying all those jobs go away because trade with some of those partners would. We try and make it work. Well, but the bottom line is this is one of the best business geopolitical economic national security agreements put together with any countries that we deal with. And by the way, remember there are two largest export partners. If we can't sell that we better find another job. Yeah. Hi,.

Stacey congress Republican party Wall Street Journal Karen NAFTA chairman United States Marine corps Senate six month
"global organization" Discussed on The News & Why It Matters

The News & Why It Matters

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"global organization" Discussed on The News & Why It Matters

"But then immediately the government needs to spend through a global organization. Fifteen trillion dollars. That's insanity. Right. Hold on. But there's to my knowledge heritage isn't stepping in and going, you know, what we support a carbon tax or we wouldn't support it. But like, but I'm not I'm not hearing. I'm not hearing this from most of my conservative friends of. Yes, I think this is happening, and we should be doing something most conservatives just do it. It's like saying the NRA the NRA doesn't care about gun safety. Are you kidding me? It's the NRA the gave the background check to America. Okay. They were the ones that said, here's the design here. Let's do it. They also have more training. I talked to NRA members every time somebody has shooting and there's a gun. They are the ones who are the most concerned because they always get blamed. They're the ones on the frontlines going stop it. Stop it in force this law when you look at places like Cabela's. I believe Cabela's is one of the largest 'financiers of wildlife. Preserve forest restoration in the United States. They give a ton of money. You don't think of Cabella? As as that conservatives just do it. So I don't know what Cabela's. What is? Where? In oklahoma. This is Oklahoma of rear borough about how long were you in New York about six years? Early. You really? Biggest outdoors. In the best prone, Oklahoma, bass pro. Throws invest pro people on the family. It's a, you know, I get your point. I think because climate change is usually when polled the lowest concern of all voters in the lowest one on the very bottom. I think it's very easy for Republicans. Generally to say, this is a debate between people who wanna take your big screen TV away and people who don't. I think it's because it's there's not a nuanced approach to it in normal discourse. Because of the it's just not a big issue. It's a lot. Honestly lot of times. They talk about it. It's it's not a it's not a ratings getter. And it's something that the free market will take care of itself. Look at we'll swing it. We bring up Matt Ridley periodic. Yes. I love.

NRA Cabela oklahoma Matt Ridley United States America New York Fifteen trillion dollars six years
"global organization" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"global organization" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Catholic church is global organization of nuns denounced the culture of silence and secrecy surrounding sexual abuse. In the church and urged fellow nuns have been abused to report. Those crimes there statement came on the eve of the US. Designated international day for the elimination of violence against women reaction has been coming in about a government report that suggests climate change will bring many more natural catastrophes in the future. National president of the Sierra Club chat. Hansen says the report makes one thing clear impacts are happening right now to communities and ecosystems and this report from government scientists and staff all across the country is an unequivocal statement that climate change is real. And we need to take it seriously. The search for signs of human remains continues in northern California were at least eighty four people were killed in the campfire about seven inches of rain fell over the burn area over three days without causing significant mudslides, more than forty three thousand absentee ballots requested ahead of Mississippi run off election. That includes a hard-fought US Senate rates. The contest is between Republican Senator Cindy Hyde Smith and our democratic challenge. Mike Espy who is seeking to become the first African American Senator from Mississippi since reconstruction the runoff is Tuesday. Barbara kusak. Spring showers. Bring more than flowers. They also bring that familiar musty smell to your basement usually caused by too much moisture molds and mildew don't bother with a dehumidifier it just circulates the same unhealthy air. Now. There's a better way to remove damp, musty air and harmful pollutants it's with the wave moisture control unit. Wave can transform your home into a drier, healthier environment. Satisfaction guaranteed. For more information. Visit dryhome one two three dot com. That's dryhome one two three dot com. Arranger station. The report a bear hug. Okay. I put out my campfire, and smokey bear hugged me. So you drowned the fire you stirred it drowned it again and felt that it was called. He's just letting you know, you did good bear hug from smokey bear status update. I'm gonna let you go. Now. There are many ways to start a fire, but one sure way to put it out learn how you can do your part at smokeybear dot com. Sponsored by the US forest service, Ad Council, and your state forester. You might not want to be in a hurry to buy your Christmas tree. Correspondent Bill Michaels has the dollar incense answer why buying a fresh cut Christmas tree gets cheaper. As we get closer to Christmas Eve cyber Monday is the most expensive time to buy a tree with prices topping out at an average of eighty one dollars each by December eighteenth that costs does drop to an average of sixty four dollars per tree. Now, if you can hold off all the way until Christmas Eve the national Christmas tree association says the average price drops a forty seven dollars. Placido Domingo has been honored by the natural politician opera for the fiftieth anniversary of his debut with the company the seventy seven year old appeared in his. His fifty second role and six hundred ninety fifth performance with a company Friday night. Domingo was presented with a chunk of met stage in a leather jacket. He wrote war in Verdi's Tello that had been dipped in gold to Mark the golden anniversary. I'm Barbara Kusak. Hey, is that a faucet running? Nope. That's not a faucet. That's a river rushing through the forest. It is. Yeah. Forest rivers provide over one hundred million people with clean water to drink. The water comes straight from the forest to us in fact, what because of the vacuum. That's not a vacuum. That's the trees in the forest cleaning up the air, we breathe how do trees clean year. They soak up the dirty air and their leaves branches and trunks, which means clean air for us. Cool. Yep. But the forest is more than give us clean air and water. It gives us shade for hot days birds. Listen to and trees to climb. That's awesome. I didn't know how cool the force could be. Hey, let's go sports more. Visit the forest today. And enjoy all it does just for you. To learn more about the forest and find one near you, go to discover the forest dot org. Brought to you by the US forest service and the Ad Council. Stinks.

US Placido Domingo Mike Espy Barbara kusak Catholic church Ad Council Mississippi Senator Cindy Hyde Smith Sierra Club Senate Hansen president California Senator Bill Michaels Verdi
Global Catholic nuns urge reporting of sex abuse to police

WBBM Programming

00:23 sec | 2 years ago

Global Catholic nuns urge reporting of sex abuse to police

"The Catholic churches. Global organization of nuns has denounced what it calls the culture of silence and secrecy surrounding sexual abuse. And is urge. Urging sisters who have been abused to report crimes to police and their superiors the international union of superiors general vows to help nuns who have been victims to heal and seek

"global organization" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

08:23 min | 2 years ago

"global organization" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Welcome back to the do it yourself investor show, and one of the things we know is that life is do-it-yourself project all the things you're proud of in life here education, your career, even a project around the house or your family. You know, things that you've done yourself things that you've taken responsibility for those are the things that bring a smile to your face the things that you're most proud of in life and unfortunately for most people when they think about their finances. They don't get a warm feeling. They don't get a smile across their face. And it's largely because you're not doing it yourself, and one of the things that we hear from people all the time is have they don't teach this in school. What we teach it in our school in our school at the Online Trading Academy. We teach do it yourself investors. How to generate the income they need so they can live the life. They want and go way beyond that. And whether you're looking for a traditional financial service product like an annuity or mutual fund or some other some other thing like that you can recreate news the same strategies that the financial services people do and do it in a way, we you get to keep the fees. You get to keep the expenses. And you get to have the satisfaction. And you had the the control to be able to generate the income you need and protect what you've got. But for most of our students, they tend to want to get more active, and they wanna be able to take ten thousand dollars and use that to generate income every week or every month. We have some students with one hundred thousand dollars. They may have you know, three four five strategies that they're putting into place some of them that take care of their current income some take care of their future income, and so we have other students that are looking to manage their money more long term. And so we have a number of programs for people that want to. So we have programs for people that want to manage the kind of their long term assets. And whether it's trying to emulate a mutual fund, whether it's trying to manage a stock portfolio, but. And do it in a way, we can get more effective and have your money with the market leaders rather than the market laggers, and where you can basically get significantly better returns than what the average investor gets. So we have a stock program that helps her students again do things safer and smarter for those who want to be in the stock market. We have another program called the proactive investor program, which is for people that are looking for safer and smarter returns with less risk than what you're currently doing with your mutual funds. And so the goal is to get a consistent return every month. Whether it's half percent one percent one and a half percent do that every month or maybe do it every week. And so that way you can magnify your returns and reduce your risk because the problem is when you just put your money in a mutual fund. It goes up it goes down. Maybe by the end of the year. You got your three four or five percent. But wouldn't it be better? If every month, you got a half percent or one percent. And then you're making progress, you know, whether it's six percent nine percent. Twelve percent. Fifteen percent. But doing with less risk than what you're currently doing. So the proactive investor program gives you that opportunity, and we also have a number of students that protect themselves and generate long-term future income through the real estate market, and we're programs for people that are looking to become wholesalers in the real estate market people that are looking to fix and flip and find opportunities. We also have programs for people that are doing rental properties commercial property, but one of the coolest parts of the online trading academy's because we're a global organization because we have students all around the country and all around the world for those who are looking for real estate opportunities. One of the keys is to build a team of people with different skills. And so some people have the money, but they don't wanna put in the sweat equity. Some people have the sweat, but they don't have the money. Some people want help finding properties. Some people have properties. They want to help find renters for to help someone do the fix and flip and do the rehab work. Some folks have you know, they have a management company or they need a management company. So part of the power of the Online Trading Academy real estate program is that you can build a team with other Online Trading Academy students, and you can invest all over the country. And so you may want to invest here in the DC Baltimore area. He may want to invest in Tennessee in North Carolina in New Orleans. There may be opportunities with the hurricane coming through. There's going to be a lot of houses that are damaged because also going to be opportunities for folks that want to go in fix up properties. Take some risks. Putting some sweat equity and turn that into a real opportunity and North Carolina over the next ten to twenty years is still slotted to be one of the fastest growing markets. In the world and from a real estate perspective. That's that's where you wanna go. Go where the other people are going to go where the growth is going to be. And so from from the hurricane coming through. It's gonna take a while for things to go down. But there's going to be people you'll be able to help if you have cash and a willing to buy their property. There's some people that are just gonna be happy that you took that headache off their hands. There's other folks that are going to need to find new housing. And so there's going to be a lot of opportunities for people that want to get engaged with real estate and particularly in the market like North Carolina that is projected to grow over the next ten to twenty years. This is probably one of the safest opportunities for people that want to be engaged with the real estate market. And so this is where we want to engage the market we need to accept what happens. And so there'll be an opportunity based on hurricane coming through. There's going to be a potential hurricane in the financial markets, and again with that you can get on the right side of that trade or yourself can become a victim of that. And so. One of the things that we want to do is give arm you with the education army with the tools armed with the strategies help you build a team of people that are going to support you no matter. What strategy you're using the generate current income? No matter what strategy you're using for your future income, no matter, what strategy using the preserve your assets, and to create wealth for you and for future generations. So there's absolutely going to be great opportunities presented and you've got to ask yourself where do you want? How do you want to engage, and how do you wanna do that effectively? And it's the same things as a do it yourself investor. You have to learn how to protect we've got then had a position what you've got and third how do you profit from what you've got? And so the Online Trading Academy. We are the place for do it yourself investors for people want to understand multiple strategies understand how to Wall Street make money, but also how does mainstream make money, and I recognized for a lot of people, you know, they're wealthy, but they don't feel wealthy because. They're not getting the return on their assets, the generate the income, so they can live the lifestyle they want or to even just give them the peace of mind that they can overcome a hurricane coming through or they can overcome some major change in their lifestyle. And so what we want you to do start thinking a little bit bigger. And as an investor your capital can have an impact on the street in your neighborhood, maybe.

Online Trading Academy North Carolina New Orleans Tennessee Baltimore twenty years one percent one hundred thousand dollars ten thousand dollars Fifteen percent Twelve percent five percent nine percent
Republican Florida governor candidate DeSantis resigns from Congress

Mike's On

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

Republican Florida governor candidate DeSantis resigns from Congress

"Security adviser John Bolton says the icy sea is illegitimate and has no grounds to prosecute Americans or their allies in no uncertain terms. The I c c was created as a free wheeling global organization claiming jurisdiction over individuals without their consent. The ICC's base in the Hagan has a mandate to prosecute crimes against humanity. Hurricane Florence draws closer to the US as a category four NPR's Windsor. Johnston says the storm is generating top sustained winds of one hundred thirty miles per hour. Lawrence's rapidly intensifying as it moves toward the Carolinas. Richard Pasch at the National Hurricane Center. Says

Governor Jerry Brown Greg Allen Rhonda Santa NPR Florida Paul Ryan Desanta Congress San Francisco ICC Virginia Windsor Johnston Hurricane Florence National Hurricane Center John Bolton United States Johnston Richard Pasch Hagan Windsor Carolinas
"global organization" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"global organization" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"As an example i want to buy a domain with a specific name the registrar is officially licensed by the global organization called i can icann for a long time i can was run by the united states department of commerce but they they gave it up a couple of years ago as they should because no one government should control the internet it should be nongovernmental and so i can now is run mostly so mostly americans on the board but it's running your nationally they're in charge of the the numbering system for servers that makes the internet work there really is a fundamental core the internet they run the big phone books that domain name system the domain name servers the thirteen canonical domain name servers the have every web address that exists is in these phone books and they run them then they license registrars to take money and to add somebody's you know just you don't you don't really own domain name you just blessed you buy it you rent it for as long as you continue to pay the fee to phase range from ten dollars a year to hundreds of dollars a year for some custom domains some countries charge more libya charges more for the dot l y because people like dot l y you know that kind of thing you've seen all the dot com dot net dot us domains all of those should be around ten dollars a year shouldn't be expensive you go to a registrar somebody licensed by i can and you say i want that domain name they say yeah it's available get ten dollars will register it for you they they become an intermediary then they're running a domain name server that you can log into and say and this is where i want that domain to go this is where my website is and that could be with another company it's not unusual to somebody like go daddy that's both the registrar and a web hosting company that you.

united states department of co libya ten dollars
"global organization" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"global organization" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Leo laporte the tech guy eighty eight eighty eight ask leo the phone number i spent one more time talking with kevin about his domain issue this is a really good lesson for everyone there are two different services here there's a service domain registrar that you go to and you say i want this domain our main tech guy labs dot com as an example i want to buy a domain with a specific name the registrar is officially licensed by the global organization called i can icann for a long time i can was run by the united states department of commerce but they they gave it up a couple of years ago as they should because no one government should control the internet it should be nongovernmental and so i can now is run mostly still mostly americans on the board but it's running your nationally they're in charge of the the numbering system for servers that makes the internet work there really is a fundamental core the internet they run the big phone books that domain name system the domain name servers the thirteen canonical domain name servers that have every web address that exists is in these phone books and they run them then they license registrars to take money and to add somebody's you don't you don't really own a domain name you just blessed you buy it you rent it for as long as you continue to pay the fees range from ten dollars a year to hundreds of dollars a year for some custom domain some countries charge more libya charges more for the dot l y because people like dot l y you know that kind of thing you've seen all but the dot com dot net dot us domains all of those should be around ten dollars a year shouldn't be expensive you go to a registrar somebody licensed by can and you say i want that domain name they say yeah it's available give us ten dollars will register it for you they they become an intermediary then they're running a domain name server that you can log into and say and this is where i want that domain to go this is where my website is and that can be with another company not unusual you go to somebody like go daddy that's both the registrar and a web hosting company that.

kevin Leo laporte united states department of co libya ten dollars
"global organization" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"global organization" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Leo laporte the tech guy eighty eight eighty eight ask lee of the phone number i spent more time talking with kevin about his domain issue this is a really good lesson for everyone there are two different services here there's a service domain registrar that you go to and you say i want this domain are our domain tech guy labs dot com as an example i want to buy a domain with a specific name the registrar is officially licensed by the global organization called i can i c a n n for a long time i can was run by the united states department of commerce but they they gave it up a couple of years ago as they should because no one government should control the internet should be nongovernmental and so i can now is run mostly still mostly americans on the board but it's running your nationally they're in charge of the the numbering system for servers that makes the internet work there really is a fundamental core of the internet they run the big phone books that domain name system the domain name servers the thirteen canonical domain name servers that have every web address that exists is in these phone books and they run them then they license registrars to take money and to add somebody's you don't you don't really own a domain name you just beliefs that you buy it you rent it for as long as you continue to pay the fee to fees range from ten dollars a year to hundreds of dollars a year for some custom domain some countries charge more libya charges more for the dot l y because people like that l y you know that kind of thing you've seen all but the dot com dot net dot us domains all of those should be round ten dollars a year shouldn't be expensive you go to a registrar somebody licensed by can and you say i want that domain name they say yeah it's available give us ten dollars will register it for you they they become an intermediary then they're running a domain name server that you can log into and see say and this is where i want that domain to go this is where my website is and that can be with another company it's not unusual you go to somebody like go daddy that's both the registrar and a web hosting company.

lee kevin Leo laporte united states department of co libya ten dollars
"global organization" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"global organization" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Three par of the network come together to drive growth in region so this makes it very very interesting so our number one customer here and centrifuges are sharda co salary and you have yeah and and that's so you get your immersed with the latest and greatest some wild ideas and good idea so that's awesome and they're they're rolling in on the regular basis and then we get to meet with early stage managers the best and brightest from techstars to front to atlas ventures and everything in between them they naturally cool and then the other thing though the third leg of the stool if you could use that analogy really all the large global organization here and the region that are desperate or eager i guess is a better way to say eager to drive new roads or technology innovation so i mean this catbird seat you know what we do is very unique the access we have two large corporates like proctor and gamble and kroger and western southern children's hospital it's very unique and so we're constantly missing it up and that looks like the right kind of collaboration to draw new solutions to pretty serious problem do you think that there's any potential conflict in that you know at all.

kroger
Jordan PM resigns after anti-government protests

WBBM Programming

01:17 min | 2 years ago

Jordan PM resigns after anti-government protests

"The report blamed bureaucratic inefficiency and understaffing at the department of veterans affairs they also found one out of ten cases had incorrect starting dates used to measure the amount of time veterans had to wait for medical care investigator said it wasn't clear whether the data entries were a mistake or an attempt to mass delays in providing the care jennifer king washington in jordan days of antigovernment protests have led to the resignation of the country's prime minister jordanians are continuing their protests even after the resignation of the country's prime minister earlier today they are broadening their demands to see an overhaul of the government system to make it more responsive to the people heard indians like avocado workers still protesting saying the ordinary people will not bear the brunt of the country's fiscal problems the problems are not sold out again protesters also demand the new government get serious about tackling corruption presidio news amman the next president of the un general assembly will definitely be a woman in only the fourth female in the seventy three year history of the global organization but the question is whether she will be from honduras or ecuador the assembly will be voting today to choose either un ambassador mary elizabeth flora's flake of honduras or ecuadorian foreign minister maria fernanda espinosa.

Investigator Jennifer King Washington Prime Minister President Trump Honduras Mary Elizabeth Flora Maria Fernanda Espinosa Jordan Antigovernment Ecuador UN Seventy Three Year
The FBI arrested a former defense intelligence officer with top secret clearance on suspicion of spying for China

WBBM Evening News

02:15 min | 2 years ago

The FBI arrested a former defense intelligence officer with top secret clearance on suspicion of spying for China

"Denise pellegrini goes top rated station for news and information newsradio seven eighty and one zero five point nine fm wbz news time nine fifty two it's time for international news a former defense intelligence agency officers accused of trying to pass information along to china and exchange for hundreds of thousands of dollars the justice department says ron rockwell hanson have been arrested over the weekend as he was preparing to fly to china cbs news military consultant jeff mclaughlin has more founding announcement in terms of intelligence security dia officer was arrested attempting to abort applied in seattle washington en route to china and is now being arraigned and charged with leading national security secrets to the intelligence services of the people's republic of china in return for literally thousands of dollars of payback's chinese if convicted of attempted espionage hanson faces a maximum penalty of life in prison the volcano of fire has arrived in guatemala cbs news correspondent don dahler tells us more than sixty two people have been killed but that total is expected to go much higher eruption eruption ash as far as forty miles away in the first few hours the ash and mud remained so hot rescuers had a difficult time reaching victims some of whom can be heard crying out for help the rapidly moving mixture of gases and volcanic matter known as myra classic flows reached thirteen hundred degrees in some places by the time first responders reached victims it was often too late dozens were either burned to death or as fixated by the deadly fumes the volcano erupted sunday the next president of the un general assembly definitely be a woman and only the fourth female in the seventy three year history of the global organization but the question is whether she will be from honduras or ecuador the assembly will be voting tomorrow to choose either un ambassador mary elizabeth flora's flake of honduras or ecuadorian foreign minister maria fernanda espinosa garces this has been international news wbz news time.

Honduras UN Ecuador Seattle Consultant CBS Maria Fernanda Espinosa Garces Mary Elizabeth Flora Denise Pellegrini President Trump Don Dahler Guatemala Officer Jeff Mclaughlin Ron Rockwell Hanson China Thirteen Hundred Degrees Seventy Three Year
The Dark Truth About China's Ivory 'Ban'

All Things Considered

02:53 min | 2 years ago

The Dark Truth About China's Ivory 'Ban'

"Let's talk now about a recent outbreak of ebola in the democratic republic of congo since april there have been forty one suspected cases and nineteen deaths now global health officials will be deploying a new tool a vaccine against the virus that is still not licensed four thousand doses have been shipped to the drc with another four thousand who follow soon npr's eisenman reports this vaccine was first tested in twenty fifteen in the waning months of the massive ebola epidemic in west africa are along genie is a bio statistician at the university of florida who helped run that trial thousands of people were given the vaccine not a single person it was vaccinated got infected they did what's called a ring vaccination for every infected person officials locate everyone who was in close proximity and then everyone who had close contact with them that's the ring then all those people in the ring are vaccinated as quickly as possible the vaccine wasn't just judged one hundred percent effective if you get it even if not everyone in the ring is vaccinated it cuts down overall transmission by about seventy five percent yeah that is a big deal it's very unusual the by the time these results came in the outbreak in west africa was basically over and since then apart from the few very small flare ups there hasn't been occasion to use the vaccine also it's still awaiting final licensing that takes a while so governments need to give special permission for it to be used the target your chevik a spokesman for the world health organization which is coordinating the vaccination effort says the drc has moved quickly to cut through the paperwork this time around the approvals have been done very fast that's because of some worrisome signs about this outbreak which is in the north so we are talking about a remote area of small villages we did no paved roads with very difficult access but it is on the shore of the river where there is important transport transport that leads to a much larger city which means there is an important level of frisk of virus going elsewhere other than this remote part of the country merck which produces the vaccine will be donating it several global organizations and charities along with the british government have contributed four million dollars to carry out the campaign read eisenman npr news it's all things considered.

Ebola Congo DRC NPR West Africa British Government Eisenman University Of Florida Four Million Dollars Seventy Five Percent One Hundred Percent
"global organization" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"global organization" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Headlines last a morning 24 hours a few days as best we may wake up to images of an earthquake human conflict or famine and then when the new cycle is over so is the crisis or so it seems we are concern worldwide a global organisation in the three thousand humanitarian needs after disaster stops trending concerns stays behind to finish what we started affective disaster relief isn't just about showing up it's about following through please support is today a concern usa dot org in these trying times the steve cochran show delves into the hard inning question how much would much ward what a would chart shock if it were trucked court truck were all part of chicago's conversation a very good question of plague mankind for relative and on limited about war perks or call them what he could sharp your vote what chocolate all the would he could shock which would not be an infinite amount would you chuck all the other shows she put on the steve cochran show who will search says seven hundred pound weekday mornings on seven twenty nine the dark thanks wgn wgn sports blackhawks and charged tomorrow night in san jose chris boden has your pregame at eight thirty the face off his at nine with john white in troy murray college basketball in new york it's the big ten college tournament less than a minute left to go in the second half rutgers as a fifty eight fifty to lead over minnesota earlier iowa beat you will vie 96 eighty seven northwestern gets out of tomorrow a against penn state that is the a pregames at five fifteen the tip at 530 would they vented joe admire exhibition baseball white sox beat the rangers five before cubs seven five winners over the ace white sox baseball blackhawks ocoee and northwestern basketball right here on seven twenty wgn let's take a look at the traffic situation right now coming in on the edens lake cook to the kennedy junction in back out again fifteen minutes all clear on the kennedy and both directions between o'hare in downtown eisenhower stevenson dan ryan all moving along at the posted speed for traffic on the sevens or eighths or any time ondemand get the traffic chicago app approved by team hochberg at perl mortgage just search t r a f f i x chicago now the forecast from the wgn chicago weather center tonight colder sprinkles build there.

hochberg chicago weather center edens lake baseball cubs iowa john white san jose steve cochran chicago dan ryan kennedy kennedy junction rangers minnesota new york basketball chris boden seven hundred pound fifteen minutes
"global organization" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"global organization" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

"Any un agency or any global organisation at the center eats its guided by the convention on the rights the child which is a sign up and ratified by nearly all countries in the world and basically commits countries to put children first and outlined certain obligations and responsibilities that states and governments and families and parents will have to the world's children obviously where far from achieving and fulfilling the convention bat eats it's an organization that works in one hundred ninety one countries and it's a it's as part of the un it's a member state organization so i mean obviously well it means that aboard is made up of member states we answer to the general you know the member states the united nations so in countries like australia unison is registered as a charity and operates to raise funds for the work it does globally bots where i was working we we were is primarily of the host government and trying to work with them to make sure that they met their obligations obviously in critical areas like health and education protection of children which is a huge issue now in many countries how do we protect children from violence and abuses you spike about had at least a each week of la accommodated cottage industries users who to for children well yeah yeah no there's there's lots of there's lots of threats children in conflict children caught up in natural disasters so on i was really fortunate in my time bettina seth because i worked in very diverse settings i worked for example after this nami in banda achebe on my worked in liberia during the end of the civil war in ninety seven well it was the first phase of the end of the civil war in an unfortunate the most started again i'm so i worked with children who had been combatants was extremely emotionally guys who crushed who because that's amazing that's what i was kind of duty twos how do you disconnect yourself from moshe would i would would mass yeah but but that the thing is i think in some ways whenever urine situations these very extreme environments one.

united nations bettina seth liberia civil war moshe australia
"global organization" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"global organization" Discussed on WTVN

"To all global organisation of the whole world is going to be better with everybody trying to be the best they can be he doesn't mean put america first over everybody else but he says compared to the world open global organisations screw that i'm going to do what's best for america and he further explained i think the brits ought to do what's best for them the theory is that in all of the western democracies in free nations there's enough commonality that these nations banded together to put themselves i'm not sure it's henderson chilean turner that's what is she was saying when i heard this it completely changed my view of trump on this i i he flesh this out for me in a way that i had not understood it and she actually became sounded like she was supportive of the whole thing when a course liberals hate the concept of america first because they don't think america deserves it america's two guilty america still has too many prices to pay america first that's just decks dense arrogant and braggadocios in there we donald t america still has too many prices to pay america first that's just decks debts arrogant embracing endorsed in there we don't deserve it in their view and so uh this piece of the ap wall who's gonna follow meaning letterman or liederman and i'm not going to share the picture i just the guy is is totally off the wall and wrong as most of the more they're not even making an effort to understand what trump actually means with the things that he says but his voters do his voters eighty percent of republicans understand it in a love it and they support it then they don't think america's guilty and they don't think america as a price to pay his voters eighty percent of republicans understand it in a love it and they support it and they don't think america's guilty and they don't think america as a price to pay opposite as trump does manafort calls on doj to release his intercepted communications with foreigners is calling on the justice department to make public any transcripts of any intercepted communicate foreigners he's calling on the justice department to make public any transcripts of any intercepted communications he may have had with foreigners mr manafort requests that the department of justice release any intercepts involving him and it you know the did this whole thing the the uh investigation of flynn.

america trump doj flynn donald t america mr manafort department of justice eighty percent