35 Burst results for "Global South"

"global south" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:31 min | 8 months ago

"global south" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"I'm el sitting in Los Angeles Shapiro in Glasgow Scotland Vanessa nakata took the title of her memoir from something that happened at a climate conference last year She posed for a photo with other activists in Davos Switzerland She was the only black woman among the 5 And when The Associated Press published the photo there were only four faces They cropped her out of the picture Vanessa nakate tweeted you didn't just erase a photo you erased a continent but I am stronger than ever Then she posted this video Does that mean that having a value as an African activist or from Africa to have any value at all This week we're meeting young activists who have come to Scotland fighting for the future of the planet Vanessa nakate is Ugandan and her book is called a bigger picture My fight to bring a new African voice to the climate crisis It's so good to meet you in person Nice to meet you too I wanted to meet you here in front of this wall because it's full of messages from the world's children about the climate crisis And so when you look at this and you read these messages what do you see What does it make you think I think I really love this one We need to learn more From a 12 year old in the Maldives from the 12 year old I think it's really important because there is so much to learn about the climate crisis And learning about the climate crisis means learning from the voices that are on the front lines and we have seen how continuously activists from the global south activists who are speaking up from the most affected communities their voices and being platformed their voices are not being amplified their stories are being arrested and I think that this is a problem We can have climate justice if voices from the most affected areas are being left behind You write and you often speak about how the global south excluded from these conversations has that been your experience at the top 26 summit here in Scotland Have you felt excluded Well I could say that I think on my first day at the top I happened to meet the first minister of Scotland Nicola Sturgeon Yes And we get a ton about and unfortunately some media the way they were reporting about it you would see a picture but then it would say greater meets fast minister And so your name wouldn't even be included It looks like a repeat of what happened last year almost And honestly I just didn't have words for it because this is something that I have already talked about And I think it's not just my experience There are many activists from the global south who have been sidelined conference As we know climate change looks different in different places Can you tell us what it looks like in Kampala Uganda where you live Yeah you're gonna as a country heavily depends on the agriculture as an economy and also for very many families especially in the rural areas So with the rising global temperatures the disruptions in weather patterns are causing extreme weather events like flooding like landslides like extreme routes so it means that there's lots of people's funds drying off people's crops destruction of people's houses so these are some of the visible impacts of the climate crisis in Uganda You began your climate activism a couple years ago as you were finishing university And you say many people around you at the time were telling you to get married and have kids.

Vanessa nakate Vanessa nakata Scotland Davos Shapiro The Associated Press Glasgow Switzerland Los Angeles Maldives Africa Nicola Sturgeon Uganda Kampala
"global south" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:58 min | 8 months ago

"global south" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"The climate change the climate crisis climate crisis being a problem of the future the one that's happening today And one that is rooted in colonialism And one that talks about the loss and damages the adaptations their reparations to global south countries as well as drastic emission cuts because those topics are also not talked about enough We're always just drastic emission cuts but then no one talks about how the current impacts are already happening and someone the global north those who are responsible for it needs to pay for it Right it's Carlin I think I saw you on YouTube say that in Marshall Islands are responsible for .00 There are a bunch of zeros right 1% of the problem that you're feeling it directly as you think about your hopes and fears for what will come out of Glasgow what are your hopes and your fears My hopes I want to see actual commitment to the Paris agreement back in 2016 Solid initiatives from the global north on sustainability and less usage of fossil fuels I want the global north to take responsibility for what they're doing and admitting to it Yeah exactly as Carlin mentioned there's not even enough admittance to the responsibility It's always solidarity funds I think Boris Johnson and the G 7 meeting said something like oh we have to send them solidarity and give them help for the climate impact that they're experiencing that completely erases the accountability that they have Climate finance isn't help It's reparations They cause this they have to pay They have the climate debt to the global south and to humanity And something that I'm really hoping for just as Carlin mentioned it's really those strong commitments and beyond pledges in the words really seeing action as Carlin mentioned It's so important that we go beyond speaking because we've had so much speaking and it's doing nothing for us I don't think that changes that we need for climate justice will happen with just the summit and with the world leaders alone Because we've already seen what happens when we leave them alone in a room They don't do anything They continue business as usual Things sometimes you get even worse than when you started But I believe and I have so much hope in the people and how there have been already so many steps moving forward And now we just really need to come together and demand for that change And it doesn't end or it doesn't even start at the 6 It's a continuous process of demanding and fighting for climate justice Mitigate is a full-time climate justice activist based in Metro Manila and she's the convener and international spokesperson for youth advocates for climate action Philippines Carlin is a youth climate activist from the Marshall Islands Currently studying for his undergraduate degree in Taiwan Thank you both for coming on climate one.

Carlin Marshall Islands Boris Johnson Glasgow YouTube Paris youth advocates for climate ac Manila Metro Taiwan
"global south" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

05:18 min | 10 months ago

"global south" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Conversations connect all aspects of the climate Emergency. I'm Greg Dalton as the Glasgow climate Summit approaches in November. We're taking a look at what's on the agenda and who's at the table. There's a growing push among environmentalists who colonized climate negotiations such as cop 26. Such groups say Western countries monopoly over the climate agenda smacks of colonial hangover and will force those least responsible for the climate crisis. To pay the costs of it. First Climate one correspondent Amman as our explains who is responsible for the climate crisis and who owns the climate debate? Two people from the global South have a say in setting the climate agenda. Grassroots activist groups are planning to make these questions front and center at this year's cop 26. More than half of the world's population lives in Developing countries in the global south. They have been responsible for far less of greenhouse gas emissions than wealthy northern countries. So the countries who disproportionately caused the problem of climate change to begin with should not dominate the discourse. That's bus of San Director of Climate policy program at the Institute of Policy Studies, he says, unless the industrialized countries disinvest from their fossil, fuel based economies and start cheating developing countries as partners The demand for the colonizing climate summits such as cop will only grow loved her realization that part needs to be de colonized has certainly sunk in. With grassroots social justice movements worldwide, but Obviously much more needs to be done in terms of pressure from the grassroots for government in the global south to really assert their right And for governments in the north to realize that they need to accede to the very justifiable demands from the blue box out senses that even the choice of venue for a global climate summit like cop often hosted by European nations can be a first step in creating a meaningful engagement across the north South Divide. The choice of venue sends a political message because the host country for for the cop has a role in the determining the agenda in determining the entire atmosphere in which the dogs happen if a country that severely impacted by climate change In Africa or in the Pacific were to host a pop. That would be a very different and Bayern mint for the negotiations than if it were to happen. In one of the wealthy countries. Gregory Jenkins, professor and Department of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences at the Penn State University, says overcoming the North South divide on climate action will be difficult and will take the efforts of many. It would be a real miracle if it could be de colonized because I really think that the things that need to be done on the ground and the discussions are happening at the national slash regional slash local levels and people have to organize at that scale to do something that is meaningful. To offset this climate crisis. Jenkins says The concerns of the developing world and disenfranchised are not high enough on the cop agenda. There would have to be sessions that address the inequity. That is currently occurring on the planet as it relates to social injustice or environmental degradation that are impacting people from a day to day basis. Or the impacts the floods. The heat stress the heat waves that are impacting so many people around the globe. That would have to be an open conversation with policymakers listening and not necessarily dictating what's next bus off senses. The cop leadership of industrialized nations is aware of this push for inclusivity from the grassroots climate movement. But it's less clear whether they are prepared to recalibrate the present north south imbalance that colors climate talks. They likely know what they're doing, but they are in some sort of denial about it because it's not politically convenient for them. What the realization certainly exists on the part of grassroots people's movement. And we will certainly not hesitate to voice those demands in the most assertive way possible as to conference in Glasgow draws nearer, environmental and rights groups are getting ready for worldwide rallies to push world leaders to colonize the climate debate, along with the carbon izing the global economy. Before it's too late for climate one in Washington, D C. This is a man is our our focus. Today is water. It's essential for life and throughout human history we've sought to control and make use of it as Giulio Bo Coletti explores in his new book,.

Giulio Bo Coletti Gregory Jenkins Greg Dalton Africa November Jenkins Penn State University Amman Pacific Institute of Policy Studies Glasgow Glasgow climate Summit Today Washington, D C. one Department of Meteorology Two people north South Divide First cop 26
"global south" Discussed on It Could Happen Here

It Could Happen Here

07:56 min | 10 months ago

"global south" Discussed on It Could Happen Here

"That you're listening to in fact it is. It is happening here in your ears but you know what else is happening here. The world's kinda fallen apart. Well i don't know not the world but the structures in the world that we all relied upon for existence. Shit sure are crumbling anyway. I'm robert evans. This is a podcast about how things are falling apart and how to deal with that shit If you're new to this show maybe check out our first five episodes. They'll catch you up there evergreen. But this week we have special guest and a special conversation to have that i think is going to be edifying for a lot of people I would like to introduce mr joey. I- ube joey. You are a writer and researcher in the host of the fire these times which is a fantastic podcast. Joey how you doing today. I'm i'm operating with the norman parameters. As i said before. I'm impressed by that because i'm i'm constantly in the process of falling apart Which is why. I was late to this. Call joey you want to give our listeners. A little background on yourself. sure Emotionally from lebanon. Honest where i grew up. My family's gonna makes bit of medicines but if it kind of all over the place. And i'm currently in switzerland continuing might be deal. Which one day would actually be done. I i have been told that there's life after Yeah so. That's what i do and i do buckets. I tonight stuff that i probably forgot and E- you wrote a column that i quite a admire for website called laos on which was based on a term that. I think it was the the mango media. Folks came up with and that term is the periphery and and one of the reasons. I think this is useful. So when i grew up and i suspect it was the same. I don't know if it was the same for garrison because he grew up in a weird cult but it was probably the sanford. Christopher the terms we heard a lot for different cut like it was either basically the united states or europe or it was the third world right. Those were the terms that i grew up with and i wasn't. I was like probably seventeen or eighteen. Before i actually learned that the terms i in third world kind of came from the cold war where like the. Us is the first world. The soviet block is kind of the second world and then everyone else that third world. Obviously that's not a great collective noun for referring to any group of anything We try not to use third world and a new term has kind of become more I don't know vogue may be the wrong word. But people start using the global south to refer to Everywhere that's not the us in europe. And you know a handful of other countries and kind of that's not great either because for one thing. A lot of those countries aren't south and i'll say it isn't north either. Yeah yeah so. I'm i'm interested in this. Because there is a use in having kind of collective nouns to refer to groups of people from multiple nations and in the west isn't gonna do for most places And i like this term. The periphery because kind of the way that you in the mangle folks kind of have described it makes a tremendous amount of sense to me and it makes a tremendous amount of sense because it's not trying to group people together based on their relationship to of of a western centered kind of international power dynamics understanding that even a lot of people in the left here kind of fall into where you know You're either a imperialist anti-imperialist but being anti-imperialist means supporting a lot of imperialist powers because they're against whatever imperialist power. You were born into anyway. I wonder if you could start by getting your your explanation. Of what is the periphery. And how do you see that. Yeah so just. Save up funded. I don't expect that term to work every diamond in all contexts. I sheriff exactly. I know someone who works. In development studies had a pretty informative chats about the terms global south Note and she was pretty convincing that they can be useful in certain materials analysis. Certain things so. I'm not i'm not gonna like it doesn't work ever basically but i think what really clicked with me although the number of things that he kicked in one. Is that conversation. When ebola vont on mongan media on their own podcast is one. I've lived in for them and then we had a chat about About the explosion babe with last year. And it's up on the topic off the briefly which they coined coins came about and the best way he described it Which is gonna given the the podcast Now is that when anti authoritarian turks. He's from turkey. See protests in for example. Lebanon hong kong. Which was what they were happening at the same time in two dozen nineteen and issac and other places students on date. They sort of think that it could happen here. Know it can happen in turkey. Essentially which is not the case offend would like leftists leftists leftists. That are speaking the west now obviously exceptions so all of this was not every turkish leftist things like that not every western after like that. But it's kind of a journal tent and for me for example the way i can explain it as a broadcast like it could happen here. Why you're sort of describing a situation that might happen here here in america. Let's say wouldn't necessarily be needed in for example lebanon. Because it's going to help you out and it's been happening for some time now. Yeah and that. That tension in some sense when i would because now even switzerland's i'm in you know in geneva which is as international as at the center in some sense as it gets on most it this tension between my dating life essentially here and what's happening back home on a daily basis is what sort of led me to think about this other term debris here because i felt that at least on an emotional never global south wasn't working as one that makes sense and one of the things. I really find so useful. An admirable about this term. Is that it. It is a. It's a collective noun for referring to a group of people but it separates those people from the state from their government. So you when you're when you're talking about the periphery include people from lebanon People from from palestine people from syria. You're not including the government's you're not. It's not the states. It's the because the people are peripheral to the power of those states into the blocks that those states find themselves in. Which is why you know any any efforts at autonomy on the the communal leveler crushed so violently. Yeah that's for me. Global south it in the term includes the states from the sober global rushing the activists from the socal global south intuitions. That i just needed this. Other layer this other term. That explains that dynamic as well. Yeah and you know. One of the things you were talking about was kind of the way in which a lot of leftists in the united states and chunks of the west will kind of disregard laboratory struggles overseas that don't neatly fit into a very simple ideological category. I'm kind of wondering as a kid who grew up in lebanon. Kind of i'm. I'm going to assume mostly focused on the regional kind of politics. When did you start to realize that. That was something that was going on internationally. Like when did you. Did you realize kind of like you know. I think a lot of folks are took surprised by the reaction of the international left like the arab spring. And i'm kind of wondering. Was that when it hit home for you or did you start to see stirrings of those problems at an earlier. Date.

mr joey ube joey robert evans lebanon america switzerland europe Joey laos joey sanford Christopher turkey ebola issac Lebanon hong kong geneva palestine syria
"global south" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

05:40 min | 10 months ago

"global south" Discussed on WBUR

"So often we hear global South, having problem getting hold of the vaccinations. What's been the situation in Vietnam? Yeah, Same. It's a huge problem, And this is going to be one of the big issues with attempting to reopen some areas. Hotel Man City Since we've been the epicenter there really funneled what vaccine supply there is to the city and Over 80% of adults in the city now have at least one shot, which is great. But in terms of nationwide only just over 3% of the population is fully vaccinated. 97 million people Vaccine supply as it has been a huge issue. There is a domestic vaccine candidate that is close to completion, but we don't know exactly when it will be approved. Um, I would assume sometime this month, but it's been a huge challenge, and it will remain to be one for into 2022 usually sounds grim. Listen, thank you very much. Indeed. For the stats and the picture you brought us that was Mike Patoski, freelance journalist. In Hoki Minh City. As you heard hunkering down. Let's stay on that theme that would go and head to Australian and will flee to camp event is now providing emergency quarantine facilities in the remote Outback time in Australia were well over 10%. The mostly indigenous population is infected with the coronavirus. The BBC's film Mr Is in Sydney, Phil, Tell us a little bit of exactly about where this is. Taking place and why it's taking place there. This is the town of Will Kenya, Raul about 1000 miles to the northwest of Sydney. It is in the far reaches of New South Wales. It has One of the highest rates of coronavirus transmission in the state of New South Wales, and in that particular community, like Like other indigenous dominated areas in Australia, there is a problem with housing. Indigenous Australians often have substantive and overcrowded accommodation. I've seen it for myself in the cities. And in remote areas and housing is a fundamental part of the government's long term strategy for reversing aboriginal disadvantage in a pandemic. There are clearly problems if covid positive patients and their close contacts need to isolate, which is why these 30 camper vans have been sent. Will Kanye Dr. Jason Agostino is a medical advisor to the national Aboriginal Community controlled Health Organization. And he says that substandard housing has been a problem for years. What is happening in Vulcania and in Western New South Wales is because of a lack of investment, inappropriate housing for aboriginal tourist town to people over decades. You know, we saw the swine flu pandemic, particularly impact Aboriginal charge down the people back in 2000 and nine and it is poor housing that is at the heart of rheumatic heart disease across Australia, Aboriginal charged under people have some of the highest rates. Rheumatic heart disease in the world, and it's completely unacceptable. And at the heart of that is this poor housing Dr Jason Agostina there on the huge challenge. We were hearing from Vietnam about lack of vaccines. They're they're very low vaccination rates in Australia as well. Phil. Could that though, be about to change. I think what Australia's advantage is that it is a pretty wealthy country overnight. We've seen 450,000 additional doses of the fight The vaccine flown into Sydney from the United Kingdom. Now this is a deal that involves Britain, sending a total of four million Pfizer doses. To Australia. These are drugs that are approaching their expiry date. Australia will in return, return the favor and send four million doses back to Britain later in the year when Australia's supplies are more secure. Australia has other vaccine deals with Poland in Singapore. About two million Australians. Are being vaccinated each week, just under 40% of the population is now double jab fully vaccinated, and the authorities say that lockdowns that still affect more than half of the Australian population will gradually be eased once more than 70% of Australians of fully inoculated. We have these comments from Prime Minister Scott Morrison, saying it's time to leave lockdowns. And come out of the cave. When do you think that's going to happen? New South Wales is anticipating reaching that 70% mark sometime in October. And as we were discussing or I'll hearing earlier, Australia really now looking to abandon its approach of Covid zero, there is an expectation among the political leaders in this country. Getting down to zero. Covid cases is no longer possible given the highly contagious nature of the delta variant cases in New South Wales and Victoria and the national capital, Canberra continue to increase Australia's strategy. Now Raul is one really of containment and vaccinations, hoping that as many Australians are vaccinated as possible to provide a shield for the community. So that in the words of the prime minister, we can finally all emerged from the cave of lockdown. Domestic joining us there from Sydney. You know, Lawrence this morning last week. We're having a great time when we're watching the Paralympics up there on the screens. I'm missing it, you know, but there's still a little bit of sort of health worker.

Mike Patoski United Kingdom New South Wales Vietnam Hoki Minh City Singapore four million October Jason Agostino Victoria Western New South Wales BBC 2022 Vulcania Will Kanye 70% each week Will Kenya Australia Canberra
"global south" Discussed on The People's Countryside Environmental Debate Podcast

The People's Countryside Environmental Debate Podcast

05:41 min | 11 months ago

"global south" Discussed on The People's Countryside Environmental Debate Podcast

"The the southern hemisphere isn't actually on fire were But when i pointed out that the global south is a socio economic statement and not a geographic statement because the global north is what you call the progressive west and the global south are third world countries. When i pulling out opponent opponent our only date was thank you for the correction And then went on to keep arguing point about Can anybody proved that the global south as a as a socio economic term is on fire and he cherry picks dieter out of context that shows the dover warming. Whether it's my not isn't happening so he he was complaining that the sign the scientists don't know they can't i offer proof and yet you saw ins- by cherry picking science to prove his point now. I thought that was an interesting behavior. And i actually at the maybe the truth is somewhere in the middle between you and exile yes. I both vehemently defending their position. It was interesting just to just two points out to sister a population's statistic tick so if southern hemisphere is what would you how did how was it described by accessory. Mom no no no no no. It's not southern hemisphere. Th the climate denier thought he was when x said the global south then not talking about geographical hemispheres right. Okay the the. Denial thought they were so he said who in southern hemisphere is on fire. The the global south the is third world impoverished countries in the global north rs the civilized nations. Because it because about about eighty. Seven percent of the population lives above the loops above the equator. Yeah but that's not as i say the global north will global south thefts hemispheric anyway This this denial started to put more out of context. Data out there. I i and the they said they said the accident extinction rebellion. Believe in fight theories boy scientists on. It's scientific conspiracy so but yeah uses science himself to back up his argument but won't believe any science. That disputes is thinking. So yes that's that's you know. That's that's the bias beacon. Oh have the question. I would ask. It's a dead end though. Doesn't that show that. Boris is a dead end. Absolutely yeah i would say. That's the reason why i'm not twitter. Twitter is for me on nonsense..

Boris twitter
Marxists Will Wage War on Capitalism in Next Infrastructure Bill

Mark Levin

01:31 min | 11 months ago

Marxists Will Wage War on Capitalism in Next Infrastructure Bill

"The growth is want to engage in policies that was studying maximum income are maximum well to weaken envy as a motive, consumerism, they say, opening borders, no border in fact. To reduce means to keep inequality between rich and poor countries. It's one of the reasons your borders open. And they demand reparations for supporting a concept of ecological debt or the demand that the global north pay for past and present colonial exploitation of the global South. The D growth is also demand the government established a living wage and reduce the work week to 20 hours. It goes on American Marxism. Very, very important chapter. I haven't spent enough time on it, That's for sure. That is Chapter five. Climate change. Fanaticism. This is in The next coming multi trillion dollar bill that the Democrats are pushing this is in it. It's a war on capitalism. It's warm, private property rights. It's a war on technological progress that improves our lives, creates medical technologies and so forth. This is a D gross movement. There's nothing to do with climate change. Has nothing to do with a green new deal. And notice. As I say the so called intersectionality. This is in the bill. That the Democrats are going to vote on in the 19th. Senate Republicans Plowed, the fields plowed the way for it.

Senate
"global south" Discussed on Journalism.co.uk podcast

Journalism.co.uk podcast

08:01 min | 1 year ago

"global south" Discussed on Journalism.co.uk podcast

"Look at. How does it work. We have at times kind of quarterly done. you know. we're not always consistent ourselves. And that's one of the things. We're we're also working on at times we do it quarterly. Where we'll say okay here there crises and we have an internal meeting where we'll discuss Or the editors will send in their thoughts to the executive editor around where we need to go in our coverage Sometimes that happens halfway through the year and then sometimes say it's a little bit more informal in our regular pipeline calls. We're thinking okay. Well this was on our list what we have That we can had to to our coverage on that how else is the new humanitarian thinking about a change in the way it approaches crises and conflict reporting. I think what we're frustrated about in our own process is that And to be honest it's it's not a question of local versus international reporters a lot of the freelance journalists that we work with By by the nature of being freelancers are not as familiar with what we need in terms of our final output. And so we're often having to kind of rewrite copy on the desk to get it to the level that we need for publication. and that feels really unsatisfying. In part because it's just not a great use of time and then in part because if we want to be as authentic as possible in a representation of local voices and and not be determining the narrative from afar Having journalists from those regions and countries in the ones to really shape the story than we want again that that process to be as close as possible. So one of the formats were thinking about and these are really early stages in our own. Discussions is Agrees podcasting only. Because in many of the countries we cover. english isn't necessarily the first language and So having people writing in english for us means that they're already kind of at a disadvantage in terms of how they're expressing themselves and Orally we think we can probably allow people to express themselves a bit more authentically And what we would do is then provide. The platform provide support in how we put the stories together. But have i really an open call to say you know if you are living in the context that you're experiencing crises and you want to share your story come to us with the story that you wanna share and we'll help you put it out there so that again. I'm they're the ones determining what the narrative is not us so. That's one of the things we're looking at. We're also thinking about Partnerships with organizations that do more regular kind of community Surveying or pulling or have More systematic ways of getting a finger on the pulse of what the issues are in the community with the rumors are in the community that can help inform our reporting on. so that's another Another thing we're looking at in the future not so much in terms of format but in terms of Workflow in decision making really interesting A word on universal practices as what we've touched on today really is discrepancies between north and south and how we cover crises. What my you know. A state of play looked like where museums around the world. You know more universal in the way they they cover humanitarian stories. You think it's really tricky and we've been thinking a lot about that. What would a universal set of standards. Look like i think. Journalism is currently dominated by a western standard and In many countries of the world the shins of trust notions of How you get information are very different and so opening up. I think some of that Some of our understanding of what that looks like. i'm not yet sure and especially given there are You know for global news from like us. We're operating in places that have such different cultures in with of working and so what is it that kind of rises to the top as universal thread or glue that pulls it all together. I think there has to be a commitment to the truth. i think there has to be To my mind. Journalism is is about improving the world so there has to be some kind of commitment that journalism is a force for good and it's Having a positive impact And then i think beyond that we have to really be a bit more flexible about what we consider to be. Acceptable practices and as long as we're transparent about what those practices are and our own workflows in production I think we can let people decide for themselves rather than insisting on. This is the way we do things. And if you do it in the other way then you're not of quality or of standard then the last thing i think Could help guide us on a universal standard. We tend to think of what is a good story rather than what is a story that is of service to the people that were covering. And i think that kind of shift would allow us to move away from Kind of old school notions of standards and move towards Are we doing good with our journalism. And if the answer is yes And we can you know abide by certain set of minimum consensus based principles for example being fact-based etc That would be for me shift in the right direction. Are we providing a good service to the people that were covering is our is our journalism of us to them and that could already be as something that kind of binds us together combination of really strong messages their love. That is their main message. You'd like to leave our listeners. With as they think about their next story on the global south or how they indeed cover this subject. Is there one main party message to leave them with. I think what i would say is that as we as journalists think about the journalism of the future you know we're grappling with a lot of things. Business models were grappling with toxic newsroom cultures That one of the things we need to grapple with as well is for lack of a better term. Because i know everyone has a problem with it. decolonizing jerusalem and that that isn't just out of A moral obligation but that it will make our journalism better. I don't think we can create excellent journalism in the twenty first century without challenging the power structures behind it and so I see this really is a challenge to all of us to rise to the occasion to stand you know to align with our own values about what journalism is supposed to be and to evolve in in order not to be again one of these relics of the past that are Disempowering the people that are are journalists. Minta servants have. I'm helping all of us as people on this earth. Move forward so i that would be my message that challenging the power structures in journalism is about making journalism better about. It's been great to speak to you. Thank you so much for jumping on the podcast and sharing your insights with us. My pleasure thank you so much great to speak to hit the and lots to go away and think about some lessons from my side would with to report four with communities not just on them track the crises. You're writing about find a way to come back to see how much progress has been made but the bottom line is to be open to change and shaking the formula on the status quo. Eventually go stale so think about anything from formats to language choices to modernize things and not be a relic of the past. If you like what you heard. Today you can pick up more episodes on soundcloud spotlight map podcasts by searching as describing to the journalism but couldn't you cabled cost if you lots of feature on the show i'd love to hear from you. Please do drop me an email. Jacob journalism look the uk. But that's all we have time for this week. I've been drinking grandeur. Thanks so much for listening so.

Minta jerusalem Jacob uk
Corporate Media vs. Bolivian Democracy

Latino Rebels Radio

01:26 min | 1 year ago

Corporate Media vs. Bolivian Democracy

"The on the show. We put the spotlight on bolivia as we examined the hypocrisy of western media towards the return of bolivia democracy following the two thousand and nineteen coup against evil morales in two thousand nineteen a right wing coup with support of both the us government and the organization of american states overthrew the government of evil morales following presidential elections that showed no proof of fraud or irregularities the resulting coup government led to several people getting killed following a wave of protests and arrest. This of course is a summarize consensus by the global south and certainly from the bolivian. People of what took place in two thousand nineteen western media on the other hand paints the picture of yet another authoritarian leader disliked by the us being quote unquote asked to step down from their post now following the two thousand twenty presidential election. Victory of evo morales maas party and the recent arrests of cool leader. Janine on years the corporate media is still following the same playbook of presenting bolivia as a country in turmoil with the type of objectivity that conveniently ends in a conclusion that favors the powerful

Bolivia Morales Organization Of American State Us Government Evo Morales Maas Party Janine United States
Waste Siege: Infrastructure and the Environment in Israel/Palestine with Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins

Jewish History Matters

07:26 min | 1 year ago

Waste Siege: Infrastructure and the Environment in Israel/Palestine with Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins

"What is it about waste. That helps us to think through big questions about what's been happening in terms of israel and the palestinian territories. You know what is going on there. You know both in terms of you mentioned the history of infrastructure and also in terms of the history of the relationship between society. The government and the palestinians in between later also the jewish settlements in the west bank and the palestinians. Living there as well like what is waste. Give us as a lens to think through kind of what's going on on a bigger scale. One way to answer that is to say that it helps us look at multiple scales at the same time so one question that kind of answers and it may be a question that we don't realize we have or we should have but that question is who governs the west bank and you could get the answer by looking at this material and where it goes and how it's processed and when it's left there when capital gets invested to place in certain places or treated in certain ways i think from those very impractical tangible practices and sites we can see who is kind of managing this territory and that such an important thing for us to know politically above all because since the mid nineteen ninety s. Either you have people saying that. The palestinian authority now that it exists is the government. You have that coming from various political positions where there's an assumption that whether or not it is recognized fully as sovereign it can be held accountable for various things like it exists and it is the government and then you have other people who sort of its presence including at some point. I remember early in my project. I had faculty telling me you know really. You wanna talk about the pa. They're not really doing anything you know and i thought like you to find out what they are doing and if they are doing something from a project that looks waste but then you do have people who think that you know. Essentially the pa is to which the israeli administration has out sourced its occupation and so it's sort of treated as a neutral conduit. You know that does israel's bidding and that therefore sort of doesn't deserve its own analysis beyond what it does to facilitate essentially the occupation. And i think that waste enabled me to see the very dumps and thick and complicated network which includes donors which includes companies which includes people who are not sort of formed in something that's legible and coherent. Who might just be people in a neighborhood who are all managing the every day together. And i think that's important to understand that we know how we want to name the condition essentially that we are looking at when we look at contemporary occupied palestine. There's a lot going on. there's lots of think about. You're talking about like the ways in which the palestinian authority plays different kinds of roles in terms of occupation in terms of the day-to-day life of the palestinians themselves. And it's interesting. Because i think that when we think about basic infrastructure people don't think about it for the most part when it works properly right you know when you turn the tap in your apartment and clean. Water comes out. No one gives that any thought or really for the most part people. Don't any thought it's one there's failures infrastructure and thinking about like for instance you know questions clean water or when it comes to waste management or i know like nuclear power plants and people may not pay attention to what kind of plant is producing their power until it turns out that it was a nuclear plant that melted down. Or you know if they somehow see the direct outcome of a coal-based plant or something ultimately. It's a question of what is the role of infrastructure in society. I think that's part of what's really interesting. Here in general also speaks to the question of what's taking place in terms of the history of israel and palestine over the course of the past hundred years if not more which is the question of what does it mean to build up infrastructure so much of the zionist movement. The building of the shoe later the state of israel was an attempt to try to construct infrastructure to increase the absorptive capacity of the land. And then later on. Also you think about you know. What does this mean in terms of the palestinians. Well there's so much going on here as we think about the history of infrastructure and about how waste is a useful element that people tend not to think about in terms of their daily lives. Yeah i mean if i can respond to a couple of things there one just point on that. Last thing that you mentioned is that i was struck by the fact that my observations of the efforts the palestinian authority was making to build waste. Infrastructures was Those early zionist efforts. You know that kind of focus on independent infrastructure essentially no matter what and i say no matter what because they're all kinds of ways in which that presented challenges for construction so for example. Israel would often say we'll let you build a wastewater treatment plant as long as you connect it to a settlements wastewater treatment plant and the. Pa would say a red line. We won't because the point is to build the infrastructure of the state. I want to say that vision. And the insistence of the palestinian authority to build the infrastructures that it imagined to be the foundation of a future state took the oxygen out of the room. In terms of what other possibilities there could be for taking care of waste and of course the assumption was and this is going to get us a little bit toward are kind of capitalism climate change direction the assumption was definitely that we consume and we produce waste at the normal speed of any normal ideally normal society and then we build the infrastructures to house those wastes. But we don't try to limit what we produce because we're still in the process of becoming what everybody else's which i think something that you find. In general and the global south. I would say that people and infrastructure studies who study it in the global south. There have been making this point over and over again which is important which is in a lot of places like basically the postcolonial world. Let's say infrastructures are just failing. All the time one interesting question to ask is do people perceive it to be a problem. In those cases or is there a kind of a normality to infrastructural failure. Such that something else becomes the abnormal thing you notice. you know. I happen to do my research in this special moment when the pa was trying to build up infrastructures from scratch for waste like infrastructures that did not previously exist. It was disrupting essentially processes and practices of managing waste in the name of order a new order but in ways that were very disruptive to people who had become accustomed to for example dumpsites being at the edge of every municipality instead of being few and centralized know two or three across the whole west bank. So what could look like failure. Now from the perspective was successful management. At that time. So i think the question of perception and how populations experience infrastructural failures super interesting.

PA Israel West Bank Israeli Administration Palestine
How to Build a Successful Value-Driven News Membership Model

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

05:29 min | 1 year ago

How to Build a Successful Value-Driven News Membership Model

"Read many stories about news innovators in europe and the united states. But what is it like to lounge digital bone outlet in the global south. What are those challenges and opportunities for funders who take the plunge in those countries. Our guest today is one of those founders. He's name is tiny gut. He was editor chief. John one of argentina's newspapers and in two thousand seventeen. He laughed to find rhodesian one of the most innovative examples of digital newspapers in the global south today china will talk about membership human journalism and social empathy and how to measure success of audience participation chine- welcome and thank you for being with us today. Thank you very much thirty for this invitation for having here. I'm regulatory audience of this podcast. So pleasure and a privilege to be thanks. Thank you so much. So i want to start with a personal question. What did you do. Why did you leave a good secure job at an established newspaper to lounge a small new startup. that's a person in question and to make the long story short. I would say i when i was twenty seven year. Old longtime ago any flow very particular path. Down there are a decider graphic. satoru Decided rector innovation director and finally eighteen chief and twenty one is at the company and for years eight chief. I decided to step down And i would say sort of to change the nature of of my challenges. Of course it was a big and beautiful challenge to lead that talented newsroom of almost two hundred people And we work and we do have a lot of fun and success in bringing into the twenty first century Great media brand Born in the nineteenth century But on the other hand today i feel that is also an enormous and also beautiful challenge to create a new media bencher from scratch So to bringing a small but also very talented team That by building this this new media we are trying to answer some essential questions to to our craft journalism and also to me. So how can we acknowledge the the media fatigue And media avoidance phenomenon for example. Or or how can we cover the most pressing social issues we face as society and covered in a different way and probably the most interesting question. A how does this. But equally experience of the twenty first century people's participation can affect journalism. So i would say that the coral of of We are trying to hook like the broadcast. One way or the model per line that was born with us media And he's one of the challenges. Our industry spacey facing. I'm sorry it wasn't short. The the answer but i have two more things to say. There is almost no secure job now. Our industry I think everything is at risk An acknowledging daddy. I think it's a good thing on the other hand. I believe that in the end. I guess That why i step down being there to of great media. Well i guess it has to do a lot with a very personal calling on that I read a sentence which i found very very interesting. What you said. Human journalists can rebuild social empathy. Can you explain to us what it means Yes we believe that the problems we are facing us society. The challenges are very complex and of course Demands complex many times complex solutions and we are not going to find those solutions without an open dialogue between institution politicians and citizens So pariah station. For example. it's it's it's almost the name of the social conversation today at is preventing us to find those solutions. An in-depth sense. i believe. Journalism has an important role in terms of showing Other words helping us understand other opinions For amd we'd take this very seriously advocates axiom. So we been trying sort of new full matz that help how to help us our own To have more empathy with different lives people that lives in a different way of thinking in a different way than myself So it has to do with how we build a more robust set citizenship. That helps that public dialogue to evolve and on find real solutions. Gus dose dilutes might should have at the end semaine back in personal and institutional decisions

Satoru Argentina Europe United States China John Matz
One Page At A Time, Jess Wade Is Changing Wikipedia

Short Wave

09:46 min | 1 year ago

One Page At A Time, Jess Wade Is Changing Wikipedia

"So today. We're speaking with just weighed in experimental. Physicists at college. London and every night for the past three years just has written a wikipedia entry about a woman or poc scientists. And if this sounds like a big commitment that's because it is. But what motivates. Just keep with. It is the possibility of using wikipedia to combat the bias. In science. We see it in who gets through peer review. We see it in who gets big papers. Cited we see who gets big grants. We see it and who wins awards. And that means that the people that we celebrate and champion incredibly homogeneous and when wikipedia launched the internet was a very small space and it was very dominated by particular types of people. This kind of you know. Tech bro attitude that we still see in silicon valley and places like that majority white majority western a lot from north america some from western europe and those were the first people to start using it engaging in contributing to wikipedia backed according to a twenty twenty study. Eighty seven percents of wikipedia. Contributors are men with media includes wikipedia wick wicky quote a bunch of other platforms and for just this bias in. Authorship creates a bias in who gets a biography so this huge systematic bias against women against people of color against people from the global south against people who are from any kind of particular marginalized group. So it's kind of two things when we have a very diverse editorship and to the things they writes about a not very diverse and this is obviously impacted by the way that science celebrates people and who took about who we define as notable. Right right just to confirm by. Now you've written what nine hundred articles for the site. Oh no no. How many i've written i've written one thousand two hundred one thousand two hundred whatever so sub usually get a bit excited so obviously that's not three hundred sixty five times three so sometimes i get a little carried away but in general i try and stick to one a day sometimes. Yeah yeah. I mean. I've been going for three. Yes so i've done a pretty good job that in those i. We thought a lot about how to ask you this question. Because twelve hundred articles is an extraordinary accomplishment as far as contributing to this encyclopedia. And so the question we're going to go with is if you could build a quarantine bubble with some of the people that you've written about living or deceased who would you include and why should question so so for sure. I'd have to have some of the people developing vaccines enough air. The person who created the oxford vaccine which is is the vaccine this just been approved for use in the uk. A viral vector vaccine is a phenomenal professor. Sara gilbert sara gilbert has had this kind of fascinating rich directory working on the development of a whole bunch of different vaccines that can walk in different corona viruses and kiss kubat. I don't know if you've come across any of your reporting. She's she's a young african american women who is at the national institute of health and had walked back scenes for for sars and mers. So has this really great legacy but also alongside. I kind of scientific research. An extraordinary publication list works to support people from undeserved communities and walks to really amplify the voices of scientists who too often overlooked but also to support young people and getting into an ethic about science. So that people at different ends of that curric- his kizzie is still very young. Where saratoga established professor but both of them have this kind of extraordinary pathway to really ultimately creating the thing. That's going to save the entire world so suddenly. If i if i had according to about they would be in it. I think that. I mean how many people might out in my quarantine babo because i could keep going. There's no official guidance but the often cited wisdom is less than ten. I'm so primed and ready to tell you stories about everyone. I'm so excited about them. So mainly because i have been. She's someone who i wrote about right at the beginning of my wikipedia. A mathematician who gladys west. She was born in virginia in the thousand nine hundred and she went to college. She went to a historically black college and university to study maths. She goes off in becomes the teach She then eventually what the us government. Wes she did the early computations and calculations for gps so for all of the technologies that almost everything that we do day to day relies on. Now you know you get in your car keys your phone. You try and navigate took particular location. You use the technology that gladys west created. And when i made gladys west page in two thousand eighteen is really hard to find. Information about. Her book is what for the us government so lots of things are adopted. A couple of months. After i put the page live so after i'd finished writing it and put it onto wikipedia. She was selected by the bbc is one of the top one hundred women so she went into the kind of top one hundred women in the world for any intentional creation. Contribution ebba and when you're on a web page like fat when you're on a page so much traffic and insight people hop over to the wikipedia page really quickly so you could just see the numbers of page views of of the wikipedia. Page going up and up and that meant that more and more people contributed to it so grew story grew. How did that make you feel. I just loved it. I was reflecting on this a lot with with my parents lockdown wife. I kept going live. I kept doing this. And i find nothing more rewarding honestly than seeing other people get recognized then champion for what they've done so absolutely love to have quarantine bubble that so many things that i want us. Yeah and you're collecting. I suppose historical information across different websites and books to write these biographies. Has it ever feel like time travel. Yeah completely does feel like time travel. It's it's so it's so interesting. The things that i find kind of thrilling and exciting now feels such a kind of privilege in a rush to be able to get access to all of the resources that we can do. Now you know online libraries. Nine archives sites archived magazines scientific journals extraordinary places that that turn to for this and there are times when you just feel like fantastic achievement. So so if you see in a lot of the world's when women get married they take their partner's name so sometimes it's quite difficult to find out things about their lives if they got married and all of their publications in this new name. And when you find that one link that one connection that tells you that maiden name and then you can go back and find their phd thesis or who was there examining all this extra level of information. So when i get to that. I'm like jump off the sofer like this is great and say yeah. It's completely like a portal into another world. Right i mean. I've chills just listening to you. Talk about this kind of forensic reconstruction of people's lives and who they were outside of who. They married or other kinds of societal markers of that. Yeah a big part of it. I think a big part of my efforts wikipedia. Who i've met the people that we've trained editor phones is to not just make pages about women no make pages about people of color but to make them as good as the comparable page would-be about a white man. Yeah yeah you've been amazing way of connecting all these dots. I really appreciate hearing that I wanna ask you one one last thing. Which is i know that in a lot of ways just talking to you. It sounds like this project is part of such a bigger desire to see science really include nbc driven by all kinds of people. And what do you think it will really take to bring more women and poc's into science so that they stay. Oh such a good question and such a huge one. I mean they're very preliminary simple things that low hanging fruit. If you will know why we don't already have in place you know proper care and support for people who have caring responsibilities so whether that's you know elderly parents or sick parents or especially now in the pandemic who seeing the importance of the childcare and how that skin influence women scientific careers if they're having to work from home but i think more than that we need to really look a scientific institutions and ask really critical questions about why people are leaving. Why do we see. So few black professes. Why do we see so few women in position of leadership. Why do lgbt he. Plus scientists not feel comfortable being out when they're in the scientific workplace and then really put money to and take action to address those individual needs. But i think from a kind of how you get more diverse people into science. I really honestly think the answer is improving our education systems and really support our teachers better. Pay them as well as we pay are bankers so that they stay and so that they create kind of inspiring science lessons. Then go out and got this next generation to come in who keep pushing for this change that we want

Wikipedia Wick Wicky Sara Gilbert Sara Gilbert Kubat Gladys West Us Government Western Europe Silicon Valley National Institute Of Health North America Saratoga London Oxford WES UK Virginia BBC NBC
The Political Legacy of Diego Maradona

Latino Rebels Radio

05:54 min | 1 year ago

The Political Legacy of Diego Maradona

"So today. Let's discuss. What may diego. Maradona an idol of the working class throughout the world. And so today on the show. We have the pleasure. And the honour of having dave's 'iran who's the sports editor for the nation magazine host of the edge of sports podcast and the co host of w w collision with eaton thomas which you can hear under ups w thursday's or anytime on wpro w fm dot org. He joins us today over. The phone is a pleasure and honor tabby on the shell dave zairean. It's great to be here. Thanks for having me is good to have you with us today and it's been a whirlwind of emotions both for me personally requested passing donor. Because i don't know what to began its Figures that for me personally. I thought we would continue to live on in a way. He'll continue to do so. But you know we started this program by quoting water galeano and you wrote not one but two articles in the nation magazine on the donor and the first one did you did. Last week. Actually called it galliano as well. So let's begin their liberate on what you call it from galeano last week because you know for no other reason that it's a shame that gagliano is not alive. Today to perhaps best crystallize the importance of madonna nominee in the world and he probably best crystallize this. This passing perhaps a better than the both of us combined. Yeah i mean. I guess i would start just by reading the words of galliano about diego. Maradona eduardo gagliano is just the absolute master of words. Somebody who can make poetry and prose intertwined with one another and produce something perfect but this is what had wow diano wrote about diego maradonna that i quoted. He's written a great deal about maradonna. But this is what i quoted. No one can predict the devilish tricks. This inventor of surprises will dream up for the simple joy of throwing the computers off track. Trixie never repeats. He's not quick more like a short legged bull but he carries the ball so into this foot and he's got is all over. His body is acrobatics. Light up the field in the frigid soccer of the end of the century which detest defeat and forbids all fund. That man was one of the few prove that fantasy can be efficient and inside that praise of maradonna. somebody who's as the ball sewn to his split because gagliano put so expertly. Of course you know in that statement is a critique of what soccer had become by the end of the twentieth century which in galliano's mine had been very flattened in very become boring faithfully As more and more countries left reflected an indigenous style of play and more countries started to play like one another and teams played like one another in a way. That was very very risk averse until maradona. Who was you know in both his life on the field and off the field was anything. But risk-averse He maradonna saw kindred. Spirit Somebody who could play with the efficiency that's needed the modern game but also had the ability to make you dream about what the possibilities of a human being could do and be On the soccer field and so in addition we encourage everyone to check out the writings of eduardo. Galeano as it pertains football because it's not just the xs and os. It goes way beyond that. Now even in regards to to madonna but the game itself as well. I'll just say on us. Wrote wrote a whole thin book about soccer called soccer in sun and shadow Of course if available in spanish and english and it's the most beautiful faca writing that you can imagine. I would recommend that this month for anyone looking for a good book to read during the holiday season. What can you tell us about the poverty. Madonna grew up in that perhaps shaped his political views later. Because you know we we just mentioned the the professionalization of football as as a global sport in how it's become sort of predictable and cold as you mentioned there's galeano mentioned but he grew up at a time where it's still not as polished as we see it today and this is very important and understanding you know his views later in life correct. Oh absolutely at Giggle maradona like to say that. He was born in the mud and never forgot where he came from and when he said he was born in the mud literally it was mud he grew up in the badio ueno status and he was the fifth of eight children and he grew up without running water or electricity and that always feel as if he was a kindred spirit with everybody on earth who lived in poverty in this globe. That's built on savage inequalities. Madonna saw himself as a tribune for those even when he was at his most his most wealthy even when he was at his most Flamboyant he never forgot where he came from he always stood particularly with the poor of the global south And that's not just in latin america that that's all over the world and My favorite Diego maradona story is diego. Maradona was also a very devout roman catholic and he was able to meet the pope Pope john paul the second and he said this is what he said after leaving his meeting with the pope he said i was in the vatican and i saw all these golden ceilings and afterwards i heard the pope's say that the church was worried about the welfare of the poor

Galeano Gagliano Galliano Nation Magazine Eaton Thomas Dave Zairean Soccer Maradona Eduardo Gagliano Diano Diego Maradonna Diego Maradona Madonna Iran Dave Trixie Giggle Maradona Football
interview With Kristen Putnam-Walker

Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

03:34 min | 1 year ago

interview With Kristen Putnam-Walker

"Welcomed extraordinary women radio chris. It is great to have you join me today. Thank you so much candidates great. Be here so one of the core values of extraordinary women. Radio is impact trading impact. Making a difference in you helped over a hundred philanthropists strategically allocate over half a billion dollars in grants and gifts. I mean that's that's just incredible first of all So congratulations for that. How did you find your passion for philanthropy. A great question i. I'm not entirely sure to be perfectly honest where it started. I remember back in his will which was way back in the day. I'm being very passionate about trying to change. Us policy and in the third world is be caught at the global south In especially in latin america and became very involved as a student activist In trying in el salvador and central america nicaragua and trying to create a lot of change there. in fact. it's funny i I saw myself in washington d. c. During college i had organized a contingent of students my university to travel to these see and participate in a demonstration and that trend into a civil disobedience unexpectedly. So i got arrested for somebody you know. These are the days of cell phones right way to reach anybody nonetheless. I boarded this bus. Where all of us are being taken off to the washington. Dc place department. I suppose and i sit down my rights and musette next at asner actor right. The mary tyler moore show which means hopefully. Hopefully your your listeners. Know that show in high show about the next three hours talking to asner. I was probably twenty. That's awesome you know what i know. It was very fun but one of the first questions he asked me was. What got you involved in. this was it. Your parents are your parents political or whatnot and at the time quite frankly i didn't have the best answer i didn't entirely. No i just knew that. Once i learned about injustice in the world i felt compelled to act on it and so i think really that kind of fuels my passion and you know in philanthropy one of the benefits. I think of being a funder or advising funders as you get to be you get to put in a variety of positions places and experiences that you wouldn't otherwise have and so it's a privilege related to be able to talk to different kinds of people like i've worked on issues related to gang violence in california. I was in salvador during the civil war. I was in nicaragua during their presidential elections as an observer I'm doing some work now with an organization called body. Osuna does in santa cruz california along with today. Another actor danny glover who's a big supporter of theirs. And they're doing a lot of work on prison reform in california and all of the Know the ways in which the prison system is working against us. Not for us. And so i guess what drives me and release is seeing the impact Seeing people who are at the front lines during this work In creating change and being able to be part of it you might be part of it for a day on a site visit or he might be part of that because it's a project that you're working on but it really is such a privilege to be able to connect with so many different people who are doing such good work in the world

Dc Place Department El Salvador Nicaragua Washington Central America Mary Tyler Moore Latin America Asner Chris Osuna California United States Danny Glover Santa Cruz
Africa and museums: shaping the future; rethinking the past

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:40 min | 1 year ago

Africa and museums: shaping the future; rethinking the past

"I just on your lawson. The founding director of the paloma in togo and andrew santo. Who's just written a book with twenty eight interviews with museum leaders across the world. I also speak to. Dan hicks about his book. The british museum's about the bronzes and for our work the week christopher repeal of the national gallery in london talks about san mateo painting of copernicus. That's coming to the national for an exhibition next year before that a reminder that you can sign up for the art newspapers free daily newsletter for all the latest stories goes to the art newspaper dot com and the link is at the top right of the page. And while you're there you can also sign up for a range of other newsletters including the book club and the art market. I now a new book by the writer and cultural strategy advisor andhra santo features twenty eight conversations with directors of museums and other institutions oldham during the covid nineteen pandemic the future of the museum. Twenty eight dialogues. Include voices from across the world attempting to define museums and the challenges and opportunities ahead of them now and in the coming days among them. Direct is of african museums including sonia lawson the director of the paladin loma in togo in west africa. Andress and sonia join me to discuss the role of museums today and look at how sonya's togalese institution reflects a new coq drew dynamism on the african continent andress. I wanted to begin by asking you. This book was written on zoom. Just as we are now essentially so you talked to twenty eight museum or cultural institution directors about what they were doing. It happened to be done in the covy deer as it were but was it. Germinating is an idea for a much longer period this spring. I wrote an article in art. Net news actually wrote it over easter weekend. So i remember did very well I guess that was early april. I can't remember the exact dates and it was an article about reopening museums. And it just hit a nerve. It really got a lot of people talking at the time. And i heard from dozens and dozens of museum directors and just became part of illogic conversation. And that's when we really realized that this is the moment because it gave us an editorial frame because it it really was a moment that made us ask what is the future about. Still trying to figure it out. I think there's no doubt in all of our minds that this is one of those years in the calendar that will be a turning point. A historical marker where new phase is beginning persona. I think this phase is the one that started in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine just ended. Now we have a new face. So what does that mean for museums. Once i figured out that this would be a book not just of conversations with museum. Directors conversations about the future not necessarily revisiting. Why museums have been great in the past of which many reasons to talk about that too but to really have a forward-looking and that is what led to choices like this extraordinary new institution in togo. Which i think is such a taste of where museums or cultural institutions or cultural centers are headed All around the world so so in a way this moment. This covert moment crystallized. How such a book could come about and how we would choose directors to be in it before we speak specifically about sons institution. I wanted to ask you about a phrase that you use in the to the book where you talk about how. The paradigm smashing experimentation in museums and cultural institutions is happening in effectively in the global south so in africa in asia in latin america. Can you expand on that a bit now. Because what do you think lies behind that. Well first of all i. That's not to say it's not happening elsewhere. And i think the book provides lots of examples of how people are thinking you in original ways about museums all around the world. But i think that there are perhaps two main reasons. Why so many of these truly interesting. And i would say inspiring. Examples of new practices are often happening in the global. South one is that many of these institutions are brand new. So it's you can speak to this. They have an opportunity to really design for the now and for the future. They're not dealing with a legacy infrastructure. They're not trying to retrofit something. That was already there and tried to adapt it to the future.

Togo Andrew Santo Sonia Lawson Dan Hicks National Gallery San Mateo Andress Oldham Sonya West Africa Sonia London Latin America Asia Africa
"global south" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

09:52 min | 1 year ago

"global south" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Good afternoon. Welcome to this. The Thursday edition of a public affair. I'm your host for this hour. My name is Alan Rough. So how do we begin to understand the state of our world, a planet buffeted by escalating crises, most of which is some man to reflect and reproduce the historic Gulf. Between the haves and the have nots, small minority of fabulously wealthy and the rest of humanity. Do we understand the class divisions here at the center of the global system and their relation to the wending Chazz ums between the U. S centered Global north and the global South. Joining us today to discuss some of these questions, and much more is Indian historian, journalists and activists. VJ Prashad He's the executive director of Tri Continental and Institute for Social Research. He's the author or editor of the number of remarkable books, including the Darker Nations of Biography of the Short lived Third World. And the poorer nations possible history of the global south and were recently red star over the third world. He writes regularly for the front line of India. The Hindu, alternate and bear goon. He is chief editor of Leftward Books. Today we're going to be discussing his latest work just out a little while ago from monthly review Press, Washington Bullets, history of the CIA coups and assassinations. We did pressured. Welcome to W o r tape. Hey, Thanks, Alan. Great to be with you. It's good to hear your voice once again. VJ your book is a prime, a primer introduction and a counter narrative. Uh, two regarding the U. S role in the world from the late 19 forties to the president. Him our listeners some brief sense of this book your goal or hope in writing it. Well, I'll have to go back to last year l into a year ago when there was a coup data against Evo Morales of Bolivia, and, um, you know, Abel ran a government for 14 years. The government of the movement to socialism alongside our comrade Alvaro Garcia, Linear A and Um, this was a cool which the U. S government had been planning for 14 years essentially had built up connections with the far right groups in Santa Clara had trained military officers. I put a lot of pressure on morale is so much so that That point about 10 years. Prior to that Abel had ejected the U. S ambassador because he was meddling in the internal affairs of Bolivia, which you'd expect. You know, this is what US ambassadors do. His name is Phil Goldberg. He was, you know, asked to leave the country and Morales was approached by a General General Williams Kalman and essentially told to leave the country. This is before his totem was over the election. We still consider the fraud in October and then turns out to have bean you know nothing fraudulent about it was to have given him a fort. Um, but he was removed in In the period of his totem. No liberals or constitutionalists in the West complained about this saying we'll let him finish his thought. Nothing people cheered it. And in fact, I was quite surprised Alan to see that there was sensitive people. Liberals left liberals, even in the United States and Canada. In other parts of the West, supporting the cool and single. It's not a cool there was fraud. Morales had been there too long and so on, essentially repeating the talking points of the CIA. And so I decided to spend as much time as it would take me. And it didn't take me long to sit down and write a book that cataloged the role of the CIA, the State Department, the Treasury Department and so on in essentially intervening in parts of the world like Bolivia from roughly 1945 to the present. And I decided I want to do this because I felt at least a generation has not bean privy to the fullness off. What I think of is a series of crimes off the Central Intelligence Agency. You know, we have The material from the CIA off the cool against Yacoub Arbenz in Guatemala, So I decided to take the Arbenz material. And I've interviewed, you know, maybe 100. See A, um both analysts and field agents over the years, including a man who actually ran the Middle East desk in the 19 seventies and eighties in development, great length after he retired, and so I wrote this book quite fast. Um, yeah, in a way so that it would be readable for four people. It's just about 100. Some pages long. It does the wide range of that history in order to say, Listen, what happened to Bolivia was a coup and I was very pleased that when the manuscript was finishing everyone rallies said he would write the foreword to it, which he did, and even more pleased, and I hope we can talk about this later, Alan, but I was even more pleased. With the election results this year in Bolivia when the masked the movement to socialism triumphed in the election, winning in the first round. You know, VJ pressured. This book is really you know, it's about the post World War two global system as you mentioned beginning in 45 coming right through to the present. But it's Mean cleavages or antagonisms. Those that you display are different from the dominant narrative. That is we, You know, I was a born and born in 1949. I grew up in a cold war culture that it was the The You know, the free world versus the tyrannies of these block of the Soviet Union. That was the, uh you know, the Bipolarity of the world system. But you're saying something quite different that there's another central antagonism here. That is actually in that, in all actuality rarely discussed, especially here in the U. S. Well, you know, there's there are many ways to period eyes, World history as we know. And, um A conventional narrative is from 1945. Or maybe just after 45 when Winston Churchill gives his speech about the Iron Curtain dropping over Europe. Roughly then deal sometime in the late 19 eighties, or perhaps 1991 when the USSR collapses that this is a period known as the Cold War. And the principal and Dagon is, um, here is so called eastwards is rest West. That's a general conventional orientation. Um, I found I find this a very limited way to look at things because In fact, there's a longer history and then I'll be more precise about the history. There's a longer history, which runs from Let's say the Haitian revolution to the present. And that's the history off a struggle between a certain section of the world for shorthand. Let's call it the north that believes that it has the rights of the world's resource is the world's labor and so on to enhance the lifestyles of people who live in this territory known as the North. And then it's a struggle off the people of the south who are fighting for sovereignty for liberation who don't want to have the price of raw materials held law in order to facilitate cheap commodities and drink the North and so on. So there's a long struggle of what we might call the struggle for decolonization. Because I said starts with the Haitian revolution. Um you know, a great uprising off subject hated people to seek freedom and continue still this day in the middle of this is quite remarkable. You United Nations General Assembly resolution passed in 1961 and It's quite remarkable because in this resolution, there was a sentence of a court in the book where the member nations agree. And this by the way passed unanimously. They agree. This is the process of liberation is irresistible. And I like that phrase. It's It's poetic, it zah literally phrase. The process of liberation is irresistible. And I think they captured the fact that the principal dynamic, um in our times for for centuries, has been this fight off oppressed people. To emancipate themselves. And of course, I said, that's a much broader thing. That then specifically off course, this desire for emancipation. This desire for you know liberation is not only Confined to the north south axis that is, the countries of the West to us is the rest of the world. It's also of course, within parts of the West were working people subjugated by the fact that they don't have any means to survive unless they go to work for somebody else. Um, you know, we're working people also seeking emancipation, so there's a much broader Story here is well which is you know the big story not between.

Bolivia Alan Rough West Central Intelligence Agency Evo Morales U. S Tri Continental and Institute US principal fraud Global north editor Abel Alvaro Garcia India United Nations General Assembl
David Lammy On Why Climate justice can't happen without racial justice

TED Talks Daily

04:56 min | 1 year ago

David Lammy On Why Climate justice can't happen without racial justice

"I've got to stop by admitting that in many. Me Giving a talk about how climate action can help black communities is surprising. I grew up whole black with a single mother in Psalm. One of the most deprived areas in London in the nineteen seventies and s climate change was the last thing on my mind. Representing Tottenham. Its member of parliament for the past twenty years my focus has been on trying to reduce the deprivation I grew up around in the past the climate crisis never featured at the forefront of my politics because it was never one of the most immediate. Constituents facing or at least it didn't feel like it. Rising sea levels feel unimportant when your bank balance is falling. Global, warming is not your concern when you can't pay the heating bills and you're not thinking about pollution when you're being stopped by the police and so perhaps this is why as the black lives matter movement roared across the world that's been so dimension saving black lives from the climate emergency. The too long those of us who cared about racial justice treated environmental justice is that was elitist and at the same time, the leaders who did focus on climate change we usually white and rarely bothered to enlist the support of black voices in their work. Even Progressive Allies sometimes took votes to granted and assume that all community didn't care or wouldn't understand the truth is the opposite is true. Black people breathe in the most toxic air relative to the General Population We are more likely to suffer from respiratory diseases like asthma. And it is people of color who are more likely to suffer in the climate crisis. This is no coincidence. The cheapest housing tends to be next to the busiest roads and many of the lowest paid jobs are the most pollutant industries. People of color consistent deny the bottom of the housing educational and Employment Ladders. This story connects black communities across the world from London to lay goes to La black-americans are exposed to fifty six percent more pollution than they course white Americans breed seventeen percent less air pollution, the May produce. It gives a whole new meaning to the black lives matter slogan I breath we all right. We know the name of George Floyd who was murdered by the police, but we should also know the name of eloquently Deborah. Ella a nine year old mixed race girl from southeast London was killed by fatal asthma attack evidence suggested was caused partly by the unknow fool levels of air pollution near her home. And it's not only urban areas where black lives are disproportionately under threat from climate change. My parents had country of Guyana is one of the most vulnerable countries on earth to the effects of climate. Change. So far, gladys contributed relatively little to the climate emergency, but it's one of the country's facing the most serious threats from it. While the annual carbon dioxide emissions beheaded the United States is a staggering sixteen point. Five metric tons in Guyana is just two point six, it is a patton repeated. The Globe those countries that have contributed least the climate breakdown mainly in the global south will suffer the most from floods droughts and rising temperatures. This is a patent suffering with a long history. The exploitation of our planet's natural resources of always been tied the exploitation of people of Color. The logic of colonization was to extract valuable resources from our planet through force paying no attention to its secondary effects. The climate crisis is in a way colonialism's natural conclusion. The solution is to build a new coalition made up of older groups most affected by this emergency black people in American cities who are already protesting that they cannot breathe. People of Color in Ghana, watching sea levels rise to the point where many of their homes become uninhabitable young people in places like Tottenham London afraid of the world they will grow older and progressive allies from all nations of all races, religions, creeds, and ages on this side. All demanding recognition that climate justice is linked to racial justice, social justice and intergenerational justice to

London Guyana Tottenham London Tottenham Ghana George Floyd Deborah Gladys Ella La Black-Americans United States Patton
Florida: The swingiest swing state in the U.S. election

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:08 min | 1 year ago

Florida: The swingiest swing state in the U.S. election

"I want to talk a bit about how we got here and why at least since the the famous near Tie of two thousand does just seem to be Florida or at least partially about Florida. Michael ask, you first win and why did floor to become the key battleground? Republican hasn't won the White House without Florida forever. So that's part of the reason that it's become. So you know everybody desperately wants it and it just seems to be the self-balancing State where it's about twenty percent immigrants. But you know the last the last fifty, million votes that have been cast for presidential candidates in. Florida. Republicans. Democrats, are separated by about twenty thousand and we've had just about every election. Every statewide election seems to come down to one percent and just seems like every time another white person. Republican moves down here from the Midwest another democratic leaning Immigrants May move into central Florida from the Global South and so it's a really seems to be self-balancing. Beyond those demographics that Monolithic is it a case of elderly white pensioners voting for Republicans, and more recent arrivals from elsewhere trading Democrat or is there some kind of overlap between spillage among those groups? As you can probably imagine it's a little bit more complex in that I think that there's didn't kind of increasing awareness for both Democrats and Republicans that some of the key demographics here you know the American immigrants but you know you have the first generation, the second generation you have the newer arrivals you have the. You have the Cubans you have the Puerto Ricans have the Haitians. There's such a mix of people and cultures and experiences, and when you add to that kind of the New Yorkers that are coming to Florida to retire, and you have all these different politics and ideologies of mixed together I think you really get. Such a representation of both the Conservatives and the liberals in both the US. But also in Latin America and I think that when you look at South Florida, you see a lot of those kind of play. You see you know from Columbia, you see the Conservatives from Columbia and you see the progressives from Columbia. So you have such a makes of. Of just these ideologies that really comes to shine like Michael said in the way that people vote. Michael is the a geographic split within Florida as well because it's the general tendency in the United States and elsewhere that cities tend to be more liberal more vaguely left-wing rural parts of a given state or given country tend to be more conservative. Is that clear cut in that respect in Florida? Well, again I think. Could certainly right that it's always a little more complicated but that's generally true I think you know you saw in two thousand sixteen that Hillary Clinton did even better than expected in a lot of the urban areas She Barack Obama won Florida and Hillary Clinton. Did even better in some of the particularly in south Florida in Miami and Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach and some of the more urbanized area. But Donald Trump there was an absolute revolution of essentially white people in the exurbs coming out and voting for trump in the rural and sort of farther away from the cities you don't want to over stereotype. But it certainly true that the Republican coalition has you know the heart of it is older white people who are very reliable voters and the Democratic Coalition relies on younger urban lots of immigrants, lots of minorities who in the past have not been turned out has not been as High Bianca. Those factors taken into consideration that I guess the Republican Party's and democratic parties in Florida will have an amount obviously in common with the National Party and parties elsewhere is there still a distinctive political culture within Florida like basically what I'm asking are Florida Republicans different from other Republicans, into Florida Democrats different from other States Democrats. I think when it gets down to it when you're thinking of. Our Florida Latinos for example, are they always kind of leaning Democrat or you know Florida South Florida Latinos are they always leaning Republican as people kind of think a lot of the time because of the cuban-american population I think that a lot of that is is changing. So at whether whether or not, you're going to see more cuban-americans still voting. Republican. In the way that they usually do a lot of that is kind of breaking and and being undone because of the younger generation, you know really having more of an experience in the. US and seeing the way that their families grew up in thinking about healthcare and climate change as more of priorities to them. So you know I would say that the main difference if there was one is here you can see a lot of distinctive kind of you see mixed political ideologies in families. So I've met even candidates who are you know Democrats were running now for public office in Florida and their families are different completely different ideology from them. So I think that that's what's interesting right and what makes Florida you know such. Unique and fascinating state is that it's changing all the time and it's changing not just because of the of the new kind of waves of immigrants that are coming in but also the new generations that are really having a different kind of awareness than the one their parents did. We'll talk more in the second half of the program about how Florida may have changed in the last four years and what it might be like in this election. But Michael just before we do that I don't like to tempt fate too much by talking about what happened in two thousand when basically an entire parallel history of the twentieth century got chalked off by a margin of a few hundred votes in Florida but. Still. Talk about that election much in Florida and Walton immense sliding doors moment that was not just for the United States. But as it turned out for the entire world, you know I think that's a great way. Great way of putting it because it certainly was I mean you know you wouldn't have an Iraq war if it wasn't for five hundred, thirty, seven votes the other way. And I think it's just a great example of. Of. You know the way these these elections and Florida are always one on the margins. Sort of every community matters again at the margins these things make a huge difference. I think. You know Republicans have been much better organized since two thousand and you saw in two thousand with that Brooks brothers riot But but everyone knows it's going to be close and and that really is a place where every vote counts.

Florida South Florida Michael United States Republican Party Republican Coalition White House Hillary Clinton Columbia Donald Trump Democratic Coalition Puerto Ricans Midwest Latin America Barack Obama Iraq Global South Brooks
Florida: The swingiest swing state in the U.S. election

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:07 min | 1 year ago

Florida: The swingiest swing state in the U.S. election

"Want to talk a bit about how we got here and why at least since the the famous near Tie of two thousand does just seem to be Florida or at least partially about Florida Michael Ask, you first win and why did floor to become the key battleground Republican hasn't won the White House without Florida forever. So that's part of the reason that it's become. So you know everybody desperately wants it and it just seems to be the self-balancing State where it's about twenty percent immigrants. But you know the last the last fifty, million votes that have been cast for presidential candidates in Florida Republicans, Democrats are separated by about twenty thousand and we've had just about every election. Every statewide election seems to come down to one percent and just seems like every time another white person Republican moves down here from the Midwest. Another democratic leaning immigrants may move into central Florida from the global south, and so it's a really seems to be self-balancing. Beyond those demographics that Monolithic is it a case of elderly white pensioners voting for Republicans and more recent arrivals from elsewhere trading Democrat or is there some kind of overlap between spillage among those groups? As you can probably imagine it's a little bit more complex in that I think that there's didn't kind of increasing awareness for both Democrats and Republicans that some of the key demographics here you know the American immigrants but you know you have the first generation, the second generation, you have the newer arrivals you have the. You have the Cubans you have the Puerto Ricans, have the Haitians. There's such a mix of people and cultures and experiences, and when you add to that kind of the new. Yorkers. That are coming to Florida to retire and you have all these different politics and ideologies kind of mixed together. I. Think you really get. Such a representation of both the Conservatives and the liberals in both the US. But also in Latin America and I think that when you look at South Florida, you see a lot of those kind of play. You see you know from Columbia from Columbia and you see the progressives from Columbia. So you have such a makes of. Of just these ideologies that really comes to shine like Michael said in the way that people vote. Michael is the a geographic split within Florida as well because it's the general tendency in the United, states and elsewhere that cities tend to be more liberal more vaguely left-wing rural parts of a given state or given country tend to be more conservative. Is that clear? Cut In that respect in Florida? Well, again I think. Could certainly right that it's always a little more complicated but that's generally true I think you know you saw in two thousand sixteen that Hillary Clinton did even better than expected in a lot of the urban areas she. Barack. Obama won Florida and Hillary Clinton did even better in some of the particularly in south Florida in Miami and Fort Lauderdale and West, Palm Beach and some of the more urbanized area. But Donald Trump, there was an absolute revolution of essentially white people in the exurbs coming out and voting for trump in the rural and sort of farther away from the cities you don't want to over stereotype. But it certainly true that the Republican coalition has you know the heart of it is older white people who are very reliable voters and the Democratic Coalition relies on younger urban lots of immigrants, lots of minorities who in the past have not been turned out has not been as High Bianca. Those factors taken into consideration that I guess the Republican Party's and democratic parties in Florida will have an amount obviously in common with the National Party and parties elsewhere. Is there still a distinctive political culture within Florida like basically what I'm asking are Florida Republicans different from other Republicans into Florida Democrats different from other States Democrats? I think when it gets down to it when you're thinking of. Our Florida Latinos for example, are they always kind of leaning? Democrat. Or you know Florida South Florida Latinos are they always leaning Republican as people kind of think a lot of the time because of the cuban-american population I think that a lot of that is changing so at whether whether or not, you're going to see more cuban-americans still voting Republican in the way that they usually do a lot of that is kind of breaking and and being undone because of the younger generation you know really having more of an experience in the US. and seeing the way that their families grew up in thinking about healthcare and climate change as more of priorities to them. So you know I would say that the main difference if there was one is here you can see a lot of distinctive kind of you see mixed political ideologies in families. So I've met even candidates who are you know? Democrats were running now for public office in Florida and their families are different completely different ideology from them. So i. think that that's what's interesting. Right and what makes Florida you know such. Unique and fascinating state is that it's changing all the time and it's changing not just because of the of the new kind of waves of immigrants that are coming in. But also the new generations that are really having a different kind of awareness than the one their parents did. We'll talk more in the second half of the program about how Florida may have changed in the last four years and what it might be like in this election. But Michael just before we do that I, don't like to tempt fate too much by talking about what happened in two thousand when basically an entire parallel history of the twentieth century got chopped off by a margin of a few hundred votes in Florida but. People still talk about that election much in Florida and Walton immense sliding doors moment that was not just for the United States but as it turned out for the entire world, you know, I think that's a great way. Great way of putting it because it certainly was i. mean you know you wouldn't have an Iraq war if it wasn't for five hundred, thirty, seven votes the other way. And I think it's just a great example of. Of you know the way, these these elections and Florida are always one on the margins. Sort of every community matters again at the margins, these things make a huge difference I think. You know Republicans have been much better organized since two thousand and you saw in two thousand with that Brooks brothers riot But but everyone knows it's going to be close and and that really is a place where every vote counts.

Florida South Florida Michael Ask Hillary Clinton Republican Party United States Barack Republican Coalition Midwest White House Republicans Donald Trump Democratic Coalition Columbia Puerto Ricans Iraq Latin America Brooks Palm Beach
Danni Reches: How to Enrich Your Experience as a PhD Researcher

Papa Phd Podcast

05:11 min | 1 year ago

Danni Reches: How to Enrich Your Experience as a PhD Researcher

"I'd really want Danny to focus on. What's your projects have been you know and? One of them we already mentioned and is quite evident but. Other projects you've been developing besides just your PhD research and the idea is also to see if we can take out of that, how that enriched your experience as a PhD student and how listeners out there could maybe take some some example of that too. Also wherever they are You know find a group of like minded people and also enrich their experience and make it a a richer one and A. How to make their PhD a more diverse experience than just doing their research? That's where I wanted to say. I've been to a lot of different things and this is something my supervisor has warned me for so. Now, a bit more cautious at I'm trying to do it a bit less, but I've been slowed down by the whole situation with corona. Anyway. So I just want that to be a little bit of a warning when I start talking about all the fun things that I did because you definitely have to keep in mind how much a person can do without burning out. By As let me start with w about my love for conferences, especially if they're paid for and abroad. in a way, it allowed me to keep traveling, which is so much love. In, my first year Beastie, I managed to spend three weeks in. Australia where never been before somewhere in the mountains beautiful place. at the form. And there are. A huge conference on different topics with two hundred. Students, not only be as there were just a few these most of them were in. From all over the world is shared my flats with someone from Pakistan right as an Israeli. F from the Philippines ends from South Korea and we went to arts events and I a events conferences about politics about health. All kinds of fields bunket, Moon spoke there prisons of Australia's spoke there I was invited as far as Israel delegation do very fancy dinner with people who worked at important banks and things like that. So this was like the big thing that I was very excited about enemies I might give per station about my research about a Mike Proposal and I got some really useful feedback from people from the field. So this was absolutely great. So in a way, it was a lot of fun at for me. It was free, but it was also different work because I got that feedback that I needed. Has to continue to projects, and then I've also spent some time in Brazil. which was the first time that was really great and I gave myself a few extra days in Rio. also about migration on a learned a lot about migration in the Global South 'cause, I focus very much Europe. And then I've done my trips to Germany for research. So this way, I get to travel been to Cairo in January for sight that have seen a beer minutes. For a conference of the. National Organization for Migration that's connected to the UN. And I presented my research on the bow dare. which was pretty cool and there will so policymakers there which is something I'm very much interested in going into after. Doing. The interesting. So also some networking definitely. And just to see how day spoke about similar topics outside of academia. So these are things that I love doing that definitely projects because you have to apply for these things especially if they involve money right and they need to plan all of your trip started dime and only Gives you a flight ticket place stay but doesn't say anything about the preparation of your actual doc or bolster at the conference. And then there you're also working 'cause you're networking is about your topic trying to get out be volts. Things like that. But for me, it was very motivating. It's It's everything I ever wanted to travel for work right. And besides that, I've always works next to my degrees I am getting scholarship, but it's not enough to survive off. So I'm working also for the center where I study. And they're responsible for organs of guest lectures like getting the guest lecturers in also from countries to speak to our students in English we also have trips for students plans, for example, to embassies here in Israel. So they can see what their options are after the grief. And also conferences and Colloquia. So this way I, really got to learn how to organize the these events and be working on something that's not so much research, but still helps with the network.

Moon Israel Australia Danny National Organization For Migr Supervisor Pakistan Corona Beastie Germany Philippines UN Europe Cairo South Korea Brazil. Rio.
"global south" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"global south" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"During the HIV AIDS, crisis, we wealthier countries are able to access a vaccine sooner or some countries in Africa able to excess lifesaving vaccination in treatment and others are not. I'd like to ask you specifically about this as you mentioned trials in Brazil as well. Is there a situation already developing where the testing of vaccines as occurring in the third. World but they've initial beneficiaries of any vaccines will be in the advanced developed countries. Certainly there's a concern that there are countries that have volunteered to participate in the trial, including in the global south, but the tombs and the conditions for what excess would mean if the if the trial is successful, is uncertain, unclear. I think what is. Concerning is that people are labeling it. The Oxford trial, but we know that there's deep involvement of extra Zenica and the terms and conditions between Oxford University and extra sanitize is not available in this you must remember is only one of a possible one hundred and twenty six vaccine candidates. About Twenty to twenty, two in a in the second phase off clinical testing and Bay Few a handful of candidates that still we'll go to phase three, so you know. The participation of the Global South in one or two of these trials is significant because we need to do that, we need to participate. We need to offer solidarity. We need to find a solution to this crisis. However, the chances off that like issue aids like a lot of life saving medication treatment are going to be lost in the line unless. Unless we can guarantee an intruder that the vaccine is freely available is equitably available to all people in all parts of the world as a campaign which is being led in the US. Free the vaccine, our president or pause as head of the a you has supported the People's vaccine, but what we saying is that all of these are really beautiful and lovely words and statements, but they don't sort of create any enforceable guarantees because. Like with AIDS. What we realized is that if you rely on the the? And the charity of this particular industry is investing millions and millions of dollars in the development of a vaccine than that won't guarantee access for the global. Putting my house and I wanted to ask you in terms of the situation in South Africa itself with the pandemic. You've said that your country has used a first world response for a Third World Country Could you talk about the situation right there in South Africa? The the situation is worsening I. Think we in a crisis I'll health system really in view both the Public Health Service in the private health service is taking. Significant strain frontline workers are getting sick. Getting exposed.

Global South South Africa AIDS Africa Public Health Service Oxford University Brazil US president
"global south" Discussed on Reports from the Spiritual Frontier

Reports from the Spiritual Frontier

05:30 min | 2 years ago

"global south" Discussed on Reports from the Spiritual Frontier

"BTS center in the new faith communities North Carolina annual conference. We're continuing our series that we've been doing for the past couple of months. Creativity compassion in the corona virus, examining creative ways that people of faith can respond to our pandemic moment today we are giving you a recording of our first ever live interview. Interview with copy. John Kuma and amazing scholar, pastor and activist, who can offer us perspective of what our sisters and brothers from the Global South know about what it means to develop resilience and joy, and whether difficult times including pandemics, if in the light of George, Floyd's death and everything that's been going on in our country. You've been looking to center some non white non western voices. This'll be a fantastic opportunity. Opportunity to hear a really deep, really rich conversation, also coming up this Thursday I want to invite you to join us for a conversation. That I'm hosting in conjunction with the BT. Et Cetera with two reports. Most popular guests Paul, Nixon and Chrissy Dean as we talk about the future of faith, communities post covid nineteen. There'll be some chances to ask them questions, so make sure you to register for that you. You can find that on the set of web page or we're looking at the Lincoln. The show notes finally. If you'd like to support the work that we're doing electric, urge you to take a quick minute. Go to www dot, patriot backslash reports and sign up to become what of our patrons it supports our work and gives you access to some really neat parks as well and now our conversation with copier. Hello everyone. It is so good to have you with us for this wonderful experiment Allah pop up from behind the mic just for a second, so you can see my face. It is so good to have you here as Allan mentioned I am. or at least one of my many hats, I'm the host of reports and the spiritual frontier podcast, which chronicles the day to day lives of people who are living in working on the spiritual margins of our country, and I've been working with the BTF center over the last few months, pandemic broke on a series called creativity compassionate in the corona virus, examining the topics and issues that are emerging for people of Faith and faith leaders and faith communities. We encountered this really odd historic moment together a couple notes about this live podcast interview I'd. I'd like to invite you to engage in this at a couple of ways. If you feel like the chat box would be a distraction as Nicole said I invite you to approach this kind of like you might spiritual reading copy. Our guest has some deep wisdom to offer us. If what you need to do is turn off the chat and close your eyes and just listen I. Invite you to do that if you find your in a place where you really want to engage, I invite you to make use of the chat box. The coal will be actively tending that, so I invite you to make comments note the things that really strike you ask questions and who knows maybe your question will get featured at the end of this conversation as well. Rather than me. Introducing our guest I thought I would introduce you to Elizabeth Parsons. She's a person who actually connected me with capita in herself on. She possesses deep wisdom about how on the global south can offer us all wisdom in this moment, so I'm GonNa. Invite her to take this moment to. Our guest for us this afternoon. Thank. You Ben. It's an honor and pleasure to introduce my friend and colleague. Copy John Coma and I will say before I. Tell You about him that I wrote to this intro based on my experience with working with him in both Zimbabwe and Zambia heated not right this and he doesn't know what I have to say yet. CAPI. John Coma is someone who accepts the consequences of speaking truth to power. and naked his words with an impressive array of experience. Is Establishment credentials include a masters degree from Trinity College, Bristol and the United Kingdom. Advanced Studies at Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge Massachusetts. Ed Doctorate in ecological ethics from Boston University School of Theology. He's also a priest ordained in the Anglican communion in his home, country of Zambia and now. Resident in the episcopal diocese of Massachusetts. Less establishment related credentials include an ability to win. The Trust of laborers taken advantage of by multinational corporations. To help the forgotten find peace and measure of joy wherever they are and to acknowledge non human creatures as kin even when it's fashionable to do so. This boundary crossing existence has been continually evident in his professional life. On the one hand, he has made presentations at such prestigious institutions as the United Nations, and the National Academies of Science Engineering Medicine. And he's produced a great number of wide ranging books and articles. On the other hand, his prophetic preaching and tenacious investigative skills have put his life in danger more than once. He speaking to us today from the Boston area where he serves as a full time priest. And his wife fee. A healthcare worker have five children. We're grateful to Dr Komo's presence with us today, and claiming a point of personal privilege related to our topic I am indebted to him for his long term patient help in learning. Meet in helping me learn to think differently when a move to Africa twenty years ago up ended my worldview. Before we begin I'm just going to invite us all to pause for a moment. To take a deep breath. And.

John Coma Zambia Global South Massachusetts North Carolina John Kuma BT Africa Episcopal Divinity School Dr Komo Boston University School of Th Boston Elizabeth Parsons Nicole Trinity College Allan BTF George
Woman's faith leads her to climate activism

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 years ago

Woman's faith leads her to climate activism

"Her faith Maryland resident. Doris Marlin has found her way to a life of climate activism. Marlin is a UNITARIAN universalist. She said UNITARIAN principles affirm the worth of every person and the need for Global Justice and equality. We see the moral implications in the injustice. That is happening as a result of climate change. It's very obvious in the global south but those who have done the least to contribute are the most vulnerable and will suffer the most and the soonest from climate change so at a very deep level faith in climate connect is a moral issue. Marlin says tackling. These injustices requires reducing carbon pollution in communities everywhere so she is a lay leader with a nationwide unitarian initiative called strengthen local climate commitments. It helps people advocate for clean renewable energy in their communities and hold their local representatives accountable for meeting climate goals. It brings together people at the local level to work with their colleagues with their neighbors on climate solutions with the goal of creating a more just world

Doris Marlin Maryland
"global south" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"global south" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Novel Corona Virus that Chinese virus. Trump's repeated use of the term KSM as Asian Americans across the United States reported a rash of hate crimes including a number of assaults Asian New York City subway riders. This is New York state. Senator John Lou. We have this long legacy not a great legacy of being termed a yellow peril from over one hundred years ago and unfortunately trump calling this. The Chinese virus only perpetuates this notion of yellow peril and those are some of the headlines. This is democracy now democracy now dot org the war and peace report when we come back we will look at the economy we will look at corporations getting exclusive rights to drugs and we will look at the Global South. This is democracy now. We're broadcasting from the epicenter of the pandemic in the United States. New York City. Stay with us Two way balm in Gilead by Nina Simone. And we're going to be speaking about a different gilead in a moment. The Gilead Corporation. This is democracy now democracy now dot Org the Warren Pace report. I'm Amy Goodman in New York City. The epicenter of the pandemic in the United States joined by my colleague. My Co host Nermeen Shea. Who is joining us to protect? Community spread against community spread joining us from her home in New York City. Heiner mean.

New York City United States New York Gilead Corporation Trump Senator John Lou Nina Simone Amy Goodman Heiner Warren Pace Nermeen Shea Global South
The Rise of Ecofascism

Think: Sustainability

04:05 min | 2 years ago

The Rise of Ecofascism

"Looking. And how the climate it crisis fuels ECO Fascist ideology and how some of those narratives already exist in mainstream politics. You're listening thing to think sustainability. I'm Julia Cockatiel. So lost time. We defined Eaker Kerr Fascism as the belief in racial purity as the only way to save the planet thus eaker fascists place the wellbeing of the earth nature. HR and animals at the forefront of their ideology and although eaker fascism draws on ideas dating as far back as the nineteenth century the contemporary context specifically the climate crisis has given the ideology. And you edge. Astrid is gone from Gazing at its nive home to a three years ago to the midst of a huge crisis in Tosa Faez and they'd rather than agricultural catastrophes and song. I think we're going to see them. Rise quite dramatically. These ecologically focused Sort of Fascist taught the the end of the wound is coming. We have to cybele solve taught movements. Betsy Hoffman Emeritus Professor of Development Studies at Hampshire College in Massachusetts agrees that apocalyptic narratives the articles spurred on by the climate crisis. Give Echo fascists a new sense of urgency here in the United States. There's a real tendency toward Still toward apocalyptic schism this ECO fascist view. That were you know approaching some kind of major conflagration or the end of the world old especially around climate change now in the environmental movement as we discussed in pot one anti overpopulation specifically by non non Anglo. Nonwhite immigrants is at the core of the fascist argument more extreme ideologies and philosophies will become more and more attractive partly partly because of global warming and And partly because there is a reality associated with population growth. You know that as the world's population grows its capacity to support the number of people Declines this idea of immigrants washing up on the shores of the West. I arriving to destroy new land after the degradation of their own is the common narrative for pated among ECO fascists in the climate crisis these immigrants are known as climate refugees mean. Climate change is bad enough as it is. It's urgent enough is it is is you know you look at the forest fires you can look at Melting ice you don't need to then make it look like all these poor people. In the Global South South are gonNA come across our borders you know a bleak future scenarios of millions and millions of climate refugees roaming across international borders creating havoc climate refugees or environmental migrants those who forced to abandon their homes due to environmental degradation or extreme weather events experts estimate that climate change is likely to displace between one hundred and fifty and three hundred million people by the middle of the century. But Betsy says most of the conversation related to climate refugees is alarmist and misleading are so many people really going to be flooding across borders. Orders most Migration will probably be within countries. Not accost borders. Why is migration happening? Migrations Complex questioned. There is likely to be climate related late in migrating. There already is but it's complicated there. A range of other factors involved in people's decisions to migrate behind the Fascist Lens. Those was occupying the Global South A- causing environmental degradation when in reality those living in poverty being forced to migrate because also the actions of those on the other side of the world

Betsy Hoffman Emeritus Profess Julia Cockatiel Tosa Faez United States Hampshire College Betsy Astrid Massachusetts
"global south" Discussed on African Tech Roundup

African Tech Roundup

15:06 min | 2 years ago

"global south" Discussed on African Tech Roundup

"And fourteen of the world's most conflict affected regions given that context. Women are of course a key target poop for the support. Spot provides they back initiatives that provide women startups in businesses with training coaching and access to finance the promotes job creation. The lend more about spark and the opportunities creating right now at spark dot NGO NGO and now back to the episode this notion of the global north has an imaginary. Am I right in saying based on what you said that they are the the economies that count within what we would term global northern affluent interests. I guess within that context and in this I'm met might identify as so in terms of the economic agency. I am I right and sort of seeing it like that a personally. I have a problematic with this terms because they are like the global North Global South and so on and there's a global our we call it like first word second word third word or like developing advanced economies and so on and everyone one knows that for example China was for longtime like from the Global South and parts of the developing countries and now China is actually challenging U s and the U so these are not really correctly used. Let's say would the time now that the word is very diversified that you cannot like like what the Gulf States together with a couple of African countries which have like no access to Internet access to water and so on or even compare them with European countries. There will be. This is true. This is this is why they tried to use this. Emerging economies as like Middle Way to just not classify them with advanced economies but not with a developing countries. But you know all this this classification based on such of indicators which are very a normative and don't take on the condition that quality of you say okay Kim macro-economic growth rate. Yes is nice very good access to turn it. But what about the quality you. You've just take the numbers. This is not enough to decide. Decide which standards have this country of development for examining this is brilliant segue to talking about development agendas because is a lot of countries who are in the position to basically influence global development. Agendas use these terms to set priorities. and to sometimes impose priorities when you try to apply it disciplined analytical approach. What do you consider the most important metrics to inform inform policy or to inform wise economic growth very simply? It's not about how much but how that you do do this. For example. That's how much students enrolled in the schools but which kind of quality education they'd get. Not How much you spend on on in infrastructure but how kind of infrastructure you produce from these for example there is a Gini Index. which like trying to measure the Disparity the income in each countries which is important but even this one need to be reviewed again just to give the better indicator indicator on how the with an income in one country or worldwide distributed. Why I'm really? This is difficult for me to just see the northlake Arizona's society or economy and the South because globally there is increasing tendency to adopt more more and more new liberal agendas than your liberal does have like the same effect everywhere to different degrees leg. Disappearing of the middle class for example is happening in Germany and happening in Syria and happening in Egypt and happening in Tunisia. But the effect for example in Germany they said the poorer people became more but the standards of the poor in Germany is different from the standards of the poor in Tunisia or in Syria. And I think there is a lot of of common interest between for example more farmers who are working in Spain with the farmers who are working in Morocco then in this American farmers and and and and and Spanish farmers then Dan Interest between the Spanish farmers and the spinners punish punish capitalists for examined so the word is can be seen in different way like according to the social socioeconomic background. If you are farmer you have something to share you're with other firms in the global north and You are in capitalist. You have a lot of things to share with our globe with With a global north for example this is also with make people in the Middle East and in other developing cancers may more frustrated because they're they're elite their governments have common interest with with a big corporates with the with the U. Corpus and with the US the US corporates more than with their own people. You know let's assume I'm I'm a well meaning well intentioned policymaker let's assume they they exist and I say that tongue in cheek I do know they exist. And let's identify an issue which I know is close to your heart and also one that I know a lot of policy. under-sea makers are looking to solve for for a number of reasons seems to be a correlation between empowering women and qualitative improvements and in society especially empowering women entrepreneurs because depending where you are some studies. Show that they actually we have higher rates of success the steward their income better. You know. They run companies better so show me how applying a A well-intentioned blankets assumption about improving the lot of say women entrepreneurs in Jordan mm-hmm or in. Tunis is actually counterproductive. And maybe to what degree is there. PABST init- benefit even with these oversimplifications being made to what extent very difficult to explain because on the one hand and women has to be given more role in the economy and they are also very good actually or successful in what they we are doing for example in the macroeconomic micro-credits institution. There there is some statistics which say credit to the women more more appreciated than to men because they could re bait the lawns better than the main. The numbers says like this but There is another to tation. They said because the women are more hesitated or like just get very fast afraid. So they don't want to have a problem. They are not strong strong enough to to to face problems or to have conflict. This is why they they this on one hand is the really bankable on the other. The hand they don't seem as confident and assertive as Mitt. Somehow like this this is one issue the other depending on which study of course that you. You're really yeah exactly. The other thing is for example when we talk about the increase of the employment female employment is a very very positive sign or indicator at again. Let like quantity and decatur but if you go there and you see under which conditions these women are working like You will see an Tunisia for example the most important liberal force Working in the textile sector are women. Why it does because they are very conscious of gender? No because the women because as women engineer I'll get less money than than Wages than than men so I just WanNa make sure I'm following before you carry on so on paper. You could celebrate the fact that women are being taken up into sort of employment fueling industrialization but not looking at is does because well frankly it's cheaper than using men this through. This is one thing addition to this there is for example no distant jobs opportunities for women because goes for examining no protection for Regmi or do you know. There's a lot of lacking conditions to have good decent work for for Tunisia for for women for example another example women in Bangladesh. There is some studies which Say That through the involvement of the women in Bangladesh in that sector and and the work. That's an empowered them. But there's another study said the money they get directly goes to the men and the men decide how they spend the money at the end of the day you. You didn't really empowered though the the women. But they use the women to empower the whole like financially the whole family. And if you will also look at where the women are like employed Loyd you will see for example is seventy percent of the ugly catcher sector Liberal forces in Africa too the the minor region according to a study. Study our our women and everyone's nor that like the income of ugly catcher is very low comparing with other sectors and if you look at for example banking sector you will see that. Women haven't high positions within the management usually they are like on the operative achieve level not in management level. If you look at the decision making process like whether economic sphere or in political sphere you you will see that women are not really a decision maker and this is also one more thing has to be considered when we celebrate the the numbers of gender equality according to how many women gets involved in the labor market and last point women if they get the involved in the labor market they cannot take rid of their social role as like were mother. As as I like taking care of the family and all these things isn't additional work for here so as long as you dont release her electric to fascinate for for hair opportunity to concentrate on one job that two jobs it is hard to talk about gender equality and the end of the a day. Social norms have more influence on women life everywhere in the world than the economic job or the position. At boy I wonder how the complex notion of Arab economies interacts with the desire for certain interest to see women unempowered and and I say this carefully the reason I say certain interests because I think there's sometimes the assumption that everyone has the same interests the norms that I would constitute the definition of an empowered economically independent of you know women in say Europe match that same definition of someone in say Saudi Arabia. It's very challenging for women to be self employed and the Arab countries like if they Women haven't lack social support like acceptance that she is an entrepreneur For example the does difficult to to run a business will not get get enough attention. This is one thing it is also has to do also with social social class of this woman there. Is the woman coming from rich families. They have different conditions than poor women for for example different limitations on what they're allowed to do in can do learn differently limitation and. Yeah societally yes I. Of course. And also for example women in the urban centers have different limitation than the rural women for example hello our working with agriculture so you cannot like generalized talking in general about things but in general if there is something bad bad happening the women will be influenced worse than men for example. This is one thing the second thing it is if they want to to reach the same level of success the man had or did they have to make more efforts to get the same level. Do you know what I municipal. They are like all the time struggling to get to the point where the brother or the father has already done with with less effort efforts so in wrapping up. Let's talk about what you would most like. The people who write the chicks in this sort of development community not chasing economic empowerment within Arab economies. What would you most like them to know? Especially those not limited to those who are looking to empower women through jobs entrepreneurship. What would you? What would you most like them to know? And first of all you cannot develop the economy without democratic political system. So that's shots fired right there. Yes yes you cannot like have a highly developed economy without to allow people just to express their opinion to participate in the exiting the economic policies to be dissipate and in planning running your city in everything this is the first one. The second one is a transparency and anti corruption measures up talking very very small corruption briberies but also the great corruption in terms of how you for example distribute the public tenders. Oh about subcontractors who are well connected to the gym to get the big fish and what Kinda orderly smart smart people can get and so on. This is the second thing that the third thing is this They have to have to deal with the problems differently. It does. We cannot like for example improve the situation of women or the situation of small farmers without to have like to look at the whole system economic.

Tunisia Germany China dot NGO NGO Global South Arizona Bangladesh Gulf States Middle East US Tunis Syria Spain Morocco Jordan mm-hmm Regmi Mitt Europe
"global south" Discussed on African Tech Roundup

African Tech Roundup

13:03 min | 2 years ago

"global south" Discussed on African Tech Roundup

"It actually seldomly does because mostly money's moving from the global global south and currencies in the global south tend to devaluate more than appreciate the these are the three major cost drivers. Now there's been a lot of progress on the AM L. Kyc side in terms of digital on boarding in terms of you've really a lot of coming into detect fraudulent transactions. And all of that and that's going to rapidly continue in terms of the pre-funding as as well as the FX exposure. I think these to get solved together in time when when the technology leapfrogs the current aren't plumbing that we have which is swift right so the day the the money can move the same money that you send from from one country that actually money moves and comes out the other end you remove the FX exposure as well as the need to prefund and you can can have instant transaction so the day that happens it unlocks the ability to go free and then it's a question of all it takes is one shot up to do it and get traction then everyone will have to have to follow so so I think these are the key drivers to make that happen and in terms of time time frame. I don't know maybe three to five years. It's probably reasonable. I would Say This company called Artesia Start Global. They for me the the most promising in in actually trying to solve the problem remained likes to say that you know we must deal with the world as it is as opposed to not as we I would like to see it and my question to you is how much of this is an aspirational ideal on your part. How much is this is a white lie versus use? I use it of commenting on where we're at. Yeah I think I mean I've seen a lot of progress in the last two years and I can see more happening so Yeah for sure. It's it's GonNa Happen. I was good to see this. Smells like crypt to bull case. Do you think it is so I wanted. I wanted to say actually if I could add your Nigerian Kenya transfers so I think so. I don't believe bitcoin solution because it has a lot of problems and it works peer to peer because nobody guaranteed you rate so for example. Okay so hang on. Let's just create some context in case someone you know. Didn't obey s an going back and listen into the previous episode also spoke about how he needed to send some cash between Kenya Nigeria and and of course they found bitcoin to be the the most useful and effective means of of transferring money cheaply between the two countries and and I think it was visa or who alluded to the fact that. Perhaps that's why someone like Jack. Dorsey would mention bitcoin specifically in his tweet highlighting it as part the future of African Fintech. And so you're saying Bitcoin as not all. That's in a piece of Pie. Well so the thing is in have peer to peer transaction which is what did buy bitcoin and then sell it. It's fine it works. I argued still not free. Same ways cash is not free. There's a lot of hidden costs there but as a as a provider doing this of it when you sell the Bitcoin to them you want a guaranteed rate rate in Kenyan shillings. Now there's huge amount of volatility in Bitcoin so they can't actually give a guaranteed rate. They're going to give you whatever the BITCOIN can words to. And it might take an hour or two and whatever. The price differences of Bitcoin. In in that time is what you're going to end up with so I think it works peer to peer but I struggle to see it working from businesses a money transfer provider using it. You're assuming that the isn't a mainstream by into bitcoin. As a store of value it takes forty minutes to do bitcoin blockade. Well true. But I'm just saying I mean listening about the implications of say the will going in the direction of China's premier who who's suddenly decided you know. bitcoin might be something we should all Bein to write. Let's assume the world did buy into that shortly. That would change things. I think the for me. The fundamental problem is is the volatility so and coming back to Romans question. I think less Crypto but more distributed ledger technology. Asia is the way forward. And I'm seeing a lot more of that happening and stable coins is probably the solution and so we have to deal with foreign exchange so we have to deal with the rate changing anyway but because it's based on economies it's not moving as volatility in you know as well as as as Bitcoin I mean you you reference table coin. What do you make of the recently announced stable coin in the British virgin bridged islands linked to of all currencies the US dollar yen? Now a bunch of them but I mean the thing is you. You need to get scaled. So you know it's chicken connect problem. I'm trying to force an acknowledgement off the intersection between the technical limitations of something like Bitcoin and maybe the geopolitical regulatory maybe even capitalist demands of legacy financial institutions. You know my sense is that sometimes the frictions On that side of things as far greater than the technical limitations what do you reckon. Yeah absolutely I mean regulation facebook's finding this out first-hand David Marcus went in front of the Senate and was us you know all these questions and he said. Don't worry we'll we'll give you you know you can you can regulators us and they said how you you're registered in Switzerland how you going to allow us to regulate you. Of course he had no answer. So there's this global the problem here because each country is kind of doing their own thing probably for the first time in they'll need to come together in some way to regulate crypto. In a seamless global manner also room an echo as coming together in a big way trying to launch the Echo single-currency led by Nigeria which of course forms the bulk of that region's the GDP sixty seven percents of GDP is in Nigeria. And so that would be a single fifteen countries which Some some dubbing the Nigerian naira plus a few countries especially when you consider that most of the economies in the region You Know I. It's different levels of development and own the five I believe Cape Cod Ivory Coast Guinea Senegal and Togo. Apparently just those five meets the single currency's criteria for a a budget deficit not higher than four percent. So yeah I mean people are coming together. What do you make of that development in the context of everything we're discussing and what is clearly a very Polish Aaron Jay about how things might change over the next three to five years? Speaking specifically to the echo like the broader point for me is that we need more trade to happen between these countries In some senses of integration amongst I the the Francophone countries specifically but there. I've seen lots of informal collectively happening like between say Nigerians trading in and could therefore all Senegal Togo lots of these markets and more that getting formalized that activity get an encouraged. I think is a good thing. I can't comment on the viability of Echo. And I wouldn't be as quick as most people to dismiss. Yes the significance of the other economies. So I I don't agree with the statement that the major if other countries if you visit these countries as you'll notice a lot of In some ways more interesting things happening yes. They're at an earlier stage development like speaking specifically to take analogy now The ecosystems are built as mature But there's lots of interesting things happening there that lots of countries can learn from So I wouldn't I'm show us. GDP as like my northstar. If I mean I do I do want to echo that because it is folks like Charlie Robinson whose chief global economist at Renaissance Capital. WHO's made statements of that nature and I think they are tinged with a dismissive ness and I obviously can't speak with authority? Not on his intent for making these statements but they seem tinged with backing a certain horse in the geopolitical space of things. You know it would be great to have him on the show at some point to defend himself on that but I do wonder though if the right level of organization and an increase in trade trade and joint self interest is in place for the reality that our own Jay painted at the top of the show this idea. Da that things are going to be very different to what we're experiencing today. which is I think by and large on the African continent very very fractured? What I was talking about in terms of global regulation nation is not connected to single currency so the currencies can stay the way they are just that the central banks need to come together and they have their forums to do that already but they really need to come up with a global strategy global regulatory approach to dealing with the crypto and login but aren't currencies a proxy for self interest essentially? I mean when we say the euro. We know who we're talking about. You know what I mean. In terms of beneficiary in terms of a regional growth in terms of a global interest in capturing value as soon as you say euro. You know what you're talking about. Yeah but the thing is that if they don't come together rather than That will give the opportunity for players to come between them so facebook these hard for them to move forward but then that doesn't mean they won't succeed because they couldn't afford us so they instagram. They couldn't really do messaging doing so. They got what's up and they probably going to buy the first stable coined that gets the most traction so possibly the echo. I thought you were going to say if re basics. Wasn't the home run. They hoped in Africa so they decided to buy the continent. I mean I thought you agree that direction. No not quite Abed actually free basing them a whole world of good right there so many people think that facebook is the Internet so they have they really. I used to be Lebron massively. And maybe I'm flogging a horse that doesn't exist here folks but I'd like you to help me throughout this episode to give our listeners listeners. A very pragmatic since the interactions between the technical advances that we can sort of fully celebrate and point to now as wow this is a glimpse of the future also. I'd like us to differentiate that from our aspirational ideals for what the future might be like. And why and then also just be really really honest about how the dynamics are set up or not set up to allow everyone to be great and everyone to benefit in this world of financial inclusion and and sort of mainstream mobile money. What's keeps us from from reaching that ideal? I think it would be really interesting to do that. Maybe as a point of reference a very specific point of reference also room. And I'd like you to share about a certain company called Migo that is not spending into Brazil. There are Silicon Valley based company founded by Nigerians and Recently close twenty million dollars series b led by the valid capital took group. They've made significant progress in west Africa. They enjoy a client list of the likes of MTN into switch. which itself is doing not shabby at the moment as we discussed last week? Help US understand why they represent an interesting new frontier in what could shape the future of African fantastic So MIGO USED TO BE I. Company called Minds Dot Co.. The I guess unveil themselves publicly sometime sometime in July August twenty eighteen with the thirteen million dollars series. A they're effectively. It credit has a service provider. So if you you take lots of the auto lenders like Bronze Tyler Carbon ATC They're issuing loans directly to consumers Migo or minds as it.

facebook Nigeria US Aaron Jay Artesia Kenya Migo Asia China Switzerland Cape Cod Ivory Coast Guinea Se Togo Charlie Robinson Jack Dorsey Brazil Africa David Marcus Senegal
News in Brief 25 September 2019

UN News

03:47 min | 3 years ago

News in Brief 25 September 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations fighting in Libya is spreading on the capital Tripoli and contributing to widespread lawlessness war crimes and a humanitarian -tarian crisis the UN's top human rights forum has heard addressing the Human Rights Council on Wednesday Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights. Kate Gilmore said that today the people people of Libya fear a return to a full scale civil war the situation in the country deteriorated in April when offensive to take Tripoli was launched by forces of these self stalled Libyan National Army under the command of General Kelly for after the result has been the deaths of at least two hundred eight thousand civilians and hundreds more injured Miss Gilmore said with more than three hundred thousand persons internally displaced while another four hundred thousand live within one two three kilometers from the clashes in Tripoli also at the Human Rights Council so Kazan Salami the head of the UN mission in Libya and smell said that widespread violations of the arms embargo by external actors had made things worse the current conflict conflict has now spread outside of the Capitol was the air and drone strikes launched against the strata sedan it also sparked the Michael Conflict and the city of Mozell in southern Libya where does the over one hundred civilians with killed over the bus to wants breath as secretary general recently warned the conflict risks escalating into full blown war together with the UN Human Rights Office this Mr Salami the Human Rights Council to establish an investigative mechanism to promote accountability in Libya the wells oceans and frozen spaces have been taking the heat for global warming for decades climate experts said on Wednesday in an appeal for urgent measures to tackle rising sea levels and melting blasio's ACEA is sheets and permafrost the experts from the Intergovernmental Panel on climate change warned that without a radical change in human behavior hundreds of millions of people could suffer more frequent natural disasters and food shortages according to their special report six hundred seventy million people who live in the world's high mountain regions and around the same same number in low lying coastal zones depend directly on the planet's oceans and frozen resources in addition for million people live permanently in the Arctic region and Small Island Developing States are home to sixty five million people without major investment in adaptation these low-lying zones would be exposed to escalating flood risks and some island nations are likely to become uninhabitable the IPC report insists it notes that in Europe Eastern Africa the tropical Andes and Indonesia smaller BLASIO's are projected to lose more than eighty percent of their current ice mass by twenty one hundred under worst emissions scenarios. This is likely to increase hazards for people for example through landslides avalanches rockfalls and floods in addition to problems for farmers and hydroelectric power producers downstream and finally a new generation of global commerce. Hamas and finance deals is needed to help poor countries grow without them having to resort to high polluting energy sources the UN trade and development agency UNCTAD said on Wednesday stay in a call for a green new deal for the world's economy in reference to the measures introduced in the United States during the Great Depression to boost growth UNCTAD maintained that what is needed is a clean break from current sturdy measures. UN Sustainable Development Goals can be achieved UNCTAD beliefs but it is going to require governments investing around one point seven a billion dollars a year in low mission policies that is around one third of what is currently spent on fossil fuel subsidies the agency noted adding that these strategy could generate at at least one hundred and seventy million jobs and resulting cleaner industrialization in the Global South Daniel Johnson U._N. News.

UN Human Rights Council Libya Tripoli Unctad Kate Gilmore Kazan Salami United Nations Mr Salami Libyan National Army Miss Gilmore Commissioner IPC Europe Intergovernmental Panel
Refugee children excluded from education will never be equipped to rebuild their countries: UNHCR

UN News

05:58 min | 3 years ago

Refugee children excluded from education will never be equipped to rebuild their countries: UNHCR

"This is natalie hutchinson with u. N. news the vast majority of the world's nearly twenty six million refugees are hosted in the global south where providing education education for them is a major challenge the u._n. Refugee agency u._n._h._c._r. said on friday an interview with u._n. Newses daniel johnson the agency's sees muhammadu deion beltway. That's the deputy. Director of u._n._h._c._r.'s division of resilience and resolutions explains how a new plan is helping to provide provide not just primary but also secondary schooling to vulnerable youngsters permanent remain in issue however you also have much a bigger challenges at secondary level as well as tertiary level. How many millions are we talking about. How many refugees twenty five million in the world twenty six million really yeah. We've got about twenty five hundred six million as of last year most of them eighty four percent in <hes> refugee-hosting countries that happened to be in the global south so refugees are hosted in some of the most deprived areas of our countries and at the same time unwritten these countries in the most deprived part of discounters. The report is calling for help from governments from communities from the private sector the to sort of change the way that refugees get education. The aim is not to do it so much in camps now as in host communities. Maybe you could expand on that and explain explain how our house communities going to deal with this. We've good examples of places where government have made changes policy changes very eddie generous ones go on them wet where for example for example in djibouti for example in uganda for example in mexico for example in countries affected by venezuela situation nations but also in the middle east north africa turkey lebanon exit so we see money of this good examples but this good examples needs sustainability. What are they doing doing exactly. They are allowing refugees to access into the secondary school. The existing schools not obliging them to go on have have their own education on their own so including the refugees in today national education systems allowing them to have additional teachers additional schools were quiet but we also see a lot of development actors development partners like the world bank like bilateral donors coming in support of them so this is new income streams streams this how you're going to do it because you're an can't do it on its own and governments haven't got the resources so you're appealing as part of the global compact refugees to get a new income stream stream. What sort of money do you need to make this work. I cannot tell you about exact amount that is needed but for example you take. Uganda has a four year plan for for over three hundred eighty million u._s. dollars in the course of four years. That's educational response plan devil for both refugee children as will as affected host populations. That's the type of amount of resources that is being posted on the leadership of the government of development actress you initiate. She are on few order ngos and the u._n. Agencies coming together and joining effort into understand exactly what is required and then so that donors as well as communities and others can contribute to responding to those needs that just an example there are many examples so in the the immediate instance. If you go to somewhere like greece the greek islands. There wasn't a lot recently about the fact that thousands of refugee children are still not attending school the islands. I don't have the resources neither does athens. What's going to help them now. Because they really do need assistance immediately they do need assistance but they also policy changes so policy changes that will allow these children to have sisters <unk> but at the same time also human human as well as financial national resources he also mentioned that in lebanon there are thousands more syrian children who fled the conflict there and if these children aren't looked after and given an education we risk reaping the consequences of not looking after them. What exactly do you mean by that. It's about being excluded in countries that have hosted them. They we're already excluded and displaced because of the conflict in the country and then coming into this host countries they need the list that is needed is to provide vitamin d type of education including civic education including cohesion if the host population so that that brighter feature that we do see four for syria when times are is i think is being correctly field by people who are equipped with education two final questions to you how many ah countries and where are you focusing on initially in this new initiative for secondary and tertiary education for refugees and why is education so important for refugees for anyone we are thinking of few countries in the eastern horn of africa rwanda kenya uganda a few orders in asia like pakistan and in these countries as i was saying they are really starting point. We are going talk about fifteen sixteen countries for youth education and secondary education in the laura on in order to make sure that it's not only only supporting the refugees who are immediately in need of that support but also some of defected host populations and education is so important because it is the one that will help refugees and our future what should happen to be able to try but also to contribute go to our societies societies that have lost to them but also the future when they return home or when they are settled or when they are locally integrated.

Uganda Natalie Hutchinson Daniel Johnson Deion Director U. N. Greece Athens U._N._H._C._R. Africa Lebanon Pakistan Asia Rwanda Djibouti Venezuela Syria North Africa
US, Iran conflict hardening over attacks on 2 tanker ships

Democracy Now

12:46 min | 3 years ago

US, Iran conflict hardening over attacks on 2 tanker ships

"Tensions between the US and Iran are again, ratcheting up as the US accused Iran of orchestrating an attack Thursday on Japanese and Norwegian oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman, Iran, denied any involvement, and accused the Trump administration of trying to sabotage diplomacy secretary of state. Mike Pompeo directly accused Iran attacking the oil, tankers just hours after the incident. It is the assessment of the United States government that the Islamic Republic of Iran, responsible for the attacks that occurred in the Gulf of Amman today, this assessment is based on intelligence. The weapons used the level of expertise needed to execute the operation recent similar rating attacks on shipping and the fact that no proxy group operating in the area has the resources and proficiency jacked with a high degree of sophistication. On Thursday night. The United States also released video of which acclaimed was runs revolutionary guard removing an unexploded mind from the side of the Japanese oil, tanker attacked, however, the president of the Japanese company that owns the ships that it was not attacked by mines, but to flying objects, he also said he does not believe any objects where tach to the side of the ship Iranian ships did approach the oil tankers after the attack. But according to multiple news accounts. The Iranians helped rescue dozens of crew members from the tankers the timing of the incident, also raise many questions as it came as Japanese Prime minister was visiting Iran and an attempt to bring Ron in the United States. The negotiating table. Iranian-american treat a party said, quote sounds like some are afraid Japan may succeed in starting diplomacy. The message of peers to be, don't you dare stand in the way of my war plans? Treat a party said last month, the US blamed, Iran for attacking four other oil tankers in the Persian Gulf, but offered no evidence will. For more, we're joined now by VJ per Shah, director of tri-continental institute for social research, chief editor of leftward books. He's also the chief correspondent of globetrotter he's the author of several books, including the poorer nations possible. History of the global south. Welcome to mockery now VJ per shod respond to it's happening right now in the Gulf of phone line. Hello, amy. It's I think important to bench into the woods you just used. You said that only hours after the attack, or the bombings in the Norwegian and Japanese thank the US secretary of state went out there and blamed, Iran hours of to, you know, it's very interesting. There's a kind of rush to blame Iran for anything that's been happening around the go. Full moves people who look closely at the oil business understand that fifty percent of the world's oil goes through the Gulf of law, Moos, the understand that, you know, getting oil is a dangerous activity, all kinds of things happen are accidents this by the see there, a series of it'll quite a common risks faced by all tankers. Iran is not one of those high on the list of Sparta's risk assessors are concerned. And the of course, this is the first thing, the United States government has said, as you said, without the evidence. So within a few is and without any evidence, the United States government wants more provoking, some sort of response from Iran, perhaps, or at least to try to galvanize public opinion to believe that Iran is a threat to the would what's really important here is yes. The fact that Shinzo Ave, the first Japanese Prime minister to visit Iran in forty one years. He goes to Iran ah shortly after the Iranian Foreign Minister visited him in Japan. In fact, Mr. Zarif visited Shinzo abbey in his home. They had a very important conversation with Shinzo obvious said that the Iranian nuclear deal is a factor of stability for West Asia. This goes directly opposed to the Trump adminis-. Stations view and what's very important here is we're not talking about a country, that's far from American the American audit. This is Japan, a reliable ally of the United States, which is not only reliant upon Iranian oil, but understands that, the warmongering in West Asia is going to be very bad, not only for Eurasia, but for the would and I think we need to understand that as Shinzo Ave is in Japan, this attack this several Taj. Whatever it is, is an rallies on the Novi jn Japanese tankers. And again as Shinzo Ave is in Iran. That's right. He wasn't there on the first time in forty one years, and he has been saying, actually interesting. This is a right-wing prime minister. This is not a person of the left he's been saying that there needs to be a return to the table. It's not only Japan saying this Amy. It's also the Europeans, the Europeans of very keen that the US not break fully from this Iran deal. The Germans in fact have been looking for noted mechanism for payments India, which is one of the largest budgets, Iranian oil had to back off because of these new very tight sanctions put in place by the US government. But the Indians are also not that interested in this new approach by the Trump administration. They would like to continue to buy oil. In fact, it's kind of 'isolation that the United States is facing its is related alongside the Israelis the Saudis and the United Arab. Emirates nobody else wants war. Nobody else wants this deal to end. And so I think it's really out of frustration that you see the United States jumped the gun come in very quickly and say that Iran is, is doing this, Ronn is doing that. And therefore, we have to retaliate. It's important to remember that in two thousand seventeen the CIA created a special unit. Call the Iran mission center run by Michael d Andry, and this is an important outfit because its entire mandate has been to ratchet up pressure on Iran. I don't know what happened to the Norwegian or thank. Oh, the Japanese thank good. But I'd be very interested to hear what the Iran mission center at the has been up to since twenty seventeen and runs. Foreign minister mohammad-javad reef tweeted Thursday, reported attacks on Japan related tankers occurred while PM obey Shinzo. Was meeting with our toll hominy for extensive and friendly. Talks suspicious doesn't begin to describe what likely transpired this morning, Iran's proposed regional dialogue forum is imperative. He said, VJ per shot. Mr. Zarif is a very capable diplomatic very reasonable person. He has been leading Iranian diplomacy, and has opened many doors to a diplomatic solution for the standoff around Iran. And I think we need to take seriously what Mr. the saying here when he uses the woods suspicious, I think we should underline that would again. I'm not saying what happened in, in the Gulf of our Moose's very clear that there are alternative explanations. We don't know what happened. We should be suspicious of the negative would forward by the US department, but we should also be suspicious about what happened, we need to ask questions, considered this form a regional standpoint, the United States, the Russians and others are in the middle of very serious diplomatic effort in Ghana stone. There are meetings of the US held in cutter, there are meetings that the. Russians of held in Moscow to dial down the almost nineteen year war that has been taking place in Afghanistan. Imagine if the United States strikes against Iran right now, it would bring catastrophe further to Ghana stone, it would open up the wounds in Iraq, and in Syria, Mr. Zuma's made it very clear that in a tack on Iran is not merely an attack on Iran. It's going to create even more catastrophe in that region. That's one of the main reasons why the Chinese are very interested in not allowing any kind of warn that region. They ever lauded stick, especially in terms of their belt and road initiative, which cuts right through this region goes three run. Nobody wants a war here. It's important for Americans to stand that the US government is deeply isolated on this issue of Iran. And on the way that the US government portrays, Iran in the rest of the would Iran is seen. As a stabilizing force in that region for some strange reason. The US government believes that Iran is an interloper. In other words, there almost eighty million Iranians who live in West Asia, and this seemed to be out of place, whereas the United States, which is, you know, thousands of miles away a portrays itself as a regional active. This is very bizarre for people around the world, and I think Americans need to understand it on Thursday, members of the House Armed Services committee from both parties said Pompeo told them in a classified briefing that the United States could use the two thousand one authorization for these military force or a you enough to attack Iran without congressional approval. This is Michigan democrat Elissa slot. Can we were absolutely presented with a full formal presentation on how the two thousand and one A M F might authorize war on Iran? Yes, I'm sir. I'm sorry, sir. Secretary Pompeo set it with his own words. The af was passed in the wake of the nine eleven attacks authorizes, the president take military action against those responsible along with any quote associated forces, your response to that VJ per shot. And what role do you think Saudi Arabia is playing in all of this? I mean look, this is very chilling. Very disturbing marching us into a war. In other words, they're marching the world into war. They're pushing Iran, the sanctions of attic, catastrophic impact on Iran's external revenues its ability to earn money. There is serious medical crisis inside the country, I think focus should be on that. We've already seen how sanctions destroyed countries how they put a lot of stress on the country, but that's not the focus of anybody's attention. In allowing people like Mr. Pompeo John Bolton. Another set the agenda here, you know, they're being allowed to say that Iran is the criminal country. Must be there for tact. I think this is very disturbing. Saudi Arabia of forces playing a lead role in this. I mentioned the Iran mission center, Mr Michael Andreas is very close to the Saudis. In fact, has. Played an important role in the drone program, and it's likely to have had some role in Saudi warned Yemen. So I mean, this is something people to consider this very quick, March to war must be stopped. The reason saying this is not just about Iran. It's about the region. It's about Eurasia and the Trump administration, I think is playing fast and loose with the facts and is being very reckless with world affairs on this in a we see the Trump administration behaving recklessly mercurially, perhaps in other parts of the world. That's true, but with Iran, I think the finger is right on the trigger and the very fact that bumpier gave this briefing should suggest to people that this is not the time to be cynical. Sick sit back and say, I don't think they're going to do it. It's very likely that the United States is going to make some strike on Iran, and that strike is going to open further the. The gates of hell for the region J for shod director of trion continental institute for social research, Fedor of

Iran United States Islamic Republic Of Iran Japan Persian Gulf Trump Administration West Asia Secretary Pompeo Saudi Arabia Gulf Of Oman Mr. Zarif President Trump Gulf Of Amman Director United Arab Prime Minister
News in Brief 20 March 2019

UN News

02:46 min | 3 years ago

News in Brief 20 March 2019

"This is news in brief from the United Nations. The UN has ramped up its humanitarian response to cyclone EBay, which was devastated large swathes of Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Malawi in southern Africa, the UN and its humanitarian partners are providing emergency food, shelter water and health care supplies and on Wednesday. The UN's central emergency response fund allocated twenty million US dollars to ensure aid reaches the most affected people as soon as possible while the full scale of the humanitarian disaster is still unknown. At least a thousand people ob- Aleve to have been killed with around four hundred thousand displaced from their homes in Mozambique alone. These figures are expected to rise significantly as the full extent of the damage and loss of life across flooded rural. Areas becomes known. The United Nations appeals court has increased the forty year sentence initially imposed on former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan carriage to life imprisonment in two thousand sixteen carriage was found responsible for genocide and war crimes, including the planning of the nineteen ninety-five shred brunettes Masoka by the international criminal tribunal for the former Yugoslavia on Wednesday, the success to that court the Hague branch of the mechanism for international criminal. Tribunals lingerie upheld the twenty 2016 verdict as well as ensuring Mr. carriage will serve a life sentence responding to the appeal decision which was the last opportunity for Mr. carriage to overturn the initial verdict. Adama Zhang UN special adviser on the prevention of genocide said that it confirmed with accountability rather than impunity will prevail and UN secretary General Antonio, Gutierrez has told leading politicians business executives and civil society. You leaders of developing countries in the global south that cooperation is key to sustainable development and the fight against global warming. The UN chief was speaking at baba, plus forty a historic summit in the tinian capital Boina Aires, which as well as strengthening cooperation aims to increase transparency and strengthen accountability in developing nations Maria Fernandez bonanza, president of the general assembly also spoke at the event, which she described as a symbol of the determination of the global south to advance equality for all across the world praising the evolution of south south corporation over recent decades, mister Gutierrez said that it can never be a replacement for the responsibilities of developed nations and must involve young people civil society, the private sector, academia and others to build innovative partnerships, Khanna Lennon, U N news.

UN Adama Zhang Un Mr. Carriage United Nations Mozambique Mister Gutierrez Ebay Maria Fernandez United States Boina Aires Baba Zimbabwe Khanna Lennon Malawi Africa Special Adviser Yugoslavia
"global south" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

05:47 min | 3 years ago

"global south" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

"Or unending funds for an already insane military spending budget for all the screaming about Trump being a grave threat to democracy. Worst president ever an unhinged maniac when he boosts the policies of imperialism he gets to be part of the club. Of the cops of the world. Cops. Where the cops were joining me now to discuss the state of imperialism in the world the situation in Venezuela. The upcoming elections in India and the recent one in the Democratic Republic of Congo is VJ shod. He is an Indian historian editor and journalist is also a writing fellow and chief correspondent at globetrotter. That's a project of the independent media institute. VJ is the executive director of the tri-continental institute for social research and the chief editor of left word books. BJ is a prolific writer authoring twenty five books, including the darker nations. A people's history of the third world and the poorer nations a possible history of the global south VJ shod. Welcome to intercepted. Thank you so much. You recently wrote that what happened to Chile in nineteen Seventy-three when there was a US initiated coup against the democratically elected leader, Sal. Vittore yesterday that that is precisely what the United States has attempted to do in many countries of the global south, and you say the most recent target for the US government and western big business is Venezuela. What are the parallels that you see between the overthrow of Sunday in nineteen seventy three and what we're seeing now with the push to overthrow nNcholas Maduro of Venezuela. I'm glad we're starting Jeremy because this is really the most important issue. I think of period, which is, you know, this very extravagant set of claims made by the United States and its closest allies about countries in the global south, whether it's Iran Venezuela, a host of other countries, let's think about the Chilean example in nineteen seventy when I n day was coming close to winning a very legitimate election. Come to office, the United States government said we will not tolerate it. If people like I decide to nationalize resources in the case of Chile. It was copper American companies dominated that you lay and economy oil companies. The telephone company. And eighty percent of the country's copper industry delays biggest source of revenue. Again days program called for putting big business in Chilean hands. And so they began to plan to in a way undermine I n day through barricading his Konami long before I end even won the election. And after he won the election. They did everything possible to prevent Sheila from selling copper outside its boundaries and therefore bankrupting Chile creating distress within the country, and then winking to the military to take over. And by the way, she lays not the beginning of this. We saw this in nineteen Fifty-three in Guatemala where the issue was the nationalization of United fruit company. Thousands of communists and fellow travelers rounded up in makeshift prisons. For United fruit. It's business as usual as all company land seized, by the communists, is return in Iran shoe was. Oil. Musset, AAC Premera Iran makes the breasts to reaffirm government's willingness to arbitrate with Britain over nationalizing, the Anglo Iranian Oil Company. Nationalize the oil company. This was something seen as totally inappropriate by western oil companies. So call seven sisters and the United States in alliance with Great Britain conducted a coup against Mohamed Mossa deck in Iran and against Jacob Arbenz in Guatemala. I mean, there's so many examples of precisely this situation with Venezuela. You know, this is a country that is never been able to diversify its economy about ninety eight percent of its external revenues comes from oil and from petroleum products. You know in the last few years oil prices collapsed by fifty percent, which means that Venezuela's external revenues have also collapsed by about fifty percent rather than help the Venezuelans. What we begin to see is the Obama administration in in two thousand fifteen declare. Airing Venezuela national security threat. And now the Trump administration with the very close help of Mr. Trudeau from Canada trying to essentially overthrow the government of Mr. nNcholas Maduro. I, of course agree with your analysis on the US intervention, but we are seeing millions of Venezuelans over the past several years fleeing the country. Yes, the opposition some elements of the opposition to Madero have killed people at the same time Madero controls most of the state mechanisms of organized violence, the police the military at cetera, and we have seen real brutality and lethal force used over and over on the opposition..

Venezuela Iran United States Chile Mr. nNcholas Maduro editor Anglo Iranian Oil Company Trump United fruit company Democratic Republic of Congo president Guatemala Madero Britain Konami chief correspondent Sheila
"global south" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

09:56 min | 3 years ago

"global south" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Technology is the equivalent of a censored mine. Now when you think about this how brilliant she was. What is capitalism? What are free markets their freedom? Freedom of what? To innovate and create freedom of the mind. If you're told you can't go down this road. You can't go down this road. You can't go down this road. Then they shut off the creativity and the productivity and the innovation of the mind. Capitalism is about voluntary commercial activity. That's all it is it's about individual liberty. It's about freedom of the mind, creativity and innovation. Now, I point out that there's these growth IRS, that's what they used to define themselves as. You don't hear that anymore? I don't know why we don't take the language back. It's so frustrating to me. And they they used to call themselves de growth, there's just like all bad ideas. This was imported from Germany and. And much of Europe. He so-called environmental movement today. Has transmuted into an aggressively nefarious primitive faction. Now Klein who somebody who the left admires who I detest? In recent interviews, she talks about she's a fanatical anti-capitalist so-called climate activists. She proclaimed, and I quote capitalism increasingly is a discredited system because it is seen as a system that venerates greed above all else. There's a benefit to climate discussion to name a system that lots of people already have problems with other reasons, she said, I don't know why it is so important to save capitalism. Pretty battered brand just focusing on climate is getting us nowhere. Many many more people recognize the need to change our economy. This is where the green new deal comes from. If climate can be our lands to catalyze this economic transformation that so many people need for other even more pressing reasons than they may be a winning combination. Is economic system. She wrote his failing the vast majority of the people capitalism is also waging a war on the planet's life support system. So they basically have followed her the pied piper of communism. Am I handle opinion? And so they've now rebranded their de growth movement into a green new deal. So you have the combination of radical environmentalism and Marxism, socialism, the green new sounds pretty cool because they have stolen the word green. Now, this de growth movement. That's what I've come to call it. That's what they used to call themselves originating in Europe. But now taking a firm hold in the United States the growth IRS include in their ranks. None other than Barack Obama. And the degrom authors define their agenda as follows, and I quote from their own documents sustainable growth is downscaling of production and consumption that increases human wellbeing and enhances ecological conditions and equity on the planet. It calls for a future where society's live within their ecological means with open, localized economies and resources more equally distributed through new forms of democratic institutions. It's marxist. They go on. It's an essential economic strategy to pursue in over developed countries. Like the United States see where over developed. For the well being of the planet of underdeveloped populations. And yes, even of the six stressed and overweight consumer populations of overdeveloped countries. There phrases work their way into the mainstream via the media via the democrat party. So we are an overdeveloped country. Now when you over develop you gotta deal with it, right? Its proponents and adherence. I write D growth has quickly developed into a pseudo religion and public policy obsession. In fact, the D growth IRS insists their ideology reaches far beyond the environment or even its odium for capitalism, and is an all encompassing lifestyle and governing philosophy some of its leading advocates argue that quote de growth is not just an economic concept. We shall show that it is a frame constituted by a large array of concerns, goals strategies and actions, and as a result de growth has now become a confluence point where streams of critical ideas political action converge. De growth is an interpretive frame phrase social movement understood is the mechanism through which actors engage in a collective action. I'm just quoting their documents. Now, the degrom through seek to eliminate carbon sources of energy. And you've heard a go on about we need to eliminate this in twelve years. And redistribute wealth. According to terms they consider equitable. They reject the traditional economic reality that acknowledges growth is improving living conditions, generally. But especially for the impoverished, they embrace the notions of less competition large-scale redistribution sharing and reduction of excessive incomes and wealth de growth is went to engage in policies that will set quote, a maximum income are maximum wealth. I quote them to weaken envy as a motor of consumer goods and open borders. No boarders to reduce means to keep inequality between rich and poor countries. Do you better understand what I'm talking about here? It's not an environmental movement. It's a Marxist movement. Take control the economy and to eliminate the borders. Now, you see the resistance. In building a wall because they work. Goes goes further, and they demand reparations by supporting a quote concept of ecological debt, or the demand that the global north that would be us pays for past and present colonial exploitation in the global south, quote, unquote. Wanna hear more? This is who they are McConnell has no idea. What's going on? Mccarthy has no idea what's going on. These freaks are in circles around them. French economist and leading de growth survey Latouche. I could say something, but I want a search that quote. We are currently witnessing the steady commercialization of everything in the world applied to every domain in this way capitalism cannot help but destroy the planet much as it destroys society. Since the very idea of the market depends on unlimited excess and domination. He also hordes economic growth and wealth creation. The very attributes necessary to improve the human condition in societies. He said he society based on economic contraction cannot exist under capitalism, so we are over developed. We need economic contraction. And indeed on July eighteen twenty fourteen four and a half years ago scores of extreme groups throughout the world endorsed a proclamation titled. In english. Climate change. Subtitled changing this system, not the climate. Which calls for among other things an end to the capitalist hegemonic system. De growth is right usually characterized by a strong utopian dimension. Its foundations rely on a version of economic relations based on sharing gifts reciprocity with social relations and conviviality are central. Now the implement this utopian vision of radically Galateri now comes the de growth movement employ strategies, such as quote, alternative building opposition and research and in relation of capitalism. They can't they can be anti-capitalist post capitalist and despite capitalism. The D growth IRS insists that governments established a living wage and reduce the work week to twenty hours. You'll you'll see these proposals or something similar to it happening soon. The living wage you've already heard that. There ought to be a minimum income for every person that comes out of this movement. This Marxist movement dressed up as an environmental movement a green new deal. Apparently discounting the fact that the population of the globe has increased by several billion human beings. In the intervening years, they call for bringing quote material production back down to the levels of the sixties and seventies and returning to small-scale farming. Gee, whiz Maui be proud and grocers quote decree a moratorium on technological innovation pending an in-depth assessment of its achievement and reorientation of scientific and technical research. According to new aspirations. Imagine the power and breadth of the police state necessary to enforce this for this form of autocracy, ladies and gentlemen. Well, we don't need to look far. And eighteen forty eight in the communist, manifesto, Karl Marx and Frederick Engels declared in part, the bourgeoisie cannot exist without constantly revolutionizing the instruments production and thereby the relations of production with them the whole relations of society constant revolutionizing of production. Uninterrupted disturbance of all.

IRS Europe United States Barack Obama Germany Klein Maui Karl Marx democrat party McConnell Mccarthy Frederick Engels Wan twelve years twenty hours
"global south" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

04:08 min | 3 years ago

"global south" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"So to some extent that profit that squeezed out of the global south helps to buy off it working class in the group worth the trouble is that that's come tune in pre much and working class organizations that were successful in the global north or under attack all over the place. And so you can see that the whatever victories workers have one point out in chapter four of the book. I think whatever they want in the global north even in the most advanced countries in terms of working class standards of living Scandinavian countries, for example, or under under sharp attack by capital. You know, be global. They move their enterprises they threaten to move their enterprises to to the global south. So the goal without where the oppression is the greatest in the global south that you'd sing successful revolutions in the Soviet Union, for example in China in Cuba in Vietnam and someone in the global north the divide in the working class the power of capital, the combination of the state and capitalist. So great that it's precluded any any sort of anti-capitalist revolution. So far. Your educational project. In fact, you begin within definition of who is the working class? But as you point out most unions in the United States don't have educational programs much less radical educational programs. Well, I'm probably the person to talk to you about that since I spent over thirty years of labor educator, and what I what I discovered was is that that's true that unions in the United States. Some of them have had in the past a good education programs and some still try to like the United electrical workers, for example, a union that attempts to educate its workers from the get-go once they become union members, and so on, but I had an interesting experience once that your listeners might be interested in I was teaching workers in Johnstown, Pennsylvania sort of quintessential industrial small city. That's still was the Dom. -ment corporation US still had some things to reminders. And so on around there. So I'm teaching group of workers and some of them work at this air conditioning company in the small little town near Johnstown and union has made concessions employer. Mid contract. They already had a click the bargaining agreement. Then the bigwigs in the United steel workers union decided to abrogate that contract and make concessions to the employers. Well, the students in my class, they take every class. They it was a classic quick the bargaining, and they went back, and they won an election to get people like to their local, and then they threatened strike, and what have you and they got back what the union had given away. And one of the things you find that union leaders, don't like education classes, because what what what might happen their positions challenged. And if you look at the way unions or structure in the United States, quite often, they're structured just like the class enemy. They're structured just like corporations are. There's a great book by Greg shot. Well, called auto workers under the gun and the United Auto Workers has always been pointed to as a very progressive union, supposedly progressive on issues of race, for example, supporting the civil rights, which of course, Walter Reuther, then president of the union did on the other hand, you have black workers revolting against the unions. And the revolutionary union movements of the nineteen seventies against the United Auto Workers. And it's a one party state. You try to win power and that union as a dissident, then you're going to be a lot of trouble. So unions fear education programs. There are some education programs that are associated with colleges. I've taught in many of those Penn State had one Cornell how one university of Massachusetts -chusetts damn Hearst university of Indiana. I taught everyone of those, and it was interesting when I first went to taught at UMass Amherst, I was red baited, buddy. If they'll see. Never some people didn't want me to be in that program because they said the communist..

United steel workers union United Auto Workers United States Soviet Union Johnstown UMass Amherst Walter Reuther Greg shot China Cornell university of Massachusetts Pennsylvania Hearst university of Indiana president Vietnam Cuba thirty years
"global south" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"global south" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"Pressingly published this book by a man from Great Britain, John Smith called twenty first century imperialism, and he points out that in the global south. You have people that make a wage that's less than one that will allow a worker to a worker in his family to reproduce it self. In other words, they're living at below subsistence. And so you have tremendous amounts of profit being sucked out of the labor of people in the global south, and it goes to the global north. In fact, it helps to finance the states of the global north. If you think about it because the global north is gonna tax the corporations to some extent, it's gonna tax rich people to some extent and their living from wealth. It's created in the global south. So the level of oppression in the global south is extreme. And in a way, it's like what was true in the earliest days is capitalism where as the great British story, EP Thompson points out there's an assault upon an entire way of life by capital, and it's not grasp -able by people and they revolt against it like a Luddite who destroyed machines who demand they'd be treated as human beings there riots in the streets, Philadelphia and working class neighborhoods because the new system strikes them like a hammer blow. Well, that's the way of the tens of millions of billions of workers in the in the global south feel every day. And so they're more likely to feel that emotionally whereas in the rich capitalist countries capital has become powerful through nationalism, for example. So that people come to think of themselves as Americans or British or French, and you can see that by creating the other capital wins a tremendous. Victory can get working class people to kill themselves by the tens of millions and World War One World War Two in in all sorts of in all sorts of of conflicts..

John Smith EP Thompson Pressingly Britain assault Philadelphia