13 Burst results for "Global Polio Eradication Initiative"

Leading the Gates Foundation Fight Against Coronavirus

The Strategerist

06:10 min | 2 months ago

Leading the Gates Foundation Fight Against Coronavirus

"We have a really exciting opportunity today to talk to someone. That's helping lead the charge against the crow virus. Mark Suzman is CEO of the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation who are putting a ton of resources behind looking for solutions right now and we're really grateful to have a few minutes of your time mark. Thank you for doing this. Great detroi- well. The Gates Foundation has a publication called the optimist which we think is exactly the kind of attitude that we need right now and we'll have time to talk about specifics of the virus in treatments soon but I in general terms at a high level. What's keeping optimistic right now? Well we do have publication called the optimistic with inter-regional you're listening to subscribe. It's a great publication that sort of sends out an US on a pretty regular basis actually comes from Bill and Melinda Gates who are like to call themselves impatient optimists we we decided not to call the publication. The impatient optimists and at times like this. It's sometimes challenging to to feel optimistic but on the real plus side one. We're seeing are really unprecedented progress in of the search for a vaccine that still going to be a wild but we're a pretty confident that they will be a successful vaccine you know unlike say with HIV where we struggle to find one up to more than thirty years. And it's going to be the foster. Sfaxien ever successfully developed in human history there already number of candidates in trials but we have a lot of scientists who look at that and feel pretty confidence and the challenge is going to be really about getting them through as quickly as possible getting them into distribution and manufacturing and trying to make sure that they are globally accessible. Because it's something the world's GonNa need so that probably the biggest one on the horizon. The second one is a cautious optimism. But it's also combined with a worry Which is so far. We haven't seen the kind of days in the developing world which we were very worried about probably off the levels we've seen in the US and Europe. We're working very hard and you. These places with very low and weak health resources to try and help with preparation still worries that there may be major outbreaks but again the steps that have been taken by these countries today despite their challenging circumstances have certainly a voted foul outcomes and that's being another bid relatively good news and I know that that global outlook is really important to the Gates Foundation. What are y'all doing to make sure that the work that you're doing is able to be used worldwide. Yes so that's something we do for like when we work extensively across the US obviously and we have carry lodge program. Which of being heavily disrupted and Writing educational opportunities for low income students and kids of Color in K twelve and post-second buck most by workers in global health and global development issues. And everything we do as informed by what he calls global access so we do a lot of research and development Some of that is in helpings like New Treatments. Or vaccines or things that are Diseases like malaria or tobacco. So I do think that disproportionately affect poor people and we have requirement whenever we make grunts that Any results Former global access. You know they need to be accessible and affordable globally and we support directly a number of organizations that help ensure that happens so the Global Fund to fight. Hiv Malaria Which was actually something where President Bush was the inaugural funded from the US and and was the counterpart to the pet. Far -Unding is a huge operation. That actually helps keep many millions of people on anti retrovirals but also that's bednets across the developing world to prevent Larrea to Berkey Laos's treatments. And what it does is it. Cools or sources including from the foundation many governments including the US which is the largest Funda. And then how? Purchase those at bulk because it is a crisis and then distribute them to the needy globally and we have the partnerships that do the same in areas like vaccines. So I know that scenario that we've worked together on before is in is in global health. We had Bill Melinda Gates recently at our form on leadership for them to talk about the work that they've done and Y'all done a lot of work with global epidemics previously like in global health. You've been very active. What did you learn from the worthy done previously? That's helping you today. So some of it is pretty simple stuff right. You need basic functional primary healthcare systems that that may sound and we're kind of used most people can excess at least minimal basic healthcare in the US effectively but You in very poor countries. That means often. There's barely a clinic with basic equipment or tools. But we need that. We make a lot of investments in trying to support those kind of experts if you have accessible primary care that's able to take early action than that helps prevent a whole lot of the health outcomes and then the car. Koga crisis where you're trying to Provide community engagement or involvement to help support challenges. Where you're often working in situations like crowded urban slums where it's very difficult to sort of isolate if you have symptoms we've seen countries like South Outta go for example which have extensive networks that have been set up to deal with HIV crisis actually being able to mobilize those network to help support Kobe or simply one of the talents we have. We are the largest. Funders globally the. Us is also very generous support of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative that unfortunately it had to be put on pause for why because we can't currently vaccinate children because it's the opposite of social distancing malaria polio vaccine. Excuse me drops that needs to be put in the mouth of a baby. That's held by their parents but we had big infrastructure that we've developed Without the partners over the years including Eunice and the World Health Organization Rotary that is very expert at surveillance and tracking and tracing Things which can now again be used in that Jacobin. So we've had a lot of those kinds of blessedness Which we wish. We didn't have to have them to help. But there certainly are helping with the current crisis

United States Gates Foundation Melinda Gates Melinda Gates Foundation Global Polio Eradication Initi Global Fund Malaria Mark Suzman Polio Vaccine CEO World Health Organization Europe Sfaxien Bill President Bush Eunice Jacobin HIV
"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

04:37 min | 4 months ago

"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Sororities believes it is pandemic continues too many people were still gathering in too many places we are the bay area news station KCBS we are here for you the need is greater than it ever has been in the area around the clock we wanted to be able to do something to support those I really feel insecure at this point all news all the time right here on KCBS a CBS news time eleven fifty I'm John Evans editing the news tonight pixie clay in San Francisco police have made an arrest in a series of arsons fifty four year old mark major of San Francisco is accused of setting two fires near Alamo square park yesterday the SFPD says he's also a suspect in other fires last November police say fire damage at the park was minor the corona virus pandemic has disrupted the fight against polio a push that began more than thirty years ago to completely eradicate polio worldwide is hitting a roadblock Kim Thompson is president of kid risk a nonprofit group that specializes in policy risk economic and infectious disease modeling their surveillance activity will slow down because instead of people looking for the polio virus and trying to make sure sample Catholic lab all of that can shut down then we start to lose our ability to see where the viruses which means that once we start back up again they'll be I need to re build capacity and and we invest in the infrastructure and the good news is that the global polio eradication initiative has wiped out two of the three polio viruses worldwide the nation's leading disease fighter Dr Anthony Fauci says that in his fifty years of working in factions diseases he's never seen anything that behaves like the coronavirus KCBS is Rebecca corral reports on the one thing we can all do to protect one another just about the only consistent feature of the corona virus is its lack of conformity some infected people barely feel any symptoms others even some healthy ones are fighting for their lives just days after their first cough even subtle symptoms should raise people's sense of their own risk to other people Yale university's Dr Lisa Sanders writes the weekly column diagnosis for New York times magazine I protect you you protect me if you are going for everybody to wear masks and I think that that's not a bad idea again the mask isn't necessarily for your own protection but it does protect those around you if you have the virus and don't know it which is why if we all start wearing them we don't need to run out and grab an N. ninety five save those for the medical workers on the frontline I think that wearing a bandanna or these homemade massive people have makes sense Rebecca chorale KCBS families are struggling with the new health department mandate on funeral attendants KCBS is Tim Ryan explains Crippen and Flynn funeral homes in redwood city in Belmont have observed the ten person rule since it was recommended by county health officers but now it's mandatory and funeral director Tom berry junior tells KCBS it's very difficult for grieving families he says with larger family sometimes not all of the children of the deceased can attend the funeral one of the things we were learning and studying to be a mortician are incorrect is the craze grief shared his grief last week and right now in society doesn't have a way to during this car doesn't have a way of lessening that great clips are great he tells families they are obviously not good and they won't get well anytime soon but some day the farmers will smell good again the sun was shining he says he has a habit of touching shoulders for those in mourning a habit he's trying to break Tim Ryan KCBS the nation's top infectious disease specialist is now a bobble head the national bobblehead hall of fame and museum in Milwaukee created all featuring the likeness of Dr Anthony Fauci algae was picked because many Americans see him as the plain speaking expert on the virus someone they trust museum will donate five dollars for every of purchase and that money will go toward masks and other protective equipment for health care workers and the bay area rock band Metallica has a foundation called all within my hands it now grants three hundred fifty thousand dollars to four groups working to support health care workers food banks and the live music and restaurant industries.

"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:25 min | 4 months ago

"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on KCBS All News

"The bay area news station KCBS for the time is ten fifty I'm John Evans picks the clay is at the editor's desk tonight Golden Gate fields horse racing track in Albany in the East Bay has suspended all racing activities due to the pandemic the track has been closed to the public since mid March but had been running races that people could watch and bet on remotely that has now ended and in LA there's been another horse death at Santa Anita the seventh since December it's believed the horse may have suffered a heart attack Santa needed temporarily ended live racing by order of the LA county health department last week however morning training was still being allowed and is now mandatory in most bay area counties that no more than ten people attend a funeral KCBS is Tim Ryan tells us as you may expect this is causing a lot of problems Tom berry junior managers Crippen flan in Belmont in redwood city and says this separation is obviously important but also really tough on people bidding farewell to a loved one many of the families we serve are very large families and and that's part of the county we we have a number of ethnic groups that have large families and sometimes ten people means that not all of the children can't even attend and it's difficult for him as a funeral director I'm a person who likes to put my hand on someone's shoulder and encourage them as best I can he says the limited attendance covers wakes as well adding it is a very difficult time but some days the flowers will smell good again and the sun will shine Tim Ryan KCBS the corona virus pandemic has disrupted the fight against polio a push that started more than thirty years ago to completely eradicate polio is hitting a road block Kim Thompson is president of kid rescue a nonprofit group that specializes in policy risk economic and infectious disease modeling that people who are out there vaccinating kids to stop the play bars are the same people that are needed to try to control the corona virus so that means that the kids who would get back now by the program are not going to receive the vaccines they need and the viruses then have a chance to research and so there is an issue with the viruses that are out there circulating now coming back and and causing more damage and the good news is that global polio eradication initiative has already wiped out two of the three polio viruses worldwide food distribution is being streamlined in San Jose and beyond KCBS is Margie Shafer reports from San Jose high school the city of San Jose has unveiled a searchable map for food distribution sites throughout Santa Clara county San Jose mayor Sam Liccardo she is has a step up to this role because we know the county is critically focused on saving lives and so we are stepping up with other cities to see how we can support the many nonprofits and schools and churches second harvest of Silicon Valley CEO Leslie botches says the need is great as unemployment rises we have almost a thousand distribution sites across Santa Clara and San Mateo counties and most of them are seen a fifty to a hundred percent increase in the Santa Clara county superintendent of schools Mary Ann Dewan says even with the spring breaks meals will be available for families I also want to take a moment to thank all of the.

"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:33 min | 4 months ago

"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on KCBS All News

"South bound wanna one right around where people so you can expect some slow traffic in both directions once they get up and running there next update seven twenty eight on the traffic leader KCBS and our forecast for the bay area we've got some clear skies tonight lows in the thirties to the middle forties tomorrow should be a sunny day with highs in the mid fifties to upper sixties though we'll start to see some rain Friday night after midnight lows will be in the thirties and forties rain likely Saturday through Monday we'll see highs on Saturday in the mid fifties to low sixties on the Sunday showers with a slight chance of thunderstorms some thunderstorms may produce some light small hail and it's a sunny during the day as well as the evening weather highs in the fifties on Sunday Monday showers likely highs in the fifties and low sixties slight chance of showers on Tuesday with temperatures staying in the fifties and mid sixties and then we start to clear up on Wednesday with clear skies highs in the upper fifties will see some sixties and low seventies in line with us slight chance of showers on Thursday look for highs to stay in the fifties and sixties up the coast sixties to low seventies by the bay and inland fifty six degrees this hour in downtown San Francisco traffic and weather together on the eight son all news one of six nine AM seven forty KCBS KCBS news time seven twenty the corner virus pandemic could be putting a dent in the ability to completely eradicate polio there's been a thirty year drive to wipe out polio worldwide but now the global polio eradication initiative is recommending.

KCBS polio San Francisco
"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:17 min | 4 months ago

"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Putting a dent in the ability to completely eradicate polio there's been a thirty year drive to wipe out polio worldwide but now the global polio eradication initiative is recommending the suspension of polio education in favor of campaigns to help stop the spread of coronavirus more KCBS is damaged and spoke with Kim Thompson who is the president of kid risk which is a nonprofit research organization specializing in integrated policy risk economic and infectious disease modeling so Kim let me ask you why would polio eradication have to be suspended to deal with the corona virus how does one connect with the other great question the real connection is that the people who are out there vaccinating kids to stop the play bars are the same people that are needed to try to control the corona virus so that means that the kids who would get back now by the program are not going to receive the vaccines they need and the viruses then have a chance to research and so there is an issue with the viruses that are out there circulating now coming back and and causing more damage so when you see the same people are we talking about doctors and nurses that they administer those vaccines the shots yeah in fact it's on and not only that it's the surveillance capacity so you can see when you have a big outbreak like we're seeing with S. pandemic all the people in the health system and the people that the global player education initiative hired to supplement those people those folks that are out there in that putting all their resources towards the M. pandemic and when that happens it takes away from you know that polio efforts on top of that the surveillance activities will slow down because instead of people looking for the polio virus and trying to make sure sample Catholic lab all of that can shut down then we start to lose our ability to see where the viruses which means that once we start back up again they'll be I need to re build capacity and and we invest in the infrastructure what kind of numbers or or do you have any are we talking about when we see a red Cape polio well the exciting thing about the whole unit that we have globally declared two of the three viruses there probably are ready cadence of type one and okay thank you and we are the only are the two that we've declared eradicated type one is the only one that's been circulating in recent years and it's only been impact on gas and we've been down to a few hundred cases a year which is really remarkable if you consider where we work thank you pick out when we started and we are closed but the virus will come back it will all depend on how long the systems are disrupted and basically what kind of mixing is happening that allows the viruses to spread so are you working in any kind of models that say if we don't get this back in six months or in a year we could triple the number of cases yeah we're actually looking at all of the logistics and all the economics around that so essentially wow what's it going to cost us to get this back on track to really recover for the for the polio programme from the same questions we should be acting as a nation now about the code nineteen situations what we need to do to recover how do we make sure that we have the resources and weren't getting in front of it as Kim Thompson president of.

polio
"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:29 min | 4 months ago

"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Twenty the corona virus pandemic could be putting a dent in the ability to completely eradicate polio now there's been a thirty year drive to wipe out polio worldwide but now the global polio eradication initiative is recommending the suspension of polio eradication in favor of campaigns to help stop the spread of the corona virus for more we turn to the KCBS ring central news line we talk with Kim Thompson who is the president of kid rest which is a nonprofit organization that specializes in policy risk economic and infectious disease modeling so Kim let me ask you why would polio eradication have to be suspended to deal with the corona virus how does one connect with the other great question the real connection is that the people who are out there vaccinating kids to stop the play bars are the same people that are needed to try to control the corona virus so that means that the kids who would get back now by the program are not going to receive the vaccines they need and the viruses then have a chance to research and so there is an issue with the viruses that are out there circulating now coming back and and causing more damage so when you see the same people are we talking about doctors and nurses that they administer those vaccines the shots yeah in fact it's on and not only that it's the surveillance capacity so you can see when you have a big outbreak like we're seeing with this pandemic all the people in the health system and the people that that global player education initiative hired to supplement those people those folks that are out there in that putting all their resources towards the M. pandemic and when that happens it takes it away from you know that polio effort on top of that the surveillance activity will slow down because instead of people looking for the polio virus and trying to make sure sample Catholic lab all of that can shut down so we start to lose our ability to see where the viruses which means that when we start back up again they'll be a need to re build capacity and and we invest in our infrastructure what kind of numbers or or do you have any are we talking about when we say a ratty Kate polio well the exciting thing about the whole unit that we have globally declared two of the three viruses that are fully are relegated the type one and okay thank you and we are the only are the two that we've declared eradicated type one is the only one that's been circulating in recent years and it's only been impact on campus we've been down to a few hundred cases a year which is really remarkable if you consider where we work thank you pick out when we started and we are closed that the virus will come back it will all depend on how long the systems are disrupted and basically what kind of mixing is happening that allows the virus to spread so are you working on any kind of models that say if we don't get this back in six months or in a year we could triple the number of cases yeah we're actually looking at all of the logistics and all the economics around that so essentially well what's it going to cost us to get this back on track to really recover for the for the polio programme from the same questions we should be asking as nation now about the code nineteen situations what we need to do to recover how do we make sure that we have the resources and weren't getting in front of it all right Kim thanks very much for the update and the information Kim Thompson who is president of kid rescue and that again is a nonprofit research organization that specializes in risk economic and infectious infectious.

"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

06:01 min | 8 months ago

"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"With Chris Marcos your body it is the watchdog on Wall Street show what can explain this maybe get little bit double of a deeper one of getting across here archer yours hello entrepreneurs of people that go out the old and create we talked about this year on the program love small businesses small business that job and yes that is where the that's where jobs are created here in this country large companies hire fired it's a bit of a wash entrepreneurs Hey an entrepreneur out there that takes chance makes an investment in makes good god bless them why going after Jeff Bezos you may not like Jeff Bezos may think he's a bit of an eccentric fool but Hey it was his company he went out he took the risk he put the work and he built it he built you get it then we take a look at JP Morgan a pecan Jamie Dimon Jamie Dimon dean bill JP Morgan aid may have and a good C. O. in managing the company they'll that not his company is a billionaire how is Jamie Dimon billion it well stock being issued stock now Jamie Dimon is a superstar a rock star as far as she owes are concerned we can all agree on that in the same way that Dwayne the rock Johnson is now a superstar when it comes to movies the latest movie that he's got coming out I think you got paid twenty three million dollars to star in why well because movies that he stars in do really well at the box office that's why I get that much real simple now Jamie Dimon is doing a phenomenal job and they feel that they should pay him I don't think thirty forty million dollars a year because of the great job that he does so be it and if he wants to go out and buy JP Morgan stock on his own so be it to but it should be granted to it shouldn't be granted that will change thanks again no one talks about this at all people who to stock buybacks and also but they don't understand how it truly works and the racket that it has become anyway let's talk a little bit about all of these some evil billionaires out there billionaire LA this democratic debate right did talk came turned the billionaire's right Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren our system is corrupt and not Elizabeth Warren said that she said I'm tired of free loading billionaires I think it's time that we ask those at the very top to pay more so that every single one of our children gets a real real what I don't know kind of we could hear what you said probably real education or something like that so the Wall Street journal basically the point is this billionaires are bad for America are you kidding me I don't think I don't think that most of America is looking to come up with a voodoo doll and stick pins into the voodoo doll of billionaires right if you were to go out your to go out the wallstreet journal makes this point you could go out and you're gonna say Hey could you name for me you ask somebody ministry could you name these for billionaires I I'd say the probably some people would say Bill Gates right somebody would say you know Bill Gates billionaire well I was just in Abu Dhabi and the reason for him being there was what kids children he was attending a meeting of the global polio eradication initiative the goal is to make polio the second human disease after small pox to be around a case Bill Gates and his wife gave this initiative one point oh eight billion dollars I was I I want to get to a point in time it might be great if it happened I I I I love giving away my want to be able to give away over a billion dollars think about that thirty three percent of the donation to sixteen billion dollars in contributions to the idea polio eradication consortium their attorney should have has been from private donors who'd you rather would you rather have the Bill Gates if the Bill Gates rather gave that money to Elizabeth Warren if you think it would be better served it with Washington DC hello having that money or Bill Gates keeping that money and deciding how to run his foundation I'm just saying if you live in Washington as a good jammer money I don't watch talking wallstreet dot com watchdog on Wall Street dot com so what would you do with an extra five hundred dollars a month in your budget pay off loans save it to some fun well it's something you may need to think about if you become a.

Chris Marcos thirty forty million dollars twenty three million dollars sixteen billion dollars eight billion dollars five hundred dollars thirty three percent billion dollars
"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

05:44 min | 8 months ago

"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"Freedom one listener at a time your listing to the watch dog on Wall Street with Chris Marcos everybody is the watchdog on Wall Street show one explain this maybe a little bit the little bit deeper what I'm getting across here arch of yours a lot of entrepreneurs are people that go out and build and create we talked about this year on the program love small businesses small business that job angel as that is where the that's where jobs are created here in this country large companies hire fired it's a bit of a wash entrepreneurs Hey an entrepreneur out there that takes chance makes an investment in makes good god bless them why going after Jeff Bezos you may not like Jeff Bezos may think he's a bit of an eccentric fool but Hey it was his company he went out he took the risk he put the work and he built it he built fat you get it then we take a look at JP Morgan a pecan Jamie Dimon Jamie Dimon then bill JP Morgan paid may have and a good C. O. in managing the company they'll that not his company he's a billionaire how is Jamie Dimon billionaire well stocked being issued stock now Jamie Dimon is a superstar a rock star as far as she owes are concerned we can all agree on that in the same way that Dwayne the rock Johnson is now a superstar when it comes to movies the latest movie that he's got coming out I think he got paid twenty three million dollars to star in why well because movies that he stars in do really well at the box office that's why I get that much real simple now Jamie Dimon is doing a phenomenal job and they feel that they should pay him I don't think thirty forty million dollars a year because of the great job that he does so be it and if he wants to go out and buy JP Morgan stock on his own so be it to what should be granted to it shouldn't be granted that will change thanks again no one talks about this at all people who to stock buybacks and also but they don't understand how it truly works and the racket that it has become anyway let's talk a little bit about all of these some evil billionaires out there billionaire LA this democratic debate right that talk came turned the billionaire's right Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren our system is corrupt and not Elizabeth Warren said that she said I'm tired of free loading billionaires I think it's time that we ask those at the very top to pay more so that every single one of our children gets a real real what I don't know kind of we could hear what you said probably real education or something like that so the Wall Street journal basically the point is this billionaires are bad for America are you kidding me not at all thank I don't think that most of America is looking to come up with a voodoo doll and stick pins enter the voodoo doll of billionaires right if you were to go out you were to go out the Wall Street journal makes this one you could go out and you're gonna say Hey could you name for me you ask somebody ministry could you name these are billionaires I I'd say the probably some people would say Bill Gates right somebody would say you know Bill Gates billionaire well I was just in Abu Dhabi and the reason for him being there was what kids children he was attending a meeting of the global polio eradication initiative the goal is to make polio the second human disease after smallpox to be around a case Bill Gates and his wife gave this initiative one point oh eight billion dollars I was I I want to get to a point in time it might be great if it happened I I I I love giving away my how to be able to give away over in dollars think about that thirty three percent of the donations the sixteen billion dollars in contributions to the area polio eradication consortium their attorney should have has been from private donors who'd you rather would you rather have the Bill Gates if the Bill Gates rather gave that money to Elizabeth Warren did you think it would be better served it with Washington DC hello having that money or Bill Gates keeping that money and deciding how to run his foundation I'm just saying if you live in Washington as a good jammer money I don't watch on him all three dot com watchdog on.

Chris Marcos thirty forty million dollars twenty three million dollars sixteen billion dollars eight billion dollars thirty three percent
"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

News Radio WGOW

12:28 min | 9 months ago

"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

"The big radio show happy Friday to you on this twenty second day of November two thousand nineteen my name is Tom Sullivan we we got a little bit of financial Friday we've got a little bit time still blown away by the there's almost I mean you just try and find a story about what happened on this day in nineteen sixty three it was the assassination of our president for goodness sake I mean it has disappeared heard so we'll do a little bit on that by the way for your wallet that little bit of business business here did you see the CD to see the big new test love pick up truck you see it is C. E. laden mosque came out with his brand new pick up truck and I don't know if you've seen it yet if you have I would love to hear what you think I it is so different I mean it's not even close to what you would think would be a pick up truck I mean I know pickup trucks have changed over the years but they basically have time to look like regular pickup trucks right and the number one selling vehicle in America has for decades been the Ford F. one fifty pickup truck yes Americans other pick up truck member they were trying to get us to buy those little love green cars and all that sort of stuff that that finally you can't force people to buy some they don't want they want they want pick up trucks but this thing you know how the B. is that the B. we wonder the B. two bomber forgive me I don't know what's the one that is the B. two I think that has so that it they've got all the weird shapes so that theoretically at radar can't see them so it's looks like that it's got all these weird sides and shapes and everything else but so one of the things about it was that it's all a trick of course and it's totally different than anything that you will see out there and there's no other vehicle on the road it looks like it so the whole thing and by the way these a Ford F. one fifty gaps are which is like the Barbie doll has kept Mattel profitable pick up trucks have kept General Motors Ford fiat Chrysler profitable General Motors our sales other Chevrolet Silverado and they're GMC Sierra pickup family Ford F. one fifty I mean this is where these companies make their money so the lan must have going right after those profit centers on those on those manufacturers so the whole thing was not only is this completely unorthodox design which I guess some people will buy because it's a non orthodox design and they want to look different look how many people bought Hummers when the Hummers are use there are there big they're boxy they're dead but people wanted to have something was not like anything else on the road so they became kind of a thing for awhile but this apparently is supposed to even be bullet proof yep so if you want to have it I don't know if you have enemies I'm not sure if you know a lot of people in the mob but if you do you might want to buy one of these things because apparently this thing is bought proof so they did remember when when you have to go back a few years when Bill Gates would come out with a new windows operating system and we bring it out that have a big to do at Microsoft and Bill Gates to be standing there and they would start the thing up and it would crash fail well here's the lan mosque in a roll this this ball of proof pick up truck out and a guy that works for him picks up a small metal ball and throws it at the side window ed and much to the surprise of everybody including E. lawn mosque it broke the window so he used the next order of that I can't use on the air but he said maybe that was a little too hard are you going hello if it's baller prove a metal ball will break the window what do you think a bolo do so he picked up the ball off the ground and throw to the back window and broke that one too so I I like all this stuff high I don't know if this thing is going to sell this temple shares were down about six percent earlier today but there the people with inside test law are worried about the lawn moss weird personal taste have overly influenced the design and I don't know he's done pretty well for himself he was one of the founders of PayPal he came up with the SpaceX he's got the boring machine the borders tunnels he's got Tessler he's got me is it I'm sorry I don't know what do you like the designs like the vehicles like the stuff that he comes up with but boy he's not your normal average guy I mean he is a guy's making things happen so this so this pickup truck is supposed to be I think in the thirties thirty some thousand dollars which if that's the case I think that's a pretty good price and I don't I know there's a lot of you that have man what's the term for were you get nervous about running out of electricity and he is the this thing's going to have five hundred mile range five hundred miles I think you have to gas up most things before you get five hundred miles don't you so anyway it was it was kind of interesting it's very much from eight is a very futuristic guy it's called the cyber truck and he says he has been thinking about this truck since he was fourteen years old this is a fourteen year old boys vision the fantasy so we'll see what this thing does but yet one guy wrote about the back it looks like it's the stars starship troopers came out but when the guy picked up the metal ball and threw it at the truck broke the windows speaking of Bill Gates so there's a great op ed in the Wall Street journal today written by the editorial board and they're talking about the big debate that was in Atlanta on Wednesday night Democrat presidential debate and along the going around from the various wanna be's the the ten that were on the stage Elizabeth Warren came around to this is her quote I'm tired of free loading billionaires I think it's time that we ask those at the very top to pay more so that every single one of our children gets a real and the rest of her thought disappeared everybody was cross talking but basically the point she was making his billionaires are bad for America so I gotta ask you our billionaires bad for America good Elizabeth Warren thinks and sodas Bernie Sanders thinks that they're bad for America and so if you want to pick out a billionaire there's a lot lot of matter Leon Cooperman did of Phrack is with the right now he's ex Greenlee philanthropic lot of these people are so we go to Bill Gates and the Wall Street journal points out that they tried to reach Bill Gates but he's in Abu Dhabi this week and the reason that he is there is he is attending the meeting of the global polio eradication initiative it's a consortium whose goal is to eliminate completely polio which would be the second human disease eradicated after small box so bill and Melinda gates have given to this effort one billion eight hundred million dollars one billion eight hundred million according to the polio eradication initiative website it more than sixteen billion dollars in contributions of come in since nineteen eighty eight thirty three percent of the sixteen billion has come from private donors that's somewhere five six billion dollars of private donations to try to a radic Kate this disease so Elizabeth Warren well I have to ask you what would you rather have would you rather have Elizabeth Warren as president with the I'm the billion dollars in the treasury for the United States for her to spend on things or would you rather have the money be in Bill Gates hands or Warren Buffett's hands or even Mike Bloomberg's Hans for them to distribute into the world or would you rather have the federal bureaucracy manages money where do you think the money would do the most good their stories or the government's choice governments do lots of great things and that's really what this is going to come down to but I look at this and I I I mean Bill Gates and and by the way he's medically pretty far to the left there is no is no righty Leon Cooperman variety no question about it so that's her that's that's the spiel was coming out of and you see were even Barack Obama has had to a couple times come out lately and say Democrats chill you're going to far left you're not going to get the votes you're not going to get elected so I look at the good things that Bill Gates is don and Mike Bloomberg and Warren Buffett and other very which rich rich rich people then I have to ask you who do you think would be the best steward of that money phone number eight five five two nine five sixty six hundred will be right back job.

Tom Sullivan president nineteen eighty eight thirty t one billion eight hundred mill five six billion dollars sixteen billion dollars thousand dollars billion dollars fourteen years fourteen year twenty second six percent
"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

12:00 min | 9 months ago

"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"For goodness sake I mean it had this of you heard so we'll do a little bit on that by the way for your your wall that little bit of business business here did you see the CD to see the big new test love pick up truck you see you see E. lan mosque came out with his brand new pick up truck and I don't know if you've seen it yet if you have I would love to hear what you think I it is so different I mean it's not even close to what you would think would be a pick up truck I mean I know pickup trucks have changed over the years but they basically have title look like regular pickup trucks right and the number one selling vehicle in America has for decades been the Ford F. one fifty pickup truck yes Americans other pick up truck member they were trying to get us to buy those little love green cars and all that sort of stuff that that finally you can't force people to buy some little what they want they want pick up trucks but this thing you know how the B. is that the B. will wonder the B. two bomber forgive me I don't know what's the one that is to be too I think that has so that it they've got all the weird shapes so that theoretically at radar can't see them so it's looks like that it's got all these weird sides and shapes and everything else but so one of the things about it was that it's all a trick of course and it's totally different than anything that you will see out there and there's no other vehicle on the road it looks like it so the whole thing and by the way these of Ford F. one fifty gaps are are which is like the Barbie doll has kept Mattel profitable pick up trucks have kept General Motors Ford fiat Chrysler profitable General Motors our sales other Chevrolet Silverado and they're GMC Sierra pickup family Ford F. one fifty I mean this is where these companies make their money so the lan must get going right after those profit centers on those on those manufacturers so the whole thing was not only is this completely unorthodox design which I guess some people will buy because it's a non orthodox design and they want to look different look how many people bought Hummers when the Hummers are six there are there big they're boxy they're dead but people wanted to have something was not like anything else on the road so they became kind of a thing for a while but this apparently is supposed to even be balik per yep so if you want to have it I don't know if you have enemies I'm not sure if you know a lot of people in the mob but if you do you might want to buy one of these things because this thing is bought proof so they did remember when when you have to go back a few years when Bill Gates would come out with a new windows operating system and we bring it out that have a big to do at Microsoft and Bill Gates to be standing there and they would start the thing up and it would crash would fail well here's a E. lan mosque and they roll this this bullet proof pick up truck out and a guy that works for him picks up a small metal ball and throws it at the side window ed and much to the surprise of everybody including E. lawn mosque it broke the window so he used the next order of that I can't use on the air and he said maybe that was a little too hard are you going hello if it's ball approve a metal ball will break the window what do you think a bolo do so he picked up the ball off the ground and throw to the back window and broke that one too so I I like all this stuff high I don't know if this thing is going to sell this temple shares were down about six percent earlier today but their the people with inside test law are worried about the lawn moss weird personal taste have overly influenced the design and I don't know he's done pretty well for himself he was one of the founders of PayPal he came up with the SpaceX he's got the boring machine the borders tunnels he's got to have slow he's got me is it I'm sorry I don't know where the like the designs like the vehicles like the stuff that he comes up with but boy he's not your normal average guy I mean he is a guy that's making things happen so this Sir this pickup truck is supposed to be I think in the thirties thirty some thousand dollars which if that's the case I think that's a pretty good price and I don't I know there's a lot of you that have man what's the term for it were you get nervous about running out of electricity he is the this thing's going to have five hundred mile range five hundred miles I think you have to gas up most things before you get five hundred miles down to so anyway it was it was kind of interesting it's very much from eight is a very futuristic guy it's called the cyber truck and he says he has been thinking about this truck since he was fourteen years old this is a fourteen year old boys vision the fantasy so we'll see what this thing does but yet one guy wrote about the fact it looks like it's the stars starship troopers came out but when the guy picked up the metal ball and threw it at the truck broke the winters speaking of Bill Gates so there's a great op ed in the Wall Street journal today written by the editorial board and they're talking about the big debate that was in Atlanta on Wednesday night Democrat presidential debate and along the going around from the various wanna be's the the ten that were on the stage Elizabeth Warren came around to this is her quote I'm tired of free loading billionaires I think it's time that we ask those at the very top to pay more so that every single one of our children gets a real and the rest of her thought disappeared everybody was cross talking but basically the point she was making his billionaires are bad for America so I gotta ask you our billionaires bad for America because Elizabeth Warren thinks and sodas Bernie Sanders thinks that they're bad for America and so if you want to pick out a billionaire there's a lot lot of matter Leon Cooperman din of Phrack is with the right now he's extremely philanthropic lot of these people are so we go to Bill Gates and the Wall Street journal points out that they tried to reach Bill Gates but he's in Abu Dhabi this week and the reason that he is there is he is attending the meeting of the global polio eradication initiative it's a consortium whose goal is to eliminate completely polio which would be the second human disease eradicated after small box so bill and Melinda gates have given to this effort one billion eight hundred million dollars one billion eight hundred million according to the polio eradication initiative website it more than sixteen billion dollars in contributions of come in since nineteen eighty eight thirty three percent of the sixteen billion has come from private donors that's somewhere five six billion dollars of private donations to try to a radic Kate this disease so Elizabeth Warren well I have to ask you what would you rather have would you rather have Elizabeth Warren as president with the the billion dollars in the treasury for the United States for her to spend on things or would you rather have the money be in Bill Gates hands or Warren Buffett's hands or even Mike Bloomberg's Hans for them to distribute in two of the world or would you rather have the federal bureaucracy manages money where do you think the money would do the most good the billionaires choice or the government's choice governments do lots of great things and that's really what this is going to come down to but I look at this and I I I mean Bill Gates and and by the way he's Klay pretty far to the left there is no is no righty Leon Cooperman variety no question about it so that's her that's that's the spiel was coming out of and you see were even Barack Obama has had to a couple times come out lately and say Democrats chill you're going to far left you're not going to get the votes you're not going to get elected so I look at the good things that Bill Gates is don and Mike Bloomberg and Warren Buffett and other very which rich rich rich people that I have to ask you who do you think would be the best steward of that money phone number eight five five two nine five sixty six hundred will be right back.

E. lan mosque nineteen eighty eight thirty t one billion eight hundred mill five six billion dollars sixteen billion dollars thousand dollars billion dollars fourteen years fourteen year six percent
"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

14:08 min | 1 year ago

"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on American Innovations

"Both as a physician as someone in public health. What do you think made polio? So so scary and so- debilitating. Polio has been around for millennia. And it's been scary for every mother. I think the way it was for your for your mother and for every child, it's terrifying. Too. See a child is learning how to walk who's already walking and running around, and then suddenly can no longer walk or or move that lemony more and the worst part about it is that sometimes polio affects the muscles all the way up to the response, Ori muscles. So that the child cannot can no longer be or even the adults can no longer be. So the pedantic you referred to in the nineteen. Fifties was in fact, an epidemic that affected all ages. And folks will remember the photographs of people in iron lungs where they needed those external machines to help them breathe through the period of recovery for those who recovered, so it's terrifying. Both for the individual who's who's affected as well as for their family. And this remains true today. This remains true today. What did we understand now about how polio affects the body? You know, we kind of some sense of it, obviously in the fifties. As we develop those vaccines, but has are presumably ours scientific understanding of it is has advanced a lot since then. Poliovirus is what's called an enter virus? So it is something that's transmitted from person to person through contaminated water. And once it's in the the intestines, if you have immunity, you can fight it off if you don't have immunity, you can become infected a you can also contracted through respirable route through being in contact with someone who's very close to you and contracted through three year, basically here breathing passages. And then once it's in your system, it can affect your nervous system. So infects your spinal column your spinal cord, and that causes damage to the nerves, which in fact, inform the muscles on how to move. So it can be the lower limbs primarily, but it can also be an arm, and is mentioned it can also be the response, the breathing muscles. Do we have a sense of why there was such a pronounced outbreak of? Leo in the twentieth century in places, like the United States was or something about our our lifestyle that changed or kind of living environments or the water that we were drinking the that made this outbreak so pronounced well with many infectious diseases the population in general, so a community will develop immunity through exposure and one of the characteristics of poliovirus in particular is that several hundred people can be infected with the virus and only have a mild, flu like illness. And then and then maybe one in a couple of hundred will actually develop Rallas. So it's possible that virus like this can be moving through the community and the community not be aware of it. But then a few years go by and immunity, Wayne's in the community, which is what also happens when people stop using vaccines so community that doesn't have protection against particular vaccine preventable disease. Will lend suddenly beep tick yearly vulnerable when a new wave of infection hits. So it's entirely possible that whereas pullovers has been around forever and people have developed immunity in early childhood when that immunity is no longer there is a community for whatever reason an outbreak can occur. It can be an explosive outbreak. One of the things we were trying to do in the telling the story of the polio. Vaccine is the sense to remind people in the United States and in Europe places where polio is not a part of day-to-day life anymore. Just how recently it was really was only fifty sixty years ago that this was, you know, something that children parents were absolutely terrified of and there was a real threat to people's lives or their ability to to to move around and walk around with full capacity. What is the state of polio today in the world, right? We we've made tremendous. Progress against where does it continue to be a threat? So today, the wild poliovirus we call it the the wild pool of ours. The original poliovirus is still endemic in three countries, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria the north north eastern pocket of Nigeria, and it's it's a dramatic progress. From when the World Health Assembly decided to declare the radicalization of polio as a goal in nineteen eighty eight. So we're talking thirty years ago now, and since then we've gone from three hundred fifty thousand cases of children paralyzed per year down to last year, just twenty two cases. So it's over ninety nine point nine percent drop in a number of polio. Cases worldwide in that intervening period. So it's tremendous progress, but because it's such an infectious disease, if we don't radically the virus completely in the remaining pockets where it's. Jill is a we'll come back simply because that's the nature of the of of the virus. It will come back on affect populations communities that that aren't protected through vaccination. So it is absolutely essential to reach every child with polio. Vaccine if we are to radically this virus, which we will is that the the component of it that is that is the trickiest if you compare it to other other factious agents other viruses that that it is so infectious is that its primary kind of strength as a as a virus one of the primary strengths of the virus. Is that in fact, it can infect many people without necessarily being identified as poliovirus? So for example, smallpox was a radical in nineteen seventy eight and it was declared a radical in nineteen eighty but child was smallpox person with smallpox was mmediately evidence. Because of the kind of. Rash and source blisters scars developed and virtually every person with smallpox develop those symptoms. So a person could be identified very quickly. The vaccination teams could arrive in in a small village vaccinate the whole village. I basically a lot was learned from that exercise from that experience because they were able to isolate the virus in in communities by providing vaccinated in in the immediate vicinity, and it was not as highly infectious as was previously thought so poliovirus is both very infectious easily transmitted from person to person communities with perhaps less sanitation or less developed, water and sanitation systems. But also, it's like the tip of the iceberg one case represents several hundred or several thousand infections, and so if you see one case, it's already an outbreak. But you actually don't know the extent of that outbreak. It's really important then to ramp up survey. Silence. And undertake what we call active case. Search so active case finding by going to the health units by going into homes the same way they did in the smallpox era looking for children with signs of of polio in specially paralysis of limb. But also doing the kind of laboratory testing that we can do today to identify if something is actually due to pull over not. So it's a major undertaking and surveillance and an active search for cases, a really critical part of the of the exercise. My my gut is that most people do not recognize the order of chief -ment that we're talking about here in terms of things like smallpox eradication and something we're getting close to hopefully polio. Eradication I think most of our listeners probably understand the idea that we've made progress in terms of kind of subduing these epidemic diseases, and you know, taking them off of mainstream everyday life, but the idea. That we have taken this invisible agent in terms of something like smallpox that we we, you know, until a couple of hundred years ago, we didn't even know the existence of we didn't understand it all and we have eliminated effectively from the face of the earth. That is such an extraordinary. Triumph of both science and medicine, but also kind of international collaboration that I feel like we should be celebrating those chievements much more than we normally do. I would completely agree with you there saving. So these are tremendous achievements. In fact, there are references to smallpox and polio in ancient literature, and in depictions stone carvings and so on so these are infections disease the been around for a long time. And the fact that smallpox was radically did through a concerted global effort with everyone contributing everyone building on the strengths of the individual countries and of the partner agencies. It was a tremendous achievement. And it was the excitement that was generated by that achievement. That led to the decision. Very quickly thereafter, so smallpox was declared a radically in nineteen eighty and L ready. Nineteen eighty eight the World Health Assembly decided to. Declare the radical of polio. As the next major goal. What wasn't understood at the time was that this was going to be a more challenging a longer haul effort, and that the last mile would be so difficult because in the meantime, we are facing access challenges, for example, it's it's, you know, working in war zones or working in areas where there are militant groups it's sometimes very hard to reach children and without vaccinating every single child. It's not going to be possible. It's going to be very difficult to to achieve complete radicalization. However at the same time, as you mentioned, we don't necessarily pre sheet the effort that has gone in or the or the achievement in the sense that sometimes when you mention elsewhere, oh, I work in polio. Eradication the question was what is that still around? We thought that was gone a long time ago. So I on the one hand, it's it's off the radar. Dr in on the other hand, it's still very much here with us in the global polio. Eradication initiative, which and this was also initially launched by as mentioned in in your previous episodes through the discovery of the different vaccine types and their different uses. But also the March of dimes which you know up to today. Rotary International remains our primary support on our primary partner, and every Rotarians worldwide knows that this is still a really important program. And that we need to continue supporting and promoting not only polio immunisation, but vaccination in general because whatever illnesses are out there in our vaccine preventable. They do come back. For example. We are seeing cases of measles in many parts of the world, including the Americas which eliminated measles, including Europe, which had gone to very low level, including parts of of the western Pacific. So we're seeing measles in many places, and it's again because of waning commitment of explanation programs are ability to deliver vaccination programs. We can't get to where we're going without examining where we've been. That's what this show is all about. And that's what I love about the great courses. If you haven't heard of it, the great courses brings you engaging immersive learning experiences about all sorts of topics lately, I've been enjoying their course history of the United States. It's a comprehensive thoughtful exploration into the people I deals and events throughout this nation's past presented by three noted historians. I love anything that could bring history to life the way. This course has done it for me. You wanna try the great courses for yourself? American innovations listeners. That's you can buy a digital copy of this course, history of the United States for only nine ninety nine which is the savings of up to six hundred dollars or get unlimited access to enjoy. This course, and so much more with a special free trial to the great. Plus, you can learn about anything that interests you with over ten thousand audio in video lectures to stream across so many topics for free to get either of these fantastic offers just head to the great courses, plus dot com slash AI. That's the great courses plus dot com slash AI. One more time, the great courses plus dot com slash AI. Today's episode of American innovations is sponsored by insight today. Technology isn't just supporting your business. It is the business and to make the most of your IT. You don't just need information. You need insight inside delivers full service technology solutions to help you manage today's priorities and prepare for tomorrow's needs within sight. You can optimize your IT supply chain to save time and money connect, your workforce to help teams work smarter. Transform your. Cloud data center to run more efficiently. And gain a competitive advantage through digital innovation. Insight is the partner you can count on to help solve your technology challenges because when it comes to your business having the right insight can be the solution that drives meaningful outcomes. So what insight do you need? Go to incite dot

polio smallpox partner Fifties United States World Health Assembly Europe measles Rallas flu Nigeria Wayne Jill Pakistan Leo
"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on UN News

UN News

05:29 min | 2 years ago

"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on UN News

"Cases of decrease barn astonishing ninety-nine percent since the creation in one thousand nine hundred eight. The global polio eradication initiative or GP comprehensive monitoring in vaccination program to deliver Apoyo free world. Listen. Now, as Frank Sinatra describes the struggles that faced young polio victims when the disease was still rampant. This is Frank Sinatra, suppose you were told that a major operation though, not essential, which engine entire life open new and wider chances for happiness. Would you consent? Well, this was the decision that faced a young man in and saw. Lived in Indonesia. He lived though never in his nineteen years that he walked taken a single step. He was a polio victim at the age of three months and when he learned to creep yet to continue creeping because his legs were too weak for walking the age of nineteen. He was admitted to the rehabilitation center at solo where surgery and vocational training given. Examined them and decided surgery could help. Answer refused. Absolutely. He said he'd only come that alone, trade all he wanted was to be shoemaker or Taylor or something like that. So he could work sitting still the rest of his life. He refused the operation. So one might ask, what was the good of this remarkable rehabilitation center? In the case of answer. It was here that doctor so Hasso and in the Nissan surgeon began operating on repairing his best. He could the victims of the six years of bitter fighting in that area. All the time. He thought of the problems that would face these incapacitated men and women. So at the end of the war, he looked for a place to continue rehabilitation and the only place available was a arise. People came to him for help garage. An ogre is too many with bodies often to down to be given aid in this place. Everything was crude except the good intentions. So Dr. Suharso looked around for help. But how could he expect anyone to notice his problems in a remote corner of Indonesia. Nevertheless did happen. He went on with his work and time word of what was being done. It solo reached the United Nations. The UN's sent the well-known American rehabilitation expert Dr. Henry Kessler to solo to observe and report. And it was Dr. Kessler's conviction that the work being done at solo was unique in that part of the world and could be a model for the whole area. After that, the story becomes one of remarkable bit of cooperation among government, the United Nations and many agencies and organizations. Now there's an orthopedic hospital teaching program surgery and all the modern requirements, laundry, kitchen, hot water sanitation facilities. Also brace shop for making graces and artificial limbs and vocational shot. But our young friend and soy gave no thought to an operation for himself. The fact of the matter was that. And so it was much too frightened. What in the ward, he soon made friends. One young fellow in particular interested in a boy named Mati and so felt sorry for for my because of these hands than engine useless to and an so brooded about this so much disgusted MRs and learned that Motti be helped if he would submit to a series of operations after all, even though an so himself was he did have the use of his hands. Well, it seem to answer a terrible pity that Marty didn't let them operate. Finally, he had to speak to modernity. Tell him he must let the doctors. Well, maybe it seems ironic, so was quite shocked when we learned a lot to be felt the same way toward him pitied him, he and saw felt he should let the doctors. Great. And so they argued about their cases kept trying to argue each other to the operating table until it became a case of I will, if you will that point and so couldn't let us friend Magdi go, I he had too much pride for that. So although answer was terrified, he wrote into the operating room. Later when he was on his crutches learning to walk. He had the privilege of giving cards to his friend Marty. Now here they are both recovering and telling each other all about their operations, and that is how to lives transformed in a garage in solo, a tiny spot on the map of Indonesia. The legendary Frank Sinatra, lending his star Power to the World Health Organization when it was a little over a decade old that brings us to the end of this addition of U N news, podcast classics. You can find the two programs hood here as well as the wealth of many other our car duty video and photos at the UN audio visual library, which is at WWW dot U N multi-media dot old. Ford slash av library. I'm Matt wells. Thank you for listening.

Frank Sinatra Indonesia Marty polio UN Dr. Suharso Apoyo Magdi United Nations Dr. Henry Kessler Hasso Motti World Health Organization Ford Taylor Matt wells Mati ninety-nine percent nineteen years three months
"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on Global GoalsCast

Global GoalsCast

13:30 min | 2 years ago

"global polio eradication initiative" Discussed on Global GoalsCast

"So it's a landscape trust, looking left and stable. What does that mean to achieving the goals? Don Kettl again, We have hobbled of distrust that is growing. We have a set of sustainable development goals. Is that require a commitment to those goals and collaboration achieving it? It's hard to get collaboration of People. Don't trust the relationships with each other, and we run the risk of getting ourselves in this awful situation where the thing that we've agreed to do is the kind of thing that we can't make happen because of founders on barriers and boulders and reefs of distrust that exist. So somebody places and which may in fact make things worse cloudy and near. You were just in San Francisco, my hometown talking a Sandy pack US and Asia Raskin from the Center for humane technology about how social media is either creating or magnifying distressed. Talked me through what they said that newsfeed that You see when you open up your Facebook or your tweeter, that makes you think that you're in control of what you're reading. But he said to weed it newsfeed tour And this is not just true of Facebook. It's true of Twitter and other feed based social networks. Is it they are trying to find the thing that you're gonna like the motion. They put that at the top. So what that means is that they are trying to get signal from you, whether it's, you know, whether you're Lake, something, whether you share it with you, you know, take some action. Sandy expands on the issues that are at the heart of this story, truth and trust. Because these algorithms are pointing people to the content. Their most likely to engage in or engage with the are much more likely to boost up content that will make you angry. Because that actually turns out to be the thing that's much more likely to get you to continue to use the service rather than something that is just sort of modern, really interesting and banal. And what this means is that the technology might be helping to erode trust. We see their splintering and their free East splintering of opinion, rather than making the world more open unconnected Rothenberg a levelling the playing field. We are questioning here If the. None of G is exploiting divisiveness in society. He was what Sandies colleague, Eva Raskin and avoid that you might recognize have to say about this. What started out as a race for our attention has turned into these direct manipulation channels were you can target and persuade a society scale in ways that never happened before. And the US, we start to see that the left and the right See completely different movies about what's going on. We can't agree on the basic facts. One of the biggest challenges we have door democracy is the degree to which we don't share a common base. Baseline affects what the Russians exploited, but it was already here is we are operating in completely different information universes. If you watched Fox News, You're. Living on a different planet, then you are a few Hill. Well, listen to NPR. And so I love how we snuck Barrack Obama in their fake news, whatever you want to call it is not new. President. Lincoln was plagued by fake news Antony and Cleopatra were ruined by rumors and it comes from fear. What we have is a problem that on the one side is eternal at has been gone on as long as there are people. But on the other hand, we have because of the rise of social media because of the rise of the Internet and because of the nature of the relationships that have mixed possible. We've got ourselves in a situation words that much easier to create distrust that much more quickly. The first amendment was from a time when speech was expensive. And hearing was cheap, right? Like it was hard to get your message out. But there wasn't so many things round So you could just listened to it if he wanted. And now it's flipped where it speeches so cheap that anyone can speak on whether that's Russia or like a blogger mom from Utah. But because there's so much controversy. Ann Dowd It's whoever controls where you're getting information, where you can hear from that has the true power PD lets us him that this thesis is right that these rumors sometimes sprayed as divisive digital-content designed to appeal to our emotional side are not just probably matic in elections in high income countries IHD's problematic everywhere. It might be actually stopping parents from protecting their children, pull across the world. But we do in this podcast is take the really big ideas and focus them down to the specific. So now we're gonna look at how miss trust is dragging out the eradication of one of the most crippling diseases on the planet and knots polio. There are people in the hills community easy that thing that for your is not a major focus of the as the dis and he's not even listed as have target. But before we get into the police story, let's take a moment with Bill Gates whom you and I spoke to a couple of weeks ago in Davos. Plenty of radicalization. Has been one of the Bill and Melinda Gates, Foundation priorities, and they have helped India to eradicate the disease. Nearly seven years ago were on the verge of eradicating polio. We have less than sixty cases last year, and we still have to get rid of it in Pakistan and Afghanistan. And then it will become the second disease to be eradicated after smallpox. It's great science, great impact. There's a lot of heroes out in the field. I Asia Wall as small as one of the heroes that Bill Gates referred to. She is a former Norwegian soldier diplomat and journalist. Her parents are from Afghanistan, but she was born in, grew up in Norway. She didn't external relations officer for the WHO 's Global Polio Eradication initiative. And by the way, she wears very noisy. Jewelry and my producer Mrs so cross with me that I didn't ask you to take off her bracelets. She told me that in Pakistan like the US like the UK vaccines are not trusted. She spent the last few weeks in Karachi joining the team of local health workers visiting homes where parents were refusing to give vaccinations to their children. And as you're gonna hear convincing mothers of the benefits of the vaccine is far from easy. I just don't mention in our and thus disarm was that she goes through their religious aspect. And we try to answer that that she goes through the demand, is she the SESAR fo? The government has knock. And why all this focus on hold him then on the western involvement that this is something that is going to to sterilize the Muslim population. And when you try to answer that, she goes over to on it. I just don't trust for the vaccine containing Zain. I heard that Chilean sake. I also spoke defect, Berkeley. He's the CEO of Gaby the global back seen Alliance, Crowder, You know him, right? Yes. I have worked with him and I have worked with the Garvey and I give them a lot of credit because what they have managed to do his work with all stakeholders of society, to make sure that together we get back, see nations all over the world. EDB Ford Gaby in the 80s organizations like units have managed to get huge World coverage of vaccines getting more to eighty percent of the world population backseat needed. But then we reach a plateau on thanks to God. He not only we managed to get out of the plateau, get to more than ninety or ninety two percent of. The world's Childress population being vaccinated, but also give more back scenes into the package that kids get. Traditionally, There was huge trust in the medical system in doctors in public health workers. And then if those problems, you had community leaders who would also reinforce that trust. But if you use the particular example of Pakistan, polio eradication has been going on for more than twenty years. And so in many communities, they have seen Month after month, people come common, bring polio drops, but not bring anything else. So one of the questions over time as well, we don't see any polio Y, you know, is this being done in that raises questions. And then second is, you know there's been some unfortunate issues as you probably know the CIA used when they were trying to track bin Laden use some misinformation and said they were out doing surveys for vaccinations and that type of thing can be used as propaganda and create mistrust even in the most deprived air. Everybody access to our most people have access to Internet, What's up. It's a powerful medium and the receiving all these Short videos and they spread like fire in the Bush distrust. And vaccines is a global story. I moved to the UK twenty years ago just before a big vaccine fake news story hit the headlines twenty years ago. Andrew Wakefield published a paper said the MMR vaccine was associated with autism, which turned out to be data was falsified. Turned out not to be true by shattered public trust in vaccines. And we saw vaccinations drop forty percent of French. People disagreed with the statement that vaccines are safe in Russia. 16 percent felt that vaccines are important in Italy, 14 percent. So we are seeing in the West a huge effect of trust in the developing world. We also see this trust affected United. It's hard to be as explicit, But in Nigeria. There's very low coverage rates in the north of Nigeria, for example, and efforts have been done to make the supply chain work to provide vaccines. And what's interesting is that even when the vaccines are air, People don't come to get them. And I suspect this is because of trust as well. Trust in the system trust on whether the government is able to deliver whether people there they are will make public cheddar cetera. So this is a really important issue. RMC. RMC. She's telling you that I will not give drops to my kids because it's going to make him sick. Of course, you not that it's not right, But you have to feel her fair. I think a lot of it is in listening alive. It isn't just giving them the time they need. I of course, trying to engage them in kind of discussion, explaining the different positive aspects of the vaccine. A lot of these women and girls, they must talking by slow, some like that really good with embroidery. So in between our household chores, There are suing staff fit. I sit and talk to them about the workday to a home. To me, it's like reconnecting with the basics of what it means to be here. We are all human. I should point out that emphasized how she was accompanying female health workers from Karachi who are in their own communities every day. This is not top-down health policy. These people are working with their neighbours in their own communities. Have a listen to the story. She told me about visiting a grandfather. At that point, we didn't know much about this House because we had not succeeded in engaging them in any kind of communication, our diet. Go on the inside and walk up the stairs We get up and his one older man was kinda like elder in the town surrounded by like sixty women and babies everywhere. Those there. Wow. You shore know to keep. All crackdown. Just like separate breakdown and I'm telling you, I'm on my why my dear my dear uncle, my grandfather's grandfather, I call unlike numerous things, you know, just to create like releasing whether just Tony, you have so many beautiful grandchildren. Why are you not Not seeing any sense laughing? They tell me that they will get like this. They told me that we keep hearing rumors that the vaccine is not good. And then I ask them, Have you try to seek information? You know they're like Noah, who has time so that this that you know. And then of course he's the only one or or the meal family members are the only ones that could actually get this information because these women, the almost never leave there. So then I sat down with them and I told and asked me questions, and if I don't have the answers you wanted to here, I will try my best to rain Some went housing, mad interests. Initially leg Cassi hostile to someone is actually just too concerned. Grandfather before we here are you shake and remember what an intangible thing trust is. Imagine inside a household when he spent an hour twenty minutes talking talking, talking, trying to you now address all the issues and seventy Inaba grandfather's as brain. All the children bring are all the children energy psychiatric fascinating. These children It is a unbelievable feeling. And you feel that what you said has a direct impact on them, ripe it. They believe. Pat's the moment that trust is built.

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