24 Burst results for "Global Director"

California bans sale of gas-powered cars by 2035

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:57 sec | 2 months ago

California bans sale of gas-powered cars by 2035

"Gavin Newsom's latest executive order bans the sale of all gas powered vehicles in California by the year. 2035. K. P. K is my Blunt has an in depth report on what this means for the car manufacturers and dealerships throughout the state. Standing in front of a row of all electric cars. Newsome signed the executive order earlier today after making a case that California must lead on the issue of climate change to protecting environment for future generations were experiencing unprecedented. Weather. August, the hottest recorded a month in California history, one of the hottest recorded temperatures in the history of our planet. Newsom says. The effects of climate change have been disastrous for California, pointing to the record wildfires and heat waves the status face this year, nearly half of all electric vehicle sales in the United States or in California. Cynthia Williams, Global director of sustainability, Hamal, a Gatien and compliance at Ford Motor Company says Ford is the only major car manufacturer to stand with California on its climate goals.

California Gavin Newsom Executive Ford Motor Company Cynthia Williams Newsome United States K. P. K Global Director
"global director" Discussed on Esportz Network Podcast

Esportz Network Podcast

04:00 min | 3 months ago

"global director" Discussed on Esportz Network Podcast

"Already one as you look towards the future five, ten years I know it's hard to do with how quickly eastward stages almost impossible to predict the role basically hanging off by the seat of our pants as thanks. How do you see the role of eastwards organizations evolving at what role they'll eventually play in this wider popular culture landscape I think night specifically was was a an I O in in how? Young demographic would also be oftentimes when I think back video games was often considered something that you know especially, kits would would be focusing on then as s bald screw stronger the two, thousand ten. We saw that most of the actual competitive place and athletes were in their late teens if not twenty s and we see in certain games, a lot of their now in their late twenties. By. By nature of the industry simply not being old enough to to having established veterans until this point in time and so with the with the emergence of night we we saw that now a lot of the competitors were. In the as of thirteen, fourteen, fifteen, sixteen. And so there's a huge responsibility on our shoulders in making sure that the the entry into gaming and east faults is a healthy one. It's a balanced one and it's one where it's being done in the right way. The same way this you know this discussion on the influence of social media in in in all walks of flying aspects of lives today. Similarly I think it's hugely important that how we communicate and treat each other across gaming We'll have a lot of focus in the years to come, and then for E. Sports specifically, the professionalization of various games add within east bolts needs to go through those same hurdles that deed. The more step is products assess the NBA and the NFL have done so historically but hopefully because of where we are a Re already. They've made those mistakes for us, and hopefully we can learn from them and and overcome that way befall anything even happens and so that we have a fully professional circuit that is Prepared to develop. health healthy mantle. But in a in a short time span, you know I I, don't personally have the The the the patients or the capacity to weight fifty years for for sports to be as popular as it Sunday at NBA Zombie became in the nineties with the entry of especially the Chicago Bulls, and Michael Jordan like I'd I'd like for that to happen over the next ten or twenty years. As would I as what? I what see sports finally has its first player strike at a player hold out. That's how I'm though he's worth is finally made it. What Day what day you imagine how we need to make this as positive space? Always, a great note to end on don't let. Twitch. Are you guys aren't always positive but let's make each worth positive ways. Let's make e sports at occlusive plays a diverse place a good place for everyone because I tell you brand marketers like Michael really want to see a diverse positive place. They do not want to see a negative toxic place fell. Brad said, let support the organizations that let's stay positive. All right. Thank you all for listening this eastward podcast. This was Michael Craig the Global Director of marketing cobs for Harmon the pair company of jbl Ed Jacob Toft editor said DP of e sports for one hundred th-this Jacob Michael joined the show it was blessed. Thank you..

NBA Jacob Michael Chicago Bulls Michael Jordan Ed Jacob Toft Michael Craig jbl NFL Brad Global Director of marketing editor
"global director" Discussed on Esportz Network Podcast

Esportz Network Podcast

05:16 min | 3 months ago

"global director" Discussed on Esportz Network Podcast

"You know what we thought we would need to be successful as we tried tried to break into the space. Definitely, and it seems like a very, well received partnership so far it's not always a guarantee is a non endemic brad comes into the space that they're going to be well received, but the the response GPO is. Very positive for what I've consumed out there social media. Jacob switch gears just a little bit I was really excited talk with you talk with somebody from one hundred thieves because over this period Deborah, the trend that is stuck out the most has been a this confluence of all these mainstream celebrities getting evolved further into gaming platform whether that's a charity event some of the NBA Two K. tournaments. The fee for tournaments that featured athletes will, that's somebody like logic seating signing an exclusive streaming deal with twitch there's been this massive push of celebrities embracing gaming as the pandemic has stopped events and I think that tread. Hundred thieves is there's a lot of credit for that. Tread based on. What the company was doing in the years previous this is drake's Kutaragi evolved of the company this NBA players wearing what hundred thieves merch they do walk in. To the arena to play a game. You talk about how all these digital cultures have come together it to gaming athletes, musicians, actors, or gaming How one hundred thieves is positioned right at that access. Yeah I honestly I think the answer is pretty straightforward like the everyone games right everyone plays video games and I think whether you're a a sports athlete or a you'RE A. Musician or an act aw all whatever may be if we're talking with the entertainment industry, they all play video games to some degree when they have their downtime and they need to you know find some some way of of stress relief that isn't necessarily just watching Netflix or whatever it may be, and so I think the the the mutual excitement and passion for gaming. You know we've seen drake's and play fall night and actually very good at it Tons and tons of both NFL and NBA SASA playing. And other Games such asphalt Nyden, and so I think it's just that shed passion fall for playing these video games stat we just ended up being you know at the. At the right place at the right time with with someone in HR specifically that they all. More. Or less have a great understanding of who is a lot of them especially for the NBA players grew up knowing who he was from call of duty. So while You and I may idolize NBA players I, think when you end that endemic system will oftentimes look outside and. Wait who who's really great at the things that we're excited about wish we were better at. So when you're looking at some of the someone who's excited about, for instance, call of duty, you can't get around nate shot and so a lot of them have probably watched him through high school and college and so forth and grew up while you know playing basketball. Dave what nature in the? Off Time and so..

NBA drake Netflix Jacob Deborah basketball Dave NFL
"global director" Discussed on Esportz Network Podcast

Esportz Network Podcast

05:31 min | 3 months ago

"global director" Discussed on Esportz Network Podcast

"While the podcast. . So we're going to be breaking down this deal for both perspectives. . It see how the cookie crumbles really what it comes down to how these deals habit. . You see all the headlights you see the products being worn by the players Orga dive into really the steps that lead up to the creation of a brand deal like this one. . So starting out from the early stages which side reach out I was JBL. . Making the step over to one hundred thieves or one hundred thieves reaching out to jbl. . Do you guys remember? ? I'm pretty sure we were the ones that initiated the contact. . Through an agency that we're working with at the time to help us to grab craft our approach to to exports into gaming in general. . So I i. . think we were the first ones to to to. . To Extend the hand. . Absolutely, , Jacob, , do you remember when those conversations started and the energy was like a as you reached out? ? This is a space that's really filled with a lot of partners jbl. . Here's a legacy audio brad reaching out to you remember what those early conversations through like. . Yeah. . A excitement is always <hes>. . Key in figuring out these partnerships and really looking at all brandon and who reposition ourselves with. . We need partnerships that we that we truly get behind an ice either about <hes>. . So with JBL obviously <hes> premium quality products something we feel like we represented in displays of east bolts. . So <hes> while I, , can't remember the. . The. . Stop Time. All . who initiates I remember you know sort of the. . The sense of feeling in the room once we came over the initial hurdle of introductions and you know that was one of excitement. . Absolutely. . I can only imagine the seems like a trend that's happened this year of these really log running brands enter eastward seeing that with Herman. . Miller. . For example, , in the complexity partnership, , you've got a brand that well out dates video games, much , less e sports getting into the space promising. . Hey, we've , got this great product that's been used by all these other industries, , and now we want to be involved in East Sports Michael From your perspective. . Why was J B L A natural fit for East? ? Sports. . So I I think to to answer that it was. . We were looking at this more as a great fit for gaming and where we think gaming is is going in the future if you take a look at how the graphics within the game have evolved over the last fifteen or twenty years like. . It has grown in leaps and bounds, , and so the realism that's now. . Prevalent in President Gains. . Really helps to create the super immersive experience for Gamers and we felt like sound was a piece that was that was lagging in that equation. . And so our whole idea was we want the gamers actually be able to hear the game in the same way that they see it. . and. . When we identified that as a need in space, , that's when we knew it was time for us to actually enter. . We didn't want to be just another brand that said, , hey, , gaming. . It looks cool. . Let's do that. . We wanted to make sure that we're actually bringing something new table and and actually you know solving a need that we thought consumers gaming space might have. . And that was really the whole impetus for US designed to get into gaming. . Absolutely in every game knows how important audio is you mentioned how graphics approving well, , sow does it prove it as well especially in the battle royale? ? Sowed is so important you've three hundred, , sixty degree view. . There's always people either above below at identified where they are and reacting to it is becoming an increasingly important part of being successful in eastport. . Jacob you of a background is professional player. . Could you talk about how audio matters especially at the highest levels of water video game? ? Yeah. . Absolutely like you mentioned <hes> the. . But I think The. . The shooter Genre in general audio is one of the most primary importance of of <hes> of performance ride. . So when we first started this conversation, , it aligned sort of when we. . Just picked up our counter strike team as well. . <hes> both counterstrike fortnight now valor and call of duty call everything right sound. . So very pivotal to to play performance. . So as one of the <hes>, , the first conversations that I remember having was making sure that whoever we partnered with on the audio category, , it would be a product that we were excited to use them that all of our. . Players get behind and use on a daily basis because of how how big of an importance it has on the products on performance site <hes>. . So it was <hes> very reassuring. . I remember Maddie from from team coming into the conversation saying listen it's got it's going to be jpl I'm really excited about this what are your concerns here because mostly on the performance side without teams <hes> and so Speaking on behalf of all of our players and going into the competitions it's important that we have <hes>. . You know state of the OPS. . Hardware. . When when we playing whether that's mountain. . audio. . Absolutely, , you're only as good as your equipment. . Well, , that's a lie could be better than your equipment plenty of types, , but at the highest level, , those little those little differences really make a big deal. . Michael

jbl J. B. L. Jacob Michael Samsung Company legacy audio Scooter Braun becker Harbor International harmon brandon Herman Miller
Breaking the Esports Audio Sponsorship Mold w/ 100 Thieves VP of Esports and JBL's Global Director of Marketing Comms

Esportz Network Podcast

05:31 min | 3 months ago

Breaking the Esports Audio Sponsorship Mold w/ 100 Thieves VP of Esports and JBL's Global Director of Marketing Comms

"While the podcast. So we're going to be breaking down this deal for both perspectives. It see how the cookie crumbles really what it comes down to how these deals habit. You see all the headlights you see the products being worn by the players Orga dive into really the steps that lead up to the creation of a brand deal like this one. So starting out from the early stages which side reach out I was JBL. Making the step over to one hundred thieves or one hundred thieves reaching out to jbl. Do you guys remember? I'm pretty sure we were the ones that initiated the contact. Through an agency that we're working with at the time to help us to grab craft our approach to to exports into gaming in general. So I i. think we were the first ones to to to. To Extend the hand. Absolutely, Jacob, do you remember when those conversations started and the energy was like a as you reached out? This is a space that's really filled with a lot of partners jbl. Here's a legacy audio brad reaching out to you remember what those early conversations through like. Yeah. A excitement is always Key in figuring out these partnerships and really looking at all brandon and who reposition ourselves with. We need partnerships that we that we truly get behind an ice either about So with JBL obviously premium quality products something we feel like we represented in displays of east bolts. So while I, can't remember the. The. Stop Time. All who initiates I remember you know sort of the. The sense of feeling in the room once we came over the initial hurdle of introductions and you know that was one of excitement. Absolutely. I can only imagine the seems like a trend that's happened this year of these really log running brands enter eastward seeing that with Herman. Miller. For example, in the complexity partnership, you've got a brand that well out dates video games, much less e sports getting into the space promising. Hey, we've got this great product that's been used by all these other industries, and now we want to be involved in East Sports Michael From your perspective. Why was J B L A natural fit for East? Sports. So I I think to to answer that it was. We were looking at this more as a great fit for gaming and where we think gaming is is going in the future if you take a look at how the graphics within the game have evolved over the last fifteen or twenty years like. It has grown in leaps and bounds, and so the realism that's now. Prevalent in President Gains. Really helps to create the super immersive experience for Gamers and we felt like sound was a piece that was that was lagging in that equation. And so our whole idea was we want the gamers actually be able to hear the game in the same way that they see it. and. When we identified that as a need in space, that's when we knew it was time for us to actually enter. We didn't want to be just another brand that said, hey, gaming. It looks cool. Let's do that. We wanted to make sure that we're actually bringing something new table and and actually you know solving a need that we thought consumers gaming space might have. And that was really the whole impetus for US designed to get into gaming. Absolutely in every game knows how important audio is you mentioned how graphics approving well, sow does it prove it as well especially in the battle royale? Sowed is so important you've three hundred, sixty degree view. There's always people either above below at identified where they are and reacting to it is becoming an increasingly important part of being successful in eastport. Jacob you of a background is professional player. Could you talk about how audio matters especially at the highest levels of water video game? Yeah. Absolutely like you mentioned the. But I think The. The shooter Genre in general audio is one of the most primary importance of of of performance ride. So when we first started this conversation, it aligned sort of when we. Just picked up our counter strike team as well. both counterstrike fortnight now valor and call of duty call everything right sound. So very pivotal to to play performance. So as one of the the first conversations that I remember having was making sure that whoever we partnered with on the audio category, it would be a product that we were excited to use them that all of our. Players get behind and use on a daily basis because of how how big of an importance it has on the products on performance site So it was very reassuring. I remember Maddie from from team coming into the conversation saying listen it's got it's going to be jpl I'm really excited about this what are your concerns here because mostly on the performance side without teams and so Speaking on behalf of all of our players and going into the competitions it's important that we have You know state of the OPS. Hardware. When when we playing whether that's mountain. audio. Absolutely, you're only as good as your equipment. Well, that's a lie could be better than your equipment plenty of types, but at the highest level, those little those little differences really make a big deal. Michael

JBL Jacob United States Maddie Brandon Eastport President Trump Herman Miller Michael
Christophe Georges and Bentley Americas

Cars That Matter

05:16 min | 3 months ago

Christophe Georges and Bentley Americas

"This is Robert Ross welcoming you to another episode of cars that matter that I have a very special guest from faraway. Actually, we're a video conference from Los Angeles to France and I'm here with Kristoff George President and CEO of Bentley. Kaz Christoph. It's wonderful to have on the show welcomed Angel Belt For me Today City my pleasure not seen one another for A. Long Time I. Think the most reason get together was for the launch of one of the very auspicious continental GT's at a dinner back on the East Coast. Since that time a lot has happened you were president and CEO at the time, and then you took over as global director product and marketing for period, and then back into the hot seat in America's with. Visits to come back. Well, obviously I thought there was some great work to do. You're kind of an outlier in the world of automotive executives because you've been with Bentley for a long time in. August, the meals. You fell in. Love is Bentley's did you do change talk about authentic? So yes, I joined than say nine G H was one months after was opening the twenty two years ago change away. On any memoir I can change this. By. Just been fascinated and I don't see that being spent for such you came on really at the let's call at the beginning of the new Bentley chose her none was on a roll he had acquired. That year spent Lee was brand new and it was an opportunity to a new chapter in the book of a mark that had been around since one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety S, and this is what we didn't again when they joined in Nj one monsalve Sango peltier's alcohol petty. We massively invested in effectively and new projects like energy with open pets right and this was the start of win. We need it just time to develop talent twin told us to knock. It's that when we introduced it in two, thousand four, each was immediately You'd success enemies in foil immunity del business by affect. Austin. So we took a change of scale company is these new coach Delta G.. Qoriniasa I should remember that launch and has been a perennial favorite of American. Luxury consumers ever sense the continental gt really did move the needle and deny fe on it to the title of your food, which is cows reach metals. That's GAL reach muddles ends easterly of. Today's Account Bacon they quickly a classic. The Guy Industry, you can name a few bullshit. Evan would be a Nike. That's right. beginner naked. It really did my simple definition of echo nosy cheese. All nuts it's hush money when you launch a new. Next Generation of existing cal people asking the question what is new is a new designs, a new feature specification, thick nosy. Belfer once on. So and when you are launching as a next generation of America, the question of from people is them right and that's a very simple way to who gets it's UNCALLED SALTA GT. As they quickly achieved that these estate us was a marketplace it. Absolutely did and what's remarkable is that even under the aegis of a new company or a brand new Bentley showing, say it really hearken back to the roots and the heritage of certainly Bentley's greatest post-war car the continental yes. In that was a remarkable fastback design that was the greatest. Yes. Well, literally continental tour and remains a hugely important collector Carta de as a Calgary says benzine spacious of. Gt was tight and nineteen, fifty, two on. This was at the time the fastest Faldo coop in the markets what became as win. So we took a lot of this inspiration even in terms of design on Galyon even you reaching down way but you can see since relation and you know when you are walking luxury, it is so a sunshine that you as laid back to some good fundamentalists, VN and soup. Stones Having Open Mitch's being nutshell for so many years. It's true. Of course, a couple of years ago you launched what you call the new continental and what I. Think's remarkable about it is that so many times refreshes or new designs don't capture the essence or beauty of their original but this car looks better than ever. Yes, it's remarkable. Thank generation So again, be put tough attention on no changing Zoe. A with his major success of counseling Tennessee these combination of luxury foam of issue Becca, butte package, which allows you to Exalt Dumb of driving shoe. This package is a four wheel drive Paktika spaces appoint foles bet foremost Asia's unique. Place, this was. Full success with fell school

Bentley Kaz Christoph America President And Ceo GT Robert Ross East Coast Los Angeles Kristoff George France Global Director NJ Guy Industry Nike Calgary ZOE LEE Austin Galyon Asia
"global director" Discussed on P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

03:58 min | 4 months ago

"global director" Discussed on P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

"If we have this conversation later this year or thousand twenty one is if the economic scenario is better than you get a reserve reverse of these credit reserves, which would boost profitability absolutely so we'll keep an eye on those. We've got still more banks ago. Tomorrow and Thursdays Kenley owned Global Director of Industry and Equity Research at CF research, we appreciate his commentary on the banks and again kind of a mixed bag coming out here, but the consistent theme across the three banks that we saw today is very high single digit in terms of a billion dollar loan loss reserves as they prepare for a weaker economy for some time to come. We'll see what we get from the big investment banks tomorrow. Well when you have Max niece and there's so many ways you.

Global Director of Industry an CF research Max
"global director" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:40 min | 4 months ago

"global director" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"It's actually building reserved for these air provisions or charges. To the bank to actual delinquencies are low horses are likely over the next few quarters. Think about this. This is the first full quarter. Yet the banks really don't have total visibility to the health of the consumers, all business who have benefited in terms of four parents. Or subsidies from the federal government. So the banks are being very conservative. They have significant capital and as I think we might have lost can there, Bonnie, But I think he's saying, you know, I was entering his comments about some of these banks, You know, don't have great visibility, so, but they're still you know, taking these big loan loss reserves, I think in a participation This is going to be an economy that is lower for longer. Yeah, I mean, I think that's very very telling. Because right now, it seems like things are being managed pretty well, right. The consumer is still spending to a certain extent under, you know, even as we're seeing mass unemployment rolls to seeing mass job creation again, you know, month over month At the same time. If we don't have continued fiscal stimulus from the government, who knows what the situation will be like, and obviously the banks don't know any more than we do as to what's going to come out of Washington, D. C. Over the next literally, two weeks. Ball, I mean that funding For the $600 per week extra for each consumer is out of work that goes away in two weeks unless Congress does something about it. Yeah, so we have Ken back. Ken Leone joins us once again Global director of research at C F R A So can't go into that point. What the bank saying about the consumer here, you know, are they Jamie Diamonds Commentary seem to be Quite conservative on the margin. That's right. And the issue really relates, Tio. Employment, particularly if we have adverse scenarios where unemployment let's say for the U. S economy is still in the mid teens that will be kind of a dire outlook for the rest of this year. That's a worst case doesn't remember Banks. Hope for the best, but they prepared for the worst, and that's the build up of these credit reserves. Keep in mind, though that with the banks there following is in line with the Federal Reserve. Stress test and their new scenarios on covert back in late June, where when you look at those 33 banks That participated in the stress tests. The historical framework was a worse case of 433 billion with Cove it with the unemployment levels that you've mentioned before. Possibly mid scene. That's 800 billion. So what the banks have to do is before the reality they have to build reserves. The flip side. If we have this conversation later this year 2021 is if the economic scenario is better. Then you get a reserve reverse of these credit reserves, which would boost profitability absolutely will keep eye on those. We've got still more banks to go tomorrow and Thursday is well. Kenley own global director of industry and equity research at CF are a research We appreciate his commentary on the banks and again kind of a mixed bag coming out here. But the consistent theme across the three banks that we saw today is very high single digit in terms of a $1,000,000,000 loan loss reserves a cz they prepare for a weaker economy for some time to come. We'll see what we get from the big investment banks tomorrow. Right now, Let's head down to Washington, D. C. For world of national headlines.

Banks Washington Ken Leone Federal Reserve Congress Global director of research Bonnie Jamie Diamonds Kenley global director CF
Zoom and MikMak

Zero to IPO

07:52 min | 8 months ago

Zoom and MikMak

"Welcome back to season two of zeroed IPO. Today we have a very exciting couple of entrepreneurs on the show. Rachel typical graph the founder of Mick Massey founder and CEO who was called by Entrepreneur magazine one of the fifty most daring entrepreneurs and we also have eric yuan the founder and CEO of Zoom. Which as we all know has grown into a beam of video conferencing. Yeah I think what's very interesting? Here is both enterprise software entrepreneurs one who is earlier in her journey another one who is later on in his journey. He's gone public taking it public but still has a lot of memory about what it was like to be at her stage so. I think this is going to be very very interesting. Let's introduce our guests grey. Eric Yuan is the CEO and founder of Zoom and has grown zoom into a little bit of a big company. I think it's very small compared to what you're going to become. That's how he thinks about it right down. Eric started the company in two thousand eleven and appealed last year and at the IPO. The company had a market cap of a little over nine billion now less than a year later. It's at twenty one billion on the public markets. Tha that's more that's more more a little bit more. That's great that's growth node and never look at him. I never let's right notice. This market cap is not sustainable revenue. Would you talk about the revenue growth? Revenue growth is very impressive. It's about on the order of about one hundred percent year over year kind of up on a six hundred plus million dollar revenue year consensus estimates. We're not seeing anything out of the ordinary here. That is very impressive. And when you can see that kind of growth that kind of scale that's something. That's very exciting. Well before we go any further. I want to introduce Rachel. Tipo graph the CEO and founder of MIC MAC which is a fast growing startup. And there's a lot of things I want to ask you about and talk to You. About part of the purpose of this show is to hear from you about how you're growing the company. What your hopes and aspirations for at our and any kind of obstacles that you see ahead that perhaps not me but the other two leaders of public companies might be able to chime in with some experience. Let me ask you to describe MC MAC for our listeners and talk a little bit about what the company does share so mic. Mac were a marketing ECOMMERCE platform fortune. Five hundred brands license our software to better understand their consumers by connecting digital invest minced. Online retail insights. So essentially when I put a dollar into facebook what does that mean for my performance at Walmart for example so my clients span. Campbell's Hasbro Lego L'OREAL Nestle essentially. If you sell it Amazon Target Walmart you will become my client because you live in darkness with retail data. Let Me Brag a little bit about you. If I may at age twenty four you became the global director of digital and social media at gap which seems pretty young to have that role. I wasn't doing much of anything at twenty four. I think I was taken out the mail for running that role at gap at the time. But then you walked away from that to start this company out of your apartment. I believe in Brooklyn that must have been a difficult decision similarly Eric. You had a big role at Webex. You were leading the engineering team. You had hundreds of engineers. You said your wife. Hey I think I need to go start this company. And she didn't like the idea yes. She's sort of an online at likely. That idea by almost field to graduate was twenty. Four years ordered the three of us. Degenerates Rachel Rachel? With killing by the way the other thing that I love about what I've heard about your career is Gary Chuck who was an investor. My company and I believe invested in yours describes you as a fucking gangster quote unquote and lucky to have his support. Let's talk about MC MAC and the growth of online video and the commercialization of online video. Obviously Eric has a massive video business. What you're trying to do with mic-mac some people describe it as infomercials for the web. I've heard the term mini-martial Did you come up with that may I coined? Yeah and the idea is that it was very hard before mic-mac to see video and buy something you had to jump through hoops. And the bounce rate was like above ninety percent when you click through and now with mic-mac the bounce rate comes down to often like just ten percent right and a thesis of MIC. Mac was I was a gap. I was seeing the growth of video. I was seeing the change in the customer journey so gap Dot Com. The home page was the most traffic web page when I started when I left the product. Detail pages were seen five. X. Amount of traffic so all of a sudden all of these landing pages were actually becoming the heartbeat of conversion but no senior leader was paying attention to them and then finally the rise of Amazon so the early signs at the major retailers were about to become new wall gardens. And if you talk to major. Cpt brands they would be investing hundreds of millions of dollars whether is in digital video social paid search programmatic and having no idea what the outcome was on the other side. So in your case you have this insight and you know it's a good insight. I'm going to start a company but you leave a massive company and now you're this tiny little entity all by yourself and you have your your powers. You have the insight that the bravest lady in the Roman. You're like little little the honest truth. We said we tell the truth. And you have these massive companies that could easily swoop in and take your idea like talk to us about. How do you navigate that? And I want to hear also from Eric because he was in the same boat as you leaving Webex. Yeah it starts with an insight. That's not the hard part. The hard part is executed and initially. My competitor advantage right is speed to market. I'm nimble I can move faster fast. Forward all of a sudden I start proving myself and then other companies begin to pay attention. Because obviously if I'm successful must mean that there's a larger opportunity out there. How did that make you feel what was your reaction to the you know? The encroachment potential encroachment. My first reaction was. This is a good thing because you don't want to be a lone ranger business. It means you're you're not doing something to market if you're the only one marquette so I was excited I'm like yeah like competition bring it on but then when you look at the size of those companies so I currently thirty employees my competitors have upwards of five thousand employees. Then you start to get a little bit scared because they could put you know. Fifty salespeople against the southwest territory and then no one at Kirk Dr Pepper. We're GonNa talk to me and those are. The dynamics began to change for me last year. Which was a like. I got a suit up. Because there's people who can be louder and market right now. I still have the utmost confidence in my product. I have most confidence in my ability to lead but the reality is that they're bigger than me. Eric talked pretty shortly to catch up. Because speed everything up today have thirty. You may not know in five years. Probably have five thousand or six thousand you know more than your competitors as

Eric Yuan Rachel Rachel Founder And Ceo Founder CEO Webex Amazon Entrepreneur Magazine Walmart Mic Mac MAC Facebook Mick Massey Brooklyn MC Dr Pepper
Dining with Singapore Airlines

Talking Points

09:36 min | 9 months ago

Dining with Singapore Airlines

"With us. We Have Anthony. Mcneill the global director of food and beverage at Singapore Airlines. Antony thank you so much for joining us now. Normally I would be worried about interviewing head of food and beverage for an airline because you know. Generally food on airplanes doesn't have a great reputation but Singapore has a completely different mindset when it comes to food and beverage. How would you describe your outlook on how you approach food at Singapore so we take a lot of emphasis on popular local favorite surfer in Singapore? We're looking for the most authentic dish in the Hawk markets if we're in the US we're looking for the most unique food and beverage items to the destinations that we fly to fly from a great example is Grew up in Seattle looking at sustainable seafood opportunities that we can tap into for air flights and then also looking for great organic produce. So he's we took a day trip down to Medford to look for the world's best cheese which was Announced last year with rogue creamery. So a lot of our competitors aren't as engaged market whether it be local sustainable but also supporting local communities to bring the best food and beverage opportunities to simple aliens. And let's just talk about your job. So in your purview. You've got in-flight for all classes of service you got lounges. You know the winds like what? Don't you do Well I we've got We've got lots under Irene and we always say that. If we shake the plane anything's fall. That would be the pilot and the Jet Fuel. Everything else belongs to inflight service delivery sir. That's everything from toilet paper newspapers all the way through Crewe Dom Perignon and Ted on Jay which joined US last year. So how does one become global director of food and beverage at an amazing airline like Singapore? Like all people at some point. They've gotta start somewhere so I started as a as a dishwasher and kitchen hand at an airport hotel some thirty two years ago and Melvin. And Yeah I worked my way through so I was still at school working during the week working on weekends. And then of course the did you study culinary management or a hospital studies culinary management. And then you know. Through the course of the years you know through hotels restaurants catering facilities and then eventually moved out of Australia to work. Overseas worked all over the all over the Walsh Lanka China for several years Hong Kong Malaysia Malaysia. For several years you know through number hotel organizations premium hotel organizations and of course catering institutions that supply airlines. And then of course I was invited to join a lodge practicing airlines and I was responsible for the global food and beverage development and also managing the Asia Pacific catering for that airline so you started in hotels big kitchens and set menus in big dining rooms. What was the biggest shock when you transition to providing meals on a metal or composite tube flying forty thousand feet in the sky the space and the height restrictions to pack a meal in-flight limits obviously opportunity to do overly creative high appetizers and called meals? But in the same focus. It's not much different to circulate. The goes into a restaurant. You have a certain amount of space you can work with. It comes in a foil kit and the crew. Help us to move from the foil onto a plate and or a casserole depending on which Kevin you you may be in. And there's a lot of science in the air our taste buds or doled historically in-flight meals are known to be salty. And what are the scientific reasons BECO- into the food that you serve on board. Yeah so a lot of what we do is look at authentically local recipes. So we look at what? The Chili pastes may be used for a Singapore Indonesia. Malaysia is the coconut milk. The right milk we're GONNA make sure the ingredients are right in the first place. The cooking techniques obviously important and in Singapore where we test and develop new dishes. We have a pressurized cabin. Which is I think. It's quite widely renowned with Singapore Airlines. Where we go in. We close the doors especially hyperbaric chamber. We bring the cabin to shoot. And then we we do the test in the cook and we taste so where we see opportunities to adjust the recipe from an authentic dish to match an inflight experience. That's where we do the modifications off the back of that. We need to make sure that you know we're securing the best produce and of course that we can deliver it exceptionally well through that in flood experience. Now we get a lot of questions about you know. Why did you taste buds change? What is Flavor Experience Change? And of course when you fly your sinuses dry out and that'll say impacts you your taste in your in your flavor profiles but the new generation of aircraft coming through the fifties eight hundred eighty s the seven eight sevens and obviously the new triple seven x which is coming on. Those cabinet arms have changed dramatically over time. And the introducing more humidity into the Kevin. Spacey pressure is at low altitude and that really allows us to give you a better dining experience a bit of drinking experience the program you know as we move forward you know. The legacy of old aircraft is slowly being retied so we can continue to focus on great. Well when you have a different because you still have some set triple seven's will you have a different menu for a triple seven than you will for an eighth? Hr Fifty or seventy seven. The Old Dominion of the same but again we also offer salt and pepper on our trees up. So if you feel the need to make the adjustment you can do it. And Tailor it to your. What are your absolute knows for an airline menu? Deep Fried foods generally just uncut it because obviously the ovens a combination of steam dry heat and of course the food. It's obviously best coming straight from a straight from the cook for that crunch value. You know I think that's probably really it and I think if everything else if it's manage well and cooked With the appropriate methods. We're in pretty good place. What is actually cooked on a plane versus precooked and heated is? You're still cooking. That goes on on a plane. I mean cooking in a sense you know. We don't have pots and pans and guess flames on on an Aircraft Galley but the ovens certainly designed to cook the meals to the next level. So women do the process of inflight catering. The chefs have to apply by seek food process. The have to apply the OUTTA guidelines and also local hygiene authority guidelines to coop the proteins to certain temperature control point. Then they come line. They go through blast chilling to be ready to be packed for in flight. So at that point that cooking on ground allows for the reheating of that stake for example to be cooked medium hoping to the center now. Of course we know when we fly the crew have to sit down. They may be turbulence ovens might be ten on in certain elements may impact your your meal experience but in general we get the right balance to get the meal onto your plate. You know in good order so you can enjoy it fish on a plane to. I'll get on a plane. I can't believe on instagram. How many people say that's repulsive? Didn't you see the movie airplane? This should never be served on a plane. Why people hate fish on a plane so much. I think it's a perception. Perhaps but we you know we sit in the go way to make sure we've got the right fish for inflight fish which is juicy you know retains it's moisture content. That might be caught on. But if you go back and you look at a at a New York locally Anthony. Bodine said years ago and he's book kitchen reservations. You should never eat fish on a Monday after the weekend. Sir You know. I think it's a little bit of apply I think in today's society the fishes fresh. It's best in its peak condition when we get it for in Flight We certainly treat it with respect that it deserves and of course another crew deliver exceptionally well. So neither commentary. You can fold taming economic outlook. Well it's probably from experiences not on Singapore Airlines if I had to guess is a high level. Trend are crafting more vegan options on traditional menus. Or is that still a special meals request that people should put in. I mean certainly Vegan is part of the special meal programming and a lot of our work that we do now without international culinary panel shifts can ranches that wellness pattern here in the US. We certainly give guidance to the chefs about how we see through trends moving into the marketplace by doing so we can tap into their local scene as well and not really understand whether it be Vegan over there be not free or so on how we can leverage that in-flight so I think as we move along deliciously wholesome. He's one about programs which has a number of vegan options but it's a constant evolution of movement so where we say transferring. We'll certainly move towards that but also we need to be respectful of passes experiences as well. You know another frustration people have in-flight is when you want to order the steak and they run out so. Singapore has for very long time had booked the cook so you can do it in advance but putting aside book the Cook for a second. How much do you use math? In determining how much food to load on a plane where it's incredibly complex depending on the sectors that we work with the demographic and And the passenger profile participation we fly and we use a lot of customer insight in customer engagement data to determine those lighting programs so we have a set ratio of meals in structure and of course where we are the Singapore luxuries most popular. We might fly. A high percentage of that way. Stake is perhaps not so popular as an example on an Indian sector. We would learn steak so of course at some point. You may be disappointed that we can't give you the the the meal of your choice. But we certainly try to endeavour to make sure that the loading is right if we see An increase ivory peak of travel holiday season for example we may learn more of one and reduce one of another but it's a constantly evolving patents are crew also give feedback on customer preferences and where we need to adjust. Accordingly will do

Singapore Airlines Singapore United States Global Director Anthony Singapore Indonesia Seattle Antony Medford Malaysia Mcneill Irene Melvin Kevin Asia Pacific Australia Aircraft Galley New York
Lydia Fenet of Christie's Auction House on Creating Your Career Path

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:12 min | 9 months ago

Lydia Fenet of Christie's Auction House on Creating Your Career Path

"Most important thing you can do especially as who starting in a company is work with your boss to create your career path. I always tell people I have three small children. I have a charity auctions at night. I'm married I have friends that I need to be in touch with so I don't sit at my desk every day thinking about your career. So don't come to me when you're about to walk out of the door because you don't feel like you're being appreciated come to me at your performance review a year before you want something because that is usually how long. It's GonNa take me to get what I need for. You so wanNA raise you want to be the director of the Department here. The two things you know what about when somebody doesn't know what they want their path to be view should be talking to your boss to help figure that out and you may not ever figure it out. I mean it may be one of those things that evolves over time get your boss invested in your career. There's nothing worse than losing someone who's worked on your team for three or four years three or four years that go out of the door and then you have to train someone to bring them back in. A lot of us grew up working in a place where facetime was integral. And I don't mean facetime on the phone. I mean like you actually had to be your desk and you didn't have the ability to negotiate with your boss about certain things that we're going to make you stay at a company that is a reality. Now and people want to stay at their company so start those conversations from the minute you get there. I was with a young woman recently that you mentored and she has a daytime job to make a lot of money and on the side she also is trying to do like a side project for somebody and she's not getting paid and you told her you ask for money ask for thousand dollars now. The thousand dollars is not going to change her lifestyle. I want you to walk me through where that advice comes from and what your feelings are around how to get additional experience and improve yourself while also taking care of yourself absolutely. There are so many things and I see this specifically in young women. I see this actually in all women that I know the idea that your time and that your experience is up for volunteer at any given time and it drives me insane because if you have a skill set that you can do better than other people and you're helping someone who does not have that skill set then. Money can be exchanged. It doesn't have to be. You can choose to volunteer your time like I choose to volunteer my time for charities. That is a choice. But if you want to make money from that and that will make a little extra cash for you to have in your pocket. Why not ask and I think in this position with this young woman. She's working with someone who can absolutely afford to pay. Her is asking for certain things that she can check off list and these are things that she can do for her. So why not ask? I want you to give me retrospective advice. I was working as an associate producer. Not Making a lot of money. I was trying to get more money and more experienced so I became friendly with a talent at the network. I worked at and volunteered. Chew be a graphics producer at night so my totally my own time. Not In my daytime hours. They said I could get paid a stipend to other people who were my level found out. I was doing it and we're like I want that experience too so they also asked that same talent who is lovely and said. Short won't can help out then. They had no money to pay so they took away the money. How do you think I should have dealt with that? Honestly you dealt with it the way that probably should have dealt with it. Which is people found out? It wasn't a one time thing. The end result was a result that you didn't have control over at the end of the day. So in that case you think it was okay to get the experience again. This is your time you can choose to volunteer your time. That's always what I say but if there is money to be happy you're right to ask the fact that to other people found out and then they didn't have money to pay was unfortunate for you certainly but at the end of the day that was the reality of that situation but no. I absolutely think you should always ask. I think that that is the takeaway. And that's what we hear so much is that there is a trend and I'm not saying this is generational China. I think it's something that women we tend to do. Which is lead with volunteer first and then gain the courage to ask to get paid and I think a lot of that is that they're scared. The answer's going to be no. Were you ever scared that the answer is going to be no? How'd you get over? That always scared that the answer was going to be no. I always say that it's almost fighting through the IC right. It's that feeling your stomach where you're just. You don't really know what the answer is going to be. And I'm sure that you guys have had this because you have a company in the asks that you're making her of people who have huge platforms of their own and time constraints of their own. When I was reading the book there are thirty three case studies of women. Everyone from Martha Stewart and Arianna Huffington. Two women that I know who've built businesses and I started with sixty people on the list. So what does that tell you? And there was one woman she was one of my. I E mails that went out and I remember sitting there. You know with with the send button trying to push myself to do it because I knew that she was going to say no and she did say no and I remember the email coming back and I thought to myself. Well now you know what it feels like. It's not that bad so you'll be fine and every time I got to know after that it was

Facetime Producer Director Martha Stewart Arianna Huffington China
Lydia Fenet, Global Director at Christie's Auction House: 'I was making a third of what everyone else was making.'

Skimm'd from The Couch

10:31 min | 9 months ago

Lydia Fenet, Global Director at Christie's Auction House: 'I was making a third of what everyone else was making.'

"Today. Lydia fournette joins us on skimmed from the couch. She's the global director of strategic partnerships at Christie's auction house. She's also very lead benefit auctioneer and she's raised over half a billion dollars for charities around the world. Lydia has taken the lessons. She's learned while paving her own career path and has put them in her book for you entitled the most powerful woman in the room is you. Lydia welcomed the skin from the couch. Great to be here. You have the coolest job and we're going to get into but I just want you to skim your resume for us well. My resume is actually kind of short. I've worked at Christie's auction house in New York for twenty one years. I started as an intern and had worked at the company for basically two internships and then was hired out of an internship. I ran the events department for basically ten years on and off started at the bottom grew up in about five or six years in everyone above me left and the job was mine and it was during that time that I realized that there was a side business that you could do. There called benefit auctioning. So you're not the art auction. You're you're not on the Podium Selling Monet's Picasso's essentially you are the person who is getting on stage at eleven o'clock at night at a charity auction trying to raise money for a nonprofit when no one wants to buy anything and so those were really my two jobs for a long time about ten years into my career decided to launch a new department called Strategic Partnerships for the company which I now run globally and I run the large scale benefit auctions around the world for Christie's now as well so really fun job and I earlier love it. What is something not on your linked in that we should know about you. I am a mom of three. I am a veracious runner and I love more than anything to be with people. It's my favorite thing in the world. Have you always been like that? Yes absolutely I am a natural extrovert. There's no question about it. I always think it's funny when people say so. What do you do for downtime? I call my friends and hanging out with them. I try to former for trying to find more friends. The exact opposite quota and my husband too. He loves being themselves and always trying to get in the room to talk to him. And we're very different. Let's bring you into my fold so before we explain. Actually what your job is in day to day? I just want you to tell our audience because I think you are the rare person who's really been at the same company for their career. What is your best piece of advice for how to get hired as an intern fulltime? I think being persistent and really walking into an interview as an intern and making sure that they understand that. You're going to work hard. I know that sounds like the craziest thing to say because it seems pretty obvious to me but I can tell you that. I've probably had eighty or ninety interns over my twenty years at Christie's I can tell you the fifteen who I still remember. I think that internships are such an amazing opportunity to do two things meet people in a company and is that because I shredded paper. My entire first internship at Christie's but guess what the shredder was by the elevator. So I met every single person going in and out of there and I'll introduce yourself I mean people are standing there waiting and remember. This was pre iphone so there was nothing to do. I just stand there and wait but I would stand there and just sort of. Make an off comment about something. That was happening her. You know something as easy as still shredding which people feel sorry for you. They start to talk to you. They always knew I was so they'd always come back. And then there was joke you're still shredding and like I sure am how's your day going. You know just a quick introduction and all of a sudden they remember my face and so when I see them at an event later that week or checking people in special events there was sort of that name recognition that facial recognition so. I just think an internship is the time that people don't realize you get a recommendation from someone that you're interning with in a job. That's very senior in a company in that stays with you for the rest of your life. How did you get your foot in the door? At Christie's I knew nothing about the auction world. I grew up in a small town in Louisiana. My parents were not art collectors but I did a junior semester abroad at Oxford University. While I was there I read an article about the auction world. When Princess Diana's dresses were being. Sold for charity. Yes I remember. Yeah new talks about Christie's and it talks about this auction world and honestly if you knew anything about me my whole life is created in my mind so well. This seems like the place that I should work. I mean it's glamorous people travel. You're meeting all of these people to my earlier point and so I basically started talking about how he was going to work. At Christie's I ninety nine percent of the people I knew had no idea what curtseys was. But my dad who is just such a charismatic amazing man. We were at a Christmas party of a family friend in Baton Rouge Louisiana which is not a bastion of art collecting and there was a young woman who was doing her. She just started at Christie's as an assistant to an assistant. And so my dad pulled me over and he said you've been talking about this place. This woman actually works there and this is when I think sometimes the universe really. If you're open to it helps you in your path. I said to her. Can I get the internship coordinator because I was still in college at this point and she gave me her number and so I started calling this woman and it was so late in the game? I had no idea what I was doing. I was coming from Louisiana. The wasn't so as a New York everybody knew about internships and so I basically just calling her and she kept saying the same thing which was. Ot I'm so sorry you know. The internship program is full but remember there was no caller. Id and that day so had to pick up her phone. She had no idea and every day I would call for two straight weeks and I kept thinking to myself like there has to be a way to make her understand that I have to be there so I have to figure this out and so I would kind of right through a list of questions that I could ask her. That might make her. Think a little bit differently about me and so one day I just hit the nail on the head. I asked her. Can I just ask you something before you hang up on me which you tell me why? The internship has to be closed at thirty people and she said well you know we do museum trips in the afternoon and so yeah. I mean you all of a sudden I was like well. I don't have to go on a museum. It's fine you know and and so I sort of vocalized that I said well listen. I don't have to go on a museum field trip. I could stay and I'm sure they're GONNA be interns. Who were sick and maybe I could fill in over. I mean honestly one college that point. Let's be serious and I think she was so for me to just stop calling her. She said look let me think about it and she hung up the phone and then she called me back an hour later and said I could do a modified internship and I say now that I'm pretty. I went on almost every single one of those museums. You know that's the funny thing because of course someone doesn't show up you know when I hear the story. We're both kind of like smiling at you. Love the fearlessness. A love gutsiness that you had an end poise at a very young age. She just go after this. Both of us had a similar tenacity but didn't have your extroverted part to our story. It's hard exhausting to put yourself out there like that and people come to us for advice all the time. It actually was just talking to a girl yesterday who just as out of college and was trying to get advice on how to network and I was like you have an email address a corporal where you work the big building just email people just like what. What are you say? So very literally. What do you say when you call what you say when you email? I always think the key to networking and my father has the best catch phrase that you will use for the rest of your life which networker die He truly believes networking is the only reason you exist. Charlotte. I would say that the most important thing you WanNa do when you're networking is distinguish yourself from other people immediately. So what makes you unique? Because you can google anybody sitting across the table from you. And I think that that's what people lose and the networking element that makes it really difficult for them because they're trying to play the part of somebody else the easiest way to sell us to sell yourself because when you're talking about yourself in a way that feels authentic. It doesn't feel uncomfortable. This is who you are. So you're just putting yourself out there. What you have get used to is the take it or leave it quality of that and I think that that's difficult for an extrovert or introvert. You know nobody likes for somebody to shut them down but at the same time you'll never get anything unless you put yourself out there. I want to talk about something that I think is a common thing between the media world and the art world. Which is they're highly competitive. It's hard to get that first foot in the door and if you are lucky enough to get it you're usually working a ton and not getting paid a lot and the question that we get all the time is how do they think about that first job do they take the job that they really. WanNa take that. Is You know the internship right. And it's a hard choice and wondering what advice you have for people out there who are looking to break into these industries and also have real financial restraints. Absolutely I think we all have we restraints. We live in New York City or even the the outlying areas around the city. It's incredibly expensive. And so I say to people especially about the art world. Can you live without our? Is it the kind of thing that you've literally wake up every morning in think I have to be around it? It drives me is my passion in if the answer is yes then it probably makes sense for you to be an intern or to take a job that is going to get you on that track over time and it may not pay exactly what you want so you may have to get a second job to make that happen but you have to understand that. That is a choice that you're making it that is not your passion and you just want to do it because it looks fun from the outside and this is what. I wish I had said to myself all those years ago. Go and get a job that pays you what you want. And this is something that you can evolve as a side hustle over the course of your life and then you bring those skills to the place where you interviewed as an intern. And I think that that's one of those things that can seem kind of shortsighted and especially in this day and age where people are hopping from company after one year or six months. Or whatever if you really understand the trajectory of a career. It's long so if you do the work at the beginning and you get to a place where you are making a salary to afford the life that you want you can pivot into the art world. You can pivot into the media world and you have a skill set that you're bringing that you didn't have when you were applying as an intern so you will get paid for that. So people do get paid in these companies. They may not get paid what people in startups get paid but they do get paid. Sometimes you just have to start a little bit more mid level than you would when you think that you should start as an

Intern Christie Lydia Fournette Louisiana New York Global Director Oxford University Podium Selling Monet New York City Google Princess Diana Coordinator Baton Rouge Louisiana Charlotte
"global director" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:36 min | 11 months ago

"global director" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of IBM history three to find what's okay so that is the original machine so it's like eight feet tall and twelve feet wide and it's actually still running you ever had a saying daisy daisy we haven't used it for that Dario Gil is the global director of IBM research a I has become so much more dominant in our lives and the questions that we ask of a high I see them reflected in two thousand and one and and looking at the history I mean IBM was incredibly open to helping this wacky director make his science fiction movie people really thought they were gonna crack this problem of intelligence they were seen so much progress with what computing could do they say you know we're really on the cusp of changing the world fundamentally today at IBM like at Google and Facebook and the others once of A. I. researchers think they're on the cusp of changing the world fundamentally as they try to make machines as intelligent as humans as soon as possible I have heard you hold the world record in debate competition wins against humans but I suspect you've never debated a machine IBM's project debater a ight which has been in the works since Watson beat the best humans in jeopardy when up against a world champion human debater earlier this year and lost although it was close remaining is what might happen when we get into a life or death debates with super computers how.

Dario Gil global director IBM director Google Watson Facebook
"global director" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

Habits and Hustle

12:32 min | 1 year ago

"global director" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

"It's not sort of throwing caution to the wind and feeling completely unsettled but rather whatever it is it could be a movement. I have a friend who says she digs her nails into her hands. A sort of put her in the moment. I have friends who are sports athletes. Who Different things right before they go out for a game but just finding that moment of pause before you move into you feel like you're coming in from a point queen of string of confidence and then the second thing I think I saw something about authenticity right like being yourself? Yes and I talk about this in the book at the very very beginning of this podcast I was talking about. How if you if you think about what an auction near might look like I definitely do not come to mind and I certainly didn't come to mind when I was twenty four years old? which is when I started taking auctions so I mean I I walked into an auction and I swear to God the look of the people in front of me were like? Where's the Chenier? What are you doing here? Are you the the auction helper. These questions that people ask me And I would sort of say no. I'm the auction ear. And then I think when they realized that I was going to be auctioning they were like. Oh no this is going to be. How could this woman coming onto room? And so because I felt what they were feeling I immediately did what I thought I. It should do which was acted like the guys that I trained with. Were all fifteen to twenty years older than me. They were all men and half of them were British so I sort of affected a British accent. I became very sort of formal and stiff. Because that's the way I trained doesn't Sort of as an art auction here and there was one night I was very sick and I still had to take the auction and it was a Saturday night. No one else was available and I went in to take the auction and didn't have the adrenaline boost to get into that pretending that I was an older British British gentleman so I got up on stage and the first thing that happened was I saw a woman seated in front of me who had been seated next to me at a lunch when the guy. I thought I was going to marry broke. Broke up with me talking talking about that in the book and it was so funny because she'd been so kind. I think we started with Napkins. I was crying so hard by the end. I think she was using so the bottom of the table cloth because adhere quickly and just instead of doing what I would have done which was moving into that very formal stiff art auction. Which would which is what you want when Someone Selling Picasso Right I looked at her and I started the law by saying something lot number. One Ladies and gentlemen is going to be a cocktail reception reception and a dinner. At this woman's home you'll have a wonderful time looking at her art collection and then I added the part that was authentic to me. You know ladies isn't gentleman. I will tell you if you were currently in therapy I can tell you. Jennifer is the woman to be with. I sat next to her after a break up and she nursing back to health over one lunch so save your money bid on this lot and some kind of joked that totally and all of a sudden the fact that I was sort of a twenty year old woman on stage seemed a little funny. I was kind of poking fun. At the fact that I was on stage I have been broken up with. The audience couldn't relate to that on some level and people stopped talking and looked at the stage and for years they they just sort of continued eating and not really paid attention during the and so I realized that that was actually the funny part and we were talking about you know when I was still taking auctions during three pregnancies sees I mean I had to say immediately when I was on stage because it was funny right and also say also. It's obvious right so it's like pointing the pink elephant in the room. Exactly I always find that. I don't understand why I mean. People always say when they see somebody who is is very successful in any in any walk of life life they try to emulate that person and the reality is. There's only one every one is unique to them exactly and I think it's one thing that I always tell people it's it's like just be yourself because whatever you have you have a superior for superpower inside you. Let that shine and people don't if people did that more Regularly I would be surprised. Like how much more they level up their lives absolutely now. People are afraid to be themselves. Well I think what you see. I mean when I sit at these events these gals year after year. I go to fifty to one hundred dollars a year. I can watch the people who are good public speakers right and the difference between a good public speaker and an uncomfortable. Public Speaker is a good public speaker. Feels comfortable in their skin. Yeah and they realized that being their authentic self self makes the audience feel at ease and therefore they feel absolutely. Well we talk. I mean that's another one of your points that so in like so in the book. There's a there's a bunch of different points and then you expand upon them of what makes you the most powerful person in the room and that's why you are who you are but public speaking is another one of those things and I agree with you one hundred percent and I think it's when I was reading that that's the one that I was saying earlier too. I was like Oh my God. I have to read this chapter like five times what I have to do produce timing. It's great timing and I think public speaking is one of those people rather other rather die than actually public speak. I know and I think it's a great way to gain confidence right away. And the issue is someone like you and your job right. You're kind of forced your kind of forced to be doing that right. You're onstage constantly so you get the practice but the majority of people bowl including me. I don't have that kind of that. They don't have that platform to be just in front of people constantly for that practice. So how do you suggest. Adjust people like get practice. How do they get better at it? Because if you're not even speaking like that people are speaking and like you said if you could be doing presentations you could be doing a ah a sales meeting. Whatever it is having that having that Ability to speak well in front of audiences I think really behooves people people absolutely and I definitely think that people often sort of say well. You're on stage. I was like I choose to be on stage when I first started taking charity auctions. It's volunteer service provided by Christie's so I'm getting on stage and I can't even tell you because I train the charity auctioneers. How many people stopped taking them after five or six they they just say to me? This is absolutely brutal. Anyone would ever do the way people don't pay attention. They talk throughout the week naturally. Good at to start art. I think I was. I was fine on. I was fine trying it but I think I was burying mediocre at the beginning. People say they're like you're so effortless onstage stage. I have been doing this for sixteen years. I took one hundred auctions a year when I was in my twenties. One hundred two or three and night right and front practice and experience. Experience makes it look effortless now and I would start by even if I had. I had an auction that evening. I would get my fellow interns in the room and I would practice the lots on them. I would practice in front of the mirror even now before I go on stayed if I go to the bathroom a couple of minutes before. I'm supposed to be backstage and I'll run over. You know how saying I started off with good evening. Ladies and gentlemen names and then throw in a joke. I always practice that joke in a mirror. Even if it's just like a seperation and practice so don't just people don't just go wing it. I think people get were. That's what I'm noticing just with my own thing. I was telling you is knowing what you're going to say and prepare of. Yes Komo practice that preparation over and over again. But then don't do people come off if you if you practice so much my fear would be that it would come. I'm across robotic right 'cause like if you memorize it and you lose track of what the memory whatever where you are. Then it's really you get a lot of nervousness because like ghost ship where am where am I like. Oh I was on the fourth sentence. I missed a paragraph. Yeah and that's awkward. But here's the greatest thing about public speaking that no one ever tells tells you that nobody knows what you're going to say right at the only person who knows I the fourth paragraph so just remember if you get a little off track I always say instead set of memorizing think the probe of the presentation or the public speaking moment the theme the theme and give yourself ten touch points over the course of that a theme so even if you get a little off track you can sort of thread back to that touch point right so you know you have a ten minute speech. You should be making one point every single minute. What is at that point and then practice every single day? When you're walking down the street get your good group of friends together? Be Like I'll buy two bottles of wine. I need you guys for an hour. I'm going to just Speak through this because sometimes talking in front of other people especially people that you know which is often more nerve-racking. Yes you actually care what they think. Perhaps I think a lot of times just getting people in a room so that you have to talk it out helps you think through what you're going to say. And a lot of times. They have feedback my friend. Mary's great whenever I have a speech I call her. Can I sit on the couch. Ultra for an hour. Just talk through this as talking. She's like what about this point. What about this Right that's a good point. Use Your network around you absolutely which brings me to the next one. Which I this is the one that I really I love and I agree with wholeheartedly is the networking one network network or die? Dad's Scotch. Yeah it's it's the absolute truth. I think of of of all these points where we were talking about how to be the most powerful person in the room and or what really takes you to the next level. It's all this authenticity it's preparation it's public speaking. It's but this networking one really. Is I think everything it's free. Yeah it's free. It's free absolutely and that pushes you. It makes you push yourself out of your comfort zone especially if you're not a natural extrovert. Brian need other other people. And that's for real opportunities. Come I always say that in a nice way like everybody's a conduit to somebody else salute late you know and if you if you I think if you really really kind of nurture that one element that's really something that makes it very powerful. Now I will say to my father who I referenced in the book. Yeah this sort of king the of networking one thing that I've always witnessed in my life. My Dad will help someone who he barely knows. He will make an introduction to anybody for no reason not to benefit if it himself just to introduce people and that comes back in in a way tenfold because people never forget him and they always think of him as a stepping-stone on on their way to something that half absolutely. I agree with your dad because you have to also gave without expectation. Yeah right and that's when the company comes I know it sounds cliche but so that becomes the biggest reward absolutely. So why don't we talk about. Give give us your three tips on how to be a really good networker. So starting I mean I mean I was thinking about networking when I'm first entering the job right and I actually have a great example because there's a young woman who contacted the out of the blue to talk about. She'd read the book and she. She wanted to talk about getting an internship at Christie's and she followed up a number of times. Because I was on book tours. I wasn't getting back with my usual frequency on email. And and every time she did I said listen now is not a good time but let's talk in two weeks. Two weeks later I would get another email from her and finally we got on the phone. We had a long conversation action about everything within the book. She told me all about her job. She told me exactly what she needed. My help doing in terms of the internship at Christie's and I was like I don't know you but you clearly are very motivated. I would be happy to red flag your resume for our HR department just said they know that someone has met you and sort of say that you are all of these things that you talk about in your resume. I ran into her at a gallery opening. I literally had no reason to be there. I didn't even know that she was going to be there and she. He came right up and introduced herself and within five minutes. I have made an introduction to the head of the gallery for her because I recognized her to be a great network of total total self starter. And that's the kind of people that you want surrounding yourself in your network into help move forward as well so what would be the first tips and so my first tip would be not afraid to reach out AL and ask for help to anyone at any level and really get them invested in your current so not being afraid. Don't be afraid but also remember get someone invested in your career. Don't just reach out once and then think they didn't get back to me. Follow up and get yourself in front of them and make sure that you're known they know who you are. Persistent he persisted. So that's your tip one and also get them invested in your career and get them in and and is that number one and number two invest in combination investment. They find someone who's invested it in your career and persistency is number..

"global director" Discussed on P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

12:08 min | 1 year ago

"global director" Discussed on P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

"Big banks we had Morgan Stanley report earnings this morning kind of a mixed bag I would say from some of the big money center banks and global investment banks kind of help us parse through what we are seeing. We welcome Ken Leon. Ken Is Global Director of Industry and Equity Research at C._F.. Are can thanks so much for joining us. Let's start with Morgan Stanley since they just printed this morning. What was your takeaway there so it wasn't earnings.

Ken Leon Morgan Stanley Global Director of Industry an
"global director" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"global director" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Got me i shouldn't have said what i said oh they got me but i shouldn't and she's not getting fired but the reality is is this is what they're doing now you know we have to look at the magnitude linda great job last the other day two days ago looking up all the numbers i mean you're talking about billions of people every year using google to search for news and information in an election years if they're suppressing information that would for the purposes of endorsing and favoring a candidate isn't that an in-kind donation and isn't it one that really is incalculable well that's exactly what what people are saying attorneys are saying this might be an p._c. hugh i think on the the biggest issue right now that i can see there's been some congressional hearings since i last talked to you ted cruz dan crenshaw congressman from arizona was grilling these executives about machine learning fairness there's been another document come out let me go to crenshaw for just a second here who's a good guy but anyway he congressman from texas and he was questioning derek slater global google global director of an information policy and you know according to these emails the mail say given that you know different people like dennis prager nazis had cetera that's a premise of what are you gonna do about that and you know ken shaw then from texas goes on and says thank you for some of the thoughtful discussion etcetera etcetera but they're good questions on whether some of these the content provide rides education so that we know the bad things out there whether it's radicalizing people those are hard but crenshaw also goes on to say that you know and talks about you a different points and goes on to say that if you if you're going to be the determine make the determination of what is good and good contact new content or news or not news and you have a bias well i mean you're rendering you're picking sides here and with the amount of power somebody like google has that could be extraordinarily influential couldn't it yes and i was gonna say sean it comes down to google has been granted special immunity from congress section to thirty of the communications decency act and the issue before congress right now is they want to continue giving google that exemption now why does expose is so big it's the biggest thing certainly i've reported is it implies that google should not be given this protection because google is no longer merely a platform now they're a publisher with an agenda so previously they've been exempt from liability and now these revelations which talk about a certain viewpoint and they wanna change outcome of elections all of these words are there is not mine congress probably has to do something about it they have to do their job the president says that google should be sued i told you before sean this is a watershed moment in this country the floodgates are opening veritas project has been inundated with insiders sources inside reaching out to me this week i mean we're talking dozens of these people who wants to explode a whistle for their country to report what's going on because if you think if you're worried about the impact on the election google can can change that in an influence that in ways you can't imagine and that's what this expose is about all right quick break more with james o'keefe founder c._e._o. of project veritas and much more as we continue busy hannity tonight don't miss it nine eastern all right outside and dining outside of downing a glass of pure liquid freedom which i love i wake up every morning the first thing i do black rifle coffee why it is the best that is the boldest it is the single best coffee ever had now it's created by special ops forces vets and these guys are amazing they hated government coffee when they were in afghanistan in iraq so they import their own beans build their own plans and then when you compare their coffee tanny other coffee you've ever tried ever in your life like wow how did i ever think that that other coffee.

two days
"global director" Discussed on Social Pros Podcast

Social Pros Podcast

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"global director" Discussed on Social Pros Podcast

"When when questions come in from customers or consumers, or is that being totally handled by separate part of the organization. Yeah. And customer service again for this is actually my first experience working in a B, two B environment. So my background prior was very consumer facing. So it's actually been really interesting to see is even customer service play. What is that? Look like when you're to be right. You can't buy a box of Qualcomm on the shelf at target. So so where that sits right now is often it comes through our websites. I mentioned earlier that the other half of the team. I sit on this DX team this digital experience team. And again, they're looking at the infrastructure, and how people kind of move through the funnel on our website to eventually purchase and transact. So they actually are closer to that customer service piece. The the the little of it that we do have again because we're not consumer. Facing? We don't get as many of those you know, inquiries that we might have gotten at Microsoft or to Dita's some of my past places of business. So we do get emails which actually I'm on. I'm on that alias in. It's kind of fun sometimes to see the kinds of questions. People ask it's quite an array an-and. I know the team is in the process actually of building a more robust tool whether that's through chat bots through army now a full-blown customer service team. But as we start to really dial up the website in make it something that people can transact on. We know we're gonna get more questions. We know we're going to get more inquiries may got set ourselves up for success for that in advance. Just in from Qualcomm, global director of marketing our guest this week on the show. Just also co hosts a podcast called social currency. You can find that. It's social currency show dot com, or wherever you get your podcast just search for social currency, you'll find.

Qualcomm global director Microsoft
"global director" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"global director" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Hills to trend from gardens city to Sterling Heights from Lincoln park points in between The news watch never stops on NewsRadio nine fifty For the second time this year a high profile Ford executive has left the company. Amid charges of inappropriate behavior ought to be reported Jeff Gilbert explains it got, a lot of attention when then for, North America president Raj Nair was dismissed for behavior deemed inconsistent with the, companies code of conduct the latest. Leave Prakesh Patel Ford's global. Director of program management Mike Martinez who covers Ford for automotive, news says the company has little tolerance for. Misbehavior an emphasis on having employees, that do things the right way automotive. News says Patel was let go for acting inappropriately Ford, will only confirm that he has left the company Jeff Gilbert w w j nine fifty is the second instance of a. Scam targeting a, registered sex offender in Oakland County in. Recent days. Shafter says a fifty nine year old Rochester hills man, was contacted by phone and told He was under, investigation for a sexual assault who still that. He needed to post a bottle, of fifteen hundred dollars using Google play. Cards or he would be arrested he end up paying, five hundred dollars the calls continue with more man's of money the phone number appeared to come from the sheriff's department authorities. Say this is, a scam similar incident was reported last. Week you. Receive a call you should contact police Vandals have silenced the. Music in Royal Oak These who were explains the piano that sits in front of Gaels. Chocolate in downtown Royal Oak is completely inoperable. After someone's spread glue all over the keys this is the first. Time a piano that's part. Of the public piano project has been vandalized we fully expect them to overtime degrade. In quality because of the weather and such but this one somebody, tried to hasten, its exit arts commission chair Jason getting says people. Love to walk by and play the piano it's really an aberration to have somebody destroy something, that's so loved by the public like this but. We won't stop the music inside of us that's for sure what will get more pianos on the street and we'll have more fun another piano will replace this one soon is a her Hoover WBZ NewsRadio nine fifty health dangerous for children and young adults who spend too much time in front of a screen according. To new warning from, the, American, Heart. Association here's Dr DNA lights phones computers ipads kids are spending a lot of time in front of Screens research finds eight to eighteen year.

Prakesh Patel Ford Jeff Gilbert Royal Oak Ford Gaels Sterling Heights NewsRadio Lincoln park Raj Nair Oakland County Mike Martinez Rochester hills Director of program management Google North America president Shafter executive Hoover Screens research
"global director" Discussed on Twenty Thousand Hertz

Twenty Thousand Hertz

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"global director" Discussed on Twenty Thousand Hertz

"Gary writes from was in when we recorded the new one and he he loved it and ben burtt just happened to be there and he came down and so we heard it in the mixing theater at skywalker sound and he loved it i think people really liked it it's really challenging to gauge the deep notes impact on the movie industry but it's something rob kohl's thinks about a lot since nineteen eighty three we have actually certified over five thousand cinemas and studios rob is the global director of marketing for thx he's in charge of how consumers embrace the teach x brand and so if you magin the average cinema probably has three or four shows a day probably has ten theaters that trailer was being played in just one cinema at least thirty times a day so then do the math and say there's five thousand worldwide you can sort of get to number was really interesting as particularly now after the company's been around for thirty five years when i took this job telling people hey i work for checks and all i would have to do is go to youtube play the trailer and immediately everyone recognized so i think we're just really fortunate that anymore created a sound that is completely associated with cinematic experiences i think that when you sit in a comfortable cinema seat in the lights go down on the commercials are over and you know that you're about to be hit with the main feature it's like fuxing of the brain is like a soda collective experience of an omen john you know to get so focused on the immersive environment that went now sitting in for the next couple of hours and it's a collective agreement to surrender on senses to the immersion of the movie were about to see and i think that's really why it's so powerful.

Gary skywalker sound rob kohl global director ben burtt youtube thirty five years
"global director" Discussed on Geek News Central Audio

Geek News Central Audio

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"global director" Discussed on Geek News Central Audio

"Snail mail why i don't understand it's it saying that in a bid it saying in the article that facebook is monitoring who is facebook monitors who who's buying advertising the site to ensure their base in a country in the country in question in the us four nationals can't donate money to or spend cash on federal state local elections in a bid to address this facebook has announced plans to send potential advertisers codes to the post office so they can prove they live or they claim to it doesn't i don't understand why facebook would do something like this there's got to be other ways to to combat this i i don't understand what how or why but facebook is obviously trying something out one of the katie harbach facebook facebook global director of policy programs is quote as saying if you run an ad mentioning a candidate we're going to mail you a postcard you'll have to use a code prove your united states again i this is it doesn't i don't know why they would do this you know i guess something new but i guess baseball is trying to kind of ways where the past election has been facebook spend all or news about like media pick news and all this kind of stuff so hopefully maybe this might be this will combat it maybe not time late hells and we'll see what happens in the latest news from the mobile phone space there's the samsung galaxy s nine s nine plus prices were leaked we did hawk todd dimension about the dimension the did mention the dimension the talked about samsung galaxy s nine s nine plus in previous episodes and you're gonna love this.

facebook global director united states baseball samsung
"global director" Discussed on Side Hustle Pro

Side Hustle Pro

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"global director" Discussed on Side Hustle Pro

"The guess chair is not only do you have the lands of being a founder and raising money but then also use served as a portfolio services director at cape four so talked to us a little bit about that transition from being the entrepreneur to be on the side of supporting entrepreneurs yeah yeah a appreciate you asking in there is a little bit between from me shutting down my first company to me joining cape or capital i think it was bow a two year break on where i know i wasn't like ana islands somewhere relaxing had gathered at like i said i got it eats i getting a pact aware and get a jld i am so what i ended up doing was i actually salt might my story so interesting because it slide that had these experiences but then i've gone back and taught other people the lessons i've learned so like a told you the beginning you know my entree into entrepreneurship was via the program start at weekend when ended up happening is that as word got around that i was shutting down my company started weekend actually recruited me to become global director start at we can education so basically take my led the experiences from going from a classroom teacher to a venture capital back start at founder and teach other people how to do this around the world and so i ran that organization for two years we scaled it from like two two six continental let me it was it was a really really fun time and then that company actually sold to text stars which is the largest accelerator in the world's in so during the time when my it started weekend had sold two tech stars i have opportunity their joint pain are take time off in you know at that point that's when i really started writing on medium hang guide of just like keeping it rail and telling people what's really going on because i feel like so much of it is a facade that people have and they keep telling themselves at all yeah things are great you know up into the ray and i'm like now home me i know what's really going a goal you're struggling in part of it is you need to tell the story so people feel less allow because oftentimes entrepreneurs are type a personalities they're very driven people they're very hard on themselves.

founder director ana islands global director two years two year
"global director" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"global director" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"Appreciated david dwyer he's at global director of research appelberg intelligence in has crippled the less joining us here at the bloomberg gearhead senate twenty 18 fly from bloomberg headquarters i'm carol massar and a johnson as she arrived at the keys nathan hager he's got wall the national headlines for at intervals studios washington dc thank you guys that president trump is in china the latest leg of his asian trip and it has gotten underway with some diplomatic niceties the president thanked chinese leader xi jinping forty called an unforgettable afternoon and evening in beijing's forbidden city but some thorny issues await both leaders as we hear from bloomberg's tom mckenzie in beijing on the train for on the for president trump of course is china's surplus with the us us wants to see the chinese side addressing that with some concrete measures all knows career of course president trump has said he wants to see china cutting ties with north korea they want to see a close a stranglehold all pyongyang seoul mckenzie bloomberg beijing by the way president trump's son gratitude to she was expressed via twitter an answer at least one question about whether the president would use his favoured social media platforms in a country that restricts such use among its own people russian president vladimir putin says he's looking forward to this week's asiapacific economic cooperation forum in vietnam in a column for bloomberg view putin says he is confident that acting together they'll find solutions to the challenge of supporting the steady balanced and harmonious growth of their shared regent putin's expected to meet with several world leaders at the apec summit including possibly president trump that was tensions high between russia and europe nato defence ministers decided today to expand their operations for the first time since the cold war that's according to the washington post global news 24 hours a day powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than 120.

vladimir putin europe apec social media washington nathan hager bloomberg global director of research washington post cold war russia vietnam david dwyer twitter north korea trump us tom mckenzie beijing president china johnson carol massar 24 hours
"global director" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"global director" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"His claim to have not known any thing is possibly bunk nearly have amy dashon has been engine and our third hour because she thinks he's going to jail yeah well will actually you and i'll get into that at the top of the more eastern hours about fifty minutes now amy will actually be studios for now abdel atti thing about that to the case or or howard might apply to rick possibly going to jail if if that's if that's possible i mean it woulda what an absolute mess he seems to be embroiled in seemingly worse than yesterday as she told me because she was here yesterday off obviously doing a lot of our shows here on cbs on the network locally in nationally and she said she was chasing down one of the agents uh that was involved in this and so one of the ages that they raided yes there's there's different there's different levels here how he that was was at asm yet is asm so there's obviously the coaches who were who we've heard the assistant coaches now rick protein it was caught up in this there's there's the shoe companies jim gato from adidas the global director of of marketing he's caught up in this but the other side the didn't get a ton of play was the agencies than were paying off the staff to tears theor guys their way so aim he's going to give us a full circle of all of the those things would lean it seedy it cd all the way around he's been cd now it's just front and center city like now you can't look the other way you know you just now not that anybody wants to get to this level obviously people can have to pay the piper i mean is always shortcut to those ways to lower or steer recruit a eu guy you know zone so's camp i mean at the laugh when you know the 13th raided or the.

amy dashon cbs global director abdel atti howard rick jim gato eu fifty minutes
"global director" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"global director" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"That still needs to sort of come out of the market should we really felt cnn materialize so i think you saw euphoria fading a bit in the rates market in the dollar equities is a place where you haven't seen it come out as much and i think that's partially because it did start to get baked in but then once people started making it in after the election you had a series of better than expected earnings seasons so that kind of help catalyze the view that that was going to happen so i think that you know if you look at the reaction of the market this morning to the rumor that gary cohn may have been resigning i think that's kind of an indication of what could happen if the market sees no hope of any of this stuff getting done i have to hunt though i mean what is the key really believe that to you by that that that if gary cohn where to resign the market with tang we have to think about it it's it's it's not just meaningful because he's he's the national economics council director he's also the front runner to take over the fed so the market needs the price in you know the impact on trump's fiscal agenda but then it also has to kind of look at what what could the monetary policy locations be if he were to actually resign so it's not just simply saying this is his current job you have to look at the fact that he is a front runner to replace yellen in february so what impact might that have right he's a he's probably like yellen a kind of low interest rate guy the market likes that who could the possible um you know replacement be if he were to step down to be the front runner you know would increase the likelihood that yellen stays in the job you know these are all questions of the market had to momentarily begin answering this morning what is lethem burst now psychics them as someone leaves the whole market tanks here that that like the film pretty good events that mike looked at a thank you so much for joining me as always mike mcdonagh is global director of.

gary cohn director mike mcdonagh global director cnn fed lethem