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"glenda jackson" Discussed on As Me with Sinéad

As Me with Sinéad

08:12 min | 7 months ago

"glenda jackson" Discussed on As Me with Sinéad

"Not really because if I take something from the play home am I haven't done my job properly. I mean everything should have been done on that state. Joel Not Empty Space. So no I mean one of the things I found quite interesting at the is is people. Say to me quite often learn those words. I do remember the Mind No. I'm just blessed in that way that I come and do but once it's a project deserve a bit about plays most obvious because it's one you do most often other than film and television. I can't remember word the day after really. I can't remember word until gum thought might be my brain just decay in but they go. You spoke earlier the fact that as you age you have this understanding that you're going back to kind of your fifteen and sixteen year old self in many ways where you feel about internally perhaps perhaps more but what would you say to fifteen or sixteen year old Glenda if you had the opportunity or is there anything you would advise them on or DR encourage them to do I was pretty good at school until I hit my teams now. Think it's when all those you you know. Whatever they called stop coursing through your veins? And I didn't spend as much time lending as I could have done for for example one of the big jokes in my form when I was about fourteen or fifteen and tended always to me that was chosen to participate. Here there were covered in the classroom senior as removable shelves and so the shelves would be removed. And I would be locked in the cupboard which the rest asked the class all knew this was a punishment for teachers. We didn't particularly like there. I was incarcerated in the cupboard and it was my job. TAP mysteriously certain moments during the clothes. I mean really. How pathetic can you get in some ways? I wish because as I said now I yeah my age I realized how little I know that I perhaps it spent more time actually learning at school than I did. What would you like to know thank? You don't pretty much everything I really would. I mean there's so many I don't for example understand visual intelligence. My landline went out and my family insisted that I get your cell phone because the people who repair your landlines very slow in doing the job so I got the cell cell phone and I pretty much knew how to make a call on it. I couldn't get incoming calls. I couldn't I didn't which PUTNEY press so I said to my grandson. Who at the the time is seven years old? He's not twelve I said to him. Would you be good enough. I said just to show me because I didn't know how to get an incoming call. He said to me I've shown you how to do do this three times. I am not doing it again. That puts you in your place. We spoke about earlier about that feeling of sometimes sometimes being alone and how the Internet and technology can unite us in a way. And I'm conscious that this podcast is going into people's ears and probably quite an isolated needed fashion. We have an audience of one in front of us and many people I think in a me too will be listening to you and say you know you had such bravery and confidence in using your own voice and stepping forward for issues or for characters or for other people and for yourself. Is there any advice or anything that you would say to people who perhaps listening to this and thinking. I don't know how I don't know if I can. I don't know if I should. They're very very difficult questions that if they are asking being themselves that I don't wear one would begin to do this. But experience is out there as others have experienced it in order. I mean and so you can tap into that but I didn't feel that anything I've done is particularly brave or outside the Norman ascendance partly because malicious my theory. Partly because I was raised by women I mean I was born in nineteen thirty six aches. You know older men in my family way war for those six years. I was raised by my mom and my aunts. My Grandma's and they also part from raising children. The country didn't they and as happened in the first world war where they had been an exactly similar situation except except that the end of that they will million men who didn't come home those women who run the country. Run the family's done everything with Patti Dilma head toll. Thank you very much. Now Go away go back. Oh did the cooking the cleaning and I think partly by what it happened out first World War I mean we got the vote eventually. Didn't we in the United Kingdom. I'm partly of the reaction of the Second World War they lose generations weren't prepared to just go away and get on with it and I think that's sort of fed into me and that was something very much that I value. Yeah I mean life had dealt all women in my family fairly a rupee cards but they are had a sense of humor. They you strongly believed in not crying over spilt milk That you know life was there to be live together and do it and don't Moan and those were very valuable and beneficial lessons so too nasty and competence confidence. I mean just just do wit thing happen and speaking of just doing it. We're sitting here. We are reimagining boldly this society that we want to build and live live in. What's the one thing you wanna see? I would just like to see the knowledge of. How is this paradoxical? Oh I know this. We are uniquely individual every single one of Assam face but we have so much share. If only we could and we should Let's hope we will Glenda Jackson. It has been the most extraordinary privilege to sit across from you this afternoon to learn from you and laugh with you and I want to hopefully instill inspiration some ideas to those who are listening. Thank you so much for being on asthma today on a U.. It's been a real pleasure to meet you. It's okay if I'm honest. That was one of the very first episode that I ever recorded episode nervous. Literally you could see my hands shaking on the table. But I hope that didn't come through to you Glenda for sharing yourself with us. This week's someone you should know is also an actress but like me. She's a little person her name is Ron Mills. And she is extraordinary in so many ways but you might be familiar with her work because she's currently starring in Harlem on Hulu. I've admired Franz work for such a long time and she's really challenging challenging the parts that people can play when they're born into specific types of bodies. If you're not already following go do so immediately on instagram. She's fron on mills that's F. or A. N. N. N. Mills M. I. L. S. as me with Sinead is a lemonade media original and his executive produced by Jessica Cordova Kramer assistant produced by Claire. Jones an edited by Ivan Cure. F- music by Jerome Rankin. Our sales sales and distribution partners Westwood one. If you've liked what you've heard don't be shy. Tell your friends or listening. Subscribe on Apple Stitcher spotify or wherever you like to listen and and rate and review as well to continue the conversation. Find me on instagram twitter at the park and find Lemon Adam media on instagram twitter and facebook. Look lemonade media..

Glenda Jackson Joel Jerome Rankin PUTNEY United Kingdom Patti Dilma Harlem Ron Mills N. N. Mills M. Norman Assam Lemon Adam Jones instagram facebook Franz
"glenda jackson" Discussed on As Me with Sinéad

As Me with Sinéad

10:41 min | 7 months ago

"glenda jackson" Discussed on As Me with Sinéad

"Less than men suddenly took on as far as I was concerned. The realizations that I I wasn't alone in feeling at an up to that point I had thought I was the new personal knives. You know just too big for my own boots is my area of the world would put it and so those kinds of fundamental realities which we are not alone in what we're feeling we're not alone in what we're experiencing and that it can produce profound profound and fundamentally basic good changes now societies is a great treschow Russia nets. Even though I'm very critical. Immune of how social media can be misused then. We can misuse everything but on its positive side. It's just amazing. Well I genuinely wouldn't be sitting across from you today without the Internet. My background is in education. I'm in primary school. An elementary schoolteacher. And in many ways I foresaw saw that to be my career for sixty seventy perhaps as years until I retired whatever age they be and I became really interested in fashion because I I felt left out because when I walk through a store I couldn't reach the rails. I couldn't find clothes. I couldn't see myself in any of the campaigns so started using social media and on the Internet as a vehicle to tell stories and that has transformed my life. And now we're getting to do something like this with as me with yourself is incredibly uh-huh but exactly as you said it's not always the technology it's how we use it but you spoke there about the importance of visibility which really brings me onto the project that you're currently working on an and as an advocate and as somebody who is disabled and a minority in so many ways there is that phrase. If you can see it you can be an. I have lived all of my life. Wanting getting to see stories or art galleries or museums are institutions exhibiting my experience and a reflection of that it has rarely happened and yet there you are on Broadway in a shakespeare production playing a role that many people perhaps couldn't even conceive of some time ago. Well I have a great friend. Wonderful Spanish actress Nuria s bad and she did King Lear in Barcelona and I went over to see and she was just just marvelous. Some music production and she said to me. Why don't you do it unless you don't be ridiculous? I stopped being by them. I said they would never let me play earlier. In England. Come on anyway I come home and The old vic wanted to play beautiful theater played there before and over time we decided layer there. I was doing it and when I was still impede. Part of one's job was to visit. Is it old. People's Homes Day Centers Jill things of that nature and what I found fascinating was as we grow older as. We're all oh getting to live for much much longer. Those absolute boundaries which defined gender begin to crack. They begin to get a bit fogy but misty and I find that very useful playing Leah and nobody. Nobody ever mentioned it to me from an audience perspective. Nobody's ever accept. A woman said to me one night waiting outside the autographs. It's the first year I've seen. Where was aware of his maternal side? Muqtada what's interesting why putting its you know what I mean. I mean there's aspect there but that is something that I I saw in. You know non Shakespearean characters in them day centers and places like that that yes we do begin to to give up on the gender differentiation of who we are what defines Jamba and so many people have been trying to kind of change and provoked that thought but you spoke there very briefly about how the conversation came about in the old vic and then the role just happened. I would love to learn more. Was it an negotiation. What was your suggestion? Initially the ELVIC were concerned that they were physically. They are physically too close to the globe theatre which is exclusively Shakespeare and they they are in the sense non profit organization after think about a province in that way but eventually they said yes. Okay we'll do it and a director who had done the play Nice three times before said yes she would do it and there. We were one of the shocking things for me. Actually was that in the main. It was a young company but but they don't work. These kids adore worked. They had never worked on a theatrical stage. All their work had been for cameras. Television of film microphones phones. I couldn't believe couldn't believe that they'd never been on a theatrical stage. You feel like you were going back to your childhood and being the eldest sibling again. No I really didn't because there is something very remarkable and I think we're very fortunate those who have the privilege wjr experiencing it in the theater. You have to communicate telling level which is much deeper than the normal kind of former getting though people slowly that kind of thing and you may not see some of the. I've had this experience many many times for decades and you bump into them in the street and it is as though you've both just walked out of the same coffee bar having had coffee. Do you know what I mean this that kind of interaction always and walk into a theater which I had worked. It didn't several times before it was as though I'd never been away a friend of mine when I was worrying about doing it said to me. Oh come on. I sat in. What if I've forgotten how to do it? She said W dickey. She says he's like riding a bicycle. You never forget how to do it so they were very worried I was. I was very worried. Read not so much that forget how do because you know you do it for the first time every performance. But I didn't think I would have the physical strength all the vocal strength. Thanks to actually do it so I started exercising would walk down the hill from my house to the local swimming pool and swim. Have you had to upkeep kind of routine as you've I haven't kept up that routine but I do have a very kind of my working day starts to clog. The cutting doesn't go up until seven but from two o'clock on there's nothing other than that and within the performance in the play a what's been the most challenging moment well the most challenging moment is walking onto the stage because as as I said every performance for me is the first time I've done it I give you a precise example of but I mean I worked. I did lovely play called Stevie which was about the poet Stevie Smith and marvelous marvelous actress. Komen Washburn played my aunt and we would sit on the stage waiting zinc. The curtain goes up every performance and she had been the product of a theatrical family. I think she'd been working in theatre acting since you about seven or eight. She was highly regarded marvelous actress. And she's out there on the Sofa in her seventies every performance. And she'd say please God let me die and the curtain went up and she was fine she didn't she survived. Die Just kicked the ball out of bug an being involved in politics and stepping forward and being a voice. Not just for yourself but for your constituents there is so many opportunities in which you can be criticized criticized quite publicly and quite vocally has that and being a politician and that experience of of criticism helped acting or are they different entities rather different entities. The one benefit that I had was years ago. I remember reading a report here. In New York doc that had studied what we as human beings fear most and after death public speaking is the thing we fear most and and for me. That was no problem I could you know. Stand up. Speak to room full of strangers and things like that. Didn't bother me at all and tempted to ask you what you do. Fear flying petrifies getting a cold guessing some minor ailment that will reduce the energy. I've got all kinds of practical things. All the physicality galaxy visas physicality and across your career. I mean you're a parent an advocate. You have won. Oscars Emmy's and Tony's Tony's and you know you've you don't win them actually. I mean I really. They're very nice to receive as gifts and that's what they are. But I mean you're not competing without the people in that sense when you're acting I mean when you doing play for instance. Everyone is responsible for the whole play largest more clout at every produce on publicity ability and also in film so. I didn't regard that I've won them. It's not like a running race in the Olympics. They're very nice. They don't make any better but eighteen the very nice to get well. How did you feel when you got them? Pretty much that talks about the coal with regard to the Oscars. It's something like three o'clock in the morning. So Oh I wasn't in my best receptive mood but no I mean they're nice but they go so they don't hold that overwhelming value for you. Acting only only exists when you do it and you do it for an audience. And it's that I mean they're strangest sitting in the dark. We strange his come on in the light at energy goes the light to the darkness. Fortunate Cup back to the light reinforced and if it really really works I've experienced experienced this you do create a circle of energy which may have caused these an ideal model of an ideal society. But that's what it's about. What is that circle of energy tangible? Absolutely what does it feel. It feels as though it's partly the energy obviously the plate self but of an audience's attention concentration. You are believable to them. The play place. You in extraordinary can't way is is a truly unique experience and I think it's unique for the audience as well. It's not just unique for the actors and has there been a moment that the end of a play okay at the end of a project when that circle of energy has been at. Its most heightened..

Stevie Smith Russia Tony Leah Jamba King Lear ELVIC Nuria s Jill England Komen Washburn W dickey Oscars Olympics Barcelona New York Emmy
"glenda jackson" Discussed on As Me with Sinéad

As Me with Sinéad

09:48 min | 7 months ago

"glenda jackson" Discussed on As Me with Sinéad

"Is immutable. We don't change. I mean hopefully. The human condition nations can be improved and set new. We've seen that around the world but that acceptance regardless of our external envelope we the same is something that is absolutely vital. I think fo- everything in truth and I sometimes wonder whether it's beginning to fray rabbit run the edges. I mean I I was just thinking back to when the Second World War was on and American troops ability in our street on the other side of the street where we live but nonetheless I'm when the V Day celebrations took place which was a street party. These guys absolutely raided their PX on base with these cans and cans and Adams enormous cans of ice cream. I don't think the kids liked it because we'd never tasted but in the adults Demand for our lack but those guys would send care packages to our street. Virtually every house for almost two years I mean I can still remember the fights. My sister and I would have because always in the cap package that would be a tin of fruit cocktail and my mother would meticulously Measure Asia Route Harmony Cherries in each dish. Because they were the big thing a my sister I would count to make sure that we have equal number of cherries. In addition fruit cocktail and America is as you know across the world you see examples of huge compassion and generosity to other human beings. But it's on the as you pointed down. It's on the direct face-to-face individual meeting individual. You seem to be losing all sense of who we are but I think it's about making sure that that compassion is rhythmic. And by that I mean it is often reactionary as you have just said that when an incident happens we are overwhelmed by that moment mm-hmm and respond which such emotion but often there is a time that lapses then which we become reconditioned by system. So how do we change in a sustainable way. We'll speak immune. I was being here politically from dimensioned there by defining that in paps different ways. I mean the obvious ways taxation. I believe Egalitarian Societies. You put forward that argument of regarding taxes being benefit to everybody knew get very scathing ebbing responses but not exclusively that the idea of how in a sense. What we're talking about here is how you create a functioning coming society? Isn't it and we have to be. I think more imaginative in how we define constitutes that society and also in on our ambition we have to be as aspirational as possible. But you mentioned there your time aspiration for for that society not I mean I think we are sprays me but too often it is singular. It's our own aspirations. It seen Cena's what we as individuals achieve. When in fact of course the real aspirations should be of how we come back aspirated national for each other as well as for ourselves and I think the increasing diversity of different types of voices that get to participate in that conversation of Water Society should look Blake? Intern would evolve and something that's a bit more fairer and just for everybody should get off the idea of what it should look like but rather more into what does it feel like I think that way and you you mentioned there but your time in politics one of the things that strikes me most from your career is the fact that you have have such a strong voice and sense of it. Either as an actress and actor either as a politician. But I really wanted to know and to learn from you. Were you very cognizant unconscious growing up of having something to say feeling like there was injustices or there was an important for you to step forward and to be an advocate or was it much more organic in that way. I think it happened. I mean I had no great sense of purpose really I mean I left school with no particularly qualification. I was fortunate enough in those days. If you've got a place as I did at the drama school your local authority paid for it at those days ago. That was interesting going through that process of Being University of credit profession. Virtually never being employed until the point where you were being employed but that sense of there being something that one could do within that kind of structure. which for me was a party? I think came rather late down the road but nonetheless. I'm very glad that it did. I'd always supported voted the Labor Party when I was old enough to vote just a little side track when I was an impede. Have all these school kids who come in you dance answer questions and a recurring question. Always for secondary school pupils was Why can't we vote at sixteen as opposed to eighteen? We can join the army army we can get married. We have to pay taxes. My response always was from my point of view Because you don't vote when you are eighteen it'd be interesting seeing the futures if they will vote in their eighteen but that sense of the possibility of as all working together to create a kind of society in which everyone can function to their best capacity came rather late in the day but I'm grateful that it did inland grateful. The varies afforded the opportunity. Not so much Well yes yes I mean. It is a privileged in the chamber. The House of Commons. And all that kind of thing but the real privilege is representing your constituents in as I was lucky lucky enough to be elected for constituency and it is a true privilege and very Ino as an MP hold advice surgeries chase and people would come in never seen before my live did note them. They didn't know me and they laid their life out on the table in front view. Because you who is the member of parliament with port of last resort and not infrequently. There's lies terrible through no fault of the individuals and the Tuli humbling thing. Whether you've got the result they wanted over the didn't they all invariably set. Thank you anything you've given me but for me they'd given me not that great great gift. Their vote not a gift right that they put the cross next year. Name Your Party and they always say thank you. Why do you think they put that cross beside your name and your party? Well the people like me will always vote. Labour always vote conservative effective always vote Lib. Dem always vote whichever party. They're associated with their those who actually read the Party Manifestos only festivals and their principals. Not You know one hundred percent but nonetheless there is a community of purpose there for others. It's the first time and they just won't vote and I'm not saying you know it's the first alphabetic letter. They recognized that promotes their vote. Not Not that at all. But what was really really interesting to me was over the brexit referendum that vote it was the largest. I just turn out of voters ever recorded in my country be it local elections which always fairly small turn to general elections and that came as biggest shock to me as the actual result. I'm still trying to get my head around. I come from Ireland heads to you very large extraordinary referendums and in recent history where we've had a huge number of people going to the Poles again the power of that voice and I think particularly clete within my instance you know the power of that young people's voice and the power of also individuals are two most recent referendums were about marriage equality and a woman's right to choose absolutely absolutely fantastic fantastic destroy but change came about not just because of political lead but to the agency of individuals who are sitting sitting with family and friends and explaining some of the most difficult or vulnerable or emotional parts of their lives whether that was coming out whether that was an abortion that they taught to have in their youth and exactly as we've been talking about building that human connection and saying this isn't just about politics this isn't just else to vote left or right conservative or liberal. This is about people and I think so often when we talk about politics sometimes we we forget that this is a bet people absolutely absolutely because there is that thing. Even though I've been very critical of artificial intelligence and social media and that kind of thing in the early part of our conversation nonetheless I am convinced that that social media has had an influence on these kinds of fundamental changes now societies. Because it's meant I mean I go back to when I was much much younger than I am now now and I can remember. There seemed suddenly to be a flood of writings of books of communication in update without social media. In that way actually arguing that we've been had a second rate definition as far as the world was concerned and that whole idea of being.

Labor Party Adams America Being University of credit Ireland Cena army army Water Society House of Commons Blake
"glenda jackson" Discussed on As Me with Sinéad

As Me with Sinéad

13:04 min | 7 months ago

"glenda jackson" Discussed on As Me with Sinéad

"This episode of Azmi with nate is brought to you by Chanel. The Legendary Fashion House founded by Gabrielle. Chanel a visionary woman who created on her own terms and continues to inspire women today. Discover her story at inside Chanel Dot Com in Gabrielle. Chanels quest for freedom..

Tony Awards Preview

Popcorn with Peter Travers

12:40 min | 1 year ago

Tony Awards Preview

"Hi, everybody. It's Peter Travers than welcome to our special popcorn Tony award show. Now, I've gotta say, before we get into the nominees about who will win and who should win. This is been the most amazing year in Broadway history. It has made over two billion dollars at the box office that never happened. And why is it? I think it's Hollywood heat everybody from TV from movies from us. It wants to be on Broadway. They wanna be on that stage. You got this year. Kylo Ren and driver on Broadway. You have Walter, white Bryan, Cranston, there, Jeff Daniels who played Harry done in too, dumb and dumber movies. They're all fighting to be best, dramatic actor, what kind of stuff is happening on Broadway. Well, let's start with the major categories, and I'm gonna start with best musical the nominees are ain't too, proud the life and times of the temptations Beetlejuice remember that movie Haiti's town, the prom, and Tootsie. You remember that movie too? Well. I think the winner is Haiti's town. It's a rigid. It's basically the myth of Orpheus ritzy, but it's got a score by a woman named Naess Mitchell who doesn't come from Broadway, at all and kind of revolutionizes it. So what would happen what could spoil the fun? There's a little musical called the prom. It's really it's totally original. It's about these bunch of Broadway veterans, and they're really hard bitten, and they're not getting any press, and they decide to go to Indiana and help, a lesbian high school student take her girlfriend to the prom. That's it. How good is it? It's really good. And in terms of the Hollywood connection, Ryan Murphy, went to see it fell in love with it, and he's making a movie of it. So how about that? Then we have best play the Ferryman choirboy, Gary a sequel to Titus andronicus. What the constitution means to me an ink. I'm telling you people, the Ferryman is got to be a movie soon. It's an Irish play. It's about the troubles, and in on a stage. We get to see an entire family deal with violence deal with their own feuds. We've got babies onstage. We've got live alive goose. We have everything there's nothing like I don't think there's any competition for it at all except there was a snub, the most successful play in Broadway history. That's not a musical is to kill among bird, and for some reason, the Tony nominee said, let's not nominated what I want. Answer on that one best revival of a play. Arthur, Miller's all my sons the boys in the band, burn this torch song and the Waverley gallery. I think Arthur Miller's all my sons which brought a net. Bending back to Broadway is a show that he wrote in one thousand nine hundred forty seven a bout a guy who was manufacturing airplane, parts and was to rush to do it. And so the planes crashed and killed pilots during the war. We live in the world of Boeing. Now, how timely could this be? So I think that's really up there. And I in terms of seeing a show that by playwright Arthur Miller who says, let's deal with the world we live in this one really, really did it then we have bible of musical. This is easy, because there's only two there's Oklahoma Rogers and Hammerstein Oklahoma and kiss me. Kate. Of course, they were both movies. We saw Oklahoma with Gordon MacRae and Shirley Jones in the fifties. But kiss me, Kate is done in a traditional way. Kelli o'hara's in it, Oklahoma is directed by guide named Daniel fish who find darkness. We're Rogers and Hammerstein only found light. It's a revelation to watch this. It's not the Oklahoma you've ever remembered, and it sung in the kind of country western way, look, if you ever get to see this on Broadway or win a tours get there get there quick. Okay. Okay. Best actor in a musical. And so, we'll do alphabetically Brooks as Mantas in the prom, Derrick Baskin and ain't too, proud the life and times of the temptations Alex Brightman and Beetlejuice. Remember when Michael Keaton had their part, Damon down, oh in Rogers and Hammerstein, Oklahoma. And send Tino fun Tanna into okay? The favorite is Tino, Tanna who is playing the part that destined Hoffman immortalized in the movie in the nineteen eighties. But what Centeno Tanna doesn't remember him on TV in crazy ex girlfriend like I'm saying everybody's from TV, or he does so much more. He sings as a man sees a woman, he does physical comedy does everything but stand on his hat. And I say, you know, who's out there that can spoil the win for Santino Tanna. And my answer is no one because this is one of the great performances you'll ever see on a musical, comedy stage. He's the winner. Best actress in a play Benning in Arthur, Miller's all my sons, Laura, Donnelly, in the Ferryman. Elaine may in the Waverley gallery, Janet mcteer in Bernhardt hamlet, Laurie Metcalf in Hillary Clinton, and Heidi Shreck in what the constitution means to me. Okay. Elaine may doesn't win this Tony. You're going to hear from me. She's eighty seven years old. She's returned to Broadway. After decades to play the part of a woman fighting Alzheimer's, and everything is no perfect about what she's done. She started with Mike Nichols doing comedy. She was starring in movies of like the new leaf directed things like the heartbreak kid. She's just one of the best actors I've ever seen anywhere. And if she loses and, you know, I feel bad for an bending because if Elaine may wasn't here this year, I think she would be the winner, but come on. Attention must be paid people. And I also wanna talk about a snub how. How does Glenda Jackson who won the Tony last year for three women returned to Broadway as King Lear? We talk about the age of hashtag metoo and time's up Glenda. Jackson is playing king. Lear gets rave reviews and the Tony committee says we're not gonna nominate her now. No, we're paying attention. And we're gonna come back and get you our best actress in a musical. Stephanie, j block in the share show Caitlyn Kanoun in the prom Beth level, in the prom, Eva nobles, ADA in Haiti's town, and Kelley O'Hara and kiss me cake. Stephanie j block who is that theater veteran is playing share in a way that sometimes she's more share than share. You might think this is just an escapist show thing to know she finds the character of who she is share shows up at this show often does numbers with her, and pus share. There's who's a bigger Hollywood. Name who is coming to Broadway with the show about herself. It takes three actresses to play here. But Stephanie j block plays the central one. And she plays the hell out of it. So she has just got to win. I'm sorry, people. All right. Best featured actress in a play for new of Flanagan in the Ferryman seal, you keep. And Bolger into kill a Mockingbird. Christine Nelson, Gary a sequel to Titus andronicus Julie white and Gary sequel to Titus andronicus and Ruth Wilson and King Lear people if you see if you see to kill among bird, and you should seal, you Keenan Bolger is very controversial because she's playing scout scout in the book and in the movie remember is in eight or nine year old girl. A C Keenan Bolger is in her forties. And yet, what she finds in this character who grew up to be Harper who wrote this novel is the heart and soul of the peace. So I'm telling you people this, this has got to happen. See Keenan Bolger remember that name best featured actor in a play birdie Carville and ink, Robin to hasten boys in the band getting Glick into kill a monkey bird, Brandon your Ranna wits in burn this Benjamin Walker in Arthur Miller's. All my sons birdie, Carville in ink. Those of us, those of you who actually went to Broadway couple of years ago and saw of any kind of a musical where you were shocked at a man playing a woman, you saw birdie, Carville in Matilda, and he played this woman, this horrible headmistress, and now he's playing Rupert Murdoch. So every who in Hollywood, who in politics would anyone hasn't been in an Rupert Murdoch publication or paper and who hasn't been rolled over the coals in it that performance and in London when he played it in one and Olivia ward, he had to play it in front of Rupert Murdoch. It's just an incredible job. I wanna talk a little about the snubs in this category. The non nominees there isn't actor named Bengal Arghanab into Killa mugging bird who plays Tom Robinson. He is the black man who is on trial for raping a white woman, a crime never committed. And he's defended. By Jeff Daniels. Atticus Finch when Aaron Sorkin adapted Harper Lee's novel to the stage. He did it so that he could expand the role of the black characters as he did here. And again, the Tony committee, decided only to nominate the white actors from tequila, Mockingbird ignoring the two black actors who are just brilliant in their roles. You people you're going to get called on the carpet. You need to all right? Best featured actress in a musical, Lilli Cooper in Tootsie, amber, gray and Haiti's town Sarah, styles Tootsie, alley stroke, or in Rogers and Hammerstein Oklahoma and Mary, Testa in Rogers, and Hammerstein Oklahoma there, something totally remarkable that happened this year in stroke, and Oklahoma. This is a woman who when she was two years old was in an automobile crash, and was never able to walk again. And now on Broadway playing eight oh Anne who is like the sexual. Time bomb in Oklahoma, the one who sings, I can't say, no, the part went to Allie. Stroke, she plays it in a wheelchair and you would think that's inspiring enough. But when you watch her play at you, forget the wheelchair exists, and you're watching her take over the stage like Dolly Parton. She, it's just an amazing thing to watch and it works on so many levels. So I wanna be there when she wins that Tony, and I want to be standing up and applauding and going Bravo. She deserves all right. Best featured actor in a musical Andre shields in Haiti town and a groups Luccin. That's a good name into Patrick page in Haiti's town germy, pope in into proud the life and times of the temptations and Ephraim Sykes ain't too, proud the life and times of the temptations, the favorite, the one, I think will win is under the shields and Haiti's town. He's seventy three years old. He stands on that stage is the narrator in like a silver suit. In total control of body and every movement and pulls you in till you're memorized. Your mesmerizing you not take your eyes off of hundred shields. This is a veteran actor who needs to get this Tony. But what if he didn't who would go to there's a young actor named Jeremy pope who plays Eddie kendricks in the into proud the life and times of the temptations? And who does he's playing a difficult man. One of the most difficult of the temptations. But one of the most talented as well. He's also nominated this year as best actor in a in a play in choir, boy, this is to me, the brightest newcomer that you will see on the stage and you're going to see him everywhere, stage movies television. It's just the beginning. So if you get to see this, you're going to be able to tell your friends, I was there win. Okay. Best director of a play Rupert Gould for Inc. Sam Mendes for the Ferryman Bartlett. Fair for to kill a mocking bird Ivo von Hosver for network, and George C Wolfer Gary a sequel to Titus andronicus Sam Mendis in the Ferryman this play. Does a job on stage that equal to his first movie which was American Beauty, which you may remember won the best picture? Oscar and once Mendis the Oscar as best director.

Haiti Oklahoma Arthur Miller Hammerstein Oklahoma Hollywood King Lear Rogers Keenan Bolger Jeff Daniels Elaine Glenda Jackson Titus Andronicus Tony Award Rupert Murdoch Waverley Gallery Peter Travers Gary Harper Lee Centeno Tanna Stephanie J
"glenda jackson" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"glenda jackson" Discussed on Here & Now

"And we only found it all out in the last ten years, quite spirituality. I didn't think of really processed it properly every day getting inside my grandmother skin, which is profound when your kid you put adults on a pedestal, and you see them in a certain way, and so need to get onto my grandmother at the age of nineteen and to tell her story, and then tell my dad's story at the age of eighteen that's been really amazing for me. Glenda, you've been nodding while she's been talking. And I'm thinking of how you've said that you've worked with men most of your life because the theater doesn't have as many roles for women. And I'm wondering if you are looking over at Ruthin thinking, it's changed a bit. It hasn't changed too. I mean, it's really scandalous. I find that contemporary dramatists. Don't fund women interesting. We are rarely ever the central dramatic engine with there's some kind of odd junked. There have been major changes and stills still that has not crept into the modern dramatists view of the world. And I find that quite bemusing, actually. And even if the lead from still the victims. I mean, I've been frustrated myself and that as a way of why I've been making my I'm walk will condition by the patriarchy. So even women of lighting stories, which still have women at the center who victims undis- head is about to explore. Well, no, I mean what I want to do. There is still the prevailing on the belly. The different woman is successful. She's exception the proves through if a woman is a failure that all failures, and that has not shift, and even though we have made strides and we'll hopefully continue to make them. It's very hard. Just one last question Ruth Wilson. So what is it like to be like right next? Glenda jet like crawled up does is there like a Spar treats me with overwhelming contempt. Maybe a special electrical field or some like an electric shock every time. I get close. Own asleep. Under somebody's being with you. Because I don't know what she's drinking she's on some sort of energy juice. The I need to have some amazing energy levels. Marvelous. What about you? Not as much energy in the play. We don't change about it. Just drives us full with interacting and fine with each other. That's why you do the job. Of course. It is Glenda Ruth. Thank you both so much. Thank you. Thank you. King Lear stars Ruth Wilson. And Glenda Jackson and a crime has been committed. Glenda Jackson was not nominated for Tony for her Lear, maybe because she won last year for Edward Albee's. Three toll women, but Ruth Wilson was nominated for feature actress, they are both extraordinary..

Glenda jet Glenda Jackson Ruth Wilson Glenda Ruth King Lear Edward Albee Tony ten years
"glenda jackson" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"glenda jackson" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Let's get back to my interview with Glenda Jackson last year. She wanted Tony for her performance in Edward all bees play three tall women. These performances were her return to acting after spending twenty three years as a member of parliament in the labor party. Let's hear what you had to say in parliament after Margaret Thatcher died and this was. In twenty thirteen and there were many tributes made in parliament. And this was a day. I think when most of the labor members of parliament stayed away and conservative members were saying, you know, giving many tributes to Margaret Thatcher. And then you stood up and made a pretty scathing speech while conservative members of parliament, basically jeered you so let's hear what you had to say. That everything I had been taught to regard as a vice. And I still regard them as vices under Thatcherism was in fact, a virtue greed, selfishness, no Ken for the weekend shop elbows shop needs. They with the wave. Continue to here. Me from all. The barriers condemn. The establishment? That was destroyed cone take it. What we actually saw the learned that has been circling around with stars around. It is that she created an aspirational society. Aspired for things as indeed one of the former prime ministers who himself had been elevated to the house of lords spoke about selling off, the family, silver and people knowing under those years, the price of everything and the value of nothing. What concerns me is that? I am beginning to see possibly the re emergence of that total traducing what I regard as being the basis spiritual nature of this country, where we do care about society where we do believe in communities where we do not leave people to walk by on the other side that isn't happening now while. So did you expect that reaction when you decided to make those code? Yes. Of course. I mean, not up there in the chamber for several hours is one does for these kinds of events before. I was called by the speaker. Yes, I'd be nice out there listening to her party rewriting history. As far as I was concerned the United Kingdom that they were describing under Thatcher was not the one I'd lived in. It wasn't the one my constituents live it in. And it certainly isn't the one that was there when she left did you miss acting while you were in parliament. Oh, no, no acting exists when you do it. So if if you're not doing it. There's nothing demands wait a minute. I miss things. I'm not doing. Like what? My missing frazzled. You know, I I mean, we all miss things that we're not doing and we miss them because we're not doing them. So but the doing is dependent on so much mold than telephoning, your friend. I mean, this is a process outside of which you all I mean, the the creation of fort, hopefully, someone will suggest you do is outside you'll re-met. And so that's why I say unless you're doing it. There's nothing to miss. Okay. Let me rephrase this did you ever miss the process of getting into character learning the role thinking about the role thinking about the intentions of the character and interacting with other actors on a set or on stage to create a scene to create a movie or a play. Well, that would presuppose I had nothing to do other than think about I had nothing to do..

Margaret Thatcher Glenda Jackson Ken Edward United Kingdom Tony lords twenty three years
"glenda jackson" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"glenda jackson" Discussed on From Scratch

"Let's get back to my interview with Glenda Jackson last year. She wanted Tony for her performance in Edward all bees play three tall women. These performances were her return to acting after spending twenty three years as a member of parliament in the labor party. Let's hear what you had to say in parliament after Margaret Thatcher died and this was. In twenty thirteen and there were many tributes made in parliament. And this was a day. I think when most of the labor members of parliament stayed away and conservative members were saying, you know, giving many tributes to Margaret Thatcher. And then you stood up and made a pretty scathing speech while conservative members of parliament, basically jeered you so let's hear what you had to say. That everything I had been taught to regard as a vice. And I still regard them as vices under Thatcherism was in fact, a virtue greed, selfishness, no Ken for the weekend shop elbows shop needs. They with the wave. Continue to here. Me from all. The barriers condemn. The establishment? That was destroyed cone take it. What we actually saw the learned that has been circling around with stars around. It is that she created an aspirational society. Aspired for things as indeed one of the former prime ministers who himself had been elevated to the house of lords spoke about selling off, the family, silver and people knowing under those years, the price of everything and the value of nothing. What concerns me is that? I am beginning to see possibly the re emergence of that total traducing what I regard as being the basis spiritual nature of this country, where we do care about society where we do believe in communities where we do not leave people to walk by on the other side that isn't happening now while. So did you expect that reaction when you decided to make those code? Yes. Of course. I mean, not up there in the chamber for several hours is one does for these kinds of events before. I was called by the speaker. Yes, I'd be nice out there listening to her party rewriting history. As far as I was concerned the United Kingdom that they were describing under Thatcher was not the one I'd lived in. It wasn't the one my constituents live it in. And it certainly isn't the one that was there when she left did you miss acting while you were in parliament. Oh, no, no acting exists when you do it. So if if you're not doing it. There's nothing demands wait a minute. I miss things. I'm not doing. Like what? My missing frazzled. You know, I I mean, we all miss things that we're not doing and we miss them because we're not doing them. So but the doing is dependent on so much mold than telephoning, your friend. I mean, this is a process outside of which you all I mean, the the creation of fort, hopefully, someone will suggest you do is outside you'll re-met. And so that's why I say unless you're doing it. There's nothing to miss. Okay. Let me rephrase this did you ever miss the process of getting into character learning the role thinking about the role thinking about the intentions of the character and interacting with other actors on a set or on stage to create a scene to create a movie or a play. Well, that would presuppose I had nothing to do other than think about I had nothing to do..

Margaret Thatcher Glenda Jackson Ken Edward United Kingdom Tony lords twenty three years
"glenda jackson" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"glenda jackson" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Was responsible for delivering services to people in local environments every school in what became my constituency spent the teachers parents not infrequently the pupils spent spare time trying to raise money to buy things like paper and pencils. And now it sounds ridiculous. But that was the case books you go into school library. I mean, they were these books that were falling apart or they were being held together. It was by bit of wallpaper. The teacher dropped it in and stuck down with zella tape. The NHS was being attempted to be restructured the national health service. Absolutely as a woman who feels strongly about women's equality. An I assume you consider yourself a feminist was disappointing to you. They're finally a woman becomes prime minister. And she's she's so conservative and stands for so many things that you are against well. I mean, the overwhelming disappointment actually was that my party didn't win. I mean general may even I mean at that time, but it was just that she seemed to me to be so out of touch with with what were the realities of life for the majority of people in my country. And yes, of course, it was a disappointment that the first woman elected as prime minister was her. But I think rob the more at the time. It was that she was a conservative. It was any of the years that when saw what we're for me. Disastrous policies wreaking such damage. My guest is Glenda Jackson. She starring on Broadway in a new production of King Lear in the role of Lear. We'll talk more after a break, and our linguist Jeff number will talk about the word socialism and its place in current political discourse, I'm. Terry gross.

prime minister Glenda Jackson King Lear NHS Terry gross Jeff number
"glenda jackson" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"glenda jackson" Discussed on From Scratch

"Was responsible for delivering services to people in local environments every school in what became my constituency spent the teachers parents not infrequently the pupils spent spare time trying to raise money to buy things like paper and pencils. And now it sounds ridiculous. But that was the case books you go into school library. I mean, they were these books that were falling apart or they were being held together. It was by bit of wallpaper. The teacher dropped it in and stuck down with zella tape. The NHS was being attempted to be restructured the national health service. Absolutely as a woman who feels strongly about women's equality. An I assume you consider yourself a feminist was disappointing to you. They're finally a woman becomes prime minister. And she's she's so conservative and stands for so many things that you are against well. I mean, the overwhelming disappointment actually was that my party didn't win. I mean general may even I mean at that time, but it was just that she seemed to me to be so out of touch with with what were the realities of life for the majority of people in my country. And yes, of course, it was a disappointment that the first woman elected as prime minister was her. But I think rob the more at the time. It was that she was a conservative. It was any of the years that when saw what we're for me. Disastrous policies wreaking such damage. My guest is Glenda Jackson. She starring on Broadway in a new production of King Lear in the role of Lear. We'll talk more after a break, and our linguist Jeff number will talk about the word socialism and its place in current political discourse, I'm. Terry gross.

prime minister Glenda Jackson King Lear NHS Terry gross Jeff number
"glenda jackson" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"glenda jackson" Discussed on From Scratch

"In a new production of King Lear when of Shakespeare's greatest tragedies Jackson plays Lear giving her the opportunity to take on one of the most challenging and prestigious roles in theatre history. But it's a role that for obvious reasons. Always goes to a man near times theater critic Ben Brantley wrote, she is delivering a powerful. And deeply perceptive performance as the most royally demented of Shakespeare's monarchs unquote, King Lear opened on Broadway this month, but Jackson had already played Lear in a London production that opened in twenty sixteen at the old Vic last year. She wanted Tony for her performance in the Edward all be play. Three tall women. It's been an incredible return to acting after serving twenty three years as a member of parliament. She was elected in nineteen Ninety-two and step down in twenty fifteen her career before that included Oscar winning performances. In the nineteen sixty nine movie women in love and the nineteen Seventy-three romantic comedy a touch of class. She won two Emmys playing Queen Elizabeth the first in the nineteen seventy-one BBC series, Elizabeth r which was shown in the US as part of masterpiece theatre, let's start with a clip from the new Broadway. Production of King Lear Lear has decided that he's old and it's time to unburden himself of his responsibilities as king and divide his kingdom among his three daughters. No, we have divided in three Yala kingdom, and is our I intend to shake all cares and business from our converting them on youngest rates. Well, we I'm. Dead wrong who won deck. Glenda jackson. Welcome to fresh air. Thank you. The first thing people always seem to want to know is why is the woman playing King Lear, and what's it like to be a woman playing Lear?.

King Lear Lear Glenda jackson Shakespeare Ben Brantley Oscar Tony London US Elizabeth r BBC twenty three years
"glenda jackson" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"glenda jackson" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"In a new production of King Lear when of Shakespeare's greatest tragedies Jackson plays Lear giving her the opportunity to take on one of the most challenging and prestigious roles in theatre history. But it's a role that for obvious reasons. Always goes to a man near times theater critic Ben Brantley wrote, she is delivering a powerful. And deeply perceptive performance as the most royally demented of Shakespeare's monarchs unquote, King Lear opened on Broadway this month, but Jackson had already played Lear in a London production that opened in twenty sixteen at the old Vic last year. She wanted Tony for her performance in the Edward all be play. Three tall women. It's been an incredible return to acting after serving twenty three years as a member of parliament. She was elected in nineteen Ninety-two and step down in twenty fifteen her career before that included Oscar winning performances. In the nineteen sixty nine movie women in love and the nineteen Seventy-three romantic comedy a touch of class. She won two Emmys playing Queen Elizabeth the first in the nineteen seventy-one BBC series, Elizabeth r which was shown in the US as part of masterpiece theatre, let's start with a clip from the new Broadway. Production of King Lear Lear has decided that he's old and it's time to unburden himself of his responsibilities as king and divide his kingdom among his three daughters. No, we have divided in three Yala kingdom, and is our I intend to shake all cares and business from our converting them on youngest rates. Well, we I'm. Dead wrong who won deck. Glenda jackson. Welcome to fresh air. Thank you. The first thing people always seem to want to know is why is the woman playing King Lear, and what's it like to be a woman playing Lear?.

King Lear Lear Glenda jackson Shakespeare Ben Brantley Oscar Tony London US Elizabeth r BBC twenty three years
"glenda jackson" Discussed on Rough Translation

Rough Translation

11:52 min | 1 year ago

"glenda jackson" Discussed on Rough Translation

"Best. Find out. More at nature's way dot com. That's get back to my interview with Glenda Jackson. She starring on Broadway in King Lear playing Lear it open last month, but she'd already played Lear in London in a different production that opened in twenty sixteen last year. She wanna Tony for her performance in Edward all bees play three tall. Women. These performances were her return to acting after spending twenty three years as a member of parliament in the labor party. Let's hear what you had to say in parliament after Margaret Thatcher died, and this was in twenty thirteen and there were many tributes made in parliament. And this was a day. I think when most of the labor members of parliament stayed away. And so conservative members were saying, you know, giving many tributes to Margaret Thatcher. And then used it up. Made a pretty scathing speech while conservative members of parliament, basically jeered you so let's hear what you had to say. We would told that everything I had been taught to regard as a vice. And I still regard them as vices under Thatcherism was in fact, a virtue greed, selfishness, no care for the weekend. Shop elbows shop needs they with the wave. Continue to hear things from home. The barriers condemn factors. The establishment that was destroyed comb taken. What we actually saw the land that has been settling around with stars around. It is that she creative an aspirational society. Aspired for things as indeed one of the former prime ministers who himself had been elevated to the house of lords spoke about selling off, the family, silver and people knowing under those years, the price of everything and the value of nothing. What concerns me is that? I am beginning to see possibly the re emergence of that total traducing what I regard as being the basis spiritual nature of this country, where we do care about society where we do believe in communities where we do not leave people to walk by on the other side that isn't happening now while. So did you expect that reaction when you decided to make those code? Yes. Of course, I may not up there in the chamber for several hours is one does for these kinds of events before. I was cold by the speaker. Yes, I'd be nice out there listening to her party rewriting history. As far as I was concerned the United Kingdom that they were describing under Thatcher was not the one I'd lived in. It wasn't one my constituents limit in. And it said he isn't the one that was there when she left so you step down from parliament in twenty fifteen so you've been gone for you know, a few years right now. Like the issue that is preoccupying England is of course, Brexit. I'm do you feel like England is falling apart during this period of paralysis and all the fears of the conserve. Quences could be if England leaves the u U E you, especially if at least without a deal. Well, I did feel that the country's falling about. But I sat in the think parliament has lost its reason. I just there smolt clips that one sees them the television here in New York, mostly prime minister's question times in the house of Commons. All MRs may yet again coming back from Europe with some ideas, and I sit there, and I look a lot of those faces. I know that people I know, and I think what in the name of all these holy. Are you doing they have simply lost it? And they have to get the heads back in shape and realized that we cannot crash out without a d just be disastrous, and they are going to have to at some point set aside. What seems to be I the. Party political vicissitudes all their own personal view of staying or leaving and concentrate on what is best for the country. And what is best for the country's deal? We had a referendum Yukon argue until the cows come home that should never been a referendum on that issue. I would probably argue for that. Because I would like is this day, but the country's democratic decision was to leave and parliaments bounden duty. It seems to me is to deliver that for the country, but deliver it to the best possible means for the country after out. I'm not doing that. At the moment. I can tell you would you like to see a new referendum some people say, oh, no. What is the point in that? I mean, we have the referendum so say you have a second preference. What's to stop somebody saying, okay? Then let's have a third or the best in five fifteen or twenty five the. Country made a decision. The argument is being put forward by seventh amendment is the country made decision out to total ignorance of what I mean. That was its decision. We count roll the crock back we have to roll it forward. Did you miss acting while you were in parliament? Oh, no, no acting exist when you do it. So if if you're not doing it. There's nothing demands wait a minute. I miss things. I'm not doing. Like what I've my miss seeing friends. You know, I I mean, we all miss things that we're not doing and we miss them because we're not doing them. So but the doing is dependent on so much mold than telephoning, your friend. I mean, she's a process outside of which you all I mean, the the creation of fort, hopefully, someone will suggest you do is outside you'll re-met. And so that's why I say unless you're doing it. There's nothing to miss. Okay. Let me rephrase this did you ever miss the process of getting into character learning the role thinking about the role thinking about the intentions of the character and interacting with other actors on a set or on stage to create a scene to create a movie or a play. Well, that would presuppose I had nothing to do of than think about I had nothing to do. But I do show you being a constituency member of Paula. Is is twenty four seven job, and what comes through the mail off the computer via the phone? I mean, they can't be transfixed thing. Okay. Let me ask this one. See the errors fund. This do you now that you're acting again? Do you miss being a member of parliament not at the present time because of the Brexit quagmire, oh is managed to put this in? But I do miss my constituency. Yes. And I miss the people, you know, that I knew that it was if it was a really interesting constituencies represent. So it seems like you thought about the possibility of serving in parliament or doing some kind of public service where back in the seventies. I'm gonna play an excerpt of nineteen seventy six interview you were interviewed by Colin Grimshaw. This excerpt starts with him asking you about what was then your latest film nasty habits based on a novel by mural sparks. New initiative before it was sent to me with the idea of of it making a very good film and making a very good film with lots of good women's parts in it, which is while you're waving the flag for women's left because they're all women waving ain't now poke it in your eye. When you think work on stage. You get enough nervous always on why? Because it just. Because I think the lonely at the more you realize you don't know and the possibilities for making the wrong choices much greater than the probabilities of making the right ones and. That sorta fairy something that you probably learned to control that. But it doesn't have any less seven the pasta. Jim I'd give up acting and take up social would you do this? Yes. Because I mean, certainly the life of an actress in films he's very short and in the theater, there's a terrible trough when the Renault parts with playing I mean until you sort of hit about sixty few. So the cracking character part, and I really don't see myself hanging around for twenty years waiting to play an obedient something, and I certainly don't see myself sitting at home, just, you know, polishing the phone into coming back to acting not really, no. Okay. The one thing that sounds wrong in that is that you did come back to acting. But everything you say, and that sounds like so contemporary the shortage of roles for women, especially at certain ages, the deal that is an absolute that has not changed during Mike experience in acting. So in that interview clip, you obviously feel strongly about the women's movement or women's lib as he as he called it how no watch I really really feel strongly about. And I wish I could come up with the reason for it is why contemporary dramatists find women so boring. They are rarely if ever the driving dramatic engine of of a play or film of you, you know, and identify that is I mean, we are by no means equal as a gender of Sydney, not worldwide. But that have been major improvements doors have opened for women that were firmly. Locked many decades ago, why don't contemporary dramatists find as interesting, but they don't let's take a short break here. And then we'll talk some more. If you're just joining us. My guest is Glenda Jackson, and she's now starring on Broadway as. King Lear in King Lear. We'll be right back. This is fresh air support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Exxon Mobil, the company that believes that carbon capture technologies are critical for lowering global CO two emissions and more and more. Scientists agree as a leader and capturing emissions in its own perations. Exxon Mobil is working on ways to make this technology. More efficient and affordable for other industries as well. That's the unexpected energy of Exxon Mobil. Find out more at energy factor dot com. Movie season is here and pop culture. Happy hour hasn't been covered for a guide for the blockbusters. You know about an surprise bright spots. You might not we'll tell you what we are looking forward to what were secretly dreading, and what might sneak up on us. Listen, now, and subscribe. You grew up

King Lear Margaret Thatcher Exxon Mobil Glenda Jackson England Europe Tony London United Kingdom Edward Paula New York preoccupying England prime minister Quences Brexit lords
"glenda jackson" Discussed on Believed

Believed

13:10 min | 1 year ago

"glenda jackson" Discussed on Believed

"From WHYY in Philadelphia interior gross with fresh air today. Glenda Jackson, she's on Broadway in a new production of King Lear, starring as Lear. She finds it unremarkable that she's playing the role of a man as we get older. Those absolute barriers that define Genda begin to crack. Jackson took a twenty three year break from acting while she served as a member of parliament in the labor party. Sometimes she was controversial when prime minister Margaret Thatcher died Jackson was jeered by conservatives. As she spoke in parliament about the values. She thought defined Thatcherism greed, selfishness, no cat the week shop elbows shop needs. They the way. Jackson has won two Oscars. Two Emmys and won a Tony last year. My guest. Glenda Jackson is starring on Broadway in a new production of King Lear when her Shakespeare's greatest tragedies Jackson plays Lear giving her the opportunity to take on one of the most challenging and prestigious roles in theatre history. But it's a role that for obvious reasons. Always goes to a man near times theater critic Ben Brantley wrote, she is delivering a powerful. And deeply perceptive performance as the most royally demented of Shakespeare's monarchs unquote, King Lear opened on Broadway this month, but Jackson had already played Lear in a London production that opened in twenty sixteen at the old Vic last year. She wanted Tony for her performance in the Edward all be play. Three tall women. It's been an incredible return to acting after serving twenty three years as a member of parliament. She was elected in nineteen Ninety-two and stepped down in twenty fifteen her career before that and. -cluded Oscar winning performances in the nineteen sixty nine movie women in love and the nineteen Seventy-three romantic comedy a touch of class. She won two Emmys playing Queen Elizabeth the first in the nineteen seventy-one BBC series, Elizabeth r which was shown in the US as part of masterpiece theatre, let's start with a clip from the new Broadway. Production of King Lear Lear has decided that he's old and it's time to unburden himself of his responsibilities as king and divided his kingdom among his three daughters. No, we have divided in three hour kingdom and desire. I intend to shake all cares and business from our converting them on youngest rates while we I'm bed. Who was on deck? Glenda jackson. Welcome to fresh air. Thank you. The first thing people always seem to want to know is why as a woman playing King Lear, and what's it like to be a woman playing Lear? So you I played him in two thousand sixteen at the old Vic in London. Why did you want to play Lear who would refuse the opportunity to work in the play of that stature? I mean is such an extraordinary play like, oh, let Shakespeare essentially he owned the asks three questions who are we what are we wildly and this particular blades, just astonishing human nature is immutable. And so in the sense, it is the most contemporary play around the minute. We in England had been engaged in the kind of gender bend wall. Really? And the marvelous company that was created and succeeded in winning. Those battles. They did all of Shakespeare's histories with over women costs. And so in the sense that battle was over. And what was really into one of the really interesting things for me playing. It was that nobody ever mentioned the fact that I was woman playing ma'am having seen the play. And also the other interesting thing I found in doing it. When I was a member of parliament part of my duties was to visit out people's homes day centers things of that nature, and as we get older. Those absolute barriers that define Genda begin to crack they begin to get a little bit foggy and break up. And if you think about it, I mean when we're born we teach babies don't we girls as we get older we begin to explore. I think rob the more the alternatives to are defined gender. And that certainly for Leary's quite useful. I want to. Elaborate a little bit on how you see gender boundaries blurring or falling away with age and to apply to your own life as well. If you find it applicable will, I think I'm a bit of a cheat. Because when things tough and kind of direct way in my real life. I don't have any qualms about playing the old car. Do you know what I mean? I mean setting as far as underground is concerned young people do get up and and of me as seat the first time it happened. I felt absolutely mortified. I now I'm beginning to get the stage where expected in the mortified if it doesn't happen but nine times out of ten thousand, but indirect reference to the play the things that he kicks out being, you know, he's a guy no one during his entire life. And these eighty is in this play has ever said no to him. And suddenly, someone does say note him. And it all begins to crack for him not in that immediate moment. But that's the story of the play. And so those aspects of him which were overtly masculine because that was the era in which he lived the environment in which he lived begin to move from absolute, I'm rights and everybody else's wrong. That's a simplistic way of putting it don't actually evaluate whether he was always, right. And he begins doubted, and that's very interesting. Are there lines from Lear that have the most meaning to you either? Personally, or that you find most powerful or dramatic to say as an actor. I tried to avoid that I try to observe the world through the characters is but people who see the play do point out lines that a particularly meaningful to them. I was rather regret that they do that. Because then it gets kinda stuck in my head. And I have to find another way of finding first time. If you see what I mean, I think I do that. You don't want to sound like a famous line. You want it to sound like like, it's ease of it. It's you know, it's direct thought. I mean, it's it arises out of the scene that Joe trying to create with the other actors on on the stage. Yeah. But I mean, you know in one's own time. There are lines that sort of reverberation echo. Yeah. Psychiatrists have tried to diagnose Lear like like is this dementia related to age is at some other kind of like cognitive disorder is at manic, depression, you can read all kinds of things at psychiatrists have said. I know you try to be inside the character not outside the character. Nevertheless, do you think what he's experiencing is the onset of age related dementia. I would think it was somewhat unlikely given the time in which it was written. I have you know, I mean, gosh Shakespeare is in my view, the most contemporary writer there is, but I think. At the time. The play was written people living to the age of eighty would have been a fairly rare occurrence, but nonetheless, it is undoubtedly the case that as I've said I've seen it as we get older those kind of gender barriers begin to crack. But also, people must've experienced walked we are experiencing now as we all living too much greater age of the mixture of what is physical and mental decay. And it is in fact, I think a big backhoe most western democracies? How are we going to cope with this the cassette? And if I look at my own country, we now have a much larger nonworking by virtue of age in retirement population than a working population. How we can look after elderly if we are all gonna go down. That road. I know we're not going to go down that road. And they will be I have no doubt advances in bed decode science, but you know, it is something that I think was still tending to think it'll be alright ilmenite and deigned. So the there's the language, of course, is as written but in the production that you're in. Now, you've spent part of the play wearing a tuxedo as do other male characters. The the the costumes are pretty contemporary the furniture is kind of contemporary. So you have this mix of the original hundreds of years old text, and you know, contemporary updating that we physically see there's also music by Philip glass, who is you know, a a very twentieth and twenty first century composer. How do you feel about that coming together of you know, the old tax with aspects? Or you say the otx forgive me in drafting you, but there was a celebration of you years ago. Remember what it was either Shakespeare tho- shakes his death. I contra member. A my grandson school that there from the age of three and till eleven, but I think they about seven when they did this the school celebration of Shakespeare in that way, the teachers went round with their mobile phones, you know, with the cameras on and each class had to had give were given specific Leah line from Shakespeare to say into the camera, and this was compiled into a film, which was delightful, those children had absolutely no difficulty saying any of those lines because the majority of the apartment Postle everyday language now, I mean, just think of the stuff that he wrote and how we use it. I mean within the play I'm transferring it around forget and forgive her prices fallen I mean. That guy was just incredible. So we've been talking about you playing King Lear. Let's hear you as Queen. Elizabeth I in an extra EMMY award winning performance in the BBC series, Elizabeth r which came to the US as part of masterpiece theater. So in this scene, you're the new Queen. You're twenty five years old and unmarried and your council is trying to pressure you to marry quickly. A member of your council challenges you to accept a suitor in front of a Hocquart. And by the end of the scene. Everyone around you is kneeling, and here's my guest. Glenda Jackson with actor as midnight. The Archduke Charles will be most happy to come to England your majesty, and I shall be most happy to see him. But if he comes he will come here as your future husband last to that anything else would come in Qabail, I have often to the imperial ambassador. The imperial ambassador doesn't tell your majesty as well as. I do. But he knows how to listen. The two ambassador magistate listens to what he's meant. And not only to what is said. Then I will say again and meet it the Archduke Charles may come to England as our guest guest and as the husband to build choice. I have not said that to have invited yachts two chows to your call. I have said he is welcome. A very welcome your majesty. I hope welcome as any other guest would be. I'm glad to hear it. I ride to king Philip and tell him that you have invited the Archduke Charles to England. And that he comes here as future husband, if he comes on those terms he had best not come at all. Your highness. He said he was to come here. I have never invited him. I have never said I would marry him. I have never said I would marry anyone.

King Lear Glenda Jackson Shakespeare King Lear Lear Archduke Charles England London Philip glass US Elizabeth r Ben Brantley WHYY Margaret Thatcher prime minister Philadelphia Tony BBC Oscar Leary
"glenda jackson" Discussed on Rough Translation

Rough Translation

13:10 min | 1 year ago

"glenda jackson" Discussed on Rough Translation

"From WHYY in Philadelphia interior gross with fresh air today. Glenda Jackson, she's on Broadway in a new production of King Lear, starring as Lear. She finds it unremarkable that she's playing the role of a man as we get older. Those absolute barriers that define Genda begin to crack. Jackson took a twenty three year break from acting while she served as a member of parliament in the labor party. Sometimes she was controversial when prime minister Margaret Thatcher died Jackson was jeered by conservatives. As she spoke in parliament about the values. She thought defined Thatcherism greed, selfishness, no cat the week shop elbows shop needs. They the way. Jackson has won two Oscars. Two Emmys and won a Tony last year. My guest. Glenda Jackson is starring on Broadway in a new production of King Lear when her Shakespeare's greatest tragedies Jackson plays Lear giving her the opportunity to take on one of the most challenging and prestigious roles in theatre history. But it's a role that for obvious reasons. Always goes to a man near times theater critic Ben Brantley wrote, she is delivering a powerful. And deeply perceptive performance as the most royally demented of Shakespeare's monarchs unquote, King Lear opened on Broadway this month, but Jackson had already played Lear in a London production that opened in twenty sixteen at the old Vic last year. She wanted Tony for her performance in the Edward all be play. Three tall women. It's been an incredible return to acting after serving twenty three years as a member of parliament. She was elected in nineteen Ninety-two and stepped down in twenty fifteen her career before that and. -cluded Oscar winning performances in the nineteen sixty nine movie women in love and the nineteen Seventy-three romantic comedy a touch of class. She won two Emmys playing Queen Elizabeth the first in the nineteen seventy-one BBC series, Elizabeth r which was shown in the US as part of masterpiece theatre, let's start with a clip from the new Broadway. Production of King Lear Lear has decided that he's old and it's time to unburden himself of his responsibilities as king and divided his kingdom among his three daughters. No, we have divided in three hour kingdom and desire. I intend to shake all cares and business from our converting them on youngest rates while we I'm bed. Who was on deck? Glenda jackson. Welcome to fresh air. Thank you. The first thing people always seem to want to know is why as a woman playing King Lear, and what's it like to be a woman playing Lear? So you I played him in two thousand sixteen at the old Vic in London. Why did you want to play Lear who would refuse the opportunity to work in the play of that stature? I mean is such an extraordinary play like, oh, let Shakespeare essentially he owned the asks three questions who are we what are we wildly and this particular blades, just astonishing human nature is immutable. And so in the sense, it is the most contemporary play around the minute. We in England had been engaged in the kind of gender bend wall. Really? And the marvelous company that was created and succeeded in winning. Those battles. They did all of Shakespeare's histories with over women costs. And so in the sense that battle was over. And what was really into one of the really interesting things for me playing. It was that nobody ever mentioned the fact that I was woman playing ma'am having seen the play. And also the other interesting thing I found in doing it. When I was a member of parliament part of my duties was to visit out people's homes day centers things of that nature, and as we get older. Those absolute barriers that define Genda begin to crack they begin to get a little bit foggy and break up. And if you think about it, I mean when we're born we teach babies don't we girls as we get older we begin to explore. I think rob the more the alternatives to are defined gender. And that certainly for Leary's quite useful. I want to. Elaborate a little bit on how you see gender boundaries blurring or falling away with age and to apply to your own life as well. If you find it applicable will, I think I'm a bit of a cheat. Because when things tough and kind of direct way in my real life. I don't have any qualms about playing the old car. Do you know what I mean? I mean setting as far as underground is concerned young people do get up and and of me as seat the first time it happened. I felt absolutely mortified. I now I'm beginning to get the stage where expected in the mortified if it doesn't happen but nine times out of ten thousand, but indirect reference to the play the things that he kicks out being, you know, he's a guy no one during his entire life. And these eighty is in this play has ever said no to him. And suddenly, someone does say note him. And it all begins to crack for him not in that immediate moment. But that's the story of the play. And so those aspects of him which were overtly masculine because that was the era in which he lived the environment in which he lived begin to move from absolute, I'm rights and everybody else's wrong. That's a simplistic way of putting it don't actually evaluate whether he was always, right. And he begins doubted, and that's very interesting. Are there lines from Lear that have the most meaning to you either? Personally, or that you find most powerful or dramatic to say as an actor. I tried to avoid that I try to observe the world through the characters is but people who see the play do point out lines that a particularly meaningful to them. I was rather regret that they do that. Because then it gets kinda stuck in my head. And I have to find another way of finding first time. If you see what I mean, I think I do that. You don't want to sound like a famous line. You want it to sound like like, it's ease of it. It's you know, it's direct thought. I mean, it's it arises out of the scene that Joe trying to create with the other actors on on the stage. Yeah. But I mean, you know in one's own time. There are lines that sort of reverberation echo. Yeah. Psychiatrists have tried to diagnose Lear like like is this dementia related to age is at some other kind of like cognitive disorder is at manic, depression, you can read all kinds of things at psychiatrists have said. I know you try to be inside the character not outside the character. Nevertheless, do you think what he's experiencing is the onset of age related dementia. I would think it was somewhat unlikely given the time in which it was written. I have you know, I mean, gosh Shakespeare is in my view, the most contemporary writer there is, but I think. At the time. The play was written people living to the age of eighty would have been a fairly rare occurrence, but nonetheless, it is undoubtedly the case that as I've said I've seen it as we get older those kind of gender barriers begin to crack. But also, people must've experienced walked we are experiencing now as we all living too much greater age of the mixture of what is physical and mental decay. And it is in fact, I think a big backhoe most western democracies? How are we going to cope with this the cassette? And if I look at my own country, we now have a much larger nonworking by virtue of age in retirement population than a working population. How we can look after elderly if we are all gonna go down. That road. I know we're not going to go down that road. And they will be I have no doubt advances in bed decode science, but you know, it is something that I think was still tending to think it'll be alright ilmenite and deigned. So the there's the language, of course, is as written but in the production that you're in. Now, you've spent part of the play wearing a tuxedo as do other male characters. The the the costumes are pretty contemporary the furniture is kind of contemporary. So you have this mix of the original hundreds of years old text, and you know, contemporary updating that we physically see there's also music by Philip glass, who is you know, a a very twentieth and twenty first century composer. How do you feel about that coming together of you know, the old tax with aspects? Or you say the otx forgive me in drafting you, but there was a celebration of you years ago. Remember what it was either Shakespeare tho- shakes his death. I contra member. A my grandson school that there from the age of three and till eleven, but I think they about seven when they did this the school celebration of Shakespeare in that way, the teachers went round with their mobile phones, you know, with the cameras on and each class had to had give were given specific Leah line from Shakespeare to say into the camera, and this was compiled into a film, which was delightful, those children had absolutely no difficulty saying any of those lines because the majority of the apartment Postle everyday language now, I mean, just think of the stuff that he wrote and how we use it. I mean within the play I'm transferring it around forget and forgive her prices fallen I mean. That guy was just incredible. So we've been talking about you playing King Lear. Let's hear you as Queen. Elizabeth I in an extra EMMY award winning performance in the BBC series, Elizabeth r which came to the US as part of masterpiece theater. So in this scene, you're the new Queen. You're twenty five years old and unmarried and your council is trying to pressure you to marry quickly. A member of your council challenges you to accept a suitor in front of a Hocquart. And by the end of the scene. Everyone around you is kneeling, and here's my guest. Glenda Jackson with actor as midnight. The Archduke Charles will be most happy to come to England your majesty, and I shall be most happy to see him. But if he comes he will come here as your future husband last to that anything else would come in Qabail, I have often to the imperial ambassador. The imperial ambassador doesn't tell your majesty as well as. I do. But he knows how to listen. The two ambassador magistate listens to what he's meant. And not only to what is said. Then I will say again and meet it the Archduke Charles may come to England as our guest guest and as the husband to build choice. I have not said that to have invited yachts two chows to your call. I have said he is welcome. A very welcome your majesty. I hope welcome as any other guest would be. I'm glad to hear it. I ride to king Philip and tell him that you have invited the Archduke Charles to England. And that he comes here as future husband, if he comes on those terms he had best not come at all. Your highness. He said he was to come here. I have never invited him. I have never said I would marry him. I have never said I would marry anyone.

King Lear Glenda Jackson Shakespeare King Lear Lear Archduke Charles England London Philip glass US Elizabeth r Ben Brantley WHYY Margaret Thatcher prime minister Philadelphia Tony BBC Oscar Leary
'The Band's Visit' dances away with a leading 10 Tony Awards

KNX Programming

02:22 min | 2 years ago

'The Band's Visit' dances away with a leading 10 Tony Awards

"And dependable forecast i'm cbs meteorologist martina brand knx ten seventy newsradio sixty seven degrees in downey also sixtyseven in irvine it's twelve forty seven the band's visit won the tony award for best new musical and six other awards wcbs tv reporter dave carl some of the other categories one by the band's visit include best book best score and best featured actor arielle statue of broadway newcomer the most exciting thing in the world i can't wait to celebrate my cast mates and to celebrate our small middle eastern show harry potter and the curse child won the tony award for best play the tony for leading actress in a play went to veteran of film theater and british parliament glenda jackson for three tall women i'm one of the oldest people i think stood on this platform receiving thrill the seven second annual tony awards were held in new york a member of congress from southern california closer to adding some names to the vietnam veterans memorial in washington d c it was a june morning in nineteen sixty nine when seventy four sailors lost their lives when the us frankie evans was struck by an australian aircraft carrier expected by the victims the families that when the vietnam memorial was erected at their names will be included and they were quite shocked to find out that they were not that they were on the other side of an imaginary line in the water that separated the combat zone from outside the combat zone the destroyer had been in combat just as earlier and was due to be back the next day shift tells knx he's just recently succeeded in getting language added to a house bill that would add those aims he says he's hoping the senate will now follow suit robarts archer knx ten seventy newsradio there were floats and musicians and brightly colored costumes when the puerto rican day parade made its way long fifth avenue in new york wcbs tv's tony a yellow it's oliver's first time to just five months old this year there were samba reminders of the death toll from hurricane maria an angry words for congress and the trump administration over recovery efforts there was a total in this regard by this federal government other governments in puerto rico share the blame a lot of corruption been a lot of unequal treatment con ed crews.

Vietnam Memorial Puerto Rico Frankie Evans Dave Carl Reporter KNX Martina Hurricane Maria Oliver Senate CBS California Congress New York Glenda Jackson Harry Potter Arielle Statue
Tony Awards 2018 winners: The Band's Visit earns 10 awards with Tony Shalhoub scooping Best Actor

KNX Programming

02:22 min | 2 years ago

Tony Awards 2018 winners: The Band's Visit earns 10 awards with Tony Shalhoub scooping Best Actor

"And dependable forecast i'm cbs meteorologist martina brand knx ten seventy newsradio sixty seven degrees in downey also sixtyseven in irvine it's twelve forty seven the band's visit won the tony award for best new musical and six other awards wcbs tv reporter dave carl some of the other categories one by the band's visit include best book best score and best featured actor arielle statue of broadway newcomer the most exciting thing in the world i can't wait to celebrate my cast mates and to celebrate our small middle eastern show harry potter and the curse child won the tony award for best play the tony for leading actress in a play went to veteran of film theater and british parliament glenda jackson for three tall women i'm one of the oldest people i think stood on this platform receiving thrill the seven second annual tony awards were held in new york a member of congress from southern california closer to adding some names to the vietnam veterans memorial in washington d c it was a june morning in nineteen sixty nine when seventy four sailors lost their lives when the us frankie evans was struck by an australian aircraft carrier expected by the victims the families that when the vietnam memorial was erected at their names will be included and they were quite shocked to find out that they were not that they were on the other side of an imaginary line in the water that separated the combat zone from outside the combat zone the destroyer had been in combat just as earlier and was due to be back the next day shift tells knx he's just recently succeeded in getting language added to a house bill that would add those aims he says he's hoping the senate will now follow suit robarts archer knx ten seventy newsradio there were floats and musicians and brightly colored costumes when the puerto rican day parade made its way long fifth avenue in new york wcbs tv's tony a yellow it's oliver's first time to just five months old this year there were samba reminders of the death toll from hurricane maria an angry words for congress and the trump administration over recovery efforts there was a total in this regard by this federal government other governments in puerto rico share the blame a lot of corruption been a lot of unequal treatment con ed crews.

Vietnam Memorial Puerto Rico Frankie Evans Dave Carl Reporter KNX Martina Hurricane Maria Oliver Senate CBS California Congress New York Glenda Jackson Harry Potter Arielle Statue
"glenda jackson" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

All of the Above with Norman Lear

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"glenda jackson" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

"Is incredible right directed glenda jackson returned to broadway in three tall women and he was a classmate of mine two years younger and an actor and he's acted on broadway and angels in america and the normal heart and directed wicked but we were just kids doing theater together and and i did a show where you remind me excuse me either remind me we're going to new york in two weeks or something else three twelve women go see is a priority it's incredible incredible you'll love it but i need i need to be reminded because care what did you say springsteen i loved it loved it how about it and he seems like he loves doing it because he keeps extending and extending that a gift to incredible to living to yes to to ability if you're not seen it going may twelve so i can't wait it's so great that somebody thought to do it because he's been entertaining thousands of people in huge venues as whole life but the intimate experience in a small theater where you're twenty feet from the stage but he's done things jew jio he followed up born in the usa nineteen eighty three eighty four which was this a record that was huge it was one of those gigantic records of the eighties you know up there with like michael jackson's thriller and stuff so he becomes a household name he's touring stadiums that go bigger than anybody could have ever magin and he followed it up with an acoustic record called nebraska that recorded in his house on a little four track cassette machine and it was just him a qatar and a harmonica surprised everybody from bringing it down so small and it's kind of part of the conversation that he's been having with the audience it i mean it's it doesn't make it any less brilliant surprising that he thought to do it yeah they thought to put it up but it's there's real poetry if you look at if you look at the the whole breadth of his career it is it's right in keeping with this conversation he's been having with the audience amazing well he really is taking.

glenda jackson new york michael jackson nebraska qatar america springsteen twenty feet two weeks two years
"glenda jackson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"glenda jackson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Some of it is through just having been around each other now for these months did these echoes kind of happen but but at the same time these women don't know each other i i heard the director jim antonello say that you laurie metcalf and glenda jackson all have the same temperature onstage what what do you think that means i wouldn't say that any of us are cuddly people no no i mean i think we're really there's not to say that we're me i don't mean to say that we're all meaning scary but i understand what he means and i don't know i don't know that that there's a better description than temperature but i'm i'm honored to be thought of in the same vein as these incredibly powerful smart women powerhouses but the show is about these tough these tough women who don't really like weakness and i think i can see elements of that and all of us as people generally i'm so fascinated that you you said that about one hundred your twenty two year olds because i didn't i didn't ask some questions about your your early career and kind of the choices that you made to get where you are right now but i i wanna play this kim thousands until as kim pine in the world tom power you're listening.

jim antonello director laurie metcalf glenda jackson kim pine twenty two year
"glenda jackson" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"glenda jackson" Discussed on 710 WOR

"By the non marshmallow pieces back in the box they go in the trash are you a simpsons fan i i hate to admit it daddy you could help us really see football every week or you haven't seen all six hundred thirty six episodes of the natalie promising three none of us is watching this show run forever you know what i watch it more after the fact because there there is a lot of relevance in what's going on in the world these days and and it always comes up in the news after that and then i'll see a clip of it and that's basically it but it looks funny some of it sounds like this joe nut go man joe man ask you joe man a congratulations to danny devito one of my favorite actors he has gotten his own day the asbury park city council honored the actor bob saturday night by declaring his birthday november seventeenth to be danny devito days november seventeenth out there in asbury park city it will be danny devito day and the tony nominations come out tomorrow i can guarantee you i went to i can guarantee you who's going to be nominated rate british actress glenda jackson in edward albee's play three toll women on broadway and i went to see it at the saturday matinee land i have seen some amazing actresses over the years i've seen maggie smith and the nasa redgrave and meryl streep live on stage glenda jackson one of the finest performances i have ever she's gonna win she's going to be nominated and she is going to win and i think tina fey is going to be nominated for her slamdunk slam dunk what be the big show the band's visit small businesses that i really love that natalie and joe bartlett went to see during a snowstorm in like two two that's going to be nominated and i think mean girls will be in their frozen where your grandkids went they went to see it and they liked it a lot and by the way wednesday around nine o'clock natalie and are going to be at a brunch for the tony nominees we're going to be interviewing a lot of them so hey are the republicans going to go down to the.

football natalie joe nut bob glenda jackson edward albee maggie smith meryl streep tina fey joe bartlett joe danny devito asbury park city council asbury park