21 Burst results for "Glen Hogan"

Candidates Find It's Not Easy Getting New Yorkers To Sign Their Ballot Petitions During A Pandemic

Morning Edition

02:35 min | 3 months ago

Candidates Find It's Not Easy Getting New Yorkers To Sign Their Ballot Petitions During A Pandemic

"Anywhere in the city in the past week or so, you've probably noticed clipboard toting volunteers asking you to sign your name. That's because it's petition season. Each person running for office in New York City needs to collect hundreds of signatures to make it on the ballot. And there are more than 500 people running. W one my CI's Glen Hogan reports. I could you help get a candidate on the ballot for Manhattan Borough President Volunteer Rachel Pratt is collecting signatures in Madison Square Park. Do you think it helps get a candidate on the ballot for Manhattan Borough President Tire? You have registered Democrat in Manhattan? Okay, she's trying to get Kim Watkins on the ballot for Manhattan borough president. And it's tough going in about a half an hour. She's only gotten one person to sign. Well, I think I have to finesse my ass because I've got a up my game that passes another person, also collecting signatures and gets her second of the morning. That girl said. All right, I know what it's like. And you can use your own town values a sympathy signature. Not just anyone. Consign. You got to be a registered voter in the same party as the candidate running. And your address has to be in the district where the races but don't sign for two candidates in the same race. One of those signatures will probably get thrown out cold that has made this election season particularly challenging. I know it's a pandemic, and people have reservations about getting too close and having conversations more than 100 candidates tried to suspend petitioning The judge ruled against them. Last month, state lawmakers did lower the number of signatures required, but they also shortened the time people have to collect those signatures. Lincoln wrestler who's running for City Council, says he tested positive for Cove it right after collecting signatures, and Loree Sutton cited covert concerns about petitioning as one of the reasons she suspended her campaign for mayor. It's like ridiculous that I think may expect people to stop and sign things because, like I probably stop for myself honestly, if I was walking the streets, this is David Estrada also stocking Madison Square Park for some things. I miss. You mentioned Democrat Manhattan. Any chance he's collecting signatures for tally for Haiti, and Weinstein, a candidate for Manhattan. D Yet my gun for hire Yeah. So I just whoever pays me the highest collect signatures for basically honestly and it's all analog. No online petitions here just the serendipity of safely crossing paths with the right person with a clipboard. Thank you so much. Thanks for signing When Hogan W N Y c news form or on the elections

Manhattan Glen Hogan Rachel Pratt Kim Watkins Manhattan Borough Madison Square Park New York City Loree Sutton David Estrada City Council Lincoln Weinstein Haiti Hogan
The Fallout for New York Gov. Cuomo Over Nursing Home Deaths

All Things Considered

05:06 min | 4 months ago

The Fallout for New York Gov. Cuomo Over Nursing Home Deaths

"Year, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo's could press briefings won him a devoted following around the country. It also earned him an Emmy Award. But today the governor who normally uses his time to deliver data and talk about vaccination efforts. Took more than 20 minutes to publicly excoriated State Assembly member who's been critical of him if you attacked my integrity. And my administration's integrity. Am I going to fail to respond? No. No. I'm not gonna do that. W My CI's Glen Hogan is here now to break it down a bit for us. Gwen, you listen to a lot of these press briefings. But today was well pretty strange, even by this year standards, right? Can you tell us what happened and who Governor Cuomo was going after here? That's right. So State Assembly member Ron Kim he is a Democratic lawmaker from Queens. His uncle died of covert 19 in a nursing home last spring, and today the governor accused him without evidence of a pay to play scheme regarding campaign donations from nails. Salon owners. Some of Kim's fellow state lawmakers quickly came to his defense and said quote was attack was clearly an effort to deflect further criticism of his own handling of nursing homes. No grand Kim has been a vocal critic of the governor for a while now, so so why would qualify ring this up now? Well. The governor's anger seems to have started last week after Kim smoke to the New York Post about a call between top Cuomo, Wade, Melissa Derosa and Democratic lawmakers. Now, in a partial transcript released by the governor following the post bombshell, it was revealed that the state withheld nursing or that she admitted that the state had withheld nursing home data to try to slow the potential federal probe into nursing homes. So after that story, Kim says he got an angry call from the governor himself, threatening to quote destroy him. And after that, the governor demanded that he retract his statements to the paper. He then says he got more texts and phone calls from the office here. He is describing the call. Was a 10 minute, one sided, screaming and yelling where I felt threatened that if I didn't act in a certain way to issue a statement, not tomorrow. Tonight, in his own words that there were a tradition. Cuomo's office sent out a statement vehemently denying he threatened. Kim, saying the office has a long hostile relationship with the Assemblyman Kim, like you mentioned has been critical of how the governor handled this four months, particularly his withholding of the true death toll inside nursing homes, and he's also criticized his controversial immunity provision, which was passed in the state budget last year. After big campaign donations from nursing home industries, and that provision basically shields nursing homes from liability for covert 19 deaths early on in the pandemic. Now, some context here. This public attack today on Kim also follows a letter that Kim and several other assembly members signed. Urging other lawmakers to support a bill that would repeal the governor's emergency powers. Can you give us some background on that, right? Right, so these powers they were granted by the legislator last year, the start of the pandemic. But now Kim and several other assembly members are trying to drum up legislative support to revoke these powers. So they sent out a letter yesterday to fellow lawmakers asking for their support, saying the governor had obstructed justice and withholding of nursing home deaths. And that not revoking the emergency powers makes the legislator complicity. Now, some experts who spoke with my colleague Chris Robin's earlier say, even if these emergency powers are revoked, the governor still has broad executive power because of the state's constitution, but also because of his, you know, ongoing state of emergency powers, but If they go through with this and revoke these emergency powers, it's definitely a symbolic political rebuke of the governor and his handling of the pandemic. Yeah, and just to remind listeners to. There's even more context here because all of this has unfolded in the two weeks since New York State attorney general a tissue James released the results of a probe that revealed the actual death toll of coded inside nursing House. Rate, So that kind of started this snowball effect in the last two weeks. She actually didn't have the total number of deaths, But the governor's office had for months and months been withholding that this number. It's the number of people who were in nursing homes but were later sent to hospitals where they died. In other words, the state had only been counting deaths that occurred inside nursing homes themselves. As an expert. I talked to said this New York was the only state in the country that was doing this. So it was only after this report came out that the state finally gave the full number of the deaths of people who had died in hospitals. There was also freedom of information, requests, a lawsuit and eventually a court order. Now that we have the full that led up to the full release of this data. So what We know now is that Cove it killed more than 15,000, New Yorkers who were residents of nursing homes and other long term care facilities, And that number includes nearly 6000 deaths that were not previously counted in nursing home deaths.

KIM State Assembly Governor Andrew Cuomo Glen Hogan Governor Cuomo Ron Kim The New York Post Melissa Derosa Cuomo Assemblyman Kim Emmy Award Gwen New York Queens Chris Robin Wade Assembly James
"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:42 min | 5 months ago

"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The country have struggled to contain the spread of covert among the people incarcerated in them in state prisons in New York. Visits have been suspended. 90 inmates have died in the last three weeks and infections are still rising. Leave. My CI's Glen Hogan has more There have been more than 1000 new infections in state prisons in the last three weeks, according to a W N Y C analysis. That means incarcerated people in a New York state prison are twice as likely to catch Cove it as people living in the general public. One of the largest outbreaks is occurring at would born correctional facility in Sullivan County. There were no confirmed cases at the facility up until mid November. But in the last three weeks, nearly 200 incarcerated people have been infected. Eventually, Wilbur was going to have to take a late. That's Marvin Lewis. He's 65 years old. He spent 39 years behind bars and was granted parole this summer after his 11th appearance before the parole board. He considers himself lucky to be out before the pandemic hit would born Now he fears for the lives of his older friends. He left behind God's just fearful classes, afraid and they're looking for some relief, you know, from the government from the parole board and the Legislature, a spokeswoman for the Corrections Department says. As of late December, they started randomly testing inmates instead of just focusing on those who were symptomatic. Or who had been exposed. They plan to start voluntary testing for staff later this month, though rapid testing is available at some locations without breaks. The death rate in New York state prisons is currently lower than that of the general public. But it's spiking. The death rate will likely go up and prisons Dahlia Heller with vital strategies, A global public health initiative warns with the rise and infections and the threat of the new, more contagious strain of cove. It The worst in New York prisons is yet to come simply because we're talking about an aging population where you would expect there to be a higher prevalence of underlying condition. Adirondack Correctional Facility was recently converted into a facility for older inmates about 100 men were sent there in June. So far, the facility has evaded an outbreak, but in late December Social worker with Cove. It met with around two dozen inmates, sending the lot into quarantine, according to several men incarcerated there, who spoke with W N Y C. John Cavanaugh says he was counting his blessings after he missed an appointment with the woman. 64 year old has HIV and I get Congress. We can I try to protect myself to test my ability, but he got kinda scary. Activist Jose Saldanha has been trying to get the governor to feel the urgency. His group released aging people in prison has been calling for the governor to release the thousands of people who are elderly or within a year of their release date, many of whom have changed their lives while they're in prison. You had man and woman's and I'll present system who are scholars there pioneered their educators, their teachers, and a lot of them have languished in prison. Three and four decades, Saldana spent 36 years in prison and has many friends still incarcerated. One of them died over the summer from Cove it and another was recently diagnosed. He says They've already lived through many health crises behind bars from hepatitis to tuberculosis. They have survived so many things, and we can't expect them. To survive this When Hogan W. N Y C news. The governor is released about 3500 people early over the course of the outbreak, most of whom were within 90 days of their release date. His office would not say whether he would expand releases due to the current search. It's double u. N. Y C. There is more to consider just after the break. Anonymous Shell companies have long been a common feature of New York real estate. On one hand. Yes, and l. L C can limit your liability and makes sense from a business perspective. But it can also be a way to hide illegal activity in the Reveillon secrecy. Well, that's all over now. Just ahead. We'll talk to Ilya merits of W and my C and propublica is trumping podcast. Ah, lot more just ahead. W. N. Y. C is supported by doctors without Borders, whose teams are on the ground in more than 70 countries, delivering emergency medical aid during the covert 19 pandemic. Learn more about their work at doctors without borders, dot or g'kar. If you're planning on getting rid of your car in the coming months, please consider donating it to W. N. Y C will turn that old car into the in depth news and reporting that keeps our community informed..

New York Marvin Lewis Adirondack Correctional Facili Saldana Glen Hogan catch Cove John Cavanaugh Borders Sullivan County Wilbur Dahlia Heller Jose Saldanha Ilya HIV W. N. Y. C Corrections Department Legislature propublica Congress
"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:54 min | 6 months ago

"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition on W N Y C I'm David first. Monarchs used to grant clemency to celebrate a birthday, raise an army or populate a colony. The president and all 50 governors still have some form of executive pardon power. And they most often use it at this time of year to bestow mercy during the holidays. In the first of a three part series on clemency from WN Y sees Race and Justice unit Glen Hogan reports the pandemic is putting a new and desperate twist on the year and tradition as covert bore down on New York state earlier this year. One Surana was 22 years into a prison sentence of 35 years to life. My first appearance to parole board Would have been in 2030 to the 58 year old was doing time at sing, sing for robbery and burglary. But because of prior convictions, he was sentenced under New York's persistent violent felony offender law, which imposes mandatory minimum sentences for repeat offenders. I'm definitely not the same person that it was. Many years ago. There's been a tremendous transformation in my life during his time in prison, Surrounded, got clean, Got his G E D worked for the prison chaplain and learned plumbing and electrical skills. He had a loving wife waiting for him on the outside, but still more than a decade left before he was even up for parole. Then this June, he got a lucky break. Clemency is it's like hitting the lottery. Let me put it that way. Me is the miracle, less a miracle and more the stroke of a pen from Governor Andrew Cuomo, who granted Toronto's petition. It's a power Cuomo uses sparingly with more than 6000 petitions piled on his desk in the last four years. Cuomo was commuted just 14 sentences. Clemency is the overarching term that refers to the governor's power to grant this kind of unique relief. That's Lawrence Houseman, a supervising attorney at the Legal Aid Society's Criminal Appeals bureau. He's worked on more than 100 of these petitions. There are two kinds of clemency pardons that wipe away a person's record and are typically granted after release and then commutations where computation doesn't get rid of someone's underlying conviction. It just mitigates the sentence. It's pretty easy to apply You write a letter about your criminal history and what you've accomplished in your time in prison. You send that to the state and then you wait. A few years ago, it seemed like this process was a priority for governor. Quibble in 2015. Cuomo announced an initiative that would connect incarcerated people with pro bono attorneys to help them prepare clemency applications in Albany doesn't invite you to Hitting a plaque for clemency out of the boo Seeing this memorandum, we said, Okay, something's going on. Hector Martinez saw a flyer for the new initiative in the Prisons Law Library in 2016. He's serving 20 years to life for burglary. He applied right away, but for a year heard nothing. Eventually he got a letter saying they were still reviewing applications and hadn't got to his yet. I pretty much knew any of this is bogus. After that, I said, I'm holding my process waiting for this. Attorneys had high hopes for the program to Lawrence Houseman says it's been a disappointment. We had hoped the governor was gonna be a leader on this issue when it's never too late This year, the state received a flood of new applications more than 2580% more than it did last year. Covert 19 was spreading inside prisons and incarcerated people and their families were terrified. At a press conference in April quibble was asked about clemency. He deflected. We have been doing that having hers. Comets brought a clemency as far as you granting on based on what right that's based on vulnerable populations. Pregnant inmates. How about if they are violent, and they're just started there? Sentence. This'd who's likely to call us for prisoners who are near the end of their terms within a year or will do that We've been doing that we've been doing but he wasn't doing that. He had instructed the Corrections Department to cancel some technical parole violations and free certain people who were within 90 days of release anyway, over the course of the pandemic that's meant about 3500. People were released from prison early. You know, we had just prepared for him when he come home. This is Joanne Samuels. Her son, Darren, is 31. He's been in prison for his entire adult life. Aaron was arrested when he was 16 after he and several others tried to rob an iPod from another group of kids. There was a scuffle and another boy in the group pulled a knife and stabbed and killed a 15 year old boy, especially my mom. She 71 in prayed for the day with, you know she can hold them. In her arms. A good prosecutors didn't argue. Darren killed the boy. But he was sentenced to 22 years to life for his involvement since Darren was so young had no prior criminal record and has shown remorse ever since. His family is asking Governor Cuomo for clemency accident. Mustafar forgiveness Mm hmm. Man in tow, give them a second chance that they'll be able to come out himself. When asked for comment. The governor's office deferred to the Corrections Department. Spokesperson for the department says there were fewer covert infections and deaths in New York prisons than most other states and that since Cuomo took office, there's been a 39% reduction in the prison population with the fewest people incarcerated in more than 30 years. When Hogan W N Y C news tonight on all things considered, we'll hear the story of one man's petition for clemency and the surprising coalition that has formed around his push for freedom. Starting at 4 P.m. here on W N. Y C..

Governor Andrew Cuomo New York supervising attorney Glen Hogan Darren Lawrence Houseman Corrections Department burglary David president Prisons Law Library robbery executive Toronto Hector Martinez Joanne Samuels Legal Aid Society Aaron Albany Criminal Appeals bureau
"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:44 min | 6 months ago

"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition on W N Y c. I'm David. First Monarchs used to grant clemency to celebrate a birthday, raise an army or populate a colony. The president and all 50 governors still have some form of executive pardon power. And they most often use it at this time of year to bestow mercy during the holidays. In the first of a three part series on clemency from WN Y sees Race and Justice unit Glen Hogan reports the pandemic is putting a new and desperate twist on the year and tradition as covert bore down on New York state earlier this year. Once around, Oh was 22 years into a prison sentence of 35 years to life, my first appearance to parole board Would have been in 2030 to the 58 year old was doing time at sing, sing for robbery and burglary. But because of prior convictions, he was sentenced under New York's persistent violent felony offender law, which imposes mandatory minimum sentences for repeat offenders. I'm definitely not the same person that it was. Many years ago. There's been a tremendous transformation in my life during his time in prison, Surrounded, got clean, Got his G E D worked for the prison chaplain and learned plumbing and electrical skills. He had a loving wife waiting for him on the outside, but still more than a decade left before he was even up for parole. And this June, he got a lucky break. Clemency is it's like hitting the lottery. Let me put it that way. To me is the miracle, less a miracle and more the stroke of a pen from Governor Andrew Cuomo, who granted Toronto's petition. It's a power Cuomo uses sparingly with more than 6000 petitions piled on his desk in the last four years. Cuomo was commuted just 14 sentences. Clemency is the overarching term that refers to the governor's power to grant this kind of unique relief. That's Lawrence Houseman, a supervising attorney at the Legal Aid Society's Criminal Appeals bureau. He's worked on more than 100 of these petitions. There are two kinds of clemency pardons that wipe away a person's record and are typically granted after release and then commutations where computation doesn't get rid of someone's underlying conviction. It just mitigates the sentence. It's pretty easy to apply You write a letter about your criminal history and what you've accomplished in your time in prison. You send that to the state and then you wait. A few years ago, it seemed like this process was a priority for governor. Quibble in 2015. Cuomo announced an initiative that would connect incarcerated people with pro bono attorneys to help them prepare clemency applications. Albany doesn't invite you to Sitting apply for clemency out of the boo Seeing this memorandum, we said, Okay, Something's going on. Hector Martinez saw a flyer for the new initiative in the Prisons Law Library in 2016. He's serving 20 years to life for burglary. He applied right away, but for a year heard nothing. Eventually, he got a letter saying they were still reviewing applications and hadn't got to his yet. Pretty much knew any of this is bogus. After that, I said, I'm holding that prosperity for this attorneys had high hopes for the program to Lawrence Houseman says it's been a disappointment. We had hoped the governor was gonna be a leader on this issue. It's never too late This year, the state received a flood of new applications more than 2580% more than it did last year. Cove in 19 was spreading inside prisons and incarcerated people and their families were terrified. At a press conference in April quibble was asked about clemency. He deflected. We have been doing that, having heard his comments brought a clemency as far as you granting on based on what Right. There's a face on vulnerable populations, pregnant inmates. How about if they are violent, and they're just started there? Sentence. This'll physical is likely to call us for prisoners who are near the end of their terms within a year or we'll do that we've been doing that we've been doing but he wasn't doing that. He had instructed the Corrections Department to cancel some technical parole violations and free certain people who were within 90 days of release anyway, over the course of the pandemic that's meant about 3500. People were released from prison early. You know, we had just prepared for him when he come home. This is Joanne Samuels. Her son, Darren, is 31. He's been in prison for his entire adult life. Aaron was arrested when he was 16 after he and several others tried to rob an iPod from another group of kids. There was a scuffle and another boy in the group pulled a knife and stabbed and killed a 15 year old boy, especially my mom. She 71 in. I prayed for the day went, you know she can hold them. In her arms. A good prosecutors didn't argue. Darren killed the boy. But he was sentenced to 22 years to life for his involvement since Darren was so young had no prior criminal record and has shown remorse ever since. His family is asking Governor Cuomo for clemency accident. Mustafa forgiveness Mm hmm. Man in tow, give them a second chance they'll be able to come out proved himself when asked for comment. The governor's office deferred to the Corrections Department. Spokesperson for the department says there were fewer covert infections and deaths in New York prisons than most other states and that since Cuomo took office, there's been a 39% reduction in the prison population with the fewest people incarcerated in more than 30 years. When Hogan W N Y C news tonight on all things considered, we'll hear the story of one man's petition.

Governor Andrew Cuomo New York supervising attorney Darren Glen Hogan Lawrence Houseman Corrections Department burglary David president Prisons Law Library robbery executive Toronto Mustafa Hector Martinez Joanne Samuels Albany Cove Legal Aid Society
"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 7 months ago

"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Federal government has sued the Rockland County Village for religious discrimination. Attorney Brian Sokoloff, who represents the village, says he hasn't seen the lawsuit yet and can't comment. 36 degrees now going up to 50 this afternoon. Increasing clouds today tonight Hello 42. Tomorrow Mostly cloudy with a chance of rain high of 51. Support for NPR comes from W. N. Y C members and from C three c three dot AI software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence and enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable business problems. Learn more at sea three dot ai and total wine and more where in stored, teams can recommend a bottle of wine, spirit or beer for the holidays. Shoppers can explore more than 8000 wines, 2500 beers and 3000 spirits more at total wine dot com. It's morning edition on W When my C I'm David first More than one million New Yorkers have downloaded the state's covert app. It's supposed to determine if you've been in close proximity to someone confirmed to have the virus, But w N Y. C is Glen Hogan says There's a long way to go before it has widespread practical use. She joins us now to explain. Good morning when? Good morning David. This APP was launched in New York on October 1st two months have gone by our people using it. Some people for sure are 1.1 million people have downloaded, so that's not nothing. But that's about 5% of New Yorkers, and some research has suggested you need way more people to download it for it to be truly effective. Over the last two months, the state says. Just 800 people were notified about potential exposure through the APP 800 people. Yes, and in that time to put that in perspective about 180,000. New Yorkers have tested.

Rockland County Village Brian Sokoloff David Glen Hogan Federal government NPR New York Attorney
"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:18 min | 7 months ago

"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Everyone. My CI's Glen Hogan, reports that didn't sit well with some of New Jersey's youth hockey community. This'll is the rallying cry before the wolves take on the Falcons for a youth hockey game at Montclair is Clay Anderson Arena on a recent evening. Yetis. Teenage skaters in full protective gear, mouth guards, helmets but mostly no masks carved across the ice, check one another and race for the puck. Breath visible in the rinks, icy air while things look pretty much the same as usual on the ice. Not so off the rink coaches are masked up on the bench. Players aren't allowed to change in locker rooms. Instead, kids stripped down and suit up outside in the parking lot in frigid temperatures. Parents aren't allowed into the arena to watch. Some are sitting in idling cars in a parking lot, watching a live stream of the game on their phones. This hard To see our kids on a little screen. Sometimes you can't even tell the number and not being able to go inside and support him. Even if it is, you know, sometimes you gotta scream, madam, or whatever. But You know, we missed that. That's Carlos Calico, unenthusiastic hockey Dad from Wayne, New Jersey, You're allowed to be at a restaurant without a mask. But what can the parents off athletes? Put a mask on watch the game. States Health Department says it's linked more than 70 cases of the virus to 14 discreet outbreaks thought to be connected to hockey teams in seven counties. This week, Governor Murphy came down hard on the sport. Hockey is in our cross hairs, he said. It's unclear if transmission is happening on the ice or gatherings among teammates afterwards, like pizza parties. Still, Murphy says. In some outbreaks, hockey parents weren't cooperating with the state's contact. Tracers got nothing against hockey, but watch yourself when you had that high on the list right now. Unless we see better compliance and lower levels of infection. We will take action. Some in the rink bristled at those remarks. Brendan Riley is the Falcons coach. They're really frustrated me because Obviously is not. He has no idea of what we go through as ah.

Hockey Clay Anderson Arena Governor Murphy New Jersey Brendan Riley Falcons Glen Hogan Montclair Carlos Calico Health Department Wayne
"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:48 min | 8 months ago

"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Divide. Sylvia Smith. NPR news The covert 19 pandemic has up ended the region's economy, shuttering movie theaters, derailing mass transit and devastating the hospitality industry, leading to permanent job losses for workers across New York City. W. Nice is Glen Hogan reports for the race and justice unit on how some New Yorkers are getting by seven months into the pandemic with no end in sight. Priscilla Grim is 46 years old. She was working as a content strategist with a digital marketing company making about $70,000. A year when covert hit, she lost her job. In the months since Priscilla's looked for work anywhere and everywhere to support herself and her 17 year old daughter. The federal funds and state unemployment were a lifeline that kept them afloat. But her benefits expired in August. Grimm says she didn't want to, but she was forced to sell off jewelry she'd inherited from her mother rings and necklaces to pay a rent and buy food. I sold the last of what I'm willing to sell. And so I'm not the bottom of that right now. She volunteers with a mutual aid group in Flatbush, Brooklyn, where she lives through them. She gets a box of food every once in a while that will last them a few days. I can make a salad out of black beans, rice and tomatoes and vinegar and onions. That's like $5 full of food that will last For like three days. She briefly had a job as a census worker. But that ended so grim says she's back to not knowing how to make her rent. Come November 1st. It's like feast or famine. And he just has to be super comfortable with that reality right now. New York City's unemployment rate peaked at more than 20% in June. It's dip down to 14% in the months since, but that's still a higher rate than the city has seen since the state started keeping track in 1976. I'm not only going to these problems This is literally a crisis. That's 25 year old Psycho Williams. He was making minimum wage as a security guard before Cove it he lost his job and got kicked out of the room he was renting in Crown Heights. In the months since he slept on the subways on friends, couches and even on the streets. Almost nobody can concrete me and Consistently Peter, right, we felt working at least 2 to 3 jobs over six months of the pandemic, New York state has paid out more than $43.7 billion in unemployment benefits. It usually spends that amount over a 20 year period under the federal Cares Act. Some New Yorkers were also getting $600 a week but that expired at the end of August. Then President Trump signed an executive order allowing six more weeks of funding $300 a week. But that's dried up now, too, and Congress can't agree on additional relief spending, and many people never qualified for the aid to begin with, because of immigration status or because they had claimed unemployment before the pandemic Because we don't have work. We don't have money to pay rent and we don't have money to eat. Jocelyn Gomez is 54 years old. And she lives in the South Bronx, where the unemployment rate is the highest of any of the five boroughs, nearly twice the city white average. She says. She survived these past few months the same way a bird does ahead in opening kickoff. Birds don't have anything to eat, and they have to find food at different places. Gomez says. She lost her job at the big box store lows last fall before the pandemic. And was just about to start working at Home Depot when covert hit, meaning she exhausted her state unemployment benefits even before the city's economy came to a grinding halt. Now she's three months behind on rent and fears eviction. Gomez says she wakes up before dawn several times a week to stand in a line outside of food pantry. Hoping to make it to the front before they run out. Akemi think there are so many people in line and the line is so long that halfway up you hear that they ran out of food, and we just have to turn around and think about what you're going to do for food that day. A line like this one on 181st Street in Washington Heights that wraps around the corner and down the block, leading up.

New York City Jocelyn Gomez Priscilla Grim Sylvia Smith NPR Glen Hogan Washington Heights content strategist Home Depot Grimm Psycho Williams Akemi Flatbush President Trump Congress New York Crown Heights
"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:15 min | 9 months ago

"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Two Children under seven. Because of an illness and the pandemic. He was out of work for several months. Now he travels to a food distribution every other week. My freezers full because of the food that I mean they provide us with more than enough I mean, ah! It does get tiring, sometimes eating the same thing. But Grateful. That's what matters. He and his fiance hope they can turn it around financially and eventually stop relying on the food bank. But for them and millions of other Texans, it isn't clear when that will be possible. For NPR News. I'm Paul Flab in San Antonio. The wildfires here in California have spawned a new word. Giga Fire. That's a fire that consumes more than one million acres, a milestone that the August complex fire in Northern California hit this week. Overall, a record breaking four million acres have burned in this state this year. But some fire scientists say focusing on Lee on the numbers of acres burned actually does more harm than good. NPR's Lauren Summer reports early in her career, Crystal Colden worked as a firefighter and one summer she was fighting ablaze in Northern California. You know, every day for our shift we would drive in A couple of hours in the middle of nowhere and take a stand and try and implement the day's activities against this fire, and it just Didn't feel right to me. They were putting out a wildfire far for many towns in an ecosystem that's adapted to fire. She got more concerned about it. When she became a fire scientist at the University of California, Merced said. If you don't allow fire to burn in those places regularly, you get a buildup of too many trees. And that is what we have seen is driving. Ah, lot of these really large fires, Holden says. That means some fires can be good, while others that destroyed homes are bad. But, she says, we don't talk about them like that. Wildfires are often reduced to one metric how big they are and big implies bad. Instead, Colton says, the focus should be on the human costs. The number of evacuees or homes threatened, focusing on fatalities focusing on homes. Is going to get us to the place where we can say Oh, okay instead of trying to suppress the fire, maybe we should be trying to do the things that we know will minimize home loss is focusing on the size of fires can obscure another important thing. How dangerous they are. The thing that's absolutely striking to me. This fire season is how quickly some of these fires were spreading. Matthew Heurtaux was a forest Ecologist at the University of New Mexico. He says. Extreme fires create their own weather. A fire can start to create its own winds and then become this Basically self fulfilling prophecy, right as it can really start to drive itself forward her toe says wildfires could be categorized. Almost like hurricanes are so people know how urgently they need to evacuate. Because in a warming world, these kinds of fires will only become more common. Lauren Summer NPR news The nomination of a new Supreme Court. Justice has added a new dimension to this year's election for some voters, particularly around the issue of abortion. Come back tomorrow morning to hear how religious conservatives are thinking about the topic as Election Day approaches. Just ask you're smart speaker to play NPR or your station by name. This is definitely when I see state team just ahead on all things considered. Last night, demonstrators lit fires in the street in Borough Park in Brooklyn to protest new covert restrictions. While the restrictions are being driven by data from the city and state health departments, many in the so called hot spot zone say the restrictions are anti Semitic. We'll talk to W is Glen Hogan, about the latest stated WN Y C is supported by Hackensack Meridian, John Ther Cancer Center, the only cancer center in New Jersey to receive.

scientist NPR NPR News Northern California Lauren Summer Colton California Borough Park Paul Flab University of California New Jersey Matthew Heurtaux Brooklyn Holden Glen Hogan Crystal Colden
"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:05 min | 9 months ago

"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Okay? The rabbi know the truth, Governor and the mayor, fabricating life. Whatever the situation is whatever agenda they have Jewish people won't buy food, so that makes it that much harder for public health officials to implement these restrictions when they're also combating misinformation. Yeah, So So again. A cz. We're hearing ultra Orthodox community members say they're feeling targeted by these restrictions and that they're anti Semitic. But you have talked to people in the community who do say No, We need to get on top of this now, right? Yes, of course. You know, As I said, there are people who are deeply alarmed by how leadership has reacted in such a pivotal moment. I spoke to blame a Marcus, who is an ultraorthodox nurse practitioner. She lives in Borough Park. And she says, yes, she admits the government should have communicated better, over much longer period of time, not just the last two weeks. But that does not negate the need for strict measures to stop the spread of Cove it. I also don't care about whether we're being singled out because it's a distraction at the end of the day, whether you like the message or you dislike the message. Finger pointing and saying, But you didn't punish him too. Takes away from the main point here, which is to keep people faith. She said She was very concerned about how community leaders were reacting, feeding more fuel to this fire of distrust between the community and the government. Okay, So how will the city enforce these numerals? And aren't there more protests planned against these restrictions? Yes, you know, the mayor has said there will be more than 1000 city workers and NYPD and people from other agencies out on the street enforcing these rules when they go into effect. Blasi was asked about this earlier today, People will be told very clearly how they need to comport themselves. NYPD will give clear instructions and if people don't follow those instructions, there will be consequences. But as we saw last night, there was this protest with fires as we mentioned in violence, and there were no arrests, which is very different to how NYPD has reacted to, for example, black lives matter. Marchers where we've seen at times totally peaceful. Gatherings that are confronted by a massive show of force from police and dozens of people arrested. So exactly how this enforcement is going to happen is still unclear. On DH. Yes, there's another protest. Tonight We'll be covering that, and this weekend is a very important Jewish holiday Simha Torah. Literally means the rejoicing of the Torah is a big party with dancing and singing a big potential spread for the cove in 19 virus. So, Gwen finally here today. Is there any other opposition to the restrictions that that are not religiously based? Earlier today, another group of Brooklyn elected officials, City councilman member Brad Lander congressman Jerry Nadler. They put out a statement saying they agree with the plan that it's well intentioned, but it isn't targeted enough and includes Areas that don't have an issue with the outbreak and schools private in public that don't have any cases of the virus. And so there seems to be a lot of people thinking that this plan is in perfect. But officials like De Blasio and Governor Cuomo are saying, Look, we have to act right now. It's to stem the spread of covert 19. Glen Hogan is a reporter in the W and my C newsroom Thanks so much. Thank you..

NYPD Marcus Jerry Nadler Borough Park Governor Cuomo Glen Hogan Blasi De Blasio Brad Lander Gwen reporter Brooklyn congressman
"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:46 min | 9 months ago

"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Wildfires have led to Oregon having the world's worst air quality and that smoke is now moving east. Researchers say. There's evidence that prolonged exposure to it can have a long term health back Sean Carlsen. This is all things considered on W M I. C Also this hour generalised Bob Woodward says it took him months to learn what President Trump knew about the Corona virus. And when it was finally in May when I discovered that was this meeting January 28th top secret intelligence briefing. More from Woodward on why didn't reveal what he knew about Trump sooner and later, Mayor de Blasio is standing by his controversial decision to move residents out of the Lucerne Hotel on the Upper West Side and a second location in Long Island City. We'll get the latest on that story from W I. C zone. Glen Hogan will have that and more this hour after the news. Live from NPR News. I'm Jack Spear Joe Biden address the Western U. S ongoing wildfires today, as well as a range of other recent climate related disasters like floods, storms and droughts and the rest of the nation. NPR's Daniel Kurt Slaven has more Speaking outside the Delaware Museum of Natural History, Biden said that President Trump quote has no interest in meeting this moment bite and sharply criticised Trump for focusing his messaging on what Trump sees as the destruction of suburbs through policies like zoning regulations, But you know what is actually threatening our suburbs. Wildfires are burning the suburbs in the West. Floods or wiping out suburban neighborhoods in the Midwest. Hurricanes are apparently suburban life along our coast, Biden touted his.

Trump Joe Biden Bob Woodward President NPR News Sean Carlsen Long Island City Oregon Daniel Kurt Slaven Glen Hogan NPR Mayor de Blasio Midwest Lucerne Hotel Delaware Museum of Natural His Western U. S
"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:03 min | 9 months ago

"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Report comes with a caveat. While firefighters may be able to slow the spread of large fires, it's unlikely they'll be extinguished until rains returned to Oregon this autumn for NPR News. I'm Dirk Vander Hart in Portland, the influential Jamaican musician to tip Bert has died. He was 77 years old. Hibbert's family announced his death last night. The family did not give a cause. But he had been in a medically induced coma at a hospital in Kingston and was waiting for the results of a covert 19 test. After showing symptoms his 1968 hit Do the reggae has credited for giving reggae music its name. And you're listening to NPR news. This is w N. Y. C in New York. I'm Lance. Lucky. Mayor de Blasio is decision to move. Hundreds of homeless men out of an Upper West Side hotel will impact nearly 900. Other people who will be moved to other locations around the city. W. Glen Hogan was outside one of the shelters that stands to be impacted by the decision. The city has temporarily halted the plan to move homeless New Yorkers out of a midtown Manhattan hotel to make room for the several 100 men being moved from the Upper West side while it tries to make accommodations for residents with disabilities who are being displaced in the shuffle. That doesn't make the news any less Devastating. For Denise Holly, a 55 year old home healthy. I'm moving, moving, moving, moving my whole house. I'm going to run and run and run course. Me. The nonprofit that runs the shelter says it will have to lay off 41 employees when it closes. The Department of Homeless Services hasn't returned to request for comment. New Jersey governor Phil Murphy says almost 3/5 of people who respond to New Jersey's Cove in 19 contact tracers are refusing to cooperate. The governor is calling on people to cooperate with the state's contact tracer to help prevent any new outbreaks. Having contact traces that the ready is only one half of this equation. The other half is you folks, So please take the call. Murphy says People are worried the tracers might pass information along to law enforcement, particularly for incidents involving underage drinking parties. But the governor says that's not the case. Overall 82% of people getting initial Carl's from tracers answer the calls, but 59% of them. Refuse cooperation. As the nation mark that 19th anniversary of the September 11th attacks. A judge ruled that two members of the sports world Royal family in Saudi Arabia will have to answer questions about who planned the terror attacks. Lawyers for victims call it a turning point in the long running lawsuit, The judge ordered Saudi Arabia to make the pair and other Saudi witnesses available. For depositions in the suit brought by victims seeking billions of dollars in damages. A lawyer for Saudi Arabia declined to comment. Court papers say the members of the royal family include Prince Bandar bin Sultan. 63 right now. It'll be mostly sunny and 72. Today, this is WNBC Support for NPR comes from epics with the new original Docuseries enslaved Samuel L. Jackson explores the lost history.

Saudi Arabia NPR News Bert Hibbert Denise Holly Phil Murphy New Jersey Dirk Vander Hart Department of Homeless Service Mayor de Blasio New York Prince Bandar bin Sultan. Upper West Side NPR Oregon W. Glen Hogan Kingston Samuel L. Jackson Portland
Homeless Residents Moved Out Of New York Midtown Hotel To Make Room For Other Homeless Individuals

Reveal

00:54 sec | 9 months ago

Homeless Residents Moved Out Of New York Midtown Hotel To Make Room For Other Homeless Individuals

"Mayor de Blasio is decision to move. Hundreds of homeless men out of an Upper West Side hotel will impact nearly 900 other people who will be moved to other locations around the city. WN voices Glen Hogan was outside one of the shelters that stands to be impacted by the decision. The city has temporarily halted the plan to move homeless New Yorkers out of a midtown Manhattan hotel to make room for the several 100 men being moved from the Upper West Side. While it tries to make accommodations for residents with disabilities who are being displaced in the shuffle. That doesn't make the news any less. Devastating for Denise Holly a 55 year old home healthy. I'm moving, moving, moving, moving my four. I'm not going to run and run and run. Because me, the nonprofit that runs the shelter, says it will have to lay off 41 employees when it closes. The Department of Homeless Services hasn't returned to request for

Upper West Side Department Of Homeless Service Denise Holly Mayor De Blasio Glen Hogan Manhattan
"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 10 months ago

"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Considered on 93.9 FM Am 20 or ask your Smart Speaker to play W N. Y. C. Tonight. We do expect showers and thunderstorms alot around 73 degrees. Currently it's 82 degrees and we have partly cloudy skies over Central Park. At 6 20. Support for NPR comes from W. N Y C members and from C three c three dot software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence at enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable business problems. Learn more at sea three dot a. I and I drive with remote PC, providing remote access to PCs, Max and servers from anywhere. Assisting those working from home and also enabling remote assistance for customers at remote PC dot com. You're listening to W N Y C. I'm Jamie Floyd. New York City activists have been marching against police brutality and systemic racism for three months ever since the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Today they boarded buses to Washington D. C. For the 57th anniversary of the march on Washington, where Dr Martin Luther King delivered his famous I have a dream speech. W. M reporter Glen Hogan is there and she joins us now going first. Give us a sense of the atmosphere and the numbers if you can. Where are you right now? And what are you seeing? So right now I'm just beside the mall where you know they were cheaper by the Lincoln Memorial, and then they're.

Dr Martin Luther King Jamie Floyd Glen Hogan George Floyd Smart Speaker Lincoln Memorial NPR Central Park Washington Minneapolis New York reporter W. M
"glen hogan" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:10 min | 11 months ago

"glen hogan" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Drives us to innovate, and it also leads to better products. President. Trump has accused Google, Amazon, Facebook and Apple of being biased against conservative voices and threatens to use his executive powers to rein them in. L Speaker Nancy Pelosi is ordering everyone to wear a mask when appearing on the House floor. The order comes after Republican Congressman Louis Gohmert test is positive for covert 19. The number of confirmed cases of the disease in the U. S has top 4.4 million with nearly 151,000 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University. Federal and local law enforcement agents in Cleveland have introduced the next phase of Operation Legend As W. C. P. N's Glenn Forbes reports. Federal officers are now heading to Midwest cities to fight crime. U. S Attorney Justin Herdman says the federal Violent Crime Reduction Initiative is an extension of an ongoing program which was stalled by the pandemic. 25 officers will be permanently reassigned to Cleveland and Herdman says they'll focus on crime. It's not an introduction of federal riot police. It is not an introduction of federal uniformed personnel. It is not an introduction of federal agents to protect federal property, Cleveland police chief Calvin Williams told Clevelanders quote. Don't believe the hype and focus on helping the city not on the political agendas of outsiders for NPR news. I'm Glenn Forbes in Cleveland. A video from New York City shows a protester being put into an unmarked van by plainclothes officers. A W N Y. C is Glen Hogan reports that thesis it ease Police Department confirms that their officers and not federal officials were involved as activists and elected officials had feared. New York City Police Department confirmed the woman was detained for damaging five police cameras near city Hall earlier in the month. But activists who witnessed the arrest said it felt like a kidnapping. Responding to the incident, Mayor Bill de Blasio said he would talk to the police commissioner. I think it was the wrong time and the wrong place to effectuate that arrest. The arrest, as I understand it so far was for damaging police property. I want to affirm very clearly you. No one is allowed to damage police property. The young woman was released several hours later with a ticket for criminal mischief and graffiti. For NPR News. I'm Gwen Hogan in New York. U S stocks from rallied after the Federal Reserve announced plans to keep its short term interest rate near zero. The Dow rose 160 points. This. Is NPR news. Maryland governor Larry Hogan has issued a travel advisory is urging residents to avoid states with rapidly increasing cases of Corona virus, where those with positive test results above 10%. Logan is also expanding a mask requirement effective Friday evening. He says anyone order than five will be required to wear face covering in all indoor public areas. As well as outdoor spaces where social distancing is not possible. The US has imposed a new set of sanctions on supporters of the Syrian regime is not a Homsi reports. It is the second set of sanctions aimed at punishing seriously leaders for alleged war crimes against their own people during nearly a decade of war among the 14 individuals and entities blacklisted a prominent Syrian businessman A Syrian Arab armies, entire first division unit and three adult family members of President Bashar al Assad, including his eldest son. And announcing this latest round of economic and travel sanctions. The U. S Treasury Department cites individuals complicity in destroying Syria's economy while benefiting from their close ties to Assad. Meanwhile, Syria's government blames Western sanctions for the hardships faced by ordinary Syrians who grapple with medicine and fuel shortages, a collapsing currency and soaring prices. For NPR news. I'm not a home invader it The European Commission says it's signed a $72 million deal to secure room death Severe the only licensed experimental drug. Treat people with severe cases of covert 19 commission says it is purchased enough doses of the drug to treat about 30,000 patients..

NPR News Cleveland New York City President Bashar al Assad Glenn Forbes Federal Reserve Police Department Congressman Louis Gohmert Justin Herdman City Police Department Speaker Nancy Pelosi Syria Mayor Bill de Blasio President Johns Hopkins University Glen Hogan Gwen Hogan city Hall
"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And that means a new New York City budget. The City Council voted shortly after midnight to adopt Mayor de Blasio EOS, $88 billion budget. It was a plan that only passed after weeks of protests back and forth between council members and the mayor and a lot of finger pointing. City agencies across the board will shoulder painful cuts due to covert related revenue losses and costs. But the most intense negotiations leading up to the last minute were about cuts to the NYPD. We're joined now by WN reporters Yasmeen Khan and Glen Hogan, who's actually at City Hall where police have moved in, and things are a little bit tense. She joins us on Skype. Morning, Gwyn, what's happening there? Good morning, yet they're you know. Throughout the night, protesters had taken some of the city blocks around the occupied city hall. But then, as the morning came, they went back into the plaza to fortify the boundaries. And now No, I'm about 1/2 a block away where there's you know, I would say a couple. You know dozens. If that, you know, 100 or maybe more police officers who are lined up right here they have shields batons. Andi was sort of a tense standoff that's happening. The activists are urging people to remain calm and not agitate not to throw things. The mood is pretty festive, but you know, it's one of those moments. I could flip on a dime and become violent. Yes, Mein. The budget negotiation is always kind of a dance. But this year, the overall budget was cut significantly because of the public health crisis. Can you give us the broad strokes of this new fiscal plan that takes effect today? Yeah. Hi. This budget process is painful carry, you know. Earlier this year before the public health crisis, the mayor proposed a budget that was more than $95 million we're down to a plan that about 88 billion So there are deep cuts across city agencies. As you mentioned. This is a budget that doesn't draw on city reserves. Onda does fund some important program. You know, the city has a restored funding for summer youth jobs. The budget, address his food and security, and it restores the school counselor program for the highest need kids. But the city actually still needs to find another $1,000,000,000 in labor savings between now and October. Otherwise, there could be layoffs of Abducted 22,000 city employees. Community advocates have called for a least a $1 billion cut to the NYPD and the mayor said he'd get there. Yes, I mean, where does City Hall in the council land on this? It's not quite a 1,000,000,000 or it depends on how you view a cut versus moving money around and you know the people who wanted major cuts. To the NYPD wanted savings that could be reinvested in young people and in communities of color. So this was a debate about providing resources that promote public safety. Just not her policing. So what? What they landed on with that that some personnel under the beady will now go to other city agencies like school safety agents will gradually shipped back to the Department of Education. There is a pretty big cut to the overtime budget for uniformed officers. There've been cuts in the past OT, though, that haven't really been met. There is the city will be eliminating a new class of cadets. Scheduled for July. So that's about 200 officers that won't start this summer. Otherwise, there is no hiring freeze for the NYPD, which is a real sticking point. For some people on the mayor does expect patrol levels to say the same. There will also be a new classic death starting in October, so there will be no officers added later this fall.

City Council City Hall Glen Hogan New York Blasio EOS Yasmeen Khan NYPD Gwyn
New York Police Department's budget has been slashed by $1 billion

Morning Edition

03:37 min | 1 year ago

New York Police Department's budget has been slashed by $1 billion

"And that means a new New York City budget. The City Council voted shortly after midnight to adopt Mayor de Blasio EOS, $88 billion budget. It was a plan that only passed after weeks of protests back and forth between council members and the mayor and a lot of finger pointing. City agencies across the board will shoulder painful cuts due to covert related revenue losses and costs. But the most intense negotiations leading up to the last minute were about cuts to the NYPD. We're joined now by WN reporters Yasmeen Khan and Glen Hogan, who's actually at City Hall where police have moved in, and things are a little bit tense. She joins us on Skype. Morning, Gwyn, what's happening there? Good morning, yet they're you know. Throughout the night, protesters had taken some of the city blocks around the occupied city hall. But then, as the morning came, they went back into the plaza to fortify the boundaries. And now No, I'm about 1/2 a block away where there's you know, I would say a couple. You know dozens. If that, you know, 100 or maybe more police officers who are lined up right here they have shields batons. Andi was sort of a tense standoff that's happening. The activists are urging people to remain calm and not agitate not to throw things. The mood is pretty festive, but you know, it's one of those moments. I could flip on a dime and become violent. Yes, Mein. The budget negotiation is always kind of a dance. But this year, the overall budget was cut significantly because of the public health crisis. Can you give us the broad strokes of this new fiscal plan that takes effect today? Yeah. Hi. This budget process is painful carry, you know. Earlier this year before the public health crisis, the mayor proposed a budget that was more than $95 million we're down to a plan that about 88 billion So there are deep cuts across city agencies. As you mentioned. This is a budget that doesn't draw on city reserves. Onda does fund some important program. You know, the city has a restored funding for summer youth jobs. The budget, address his food and security, and it restores the school counselor program for the highest need kids. But the city actually still needs to find another $1,000,000,000 in labor savings between now and October. Otherwise, there could be layoffs of Abducted 22,000 city employees. Community advocates have called for a least a $1 billion cut to the NYPD and the mayor said he'd get there. Yes, I mean, where does City Hall in the council land on this? It's not quite a 1,000,000,000 or it depends on how you view a cut versus moving money around and you know the people who wanted major cuts. To the NYPD wanted savings that could be reinvested in young people and in communities of color. So this was a debate about providing resources that promote public safety. Just not her policing. So what? What they landed on with that that some personnel under the beady will now go to other city agencies like school safety agents will gradually shipped back to the Department of Education. There is a pretty big cut to the overtime budget for uniformed officers. There've been cuts in the past OT, though, that haven't really been met. There is the city will be eliminating a new class of cadets. Scheduled for July. So that's about 200 officers that won't start this summer. Otherwise, there is no hiring freeze for the NYPD, which is a real sticking point. For some people on the mayor does expect patrol levels to say the same. There will also be a new classic death starting in October, so there will be no officers added later this fall.

Nypd City Hall City Council New York Glen Hogan Blasio Eos Andi Yasmeen Khan Gwyn School Counselor Onda Department Of Education
"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"glen hogan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Nation's top infectious disease expert, told Congress today. Newly reported Cove in 19 infections are running around 40,000 day in the U. S. What are the chances that students will be back in there? Really classrooms in the fall? Dr Fauci says it depends on community infection levels. Updated guidelines for schools are due soon from the CDC and PR's Anya Kamenetz has more as Corona virus infection surged in 30 states, Senators pressed the nation's top public health officials for an update on reopening schools this fall. Dr Faust. He responded that it depends on successful control of the spread of Corona virus in each location. The basic fundamental goal would be As you possibly can to get the Children back to school. And to use the public health efforts as heat school to help get Children back to school and Kamenetz NPR news People from the U. S. Are explicitly excluded from a list of nations whose citizens are to be permitted in the European Union next month. Teri Schultz explains how the European Union has compiled its list of which countries are considered safe. The dominant criteria that you used for deciding which travelers can visit starting tomorrow are epidemiological factors. Such is the rate of infection for 100,000 citizens compared with EU average and whether the trans nationwide is going up or down. Another factor is whether a country allows you citizens to travel there. The U. S has a high rate of infection overall, which is going up and you citizens are still blocked from visiting the U. S. JERRY shells reporting at the close on Wall Street. Down was up 217 points, closing at 25,812. The NASDAQ rose 180 for closing at 10,058 S and P 500 gained 47 points to register its biggest quarterly percentage gained in more than two decades. This is NPR. This is W and my scene in New York. I'm Sean Carlson. New York, New Jersey and Connecticut are adding eight states with high rates of Koven 19 infections to their travel advisory list. Last week, the tri state governor said people visiting from eight states including Florida, Arizona and Texas. We have to quarantine for 14 days upon arriving in the region. Speaking on New York one today, Governor Andrew Cuomo says recent data has caused that number to double. The good news is our house is doing very well. Diagnose is the neighbor's home is on fire. Quarantine advisory now includes visitors from California, Georgia, Iowa, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada and Tennessee. Protesters occupying the public plaza outside City Hall calling for de funding. The NYPD were rattled after a tense encounter with police this morning. W Nice is Glen Hogan reports. During the night occupiers pushed barricades out of the way took over Chamber Street just north of the plaza. But as the sun rose, they said, dozens of police officers in riot gear descended to force them out of the street. One activist who gave only the name lip described being pinned between a row of protesters and police on top of a woman whose leg was mangled by the metal police barricade was being pulled between my friends and the cops themselves..

New York European Union Dr Faust Anya Kamenetz Dr Fauci Governor Andrew Cuomo Congress NPR Sean Carlson NYPD CDC Teri Schultz Glen Hogan City Hall New Jersey California Connecticut Florida
"glen hogan" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"glen hogan" Discussed on NPR News Now

"General for a local official in the country's east and pr as dea had deed reports from islamabad the blast left puddles of blood behind in the cemetery a local official said the mourners were killed by a bomb that with hidden in a rickshaw he said it was remotely detonated there was no immediate claim of responsibility the taleban and islamic state of both active in the area and both target local officials and pierre's dea hud deed in islamabad new york city is gearing up for one of its biggest celebrations of the year an estimated two million people will stream time square to watch the ball dropped tonight wnyc's gwyn hogan says city officials are warning visitors about the freezing temperatures temperatures are expected to plummet as low as seven degrees sunday night and spectators will have to stand outside for upwards of 12 hours as they make their way through safety check points and into the secured area inside times square if you insist stand being one of them new york city mayor bill de blasio says be prepared if you're going to venture out eurobond all up wear long underwear you'll bring hand warmers all those basics take the weather very seriously emergency services will be onsite throughout the area to help if needed for npr news i'm glen hogan this is npr in china a ban on the sale of ivory is being implemented beginning today and purity's rob schmitz has details from shanghai while they've activists are calling the ban of vital step in reducing the slaughter of endangered elephants for the past three years china's made a big push to eradicate ivory sales demand has fallen due to slower economic growth in a government crackdown on corruption but also because of public awareness campaigns featuring celebrities like basketball star yao ming who have helped boost awareness of the bloody cost of ivory china continues to allow the sale of socalled preconvention ivory carvings in crafts acquired before the nineteen 75 convention on international trade in endangered species as long as it's accompanied by certificates china's ivory ban is already led to an eighty percent decline in seizures of illegal ivory rob schmitz npr news shanghai the case of inactive voters was brought to light in the last presidential election and now the supreme court will hear a case about ohio's efforts to remove inactive voters from.

rob schmitz basketball bill de blasio york city islamabad new york ohio presidential election endangered species shanghai official china npr glen hogan emergency services gwyn hogan pierre islamabad eighty percent seven degrees three years 12 hours
"glen hogan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"glen hogan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To help if needed for npr news and glen hogan the clock struck midnight in sydney australia where fireworks are being set off of of sydney harbour you're listening to npr news south korean authorities confirmed that they have seized a second tanker suspected of transferring oil products at sea to north korea in violation of international sanctions south korea's yonhap news agency says the seized ship can carry more than five thousand tons of oil and has a crew mostly from china and myanmar yonhap said south korea's intelligence and customs officials are conducting a joint investigation in china of ban on the sale of ivory is being implemented beginning today as impure as rob schmitz reports from shanghai while they've activists are calling the dan a vital step in reducing the slaughter of endangered elephants for the past three years china's made a big push to eradicate ivory sales demand has fallen due to slower economic growth in a government crackdown a corruption but also because of public awareness campaigns featuring celebrities he's like basketball star yao ming who have helped boost awareness of the bloody cost of ivory china continues to allow the sale of socalled preconvention ivory carvings and crafts acquired before the nineteen 75 convention on international trade in endangered species as long as it's accompanied by certificates china's ivory ban has already led to an eighty percent decline in seizures of illegal ivory rob schmitz npr news shanghai group of polish mountaineers are aiming to make history they want to be the first to scale k two during the winter months qe two's world's secondhighest speak in the group left for northern pakistan to start their attempt today one group member told the reuters news agency that the chance to make history is a strong motivation the group is expected to.

sydney oil products north korea news agency china south korea shanghai endangered species pakistan npr glen hogan myanmar rob schmitz reuters five thousand tons eighty percent three years
"glen hogan" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"glen hogan" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Venture out you know bundle up wear long underwear he'll bring hand warmers all those basics take the weather very seriously emergency services will be onsite throughout the area to help if needed for npr news i'm glen hogan the clock struck midnight in sydney australia where fireworks are being set off above sydney harbour you're listening to npr news south korean authorities confirmed that they have seized a second tankers suspected of transferring oil products at seed to north korea in violation of international sanctions south korea's yonhap news agency says the seized ship can carry more than five thousand tons of oil and has a crew mostly from china and myanmar yonhap says south korea's intelligence and customs officials are conducting a joint investigation in china a ban on the sale of ivory is being implemented beginning today as impure its rob schmitz reports from shanghai while they've activists are calling to ban a vital step in reducing the slaughter of endangered elephants for the past three years china's made a big push to eradicate ivory sales demand has fallen due to slower economic growth in a government crackdown on corruption but also because of public awareness campaigns featuring celebrities like basketball star yao ming who have helped boost awareness of the bloody cost of ivory china continues to allow the sale of socalled preconvention ivory carvings in crafts acquire hired before the nineteen 75 convention on international trade in endangered species as long as it's accompanied by certificates china's ivory ban has already led to an eighty percent decline in seizures of illegal ivory rob schmitz npr news shanghai no group of polish mountaineers aiming to make history they want to be the first to scale k two during the winter months k two is the world's second highest speak in the group left for northern pakistan to start their attempt today one group member told the reuters news agency that the chance to make history is a strong motivation the group is expected to begin their climb early next week on trial snyder npr news.

emergency services glen hogan sydney oil products north korea news agency china south korea shanghai endangered species pakistan npr myanmar rob schmitz basketball reuters five thousand tons eighty percent three years