7 Burst results for "Glen Buxton"

"glen buxton" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

05:55 min | 10 months ago

"glen buxton" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"I wanted to learn how to play piano. And i just i even like joining the band in junior high and just like trying to read music i was like oh my gosh. I'm actually i. I might not be smart. Find out item dumb. Yeah so it is said that. A nineteen seventy-one. Alice cooper concert that he attended with his brother was really the game changer for him and it was like. Oh i'm going to do that. And you know glen buxton. Was the guitar player in the alice. Cooper band and he was like. I want to do that. And i'm going to do that. I'm going to work hard and do that. And then not long after is a assortment of musicians in the l. a. including. You know his his buddy from high school to other guys in net and they form a band called quiet riot and it's not the quiet riot that you know it's not the quite right there. Really anybody doubts you know. They were hot on the la scene. Kind of more glam rock than hair metal. Because this is like the seventies like the mid to late seventies even though they're very hot and the la seed. their first two albums are not released in america only released in japan. Have you heard those out sean. I know them intimately. Because i actually had to write sound lakes for the songs from those albums for a documentary about randy. Call randy rhoads the quiet riot years. So i actually had to sign legal disclaimers indicating how. I was going to change these compositions so we could get insurance for me to do the sound lakes so i went in and deep dole on those first two records because they the director the producer wanted. They wanted certain feeling certain things and they were having a hard time getting the right securing the rights to so and i have to tell you. They're not very good. It's not good music. I mean there's moments that are kinda cool but it's certainly not the randy rhoads. We would see. Come out on that. First ozzy record would you say your sound likes are better are right a right and the same ball i did. You know there's cool stuff but it's just compared to what we come to know and what the world knows of randy's music those first records i mean they're okay but it's it's like you said it was it was coming out of the glam rock. The rondi rodney. Big heimer seeing you know it was of glam rock a little bit. Hyrog- little steve. Mary little humble pie in there. But but not fully formed and even randy's mama's komo doors roads said you know randy never wanted. The kids stabbed those records. You know he wasn't proud of those records. He was proud of the work. You do with ozzie. And dolores us to give our diamond with say mama meet. I've made a record she. That's not good teacher. Right yes good. She knows we're there any signs of randy's abilities maybe what would come in those albums over sure like the tone and the confidence and the execution eat on you can hear in the fingers. The called the bone like he was had his beginning sound. But you know if you go and find youtube footage of him playing live with quiet riot and doing like his solo guitar spot. You get a much better pitcher. He was actually much further ahead. Sometimes when doing those nascent recordings there's all sorts of factors why you don't capture your best performance at your first time in this sterile isolated environment.

glen buxton randy rhoads randy Alice cooper la Cooper rondi rodney Big heimer sean japan america ozzie steve Mary youtube
"glen buxton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:58 min | 10 months ago

"glen buxton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Whenever powerful new means at his or her disposal to alter the acoustics of the space in which they were performing. Or at least the way in which the audience perceived that space So these effects quickly became the staple of rock music. But with hindsight, it's now clear that perhaps an even bigger change was the increasing scale of pop concerts. There had been the occasional concerts going back to the 19th century, with many thousands in the audience, but stadium sized performances only became the norm in the second half of the 20th century. So, Monica, What did that mean for guitar amplification? Well, now, suddenly you have thousands tens of thousands of people out and say a stadium screaming. And the musicians would have had a hard time hearing themselves anyway, let alone getting their music out to the back of the stadium. So this, of course, cause some changes and how they played. And The more dramatic and dynamic and exciting you could make it, the better it would carry, the better it would be expressed across the whole audience. So you now have bands like the Beatles Rolling Stones and so on playing their instruments in a way that Was trying to essentially play over the screams of the crowd, and that also didn't lead to huge, powerful amps like the Marshall with four speakers and stacks and all those kind of things and the roadie came along. Is that right, Monica? Yes. I mean, you now need a lot more equipment a lot bigger equipment. That, of course, means you need more people setting it all up. I mean, it's hard to imagine the difference between The early recordings around maybe one horn. They've called a horn off of the gramophone and all the musicians gathered around it. To now having a large band on a stage in the middle of a huge stadium outside trying to be heard. And so you now have to have a basically a village of people supporting you with bigger equipment, Better equipment to reach The audience Now the motto of one very famous rock band Blind them and Death in, um sums up well, the loudness war. Really, that became an integral part of pop shows. And the electric guitar was often the loudest of all the instruments on stage. But let's go back to the way that it was constructed and further improvements to the early models once solid body guitars became commonplace. Designers realized that they weren't limited to certain classic shapes derived from acoustic guitars and other stringed instruments. In fact, at its most basic and electric guitar could just be a broomstick with strings and a pickup. So tell us more about the pioneers of that trend Pool. It's interesting that the first company to really do this to break the tradition of the shape of the guitar going back to the Spanish classical guitar. With an electric solid body guitar. Was Gibson, the largest company in the whole industry. That hunt traditions going back many, many years to the late 19th century of making handmade acoustic instruments. And they were always seen as a very old fashioned company. But they really took a stand in 1958. Ted McCarthy, who was the man in charge said I was fed up of being seen as an old footy duty or Gibson being seen as an old fashioned company. And so they produced a series of guitars which are now They were known as the modernistic guitars. On the most famous of those was the Flying V, So that's 1958. And it is very logical in a way that you know you take The guitar and you cut away everything that you don't need. That's how he described it, because he claimed that he designed it. That story again has been contested, so we know that at that period of time, Gibson we're using external design consultants. And he discussed earlier about the world being covered. With drawings of different types of guitar shapes, whether we're experimenting with what they could and couldn't do. So the like of it came from an external source, and the reaction at first was so radical. It was seen as so radical that it was used as something to put in a guitar shop window. It wasn't really seen as a serious instrument. That people would take and play and in fact, there weren't that many made and they were stuck in guitar shops and nobody bought them. It wasn't until it became seen on television in the middle of the 19 sixties. All of a sudden everybody wanted one. And that was really the starting point of guitars being Any shape that you want. As the name suggests, the body shape of the Flying V is like the letter V nine on its side, not a single traditional guitar curve to be seen. And it's eventual success led to a number of other pretty spectacular designs. CHP. Tell me what are your favorites? And what does freedom mean for musicians and for the guitar making business? Well, first off for musicians. It meant there's a wider variety of guitars. It could be chosen. Is part of a personal style almost like a fashion statement. I think that first became evident when fenders started introducing colors in the 19 fifties, and those colors were based on contemporary out of motive. Paints before that guitars were basically brown or some variation of brown, orange and red. Today. There are literally thousands and thousands of variations shapes colors of all the traditional instruments that became popular in the fifties. Like the vendor Stratocaster, the Telecaster and Gibson, Les Paul. And those have really managed to stand the test of time, even though thousands of other kinds of come and gone thousands of other shapes and colors. They stood the test of time. But you asked Personally What I thought I've always preferred the shape of the Gibson s G, which was made famous by Tony. I owe me of Black Sabbath. Glen Buxton of Alice Cooper and Angus Young of ACDC. It's known kind of heard Devil Horn. Look, it has to cut aways, but it's also It's a great design element, and it makes it easier to play no tie up on the fretboard. It's also one of the few electric guitars. It has this really great visual symmetry that isn't part of sort of the off kilter Stratocaster and some of its elk. Now It's often said that the essential elements of the electric guitar design have remained the same since the 19 fifties and 19 sixties despite or gradual changes and improvements in the subsequent decades. Now, whether this is true or not, is a debate well beyond the scope of this program. But what is evident is that some of the early electric guitars by the likes of Fender Gibson or grit. Now change hands with thousands of dollars. Why is that HP? Well, I think there are two reasons. The first is a combination of collectibility and nostalgia. Like many things that adults collect from vintage cars to baseball cards. There's a desire to own something from their childhood. And once people become adults, they can finally afford that item that they might have lusted after 30 years ago, even though that item may now be rare, and most likely is appreciated in price. That also applies to guitars. There's a lot of nostalgia for the guitar that you saw in the music store that you couldn't afford when you were a teenager. The second reason for the high value on those is a belief that the wood and even the electronic in older guitars, especially those that are half a century old Have aged to the point where they've created a much richer sound. And, uh, the instrument have been broken in all over all those years and the bodies and next feel more comfortable. A lot of people who play vintage guitars will tell you simply that they just sound better than new guitars, and there's a lot of dispute over whether or not that's universally true. Or if that's something that's in the ears and the hands of the beholder. It's certainly true. An acoustic guitars where the wood, which is responsible for the sound does change. But electrics have more variables from the type of pickups to the amplifiers and the kind of speaker so it's harder to state conclusively that vintage guitars always sound better than new ones..

Ted McCarthy Angus Young 1958 Black Sabbath Glen Buxton 19th century Monica 19 fifties ACDC Telecaster Blind them Tony thousands of dollars late 19th century Fender Gibson Today two reasons second half of the 20th centur HP Alice Cooper
"glen buxton" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

08:54 min | 10 months ago

"glen buxton" Discussed on WBUR

"The performing musician would have a powerful new means at his or her disposal to alter the acoustics of the space in which they were performing. Or at least the way in which the audience perceived that space Mm. So these effects quickly became the staple of rock music. But with hindsight, it's now clear that perhaps an even bigger change. Was the increasing scale of pop concerts. There had been the occasional concerts going back to the 19th century, with many thousands in the audience, but stadium sized performances only became the norm in the second half of the 20th century. So, Monica. What did that mean for guitar amplification? Well, now, suddenly you have thousands tens of thousands of people out and say a stadium screaming and the musicians would have had a hard time hearing themselves anyway, let alone getting their music out to the back of the stadium. So this, of course, cause some changes and how they played. And the more dramatic and dynamic and exciting you could make it, the better it would carry, the better it would be expressed across the whole audience. So you now have bands like the Beatles Rolling Stones and so on playing their instruments in a way that was trying to essentially play over the screams of the crowd. And that also didn't lead to huge, powerful amps like the Marshall with with four speakers, stacks and all those kind of things, and the roadie came along. Is that right? Monica? Yes. I mean, you now need a lot more equipment a lot bigger equipment. That, of course, means you need more people setting it all up. I mean, it's hard to imagine the difference between The early recordings around maybe one horn. They've called a horror in off of the gramophone and all the musicians gathered around it. To now having a large band on a stage in the middle of a huge stadium outside trying to be heard. And so you now have to have a basically a village of people supporting you with bigger equipment, Better equipment to reach The audience. Now the motto a one very famous rock band Blind him and deafen him sums up. Well, the loudness war. Really, that became an integral part of pop shows, and the electric guitar was often the loudest of all the instruments on stage. But let's go back to the way that it was constructed and further improvements to the early models. Once solid body guitars became commonplace, Designers realized that they weren't limited to certain classic shapes derived from acoustic guitars and other stringed instruments. In fact, at its most basic, an electric guitar could just be a broomstick with strings and a pickup. So tell us more about the pioneers of that trend Pool. It's interesting that the first company to really do this to break the tradition of the shape of the guitar going back to the Spanish classical guitar. With an electric solid body guitar. Was Gibson, the largest company in the whole industry. That how traditions going back many, many years to the late 19th century of making handmade acoustic instruments. And they were always seen as a very old fashioned company. But they really took a stand. 1958 Ted McCarthy, who was the man in charge said I was fed up of being seen as an old fuddy duddy Gibson being seen as an old fashion company. And so they produced a series of guitars, which are now they were known as the modernistic guitars. And the most famous of those was the Flying V so that 1958 And it is very logical in a way that you know you take The guitar and you cut away everything that you don't need. That's how he described it, because he claimed that he designed it. That story again has been contested so and we know that at that period of time, Gibson we're using external design consultants. And he discussed earlier about the wall being covered. With drawings of different types of guitar shapes, whether we're experimenting with what they could and couldn't do. And so the likelihood that came from an external source and the reaction at first was so radical. It was seen as so radical that it was used as something to put in a guitar shop window. It wasn't really seen as a serious instrument. That people would take and play and in fact, there weren't that many made and they were stocking guitar shops and nobody bought them. It wasn't until it became seen on television in the middle of the 19 sixties. All of a sudden everybody wanted one. And that was really the starting point of guitars being any shape that you want. As the name suggests, the body shape of the Flying V is like the letter V lying on its side, not a single traditional guitar curve to be seen. And it's eventual success led to a number of other pretty spectacular designs. So HP tell me, what are your favorites? And what do this freedom mean for musicians and for the guitar making business? Well, first off for musicians meant there's a wider variety of guitars. It could be chosen. As part of a personal style almost like a fashion statement. I think that first became evident when fenders started introducing colors in the 19 fifties, and those colors were based on contemporary out of motive, paints. Before that guitars were basically brown or some variation of brown, orange and red. Today. There are literally thousands and thousands of variations shapes colors of, of all the traditional instruments that became popular in the fifties. Like the vendor Stratocaster, the Telecaster and Gibson, Les Paul. And those have really managed to stand the test of time, even though thousands of other kinds of come and gone thousands of other shapes and colors. They stood the test of time. But you asked Personally what I thought I've always preferred the shape of the Gibson s G, which was made famous by Tony. I owe me of Black Sabbath. Glen Buxton of Alice Cooper and Angus Young of ACDC, DC It's known kind of for its Devil horn. Look, it has to cut aways, but it's also It's a great design element, and it makes it easier to play no tie up on the fretboard. It's also one of the few electric guitars that has this really great visual symmetry that isn't part of sort of the off kilter Stratocaster and some of its elk. Now it's often said that the essential elements of the electric guitar design have remained the same since the 19 fifties or 19 sixties despite or gradual changes and improvements in the subsequent decades. Now, whether this is true or not, is a debate well beyond the scope of this program. But what is evident is that some of the early electric guitars by the likes of Fender Gibson or Gretch. Now change hands. The thousands of dollars. Why is that HP? Well, I think there are two reasons. The first is a combination of collectibility in nostalgia. Like many things that adults collect from vintage cars to baseball cards. There is a desire to own something from their childhood. And once people become adults, they can finally afford that item that they might have lusted after 30 years ago, even though that item may now be rare and most likely has appreciated in price. That also applies to guitars. There's a lot of nostalgia for the guitar that you saw in the music store that you couldn't afford when you're a teenager. The second reason for the high value on those is a belief that the wood and even the electronics and older guitars, especially those that are half a century old Have aged to the point where they've created a much richer sound. And, uh, the instruments have been broken in over all those years and the bodies and next feel more comfortable. A lot of people who play vintage guitars will tell you simply that they just sound better than new guitars, and there's a lot of dispute over whether or not that's universally true. Or if that's something that's in the the ears in the hands of the beholder. It's certainly true. An acoustic guitars where the wood, which is responsible for the sound does change. But electrics have more variables from the type of pickups to the amplifiers and the kind of speaker so.

Glen Buxton Angus Young Black Sabbath Ted McCarthy 19th century Monica Telecaster Alice Cooper late 19th century Tony second half of the 20th centur thousands of dollars two reasons Today 1958 19 fifties Beatles Rolling Stones Fender Gibson second reason 19 sixties
"glen buxton" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

09:06 min | 10 months ago

"glen buxton" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Would have a powerful new means at his or her disposal to alter the acoustics of the space in which they were performing, or at least the way in which the audience perceived that space Mm. So these effects quickly became the staple of rock music. But with hindsight, it's now clear that perhaps an even bigger change was the increasing scale of pop concerts. There had been the occasional concerts going back to the 19th century, with many thousands in the audience, but stadium size performances only became the norm in the second half of the 20th century. So, Monica. What did that mean for guitar amplification? Well, now, suddenly you have thousands tens of thousands of people out and say a stadium screaming and the musicians would have had a hard time hearing themselves anyway, let alone getting their music out to the back of the stadium. So this, of course, cause some changes and how they played. And the more dramatic and dynamic and exciting you could make it, the better it would carry, the better it would be expressed across the whole audience. So you now have bands like the Beatles, Rolling Stones and so on. Playing their instruments in a way that was trying to essentially play over the screams of the crowd. And that also didn't it lead to huge, powerful amps like the Marshall with With four speakers and stacks and all those kind of things and the roadie came along. Is that right? Monica? Yes. I mean, you now need a lot more equipment a lot bigger equipment. That, of course, means you need more people setting it all up. I mean, it's hard to imagine the difference between The early recordings around maybe one horn. They called a horror in off of the gramophone and all the musicians gathered around it. Now having a large band on a stage in the middle of a huge stadium outside trying to be heard, And so you now have to have a basically a village of people supporting you with bigger equipment, Better equipment to reach The audience. Now the motto of one very famous rock band Blind him and deafen him sums up. Well, the loudness war. Really, that became an integral part of pop shows. And the electric guitar was often the loudest of all the instruments on stage. But let's go back to the way that it was constructed and further improvements to the early models. Once solid body guitars became commonplace, Designers realized that they weren't limited to certain classic shapes derived from acoustic guitars and other string instruments. In fact, at its most basic, an electric guitar could just be a broomstick with strings and a pick up So tell us more about the pioneers of that trend Pool. It's interesting that the first company to really do this to break the tradition of the shape of the guitar going back to the Spanish classical guitar. With an electric solid body guitar. Was Gibson, the largest company in the whole industry. That had traditions going back many, many years to the late 19th century of making handmade acoustic instruments. And they were always seen as a very old fashioned company. But they really took a stand in 1958. Said. McCarthy, who was the man in charge said I was fed up of being seen as an old fuddy duddy Gibson being seen as an old fashioned company, and so they produced a series of guitars, which are now They were known as the modernistic guitars. And the most famous of those was the Flying V. So the 1958 And it is very logical in a way that you know you take The guitar and you cut away everything that you don't need. That's how he described it, because he claimed that he designed it. That story again has been contested so and we know that at that period of time, Gibson we using external design consultants. And he discussed earlier about the wall being covered. With drawings of different types of guitar shapes, whether we're experimenting with what they couldn't couldn't do. And so the likelihood that came from an external source and the reaction at first was so radical. It was seen as so radical that it was used as something to put in a guitar shop window. It wasn't really seen as a serious instrument. People would take and play and in fact, there weren't that many made and they were stuck in guitar shops and nobody bought them. It wasn't until it became seen on television in the middle of the 19 sixties. All of a sudden everybody wanted one. And that was really the starting point of guitars being Any shape that you want. As the name suggests the body shape of the flying V like the letter V lying on its side, not a single traditional guitar curve to be seen, And it's eventual success led to a number of other pretty spectacular designs. So HP tell me, what are your favorites? And what do this freedom mean for musicians and for the guitar making business? Well, first off for musicians meant there's a wider variety of guitars. It could be chosen. As part of a personal style almost like a fashion statement. I think that first became evident when fenders started introducing colors in the 19 fifties, and those colors were based on contemporary out of motive. Paints before that guitars were basically brown or some variation of brown, orange and red. Today. There are literally thousands and thousands of variations shapes colors of, of all the traditional instruments that became popular in the fifties. Like the vendor Stratocaster, the Telecaster and Gibson, Les Paul. And those have really manage to stand the test of time, even though thousands of other kinds of come and gone thousands of other shapes and colors they stood the test of time. But you asked Personally what I thought I've always preferred the shape of the Gibson s G, which was made famous by Tony. I owe me of Black Sabbath. Glen Buxton of Alice Cooper and Angus Young of CDC. It's known kind of for its Devil horn. Look, it has to cut aways, but it's also It's a great design element, and it makes it easier to play no tie up on the fretboard. It's also one of the few electric guitars that has this really great visual symmetry that isn't part of sort of the off kilter Stratocaster and some of its elk. Now It's often said that the essential elements of the electric guitar design have remained the same since the 19 fifties or 19 sixties despite or gradual changes and improvements in the subsequent decades. Now, whether this is true or not, is a debate well beyond the scope of this program. But what is evident is that some of the early electric guitars by the likes of Fender Gibson or grit. Now change hands. The thousands of dollars. Why is that HP? Well, I think there are two reasons. The first is a combination of collectibility in nostalgia. Like many things that adults collect from vintage cars to baseball cards. There is a desire to own something from their childhood. And once people become adults, they can finally afford that item that they might have lusted after 30 years ago, even though that item may now be rare, and most likely is appreciated in price. That also applies to guitars. There's a lot of nostalgia for the guitar that you saw in the music store that you couldn't afford when you were a teenager. The second reason for the high value on those is a belief that the wood and even the electronics and older guitars, especially those that are half a century old Have aged to the point where they've created a much richer sound. And, uh, the instruments have been broken in over all those years and the bodies and next feel more comfortable. A lot of people who play vintage guitars will tell you simply that they just sound better than new guitars, and there's a lot of dispute over whether or not that's universally true. Or if that's something that's in the the ears in the hands of the beholder. It's certainly true. An acoustic guitars where the wood, which is responsible for the sound does change. But electrics have more variables from the type of pickups to the amplifiers and the kind of speakers so it's harder to state conclusively that vintage guitars always sound better than new ones..

Black Sabbath 1958 Rolling Stones Glen Buxton Angus Young Monica 19th century McCarthy Telecaster Tony late 19th century thousands of dollars Today 19 fifties second half of the 20th centur 19 sixties Beatles Fender Gibson second reason CDC
"glen buxton" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"glen buxton" Discussed on Pantheon

"Album was a flop to it wasn't until they teamed up with producer Bob Estrin that they finally had a hit with their third album. But by Nineteen seventy-two Alice Cooper were huge stars and generating more than their share of controversy. They were an easy target for grandstanding politicians. So Vincent now Alice responded with his own political satire, the nineteen seventy two elections were right around the corner and who would make the most unlikely candidate Alice Cooper. Despite the fact that reflected had bombed as a single Bob as really liked the song as the story goes, he told the band, it should be redone and made a hundred times bigger. So the riff and some of the melody of reflected were re used to create the new song elected. Elected was released as a single in September nineteen seventy-two right before the election it was also included as track number three on the billion dollar babies album that followed in February nineteen seventy. The Song Features Alice Cooper on Vocals Glen Buxton on Lead Guitar Michael Bruce on Rhythm Guitar Dennis. dunaway on Bass and Neil Smith on drums the song was written by five band members and produced by Bob as. The song opens with a big intro. One Crashing Guitar Chord in a few quick notes from Dennis Dunaway's base in the left channel along with some oddball percussion.

Alice Cooper Bob Estrin Dennis. dunaway producer Glen Buxton Vincent Neil Smith Michael Bruce
"glen buxton" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"glen buxton" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"Right. We're gonna We're gonna leave it there. I would, I would say, like Tom Jones with a J. You all right? They would appreciate it very well. But, you know, I I understand what he's saying. For one thing. I don't like to compare guitarists because they all have different styles. I don't believe there's The greatest guitarist of all time. That's my Humble opinion. But any man, it took me a long time that even appreciate Jimmy entries That was through you because I never gave Jimmy Hendrix much thought It was just loud noise to me. But then you know, you started playing some stuff and I started taking a second look at Jimi Hendrix. And he was he was incredible. There's no doubt about it was incredible. I tell you, the guitar player that I think and You know, people think that Eddie Van Halen my ultimate It's our hero, and he's right up there, But I think one of the greatest guitar players of all time is Jeff back. I think the guy that phenomenal I'll tell you something else. And this is obviously not in the rock and roll. But Glen Campbell was a heck of a guitar player yet Roy Clarke on the countryside and shit too. We got shit. Oh, man! Yeah, So I mean, you start going down that road and then you start comparing styles, and it's just hard to see you just can't do that. You can't say that one guy's better than the other because they all have different styles. There you go. But we will will remember Eddie van haven today, so they passed over the age of six in case people. Tooni and going. What the heck are you guys talking about? Well, the short answer is we don't know. But the thing is, we're talking about Eddie of an Hey, let's die today. The age of 65 Just tell my great guitarist down through history. And I started thinking when you talk about, you know, Deep purple and Ritchie Blackmore Ritchie Blackmore. I mean, that's a heck of a guitarist, too. And I'm tell you, somebody who I think was underrated. What was the guys who guitars for Alice Cooper on those early albums? You had to go. It was Glen Buxton, and he's gone and Michael Bruce, so I think played rhythm. Yeah, but I mean, the lead guitarist was frickin for not like wheels instead. Oh, my God. That guy was phenomenal, Alice even underground under. I mean, that's just awesome stuff, So I mean, we could go all the way. Well, one thing I loved like to say the whole reason we play a lot of Van Halen on this show. Is because of the 101st. I did play some Van Halen, but it was very rare. And all of a sudden I started getting calls from the 10 1st is when we first started the show, and then they love and oh, man, they coming and I play one on sudden. Amen. Place a mailing Where you calling from? I'm from the Fort Campbell for 140. Okay, Well, good. Well, they're probably in mourning today, too. We'll dedicate today to them too. They go to the 101st from Eddie. Well, yeah. Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer. This from Red States today has the charm of a three year old being told no more cookies and decides to Thor Temper tantrum, kicking and screaming. So last Friday's We told you she was handed a seven to nothing lost by the Michigan Supreme Court on our executive order overreach. And now she's coming out with new ones. Oh, yeah. She took the weekend off to come up with some new screwball plans, and she came up with a doozy. She's gonna have one of her agency's yousa law created during the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918. To give out finds two people who don't do what she wants them to do. This is W x Y and Z reporting in Detroit. It says. Last evening, Governor Gretchen Whitmer released a video addressing the Supreme Court's decision to rule against her covert 19 emergency orders. While reminding Michiganders to remain vigilant and taking precautions during the pandemic would were also called for bipartisan ship in working with Republicans to address the virus and its impact on the economy. She says. As a result of the court and legislatures action, our covert 19 cases will likely go up. There will be uncertainty, disruption and possibly greater risk to our economy. More people quarantine and more deaths. She added. The ruling does not mean that all mandated protections against the virus will go away. She stated. She plans to use additional powers to protect Families. So she's announcing Mohr lockdowns and things like What's going to be interesting is is if as has been going on the cases and deaths continue to go down, down down. And she's saying that this is going to cause him to go up. We'll see who's right. Quick time out, will be back with more right after this holiday is fast approaching, We're gearing up for the national rescue missions Annual radio Fun on Monday, November 23rd hates Phil Valentine ing like you to join us for the one day of the year that we can all give back to this amazing organization that serves the hopeless and needy here in Middle Tennessee. They help over 800 men, women and Children each day. So please be a partner of hope this year and support national rescue missions. Radiothon on Monday, November 19th right here on Super talk. 99 7. W T. N. For more information.

Jimmy Hendrix Gretchen Whitmer Eddie Van Halen Eddie Alice Cooper Van Halen Ritchie Blackmore Ritchie Blac Eddie van haven Glen Campbell Michigan Supreme Court Tom Jones Glen Buxton Phil Valentine Michigan Fort Campbell Detroit Tooni Mohr Roy Clarke Supreme Court
"glen buxton" Discussed on Decibel Geek Podcast

Decibel Geek Podcast

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"glen buxton" Discussed on Decibel Geek Podcast

"That was the first thing I wanted to hear and I was really how did leave disappointed Terrible. Rabanne they had. Not. The I mean. The original songs on that album weren't that great on paranormal. There were of humor few that. One's like. Oh God this is even worse see and I thought those were getting my favorites and they were my least favorites. Yeah I don't I don't know what's going on there I don't know is that like you know it does Michael Bruce. Not having more to to wrote choride those anthems or is it like? Did they hide the best shit to make it look like Alice doesn't need him I don't know I. Mean They Michael Bruce released like a easier because he's doing a Michael Bruce Ban thing next year and and I really enjoyed what I heard on that. So I don't know if it's also holding back as Ryan holding him back. But it's yeah. I mean I it wasn't I wasn't blown away by that either and even like you said he and not even the original stuff out paranormal for the most part I wasn't crazy about there is maybe two songs that were really keepers for as far as my personal playlist goes so. You know we'll see how it goes. Yeah but I don't know I'm always pulling from fucking Harris I. Love Alice Cooper I. Love Him to death. I. You know I love all eras but to me. You know there's the Alice Cooper band and then there's everything else. You end as much as I don't want to discredit them. I think always the weak link was Glen Buxton. As, far as writing, I would say as far as performing writing. You know it was always about Alice and Michael Bruce Right..

Alice Cooper Michael Bruce Michael Bruce Ban Ryan Glen Buxton Harris