35 Burst results for "Glaxosmithkline"

Shot to Prevent H.I.V. Works Better Than Daily Pill in Women

News, Traffic and Weather

00:40 sec | 2 weeks ago

Shot to Prevent H.I.V. Works Better Than Daily Pill in Women

"A new study suggests a shot of an experimental medicine every two months works better than daily pills to help keep women from catching HIV, ABC Chuck's Iverson. The injection of the drug was 89% Mohr, effective at preventing HIV infection from an infected sex partner than Truvada pills, although both reduce that risk is a boon for AIDS prevention efforts, especially in Africa, where the study took place and where women have few discreet ways of protecting themselves from infection. A similar study involving gay men had the same results. The drugs being developed by a group of entities, including GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, the US National Institutes of Health and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Hiv Infection Iverson Mohr Chuck ABC Aids Africa Us National Institutes Of Heal Glaxosmithkline Pfizer Bill And Melinda Gates Foundat
"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:29 min | Last month

"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on KCRW

"For vaccines at GlaxoSmithKline, one of the companies now working on a Corona virus vaccine. It's Lowry was a government employee. He would have to go through a bunch of office of government ethics steps, disclosures about his stock holdings, investment of anything that might pose a conflict of interest, or he might have to recuse himself from certain decisions. What's more, all of this would be public. That didn't quite happen here because he was brought on as a contractor and hired through a private firm working with the government, and that just that detail in and of itself is being a contractor that has been controversial. That's right. Senator Elizabeth Warren is among several Democratic legislators to question whether slow we should have been hired as a federal employee. Instead given his key position, he said, he doesn't make decisions, but he has a lot of influence. In a statement, he said he took on this role out of a commitment to public health and to helping control this deadly pandemic. He also affirmed his commitment to the highest ethical standards. Details of Slattery's contract have emerged slowly, but the full contract wasn't widely available. Even though folks have been asking for it for months. It did just provided. It's me last night. So what's in it? What can we learn from him? Well, even though it's been well reported that slowly, is only being paid a dollar for his work. He's actually being paid $1000 same basic principle, though it's a lump sum. That's a lot less than what he'd be paid on a salary. The contract repeat some of what's already come out and news reports and from congressional oversight but lays it out in black and white. It includes slouches board memberships, including his role on Vaccine front runner of Modern is bored, He stepped down. It also includes stockholdings slow he's held on to his GlaxoSmithKline stock, but agreed to donate profits during his time in operation Warp speed above a certain threshold. We also learned that the scope of this work, as described in the contract is really brief. Which I'm told by a lawyer who works on government contracting isn't that abnormal? But public Citizen's Craig Holman says it may be too vague. You know the contract itself. Doesn't actually explain what it is he's doing on DH, so that provides provides a lot of wiggle room for months of slowing. He says slowly, shouldn't be a contractor because he holds such a key role in Operation Warp speed. What to his bosses in the Trump administration. What does HHS say about HHS says Lowey's expertise is invaluable to operation warp speed, but the actual investments are decided by a board of directors. That board includes the secretaries of the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Defense. It also includes members of the White House Corona Virus Task force, and they also say they're agency ethics officers say Slough is in compliance. With its standards thanks to the steps he's taken to disclosed a vest and donate This is NPR pharmaceutical correspondent Sidney Lumpkin. Thank you so much. Sydney. You bet. When Louisville police raided Briana Taylor's apartment, then shot and killed her. Ah police officer was also shot. That man has now filed a civil lawsuit against Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker. The officer claims that Walker quote willingly or maliciously shot him while officers were serving the No. Knock warrant. Eleanor Klibanoff from member station W F P L has more In plain clothes. Louisville Police enter Briana Taylor's apartment in the early morning hours of March, 13th Sergeant Jonathan Mattingly was at the front of the group down the hallway. He saw Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, holding a gun. Here's Mattingly, speaking on ABC last week, he wasn't shooting at the ground warning shot. He's pushed out with two hands looking straight at me Wi I saw his gun. Our postures were the same looking at each other. When he fired that shot. Walker fired one shot striking Mattingly in the leg. Mattingly and two other officers returned fire 32 shots, six of which struck Taylor, killing her. Walker told police later he believed they were intruders and filed a lawsuit seeking immunity from prosecution under Kentucky, stand your ground laws. But now Mattingly has filed a counter suit, arguing that Walker knew they were police and fired at them intentionally anyway, causing him trauma and mental anguish. The suit says Walker's conduct was quote outrageous, intolerable and offends all accepted standards of decency and morality. Mattingly also wants the lawsuit against the city and the officers dropped because of qualified immunity. The idea that government officials could only be sued for violating rights that are clearly established in case law. Police officers suing a civilian and Court for emotional distress is unprecedented. Gloria Brown Marshall teaches constitutional law at John Jay College at the City University of New York. Sergeant Mattingly. Wants to have it both ways he wants to be shielded by qualified immunity. And also bring an action as though he is a civilian individual who's been injured by another civilian, She said. This could open the door to any government employees suing a civilian for mental anguish or distress caused by doing their job. Steve reminds represents Kenneth Walker, he said. This countersuit is concerning to him on another front can, he could be setting for defending himself in his own residence. Make no mistake that all lawful gunowners rights or risk and actually scare everyone. Walker was charged with attempted murder of a police officer. The Jefferson County commas attorney dropped those charges in May, but said there could be other charges against Walker once all of.

Kenneth Walker Mattingly Briana Taylor officer Louisville Police GlaxoSmithKline HHS Sergeant Mattingly Senator Elizabeth Warren Jonathan Mattingly Lowry Slattery NPR Craig Holman Sydney Eleanor Klibanoff Slough ABC
Editing in Isolation

This Week in Photo

07:04 min | Last month

Editing in Isolation

"Welcome back to another episode of this week in Photo I. Am your host Frederik van Johnson today. Lee Herbert is on the show. He's a final cut pro expert who has been using the absence like the early days of the software I think when it yet cert- up with a crank or something. Now Lee is the expert. He's talking all over the world these days. Virtually we're GONNA talk about how his business has changed as an editor that's Kinda stuck sheltering in place like the rest of us Lee Herbert Welcome showman how you doing. Much. I'm much like the rest of the will of surviving this year. So yeah, we we're getting. We're we're we're based in Melbourne. So we are now in I think we twelve or thirteen time has no relevance anymore of of lockdown here. So Yeah, it's It is what it is. It is what? gives us the the Reader's Digest. Story the first resume paragraph of WHO Lee Herbert is. Yeah, the first line, which ironically as an editor I, struggle to keep things brief when I'm talking. which. Because as an editor, obviously your main job is to make sure that you tell your story in the most short and succinct way. But when I'm telling marine. Story. But. So a little bit about me I have had many over the years but I worked in the apple wheels for ten years of a favorite Tom was that as a final per China. But at the same time, I also did a lot of theatre and TV and things like that and so I sort of ended up wanting to do a lot more production work. So I left Apple. Back in two thousand, thirteen I think two, thousand, thirty, two, thousand, fourteen, and started mining production company I. Still focused a favorite on training really enjoy the training side of things but yes oh, you know thankfully, we've been going from strength strength and so been doing. Mostly corporate videos for large and medium and sometimes small corporate clients my passion Israeli documentaries because I. Love. I love telling people stories in learning people's stories and Yes. BUYS. That's that's the the high level view of what I do and why do it? That's cool and you love this stuff I mean you you've been editing on I mean obviously as evidenced by posters on the wall behind you, you are a fan of apple products? And you have not working. We're apple a for a while since I've known you've been contracting on an offer. Those guys, right. Yeah it's. Yes on an. been doing doing stuff for them. Luckily I get to do stuff for up dump stuff cerny done stuff for a lot of stuff in the medical field. So we worked visor with books for GlaxoSmithKline. Quite a few local companies here as well. Obviously was the big stuff. But yes I've been doing a lot of corporate and I really. It's funny. The corporate side of things I think photography might get this quite a lot as well is that I get quite a lot of friends of mine who are in the field but they work more in in narrative do soap operas they do movies and things like that and they say to me Oh you know I'd hate to do corporate stuff because you sort of a confined and be. You know you might not have. A particularly exciting product to talk about and I was like, yeah. But that's like that's the really cool thing for me is I love the idea of having to look at a widget and go how can I make this widget coup? How can I find the story and helped tell the widget story so that you know the people can get it like I was just having a virtual meeting with a client earlier this week in you know she was saying that they want to build a relationship with the production company because I don't just want to talk about the speeds and feeds of what they sell they WanNa talk about the benefits they want to talk about you know. got these cool buttons but here's why does cool buttons are going to make your life better and here's why you should buy it. So I really like that aspect of. Doing corporate work yeah, yeah, this whole world though you know as you as you look at just sort of the shifting of where things are right now, you know like the title of this, the stream slash recording is editing an isolation and as you and I were talking about offline last week I think it was there has been some positive you know obviously. You know the whole thing is negative. There's no way to spin it as positive but there are some cracks in the clouds and that are revealing new revenue streams that you didn't have prior to the whole pandemic. He talked about that a little bit of how things have shifted from Lee. Herbert hopping on a plane first-class to go to a gig versus. Lebron up skype in firing of invoices. What does it look like? It's definitely Dif- Liam. been quite different from that. So I'll given. So obviously like I had when when everything sort of started going crazy I had at least five to ten jobs that were either put on hold canceled, and obviously I'm not going to get flourine outs to the USO Asia wherever it is GonNa fly me out to to shoot stuff for them but the interesting converse of that is. Interestingly enough events because my my company we do we do a few events. We got a couple of in the middle of the year and then a couple at the end of the year. But like regular ones, men bits and bobs coming but we didn't really do a lot of events and funnily enough a lot of the work that's coming from lately is from virtual conferences. So I've had quite a few corporate clients who they've got staff members who are presenting it at virtual conferences, and thankfully they have realized very quickly that just doing it on a Webcam is not a good look for the company. I think we've all kind of like one of my biggest concerns when when the whole lockdown thing started is if you watch the news just about everyone that they were interviewing on the news, which is in the terrible lighting situation with you know they they elect either under the nose looking straight up they nose as what will up somewhere and you got people in the background working with their underwear it was. Dogs and cats living together complete my him and I was looking at that going. Oh, my goodness I. Really Hope People don't get used to it and go. Okay. Well, this is just how you know. You're not going to have good lighting. You're not going to have good camera. You're not gonNa have good microphone and we just going to be eastern that's going to be fine. I was like I'm out of work. This is awful. But thankfully, what's happened is a lot of my clients have looked gaunt. Yeah. You know we could do better. So there's been a favorite of consulting but I've done. So locally here in Melbourne between lockdowns, I worked with quite a few clients who realize that they were going to be working from home lot. Warn I helped them get even if it was just bit a webcams or just. A little you know like, for example, a lot of them when they could get them in stock. This thing called the Algata cam link between you and me there's tons of these for twenty bucks on Amazon that you can get instead of big fancy expensive ones. which allow you to connect. Dias Laura Ramirez camera into your computer used as Webcam as I am with my ach three now.

Lee Herbert Frederik Van Johnson Apple I. Love LEE Cerny Melbourne Glaxosmithkline TOM China Lebron Herbert Liam Skype Asia Dias Laura Ramirez Amazon
Sanofi, GSK to provide COVID-19 vaccine to global alliance

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last month

Sanofi, GSK to provide COVID-19 vaccine to global alliance

"Two leading drug makers have agreed to provide two hundred million doses of that potential coded nineteen vaccine to the Kovacs facility a vaccine candidate developed by Sanofi and GlaxoSmithKline is in early stage trials with results expected in December teams plan to begin phase three trials by the end of the year and request approval for the vaccine in the first half of twenty twenty one the launch quota of disease is set for a facility within Kovacs a coalition of governments health organizations businesses and charities working to accelerate the development of Kobe nineteen vaccines worldwide Charles the last month London

Sanofi Kovacs London Glaxosmithkline
Operation Warp Speed advisers held investments in COVID vaccine firms, records show

BBC World Service

01:07 min | 2 months ago

Operation Warp Speed advisers held investments in COVID vaccine firms, records show

"Several consultants working on the crash program to develop a Corona virus vaccine had financial ties to companies involved in the cove. It 19 response. That's according to new records released by a House subcommittee, and he presents a potential conflict of interest. NPR. Sidney Lumpkin has details. Operation Warp speed is the Trump Administration's pushed to make a Corona virus vaccine in record time. Its chief scientific adviser is former pharmaceutical executive Moncef Slowey. He has GlaxoSmithKline investments, and he's allowed to hang on to them. That's even though GlaxoSmithKline is receiving $2.1 billion in federal funding to work on a Corona virus vaccine. He called the stock his retirement and promised to donate any excessive profits to the National Institutes of Health. But a House subcommittee released documents Tuesday showing he doesn't have to do that while he's alive. The subcommittee also found three other operation warp speed consultants with potential financial conflicts. Sidney Lumpkin, NPR news in pre market trading, US futures are mixed on Asian stock market shares are higher.

Sidney Lumpkin Moncef Slowey NPR Glaxosmithkline National Institutes Of Health Executive United States
Nine Pharma CEOs Commit to the “Integrity of the Scientific Process” in COVID-19 Vaccine Trials

Squawk Pod

05:26 min | 2 months ago

Nine Pharma CEOs Commit to the “Integrity of the Scientific Process” in COVID-19 Vaccine Trials

"Breaking news out of the former suitable sector. Let's get to make. Good Morning. Good Morning Joe Nine. CEO's of some of the largest drug companies in the world announcing they've signed onto what they're calling a historic pledge to uphold the scientific integrity and put safety first as they are developing covid nineteen vaccines. These are basically the front runners in the vaccine race for covid nineteen, all of the companies involved in operation warp speed in addition to Merck Pfizer and its partner biotech Astra Zeneca Madonna GlaxoSmithKline Sanofi Johnson and Johnson and Nova VACs all signing onto this pledge to do essentially four things. They say always make safety and wellbeing of vaccinated people a top priority continue to adhere to high scientific and Ethical Standards Regarding. The conduct of clinical trials and the rigor of their manufacturing process they pledged to submit for approval or emergency use authorization after demonstrating safety and efficacy through phase three clinical studies designed to design and conducted to meet regulatory guidelines through a regulatory authorities like the FDA, and they say to work to ensure sufficient supply and range of vaccine options including those suitable for global access. They say quote we believe this pledge will help ensure public confidence in the rigorous scientific and regulatory process by which covid nineteen vaccines are evaluated and may ultimately approved and guys. This comes as vaccine development is moving at unprecedented speeds and we are hearing about some hesitancy. From folks to believe in the process and to be comfortable taking these vaccines especially as the FDA's leadership has come under question about political influence regarding convalescent plasma and hydroxy chloroquine in a recent change research and CB poll about thirty percent of people said that they either definitely not or probably not take covid nineteen vaccine, and so guys the company is trying to step in here to tell the public, they will keep safety I. Yeah. It's in response to rumors that we'd get an emergency youth authorization for for one of these vaccines before completing. The process there's always pressure on the FDA. obviously in especially with you know we're talking about life and death situations with with some of these drugs to to cut corners and I think they're just you know they're just putting it out there that especially with so many people when. Vaccines are such A. Controversial even before this people, you know what? The Anti Vaccine and everything else and we do remember back with with polio before we knew everything luckily nothing happened but you need to be sure. His longtime ago we know so much more and we know what's in vaccines. We know the scientific basis for how they worked meg. So I, I would be comfortable with. with one of these, the ad no mediated. Vaccine or you know if there's a small stretch of Messenger Aurigny I'll give it a shot I. I'm not overly concerned with with like contamination by some horrific virus that we don't see or something like that. You know make so. A wary public needs to be. Absolutely certain that that. We've. Crossed all the cross the is and cross. The is in dotted the teeth I just wanted to know we are coming up on that and that final stretch and the vaccine development process sort of inconceivably because this only begin in January really. But when we get to the end of October that's when Pfizer is indicating that they may see results about whether they're vaccine works and the FDA has scheduled advisory committee meeting of outside advisers, October twenty second, and so a lot of people are gonNA be looking at that date and saying, are we going to see data and how transparent will this process be So these are nine major drugmakers saying that their first priority is safety and I think this is hugely important not only for building public confidence in. A covert vaccine, but for protecting the sanctity of vaccines in general broader, we've had discussions with Scott gottlieb about this. The reason you don't want to rush through and push something out there that hasn't been thoroughly vetted with a phase three trial is that if there were problems with it, not only would it convince people not to take a Kovin vaccine, but it could undo a lot of the work that's been done with other vaccination programs around the globe I mean Joe. Brought up polio. Well, Jonas salk actually. Vaccinated his children. As some of the very first people testing this out so you know that was something he felt one hundred percent confident with we don't do things that way anymore. But there has been so much that that we have done with vaccinations diseases that we don't even think about anymore because over the last fifty years or so you know they've they've they've kind of gone away up very common This is just important not only for covert vaccination, but for faith in the vaccination system at large. Yeah it's so fragile. Public Health experts are incredibly concerned that a misstep here when vaccines are so important could shake the the fragile confidence in the vaccine system in general, and as you pointed out, it's this terrible irony of vaccines that they have rendered all these terrible diseases sort of non existent, and so we don't appreciate that vaccines did that for us. So there's a lot on the line here.

FDA Polio Joe Nine Sanofi Johnson Merck Pfizer Pfizer Jonas Salk Astra Zeneca Madonna Scott Gottlieb CEO Chloroquine Partner
"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

01:32 min | 4 months ago

"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Thanks for staying with us with Kristen D. As in David rank in the head of Customs and border protection, says border security. Now is a public health mission. Cbb commissioner Mark Morgan tells me they are fighting the Corona virus with something called Title 42 which dictates how undocumented migrants are handled there now immediately deported instead of being held in custody when she says, would create a situation where the Corona virus could spread, 90% of those people were encountering were returned immediately jelly within two hours back to Mexico. It's been a game changer when it comes to migration. He says. It has slowed due to the pandemic, but it is not stopped. There are about 1200 encounters a day with CBP, Michael board NewsRadio, 10 80 K R. L D. Well the U. S government is pledging its biggest investment yet for Ako been 19 vaccine $2.1 billion will go toward a vaccine effort involving pharmaceutical giants. Sanofi and GlaxoSmithKline. The money will be used for research, testing and production of 100 million doses of the vaccine with an option to buy another 500 million of it if it works. The U. S. Has also made similar vaccine deals with companies like Pfizer and AstraZeneca and Novavax under Operation Word Warp speed. The Sanofi Glaxo vaccine will be beginning early phase trials in September and hopes to have a vaccine ready by early next year. Now the celebrity joining those that are criticizing Ellen Brad Garrett says, Yeah, it's probably true about Ellen..

Ellen Brad Garrett Mark Morgan Sanofi CBP Kristen D. Pfizer commissioner AstraZeneca Mexico Ako GlaxoSmithKline David Michael
"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:53 min | 4 months ago

"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Car to clear the intersection before protesters could surround it. As driver cleared the intersection are officer prepared to make a U turn and returned to his traffic control position, which was back west of the intersection. It was during that turning maneuver that he did not see the protester industry while the car did strike the protester, and there were words exchanged between the officer and the man character says the incident was not intentional. But the search for information continues. We're still asking for any protesters who might have additional video or witnessed the incident to reach the police department and give us a call Pete Demetrius. Okay and extent, 70 news radio. You could see that video on our website Kate, next 10 70 dot com 20 with a look at your money here. Spring Motel, a couple of drug giants making news today, GlaxoSmithKline and Senate Pastor have struggled more than $2 billion deal with the U. S government to develop a manufacturer of potential vaccine for the Corona virus. The deal is the biggest one yet so far announced by the federal government for vaccine as part of Operation Warp speed, the effort to develop multiple covert 19 vaccines simultaneously. This a day after Fizer signed the nearly $2 billion deal with the government to provide 100 million doses of a Corona virus vaccine. Meanwhile, surging sales of cancer medicines and reduce spending across the board helped Merrick, another drug giant, overcome a big hit from the Corona virus pandemic, pushing second quarter profits up by 12%. We're watching. What's happening in Washington so far are no action yet on a new Corona virus rescue package that could extend the unemployment benefits as well as the eviction bands a very critical point for a main street now, right now, the Dow was down 216 points, the S and P 518. NASDAQ higher by 11. Check. The money is 20 and 50 each hour. Frank Moto from the agent's Campell Money desk can extend 70 years. Radio, college and high school sports are taking a big hit details unless the 90 seconds it's 11 22 from covert tasks are already gone into cries for justice.

officer federal government Campell Money Pete Demetrius Spring Motel Frank Moto GlaxoSmithKline Fizer Kate Merrick Senate Washington U. S
Sanofi, GlaxoSmithKline in $2.1 billion vaccine deal with U.S.

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:29 sec | 4 months ago

Sanofi, GlaxoSmithKline in $2.1 billion vaccine deal with U.S.

"A couple of drug giants making news today, GlaxoSmithKline and Senate Pastor have struggled more than $2 billion deal with the U. S government to develop a manufacturer of potential vaccine for the Corona virus. The deal is the biggest one yet so far announced by the federal government for vaccine as part of Operation Warp speed, the effort to develop multiple covert 19 vaccines simultaneously. This a day after Fizer signed the nearly $2 billion deal with the government to provide 100 million doses of a Corona virus vaccine.

Federal Government Glaxosmithkline Fizer Senate U. S
Sanofi, GlaxoSmithKline in $2.1 billion vaccine deal with U.S.

KYW 24 Hour News

00:21 sec | 4 months ago

Sanofi, GlaxoSmithKline in $2.1 billion vaccine deal with U.S.

"Covert 19 vaccine being developed by tobacco plants by British American tobacco using tobacco plants. The maker of Lucky Strike cigarettes, says clinical trials could start within weeks mate on the federal government striking of more than $2 billion deal to buy the covert 19 vaccine being developed right now by drug maker Sanofi and GlaxoSmithKline. With

British American Tobacco Sanofi Glaxosmithkline
Who Is Winning the COVID-19 Vaccine Race?

CNBC's Fast Money

02:00 min | 5 months ago

Who Is Winning the COVID-19 Vaccine Race?

"New face on the race to develop a corona virus vaccine as cases surge in several states. Terrell joins us with the very latest. Hey, MEG! Hey, Melissa Will Sanofi providing an update on its plans today seeing now that it's program in porter ship with GlaxoSmithKline could be human clinical trials in September and potentially in a larger phase, three efficacy study by the end of the year or early twenty twenty one now that's still a few months behind where other companies are but Sanofi, CEO pointing out that their technology is one of the only ones that's proven in. In an approved vaccine, already have a flu vaccine based on this technology separately. They also have a partnership with translate bio, and you can see that stocks up forty seven percent today an expanded partnership. They're going to work together on other vaccines to not just the Cova vaccine, and that's an Mr platform similar to Madonna's, and that's a little bit further behind the GlaxoSmithKline Sanofi vaccine so Sanofi. They're having two different Cova. Tracks ongoing. Meanwhile, the first efficacy trials in the United States those thirty thousand person trials expected to start in July from dern and Pfizer AstraZeneca close on their heels, potentially starting July or August with their trial Johnson and Johnson expected in September and then of course as we mentioned gs K.. Sanofi at the end of the year, so these big companies all gearing up to start these large scale efficacy studies within weeks already. What is the earliest projection by accompany MAG for back backseat hitting the market or getting FDA approval? Well we've seen from some companies like Astra Zeneca. Could deliver this vaccine by October if things go well, FIS has made similar projections, but today Dr Fao. She was testifying on the hill. He reiterated the end of Twenty Twenty early twenty twenty one time line for the earliest, these vaccines could be ready. It's all going to depend upon the rate of infection. In these large-scale efficacy efficacy trials because the more infection there is the faster they will prove that they work

Sanofi Flu Vaccine Cova Twenty Twenty Glaxosmithkline Johnson Astra Zeneca Terrell United States Pfizer Astrazeneca FDA CEO MAG Dr Fao Dern
Trump announces leaders for "Operation Warp Speed" to find a coronavirus vaccine

Wintrust Business Lunch with Steve Bertrand

00:14 sec | 7 months ago

Trump announces leaders for "Operation Warp Speed" to find a coronavirus vaccine

"President trump has announced the two leaders of operation warp speed the effort to develop a corona virus vaccine they are mon sep slough we the axe head of GlaxoSmithKline's vaccines division and four star army general Gustave

Donald Trump Glaxosmithkline President Trump Gustave
"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:31 min | 10 months ago

"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on WGN Radio

"President in the body speaking in the morning what to one of his biggest crowd so far in Iowa Biden vowed not to act how he sees president trump acting it rally another Democrat particular things that aren't true and that's what I'm not going to do I was with warning people to judge third and fourth that near the fifth places Minnesota senator Amy Klobuchar she however believes the contest is wide open and she's expecting a surprise as caucus voters caucus goers a cast their votes tonight health officials in central California of confirmed two new cases of coronavirus including one new person to person transmission the two new cases are in San Benito county bringing the total number of cases in the U. S. to eleven there are seventeen thousand cases worldwide most of them in China twenty three countries have reported cases of coronavirus nearly three hundred people have died now with WGN sports here's Dave that in two thousand thirteen Patrick well homes tweeted I bet it feels amazing to be the quarterback who says I'm going to Disney world after winning the Superbowl last night he was the quarterback his seventeen year old self in vision to getting his chance to save my homes the MVP of the chiefs thirty one twenty one of the forty Niners insuperable fifty four for Kansas city first Superbowl win since nineteen seventy the forty Niners come up short of their sixth Super Bowl crown NBA the bulls fell to Toronto one twenty nine one oh to their third straight loss college basketball eighteen Frank I will rally late to beat number nineteen illinois' seventy two sixty five dropping me a lot I back into a first place tie with Michigan state the Blackhawks still three points out of a playoff spot our Xfinity X. five Blackhawks report the hawks played Minnesota tomorrow night and Webb Simpson wins the PGA Phoenix open in a playoff with totally free now Dave at it WGN sports your money on WGN U. S. stock futures bouncing back after Friday six hundred point sell off futures on the Dow S. and P. five hundred nasdaq are all up this morning heading to the opening bell in about an hour DOW futures are up about a hundred and twenty points meanwhile Asian markets tanking under fears about the spreading corona virus in China the Shanghai composite fell of more than nine seven and a half percent almost eight percent it was the Shanghai composite index so that markets first day back after a week off for the.

Toronto Michigan NBA Kansas Disney WGN Iowa Webb Simpson Minnesota hawks Blackhawks illinois President bulls Niners MVP Patrick Dave
More drugmakers hike U.S. prices as new year begins

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

00:31 sec | 11 months ago

More drugmakers hike U.S. prices as new year begins

"Drugmakers Pfizer GlaxoSmithKline. So SmithKline and Sanofi have confirmed that they will raise the price of a collective two hundred medicines here in the. US visors says at least fifty of its drugs. We'll see a price hike including including I branch which is used in breast cancer treatment. GlaxoSmithKline will raise the price on thirty of its drugs including respiratory treatments that use their elliptic inhaler synovium not yet said which drugs will be impacted but confirmed it will be around ten of its drugs. The hikes are expected to be less than ten percent with the average raise expected to be around five

Pfizer Glaxosmithkline Smithkline Sanofi Breast Cancer
It Looked As Though Millions Of Babies Would Miss Out On A Lifesaving Vaccine

Morning Edition

03:21 min | 1 year ago

It Looked As Though Millions Of Babies Would Miss Out On A Lifesaving Vaccine

"Two million. That is the number of babies who were at risk. Because the pharmaceutical company, Merck stopped providing lifesaving doc seen to several west African countries at the same time. Merckx was going to start selling the vaccine at a higher price to China NPR broke that story last fall. And now we have good news to report those babies will still get the vaccine as NPR's. Mike, lean do cleft reports other companies are now stepping in the vaccine is for a disease called Rotavirus, which infects basically. Every child on the planet every child. Whether you live in the US so you live in doping country is infected with this disease. That's Dr mature Santo, Shem Johns. Hopkins University pediatrician in an expert on Rotavirus. He says the disease causes very severe diarrhea here in the US children can easily get treatment at a hospital, but in poor countries without good healthcare systems would've virus can be deadly. It can be a very severe disease. Like I've seen kids died in front of my eyes. Santos says Rotavirus still kills about two hundred thousand children in babies each year. Because families in poor countries can't afford the vaccine here in the US it cost about two hundred dollars a course. So back in two thousand twelve the two companies that manufactured a vaccine Merck GlaxoSmithKline agreed to drastically, reduce the price for low income countries to about ten dollars a course Merck would supply four countries in west Africa in GlaxoSmithKline with supply, forty two countries. Cintos says this was great news could should not be denied vaccine, just because they belong to a poor country. Muck stuck to that agreement for six years, then last year, the company announced it was ending the agreement at the same time, Merck started selling the vaccine to China and a much higher price. Deborah Athalie is at the nonprofit path, which helps develop vaccines for poor countries. She says the global health community was alarmed. You have a, a major manufacturer of a vaccine announcing that they're going to exit from the market. And I think it created a bit of a panic for countries that were accustomed to having this vaccine. It also meant that more than two million babies in Burkina Faso Ivory coast. Mali in Sao Tome, Principe would go without the vaccine. That was November two thousand eighteen at the time. Moore told NPR in an Email that the reason for the pilot was supply constraints. The company also expressed quote, deepest regret to all the parties involved. Soon after NPR reported that story other vaccine manufacturers stepped up to fill in the gap. Glaxosmithkline is now supplying one country with the vaccine, and Athalie says to Indian companies Bharat biotech in serum institute of India will supply, the other countries in thirty says, no child will miss out on immunization because of Merck's termination of the agreement. We do not anticipate that any countries will have a gap in vaccinating their children. And so you think of this is a pretty big success story. It, it is we deal with tons of challenges in global health, and this is one where the global health community rallying around with the countries has really created success a success. That means millions of babies will now be protected

Merck Rotavirus Glaxosmithkline NPR Deborah Athalie United States China Severe Diarrhea Burkina Faso Ivory Coast Merckx Sao Tome Dr Mature Santo Hopkins University Mike Santos Bharat Biotech Cintos Muck
"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Did not cave to pressure from President Trump to keep interest rates low apple says Facebook can no longer distribute an app that paid users including teens to extensively track their phone and web use in doing so apple closed off. Facebook's efforts. To sidestep Apple's app store and it's tighter rules on privacy attack crunch reported late Tuesday that Facebook paid people about twenty dollars a month to use the Facebook research app. The first generic version of the popular Advair asthma inhaler has been approved by US regulators the food and Drug administration this week approved. My lands version three strengths for ages. Four and up the inhalers are used twice daily to keep Airways open and prevent flare ups about forty two million Americans have asthma or obstructive pulmonary disease conditions at the device contains two medicines inhaled any precise mixture and that complexity is stymied a couple of other companies. I tried to develop generic versions of the inhaler that GlaxoSmithKline advert discus inhaler costs about four hundred bucks a month. Well, the search continues for the two people actor Jesse small at says attack them in Chicago. And the search also continues for any surveillance footage that may give a look at what happened yesterday. Detectives released images of two persons of interest. Police say none of the video they've checked so far show the attack on the actor smollet says two masked men beat him as they uttered racist and anti gay comments. No arrests had been made thirties are investigating the matter as a possible hate crime Denver's launching a driverless shuttle to carry people to and from a commuter rail station near the city's airport dug his Dale is the board chairman of the regional transportation district. He says the agency will have someone on board the shuttle as a so called ambassador, but the vehicle.

Facebook apple food and Drug administration chairman GlaxoSmithKline smollet Trump US President Denver Jesse small Chicago twenty dollars
"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"Footage in Chicago of empire actor jussie smollet walking to his downtown apartment. But so far, none of the video shows him being attacked by two masked men. CBS's? Matt piper reports investigators have obtained images of people they would like to talk to police in Chicago of released very grainy surveillance footage of potential people of interest in the alleged attack against empire actor Jesse small let beliefs saying while the video footage does not depict an assault those pictured or seen in the vicinity of the alleged criminal incident during the alleged time in the occurrence the star said he was beaten after visiting a subway restaurant. But so far police have not been able to paint much of a picture. Meantime. Smell. It will go on with a scheduled performance of his this Saturday in Los Angeles math piper. CBS news Senator rand Paul has been awarded more than half a million dollars in his lawsuit against a neighbor who attacked him in a dispute over lawn maintenance here CBS news correspondent Bill Raikov. The jury in bowling green Kentucky deliberated for less than two hours before delivering the five hundred eighty thousand dollar award to the Republican lawmaker who'd been attacked while doing yard work at his home. The Senator testified during the three-day trial that he feared for his life. As he struggled to breathe after Rene Boucher slammed into him in their upscale bowling green neighborhood. As attorney said, he expected the verdict would go in Paul's favor, but said the award was far greater than what he was expecting and promised to appeal Bill Rakoff CBS news, one of Charles Manson's followers will be released from prison if California goes along with the parole board recommendation to free Leslie Van Houten after more than forty years in prison. Her lawyer rich Pfeiffer says governor Newsom cannot. Simply decide to keep her in prison. Reason and asked me a liberal reason, and he has to be unreasonable public safety. And I don't believe that anybody thinks that she Van Houten was nineteen when she joined the murderous Manson family back in nineteen sixty nine and is Super Bowl Sunday is fast approaching NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell is breaking his silence on the controversial no call that may have cost the New Orleans Saints a spot in the big game. CBS news correspondent Steve Futterman. For the first time NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell spoke publicly about the botched call which may have cost the New Orleans Saints a spot in the Super Bowl, we will look again at its refi. It does not cover judgment calls. This was a judgment. Call the controversial play took place in the NFC championship game between the saints and the LA rand should have been a penalty. The league will now discuss whether instant replay should be expanded to allow plays. Like this to be reviewed. Steve futterman. CBS news. It lanta. There are so many Americans who suffer from asthma. And now the first generic version of the popular Advair inhaler has been approved by regulators the FDA has approved mile lens version in three different strengths. They just foreign up use it twice a day to keep Airways open and prevent flare ups of weasing and shortness of breath the symptoms of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Forty two million Americans had those conditions. This device contains two medicines. Inhaled it a precise mixture and that complexity has stymied a couple of other companies developing generic versions of glaxosmithkline's Advair discus in the other cost about four hundred dollars a month. Your news, your traffic, your weather on demand all there on the radio dot com app. WCBS eight eighty s exclusive streaming home right there on your phone on the radio dot com. Everybody. This is.

CBS New Orleans Saints Senator rand Paul Commissioner Roger Goodell Leslie Van Houten governor Newsom Steve Futterman Rene Boucher Chicago NFL Charles Manson Matt piper rich Pfeiffer asthma Senator assault Kentucky Jesse small
"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on KTRH

"Happy to listen to your show. I'm like seventy years old, and I've always been really interested in having a DNA cast. For listening to you. A couple of months ago where you talked about this. I'm I'm happy to get this information. We talked about it before. I was just saying, hey, you know, GlaxoSmithKline, what do you think of this? You know, they're selling your information or they're actually gonna use it for drugs. And then I find out that was the plan on long it used to be. Hey, we're just a happy little company that wants to give you information about your DNA. And now it's all along we were going to sell it to Biogen companies. We will do bio harvesting we want to make our bottom line bigger. We went to continue the big plans with other countries to take DNA and use it for their purposes. And I say hold on hold the phone hold the phone. You guys were doing this and you were using deceptive practices to get people to voluntarily spit into a Cup. So you can manipulate their DNA and use it for other things. This is bio- harvesting. And it's almost like a new form of vampirism, in my opinion. Yeah. You know, I was watching something about toback scenes, and they were talking about how they're chopping up DNA strands into small bits and injecting it now through vaccines. So who knows we all this is going to right? And the thing is now we live in times where you have to think about these things because you'll be part we thought it was all science fiction. But now, it's fact now, you're you're you're cognitive liberties has taken even your physical liberties at stake. It's like it's almost like, you know, we have to add another amendment to the constitution to say, not only should we avoid unlawful search and seizure. But we have to also try and fight people unlawfully searching and seizing our DNA and using it for their own for their own reasons. But see this is voluntarily did they do any voluntarily? So I mean, what do you do if you're voluntarily giving up your DNA to someone that you don't know who they are? I mean, I guess you make your bed you sleep in it. But I I would say you don't use them discretionary. Discernment put on the blindfold of discernment and say, I'm not going to do this. Oh, that's why I'm really thankful that you're getting the information out. Can I ask because some of us like I said, I'm kinda dinosaur being seventy plus. Let me get the information from you, literally good. I thank you. Listen to my show on you rock with me. So give me in your seventies as many can't rock.

GlaxoSmithKline Cup seventy years
Pfizer, Glaxo to Create Over-the-Counter Drug Giant

Hugh Hewitt

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Pfizer, Glaxo to Create Over-the-Counter Drug Giant

"Story yesterday Pfizer Glaxo to create over the counter drug giant, just great Pfizer and GlaxoSmithKline plan to combine their consumer healthcare units. And eventually spin up a joint venture, creating the world's largest seller of drugstore. Staples, like Advil, sensitive toothpaste, the deal announced Wednesday will free up both companies to concentrate on prescription medicines. Which tend to be more

Pfizer Glaxo Pfizer Advil Glaxosmithkline
"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on KTRH

"Hi, Pamela, you're on ground zero. How you doing? How are you? According to what you're talking about earlier about that. I mean, the Chinese gal that won the Olympics. Oh, yeah. The one that they said may have been manipulated, correct? Correct. Well, I was listening to a a show today about. Bears. I think he's a super soldier. I could have a name anyway Nomex peers was a paranormal investigator. Wasn't. He. Okay. It would be like a super soldier. All right. Anyway, he's deceased now. But he was talking about that different bloodlines or not different bloodlines, but the different blood types because that's different different qualities like, you know, AB native could, you know, could make a person like having the really super strong that they crack are. You know, like likewise. That was of comment when I heard about that in my other one was perhaps for DNA wanting the DNA off of that topic or general public transit could go a little bit deeper than that. Perhaps, you know, some some such like billions contain in order to find out what bloodlines are out there yet. They could you know. There's always been there's always been that idea that someone has interest in your DNA. Now, they are telling people every day sign up for our little DNA package. Spit into a Cup send it to us. And they don't tell you is they can have that DNA and use it for whatever they want for ten years. Yeah. Yeah. Truly they can use that DNA for whatever they want. In fact, I did a show a while ago where some of these DNA companies have now teamed up with Pfizer and GlaxoSmithKline and several drug companies in order to have drugs may designer drugs. Made for people with certain genetic backgrounds. There you go. So I mean, something is definitely up here. I mean, they really are chomping in the bid for your DNA. And now, you know with the deaths of what happened in California mean nine eleven should have been enough. But no with the deaths in California. Now, they're saying,.

California Pamela Olympics investigator Pfizer GlaxoSmithKline ten years
"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on WRVA

"Hi, Pamela, you're on ground zero. Hi, how are you doing doing good? How are you? I'll according to what you're talking about earlier about the Dow Jones. Those what the Chinese gal that won the Olympics. Yeah. The one that they said may have been manipulated, correct? Correct. Well, I was listening to a like a. A show today about marks bears. I think he's a super soldier. I could have long by anyway, Nomex peers was a paranormal investigator wasn't he? Okay. No. It would be like one up super soldier how come all. Right. Anyway, he's deceased now. But he was talking about that the different bloodlines or not different bloodlines. It gives them blood tights. It was different different qualities like, you know, AB native could you know, it could make a person like having Jurij really super strong that they crack or no. You know, like likewise. That was my comment when I heard about that in my other one west perhaps DNA wanting the DNA off of that public or general public traffic could go a little bit deeper than that. Perhaps, you know, some some like trillions contain in order to find out what bloodlines are out there yet. They could you know. What has always been? There's always been that idea that someone has interest in your DNA. Now, they are telling people every day sign up for our little DNA package. Spit into a Cup send it to us for what they don't tell. You is they can have that DNA and use it for whatever they want for ten years. Yeah. Yeah. Truly they can dig a us that DNA or whatever they want. In fact, I did a show a while ago where some of these DNA companies have now teamed up with Pfizer and GlaxoSmithKline and several drug companies in order to have drugs may designer drugs. Made for people with certain genetic backgrounds. There you go. So I mean, something is definitely up here. I mean, they really are chomping in the bid for your DNA. And now with the deaths of what happened in California me nine eleven should've been enough. But no with the deaths in California. Now, they're.

investigator Jurij Pamela Olympics California Pfizer GlaxoSmithKline ten years
"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on Sawbones: A Marital Tour of Misguided Medicine

Sawbones: A Marital Tour of Misguided Medicine

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on Sawbones: A Marital Tour of Misguided Medicine

"Nhs. So said to hear you tell it everybody was crazy about herpes. They love the stuff. And then around the seventies started to take time. I didn't everybody was crazy about it. It just wasn't. It was kind of one of those things like a lot of people got cold sores and people a lot of people are probably getting swords on their genitals. And they just weren't. I mean, whatever we weren't talking about making a federal case at it. Right. People weren't seeking a lot of treatment for it is the truth. In the seventies. Though. A few different things happen that changed that. I the first big deal drug to treat herpes was released. The first one that didn't have a lot of horrible side effects and was targeted at herpes at HSA. It was released by Burroughs Wellcome company, which I think is now GlaxoSmithKline a believe Zoe over access or a cycle veer as you probably have heard it now racks, I'm here to carry your heart breaks that's earth pace. I don't think they don't think the commercials like that. But I wish it was. It was a it would have been good Marshall. But it was originally the idea because we had antibiotics right? Like, this is like by this time in history, we already have penicillin and all of the antibody that came there after well, quite a few of them by this point. And we knew we could treat and cure bacterial infections, the next big landmark. Mark was can we treat and cure viral infections the way, we do 'Bacterial viruses are harder, which is why as you know? We don't have a lot of antivirals. Right. I mean think about it when you come in. And we say you got a virus? We don't give you anything for it. Because we don't have anything that'll help with that. And most of the time they're self limited. And it's not a big deal. Anyway. Well, there are as I mentioned life threatening manifestations of the herpes virus in certain patients under certain conditions. And so we did need drugs to treat that. But the idea as they introduced a psych Lear among their marketing team was that that's not enough because those life threatening infections are not very common. And while that certainly is a good use for our drug. We want to sell it to more people. We've put in all this time and effort and research and development to make this drug and we wanna make a ton of money off of it. But most people just don't care enough about herpes to bother to treat it and certainly not to pay for a brand new antiviral medication. Right. And this is supported by the fact that as late as nineteen seventy five. There was a study done psychological morbidity a clinic for sexually transmitted disease. So this is I mentioned earlier that from a purely physical like cellular destruction standpoint, most herpes not that big a deal, but from a psychological standpoint now, we would say, it's a it's a huge deal for a lot of patients. Well, as of nineteen seventy five when they did a study on the more the specific psychological effects of getting an STI they don't even mention herpes. So it's like nobody nobody cared. They didn't it wasn't even included in the study because the idea that people. Would be suffering a psychological man, some some sort of illness from a herpes infection was just unheard of. Nobody would care. Why would we? So they needed a strategy strategy. How do we get people to care about herpes? They launched a disease awareness campaign. Your oh, no this coming. They were emphasizing the importance of treating genital herpes specifically. So they they didn't focus on cold sores because I mean for one you can see that people have them. So it was hard to stigmatize cold sores. Right. Even if a lot of people have genital herpes, you're not seeing that on the street on to make that a secret. Shame. Yes..

herpes Burroughs Wellcome company Nhs. penicillin GlaxoSmithKline Marshall Mark Zoe
"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"The US secret service has intercepted package bomb sent to the Clintons and the Obamas. CBS news special report the Clintons the Obamas. George Soros three explosive devices in three days are looking at whether or not this was a specific plan to target high profile Democrats ahead of the midterm CBS's. Paula Reed have confirmed as CBS news that the device into the Clintons. Home is similar to one found at the home of George Soros, a billionaire, philanthropist and liberal donor. Now that device was discovered on Monday yesterday. The Clinton device was discovered an earlier today the device into the Obamas was intercepted. So that's an average of one a day so far this week. Cbs's? Cami McCormick says neither the Obamas. Nor the Clintons were ever endangered. Secret service says it immediately identified these two packages during routine screening as potential explosive devices in handled them as such one was intercepted in New York. The other here in Washington. The secret service says it initiated a full scope criminal investigation that will use resources from state, local and federal agencies CBS news special report. I'm Vicki Barker. And of course, keep it tuned right here. KYW NewsRadio for continuing coverage of this. Breaking news story. It is eleven twenty one. Another defendant has pleaded guilty to stealing valuable research from the pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline in upper Marion to form a competing drug company in China. KYW Steve towel reports in the federal courthouse in Philadelphia. Who is the twin sister of a former GlaxoSmithKline researcher who worked for ten years at Glaxo's, upper Marion campus, according to court documents, the information technology specialists, set up a computer system and downloaded intellectual property and otherwise confidential material from her sister, Dr use you also known as Joyce who worked at GS GSK. Joyce you regarded as one of the top protein biochemist in the world and a third associate the Chinese companies fundraiser previously pleaded guilty to conspiracy to steal trade secrets. Federal prosecutors say they were bankrolled by the Chinese government and their aim was to set up a rival company named Reynaud pharma to develop anticancer drugs. Steve Taiwa, KYW NewsRadio. It is eleven twenty two reproductive medicine associates of New Jersey and Philadelphia sponsor, traffic.

Clintons CBS George Soros Obamas GlaxoSmithKline Cami McCormick US Philadelphia Joyce Steve Taiwa upper Marion campus Paula Reed Reynaud pharma Vicki Barker New Jersey Steve towel Washington
"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"This one. There is a report. From a well known and respected diabetes. Doctor. That Glaxo Smith Kline. Selling the diabetes, drug Avandia, A V A N D. I A. The people in congress having hearings on what drugmakers doing what the cost of drugs is you've heard a lot of that stuff. So there's a bit of testimony that caught my attention because the doctor says he was threatened by three drug company executives threatened. He was threatened with a suit when he first raised questions about the safety of the drug from Glaxo SMithKline at testimony, coupled with the recent medical journal analysis, highlighting the heart attack risks associated with this drug prompted some lawmakers to rebuke the food and Drug administration for failing to protect consumers. So anyway, they'd been a lot of warnings from outside experts about this drug. A lot of people millions in fact have been on Avandia to control their blood sugar, and despite the risks involved the FDA never required to manufacturer to conduct a thorough post market study of its heart risks. So in other words, it's good for keeping your blood sugar car down, but it's likely to cause a heart attack and this doctor who figured that out was threatened by GlaxoSmithKline threatened with a suit to shut them up. I do like that boys and girls think about that in terms of what kind of medical construct there is in our country. This is good day health. Forget about our good day health show podcasts. The most recent one from Ken focusing on the benefits of.

Glaxo Smith Kline Drug administration GlaxoSmithKline congress FDA Ken
Who owns genetic testing results?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:25 min | 2 years ago

Who owns genetic testing results?

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by wasabi hot cloud storage. If your company is thinking about moving data storage to the cloud, then you have to think about with Sabi. It's less expensive than just the maintenance on your current on premises storage. See yourself with unlimited storage for a month. Go to a dot com. Click free trial and use the offer code was ambi-. Genetic testing is popular and potentially has lots of benefits, but who owns the results from American public media? This is marketplace tech demystifying. The digital economy I'm Ali, would. DNA and genetic testing are big business, but there are real questions about privacy and about what happens to your genetic information after you get tested recently, the DNA testing company. Twenty-three in me, partnered with pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline to develop personalized drugs and research treatment for diseases like lupus and Parkinson's. Jen king is director of consumer privacy at the center for internet and society at Stanford law school. Her research finds that surprisingly, most people who take DNA tests, don't think the data is all that personal. Most of them felt that their genetic data while it was personal at the same time, it didn't reveal who they really were versus one of the things in my study I looked at was search queries. So when people type a search term into Google, for example, did they consider that more personal than genetic data? In some cases they did because it really revealed something more about what. Made them tick what they were concerned about, what they thought about what they care about. Whereas genetic did. It doesn't tell you anything about that, but then you get to, you know, the news that twenty three and me is partnering with a pharmaceutical company to develop drugs based on DNA data that they got from twenty three and me. Do you think that changes the calculation for people? I think it can because one of the things I discovered is while people were motivated by the idea that their data could be doing good. That often wasn't very critical. People hadn't spent time to really dig into what that meant. And so while there's probably an assumption that, well, you know, great. I'm going to help make a drug that could help a disease. I know nothing about and maybe I'll benefit because I have that disease. No one, at least of the people I talked to really sat down thought about, well, wait a second. The company isn't obligated to give that drug away for free. They can charge as much as they want for it. So there was the sense of helping the public, but it wasn't very critical. Really wasn't carefully thought through just exactly how that might happen. It was more of a check the box going, hey, I can do something good. This is a little Sifi I know as we are also exploring gene editing. Is there an argument that we should start to consider patenting gene profiles? You know, should we started having like an ownership conversation about our most basic identity? That's really interesting question. If you look at the customer agreements of these different online genetic testing companies, it's kind of a big open question as to who owns your data and the agreements today, I think are pretty clear that at least with twenty three and me that once they do something with that data, in this case partner with a pharmaceutical company and develop a drug on its basis, you sign an agreement saying you have no rights to it, or you have no property interest in the outcome of its. You can't go to them later and say, hey, you need to compensate me for this blockbuster drug that you developed using my data. That's Jen king of Stanford center for internet and society. Another fun tidbit. New research in the journal science says, you could be identified even if you haven't taken a genetic test. Just by tracing the DNA of distant relatives back to you using social media and other online data about sixty percent of Americans of European descent could be tracked down that way. And now for some related links, even though the future of the international space station is currently sort of in doubt after a Soyuz rocket malfunctioned last week in two astronauts barely survived. NASA is trying to figure out when it can send astronauts to the ISS again and whether the ones who are already there, we'll have to abandon the space station completely for awhile because the Russian rockets are currently the only way to get humans to and from the ISS and they are grounded because of the accident, Jeff Bezos, aerospace company, blue origin, put up a video today, promising to send millions of people to space eventually. Now is the time to open the promise of space all in lay the way for generations to come. When our descendants look to the stars, perhaps more rocky moon or calling his floating and open space. They'll remember this time. And love me. I'm not trying to be down on big ambitions, but we do seem to be doing a lot of fast forwarding to the future. And I'm kind of wondering what is the plan for the now. Tell you one other thing I'm intrigued by today? A new little phone called the palm? Yes. Nostalgia, they bought the rights to the old name. It's meant to be an accessory phone, so you're big everyday, Android smartphone. So you have like a little add on gadget? The does simple stuff like texting and calls and music and doesn't distract you with the whole smartphones situation. Plus it fits in your pocket. Kind of like apple watch, accept a phone that goes with your other phone, and I know you wanna laugh. But like the bird said, when they wrote about it, the idea kind of worms its way into your head. Mainly the idea that maybe what we all really want is just less computer more phone, less future more now, see what I did there. I'm Molly would, and that's marketplace tech. This is APN this marketplace podcast is brought to you by Amazon web services. Do you ever wonder how we're streaming millions of movies on demand, turning homes into hotels, are watching live missions from Mars, smart business minds dreamed, these ideas and Amazon web services is how they built them with the broadest functionality. And the most experience leading enterprises trust the AWS cloud to build the next big idea. Are you ready to build it? Learn more at AWS is how dot com slash podcast.

Jen King Amazon ISS Google Stanford Law School Glaxosmithkline ALI Lupus Apple Jeff Bezos Stanford Center APN
"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Brexit with Kohl's house values to plummet in Britain by as much as thirty five percent because of rising mortgage rates Connie also warned the plan would plunge and they'd be an increase in inflation and interest rates. The Bank of England this declined to comment on the reports of Connie's post Brexit predictions witness scheduled to leave the EU in March and that concerns about the slow pace of talks Charles de LA desma under Chinese scientists has pleaded guilty to conspiring to steal biopharmaceutical trade secrets from GlaxoSmithKline in what prosecutors said was came to setup companies in China, the market them. There's an analysis at townhall dot com. I new federal regulation of e cigarette manufacturing and sales has been implemented. Dr Charles Neiderman has more on the story evidence that e cigarette user vaping strongly associated with starting tobacco cigarette smoking that lessons has caused the food Drug administration to call for fines against retailers who sell the devices to anyone under eighteen the FDA is also considering a ban on the use of flavoring cigarette food because it attracts used by children in that lessons. This is Dr Charleston reporting from Washington, Utah governor Gary Herbert says the next few days are critical as firefighters tried to keep a raging wildfire away from hundreds of homes. Harvard spoke Friday evening after meeting with fire officials of fairgrounds in Spanish fork. The governor says if the Wednesday down crews will have a good chance at staying on top of the blaze hundreds of residents have been evacuated. Woodland Hills elkridge and covered bridge. More on these stories at townhall dot com. You know as an allergy sufferer you're wired differently. I sure feel that way. That's why there's Nasacort each different to you. See unlike antihistamines nasal core targeted inhibits more, the allergic, inflammation, that causes your congestion and other nasal allergy symptoms. My antihistamine doesn't do that. None of them do is different. And is why Nasacort more effective at giving you twenty four hour relief..

Connie nasal allergy Dr Charles Neiderman Woodland Hills elkridge GlaxoSmithKline Charles de LA Bank of England Kohl EU food Drug administration Gary Herbert Dr Charleston Britain FDA Utah Harvard China Washington thirty five percent
Chris Berman's Wife Was 3 Times Over Alcohol Limit In Fatal Crash: Police

Barsky Radio

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Chris Berman's Wife Was 3 Times Over Alcohol Limit In Fatal Crash: Police

"We're learning more about, a fatal crash. That took the life of the wife of longtime ESPN broadcaster Chris Berman police say Catherine Burma had a blood alcohol. Level three times the, legal limit when she rear. Ended another, man's car killing them both Connecticut. State police also determined she was speeding and did, not apply the brakes before crashing into eighty, seven year old Edward Was on his way back from visiting his wife's grave at the time Family of retooling had filed a lawsuit alleging Woodbury restaurants served alcohol to Berman while she was intoxicated before the crash police have since closed, their investigation without filing any charges because both drivers died, in the

Meyer ABC Chris Berman Ryan Burrow Head Football Coach Catherine Burma Dr Kurt Nolte Ohio State University Myers Zac Smith China Ohio Glaxosmithkline Espn Disneyland Connecticut Woodbury Reporter Arizona
Is The Next Recession On Its Way?

WBZ Morning News

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

Is The Next Recession On Its Way?

"Even during the longest economic recovery, on record economists are, looking for, signs that our recession could be on the way rising interest rates the global trade war even the intimidating. Sounding reverse yield. Curve but Allen, Sinai with, decision has won, a contest whose glass is half full, by that Interest rates are. Still low they're growing up fundamentals are really good for consumers and businesses and next year. We'll have more fiscal stimulus than this year Sinai believes, a three percent. Growth rate is attainable for the foreseeable

Sinai Glaxosmithkline Rhode Island Allen Three Percent
Samsung Display says unbreakable, flexible screen passes U.S. safety test

Kim Komando

04:12 min | 2 years ago

Samsung Display says unbreakable, flexible screen passes U.S. safety test

"Prime from ninety nine dollars to one hundred, twenty dollars a year Pretty good chunk of change and to the bottom line right there The FDA just really interesting guy it seems like A. Lotta wealthy people Parasite, from visas of course you have Richard Branson Westwood One Jeff Bezos says he plans to. Send she wants to by. Next year, they said You're going to get there. By Tuesday DNA analysis in collection big money there there's a lot, of data mining happening in these databases and, if you read the terms and conditions when you, sign up to do a DNA test you pretty much give the company who does the test right to do anything with your DNA from using it for research. Or, prophets to actually selling the data now the reason why bring this, up, is that the big pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline they're going to invest three hundred million dollars for a stake in. The consumer start twenty three and me now this new cash for Twenty-three me is more. Than just spitting the. Test to folks they hope to, use Twenty-three as they say genetic data. Get a lead up on pharmaceutical competitors they've developed a strong. Business by selling those home testing kits. They have more. Than five million users that's pretty amazing but the company planned, on making it's real cash selling spit and the juicy. Data with it to pharmaceutical research companies now the GS k. deal Says that the pharma companies they. Need the patients with the generic profiles for clinical trials they're. Going to pay top dollar for all. This data and. Just think for just a moment, of all the insurance companies, that would just love to get their hands on your. DNA data and they will Did you ever drop your phone and. The whole thing just shatter, gosh, what a nightmare isn't. It and then, every single time you drop your phone after that you looked out and you pick it up and. Get like this side of relief because it didn't shatter all over well new tech those days are. Coming to an end Samsung has unveiled the unbreakable oh LED screen for. Smartphones, and these tests the screen was able to survive being dropped twenty six times for about four. Feet with no damage I need this display also made it through a further drop of protest test of about six feet now the, new screen was actually certified as unbreakable by the underwriters labs now along with the drop test the screen survive temperature tests said at twenty six degrees below, zero in case you ever want to do a little hiking, somewhere on some high mountains or a high of one hundred sixty degrees Fahrenheit which is perfect for us here in Arizona this time of year because it was so hot this past week that the cow Because, they were giving evaporated milk? Right and finally a great story to warm your heart of former Florida woman was hoping to get just just a glimpse of her past and she got more than she bargained. For, when she, filed fired up Google street view she. Just wanted to take a, look, at one of her. Old homes her, name is Denise Underhill she now lives in the UK and she had a desire to call her. Mother but the problem is that her mother passed away in two thousand fifteen and she was really. Really missing her mom so Underhill decide to do the next best thing. She, got onto Google earth and she looked at her mother's old home using Google maps and then. She saw something it wasn't just her mother's house but her mother to zoomed in on Google street view Underhill was shocked to find, an image of her mother watering plants in their old guard and I mean isn't that something air she was missing her mom Tom went onto Google earth and then all of a sudden mom right there watering the garden as she always has been all right let's talk about all the data that, you're? Creating on, your PC's your max your servers your Facebook your Instagram account boy the list goes on and on doesn't it I mean, you've got your photos you've got your videos all your documents anything under the sun now, imagine if that was all just to go away well that's why you..

Denise Underhill Richard Branson Westwood Jeff Bezos Glaxosmithkline Samsung Facebook Arizona Instagram UK Florida TOM One Hundred Sixty Degrees Fahr
Samsung Display says unbreakable, flexible screen passes U.S. safety test

Kim Komando

03:55 min | 2 years ago

Samsung Display says unbreakable, flexible screen passes U.S. safety test

"The capital p. get this Amazon topped two billion dollars in quarterly profits for the first. Time in history three months we let that sink in they earned two and a half billion dollars in profit for three months ending in June, isn't? That just amazing this time? Last year they posted about, one hundred and, ninety seven million dollars in profit little bit of a difference. That right where's the money coming from Amazon's. Cloud computing, business AWS Amazon web services that division jumped to more than six billion, dollars in sales the company's. Other category tight about advertising services two. Point two billion in sales that's up from, one hundred and thirty two percent and then there's Amazon prime. This is where they made a killing they don't disclose new stats for, the quarter but more than one. Hundred million people pay for Amazon prime Now during this whole quarter they raise the price of prime from ninety nine dollars to one hundred and twenty dollars a, year? So is a pretty good? Chunk of change into the bottom line right, there now Jeff PISA he's a really interesting guy seems like. There's a lot of wealthy people trying to. Win this, space tourism race aside from visas of course you have Elon Musk Sir, Richard Branson and Jeff Bezos. Says he plans to send humans into. Space by next year or if they sign, up by Amazon prime you're going to get there by Tuesday All right. Let's move to DNA analysis in collection big money there there's a lot of data mining happening. In these databases and. If you read the, terms and, conditions when you sign up to do. A, DNA test you pretty, much give the company who does the test right to do anything with your DNA from using it. For research or prophets to actually selling the data now the reason why I bring, this, up, is that the big pharmaceutical. Giant GlaxoSmithKline they're going to invest three hundred million dollars for a stake, in, the. Consumer start up, twenty three and me now this, new, cash for Twenty-three me is more than just spit in the test to folks they hope, to use Twenty-three in they say genetic data, get a lead up on pharmaceutical competitors They've, developed a strong business by selling those home testing kits they have more than five million users that's pretty amazing but the company planned on making it's real cash. Selling, spit and the juicy data with it to pharmaceutical research companies now the, GS, k. deal says that the pharma companies they need the patients with genetic profiles for clinical trials they're going to. Pay top dollar for all this data and just think for just a moment of all the. Insurance companies that would. Just love to get, their hands, on your DNA data and they will All right you ever drop your phone and the whole thing. Just shatter gosh what a nightmare isn't it and every single time you. Drop, your phone after that you, look down and you pick it up and you like this I. Of relief because it didn't shatter all over well new tech those days are coming to an end Samsung has unveiled the unbreakable oh LED, screen for smartphones in these tests the screen was able to survive being dropped twenty six times for about four feet with no damage I, need this the display also made it through a further drop. Of the test of about six feet. Now the new. Screen was actually certified as unbreakable by the underwriters labs now along with the drop tests the screen survive temperature tests. Said, at twenty six degrees below zero in case you, ever want to do a little hiking somewhere on some, high mountains or a high of one hundred and sixty degrees Fahrenheit which is perfect for us here in Arizona this time of year because tell you it was so hot this past week, that the cow Because they were giving evaporated? Milk right and finally a great story to warm your heart of former Florida woman was hoping to get just just a..

Amazon Jeff Bezos Jeff Pisa Samsung Richard Branson Arizona Florida Glaxosmithkline Giant Three Months Three Hundred Million Dollars Ninety Seven Million Dollars Sixty Degrees Fahrenheit
"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on Slate Money

"Emily. Have you taken. Gene test from twenty three in meal. Any of those companies? I really haven't. I am. I don't want to know. But his question apparently according to twenty three and me, eighty percents of the people who have had that genes tested have like often take some kind of a box which allows that personal genetic information to be shed with pharmaceutical giants. Like Lexa SMithKline. I really wonder how active that opting in is, but we are about to find out because Anna GlaxoSmithKline has made a what is it? Three hundred million? Three hundred million dollar investment in twenty three and me. So that four, I think about four years. They're going to have access to twenty three in me's DNA data that they will be able to use to create new drugs. And specifically they have a drug which they have already developed full Parkinson's, which only works. On people with a certain gene mutation. And so they like, great, we have this drug, we want to use it on people who have this gene mutation with questions. How'd you find the people who have that gene mutation onset? You go along to twenty three and me and say, can you just give us the Email address of everyone with gene mutation? And then we can just Email them and say, do you want Parkinson's drug? It's just the u. you have exactly the right gene mutation. And on the one hand, this is creepy. Fuck. On the other hand, you can see how actually quite useful. I actually think this is a fantastic thing. I think that if you're looking and you're saying, okay, well, we have the ability to more quickly and more inexpensively create drugs that can markedly improve people's lives. And on the other side, there are privacy concerns. I think the former is much more important. What I thought was interesting also was that people pay to us twenty three and me, and then they give them in. Addition to money, the right to look at all their genetic information than twenty three and me use that to make a multimillion dollar deal with a big pharmaceutical company. So you're were essentially letting ourselves not me because I don't do twenty three me, but we're essentially letting ourselves be these pigs for free. Monetize Jesse for the privilege of being monetize. Wow, doesn't seem that doesn't ring fair to me. It seems exploitative I think that you're saying, I mean, even beings with they are given and they have a product and as there's an opt in, it's not opt out. It's an opt in. And if you when eighty percent of people, ten, you kind of wonder how how often is like Uber saying? I agreed to arbitration when I downloaded Uber, it's like, no, I just wanted to get a car really fast known reads any of this stuff. I who knows. We don't know Felix said, we don't know how much work people are doing on the optin like you would never say to someone like when companies test drugs, they do trials, they, they pay people, you pay people. This is, I think this is a really important point. Is that like some like tick the books that you do when you buy test shouldn't be. You shouldn't be able to give a super Val. Table day through in that way. Like I don't think people are realizing how valuable that data is. And if Twenty-three me turned around and said, we're going to sell this full, you know, three hundred bucks to GlaxoSmithKline and we're gonna keep the three hundred bucks feel south and you're not gonna get any of it. People be like, no, actually this is my network information. If my genetic information, it's going to be self three hundred bucks. I want the three hundred bucks. So I agree with you that I think in health data in in general, I think as we move forward, there's going to be more questions about people owning their own data and people being able to make money off of their data. And I agree with that, and I think that that shouldn't be able to give it up as easily as people seem to be able to give it up. I also think that people are adults and I think that if if you agree to do something I there's a little part of that feels like, why are we willing to hold people accountable? You agree to do something..

Anna GlaxoSmithKline Parkinson GlaxoSmithKline Emily. Lexa Jesse Felix Three hundred million dollar eighty percent four years one hand
23andMe Is Sharing Genetic Data with Drug Giant

As It Happens from CBC Radio

04:28 min | 2 years ago

23andMe Is Sharing Genetic Data with Drug Giant

"The pharmaceutical company is investing three hundred million dollars US in twenty three and me in an effort to develop new drugs. MARCY Arnab sqi has concerns about collaborations. Like this one. She's the executive director of the center for genetics and society. We reached her in Berkeley, California, MS darn asking what is twenty three and me getting out of this deal with GlaxoSmithKline, twenty three and me getting a very large fusion of money, three hundred million dollars and what is GS que get out of it and she cake. It's access to a Hugh. Huge trove of information to the DNA sequences of twenty three's customers and also to other lifestyle information that customers have shared with the company. Why would they want the lifestyle information? Well, they want to look at all sorts of correlations between DNA and health information, environmental information. That's what makes it valuable. What concerns do you have about a deal like this? Well, you know, I think that the main one for me, there's a number, but the main one for me is that this is not what people expected when they sent in their spit kits to twenty three and me, and you only need to look at the Twitter feed to see how surprised and upset. A lot of people are to know that the company that they thought was selling them spit kits in fact, is selling their information to a big drug company that's going to profit and so is twenty three me off any discoveries that. Are made, but there was a press release from the of twenty three in me that assured people that customers can choose whether they want to participate in this type of research, they can opt in or opt out at any time he'd said, so isn't it up to the people who use the service to read the fine print and find out how the information's being used as a legal matter? Of course it is. And yes, twenty three and me did put all that information in the agreement that they sent to their customers. But as a practical matter, as we've learned from people's agreements with the Facebook terms, we don't really read those very carefully and we don't really think through what all the ramifications and implications are. So I think the publicity around this deal is really going to help people realize that you know, they need to think about Twenty-three in me, not as this hip cool startup, but as a part of big pharma will let me play devil's advocate, what what's wrong with doing this? Why? Why shouldn't they be able to get a look at all of this data in the name of trying to make. Medicine's what's at risk for these customers? Well, sure. That's the right question. And of course, we all want drugs to treat people who are sick. But when you think about our history with big pharma, we know that sometimes those drugs aren't safe. Sometimes they're not affective, and especially lately too many of them have been priced at obscene levels that makes them on affordable and inaccessible to a lot of people. So in your mind, it's it's, it's not it's it's a question of whether you feel good about helping big pharma. Yeah, and and you know, when you listen to the rhetoric of the marketing rhetoric and the website, say of twenty in me, you know, they talk about developing life-saving drugs and and yes, that's what we want, but they did not really make it clear in their marketing and self presentation that their business model really doesn't have to do with selling spit kits to regular people. It has to do with making money off the information. Nation that their customers are paying them to to provide and then using that data to generate profit for themselves. Other issues that arise here, I was listening to the two companies, chief scientific officers being interviewed, and one of them was talking about leveraging the information of these patients. Shouldn't they be getting recommence if in fact it is bare information that is being used to create drugs that may become profitable will some people have suggested that they should get rebates. But you know if the if GSA k. or twenty three and me sends a few people, the ninety nine dollar fee. That might be one way to address something, but maybe there has to be some public interest agreements about pricing so that any drugs that are developed are widely available, I guess in general, you know, we have as a society..

Executive Director Twitter Facebook Berkeley Glaxosmithkline GSA California Three Hundred Million Dollars Ninety Nine Dollar
"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"The biggest players glaxosmithkline has financial results out one of its big rivals is finding a takeover from japan his dominant with yes sir take is for shire not a household name but a specialist and treatments for rare diseases it has a forty six billion pound propose on the table from takeda of japan you say fighting at but just after midnight shawn said yes a completely done deal yet but the shy board said it was prepared to recommend the offer from takeda if certain conditions are met the results from jfk should also be interesting a big important british company at something of a turning point dr steven godwin is director at the independent pharmaceutical research company planning shop international he's covered the sector for forty years stephen everybody will know the name glaxosmithkline is a bit of a household name but not so much shire but isn't the footsie100 a big important company what does it actually do sean has been around for quite a while it's built its portfolio folio steadily and then in around about two thousand twelve two thousand thirteen embarked on the strategy that was to look at the red z sector and it was one of the first to do this and he's done it very successfully when you say these these these patients a handful of patients but the drugs are very expensive that's the point it was probably one of the companies that showed it doesn't really matter how many with these drugs with how many patients you have if you can sell them for very very large we talking about we're talking about quarter of a million half a million dollars a year these these because they are few in number these patients sit rather below the radar from the point of view of the regulatory authority what does decatur japan see ensure that precede them pretty doggedly and seemed to have one now yeah i think everything about the pharmaceutical industry is about having a pipeline if you haven't got a pipeline you haven't really you new drugs in a sort of over a long period of time because it takes ten years to get into the marketplace in the first place so you need this really wellstocked pipeline and shi'as certainly has a wellstocked pipeline listened to jfk on that same jfk.

japan shawn dr steven godwin director jfk takeda of stephen sean decatur wellstocked forty six billion pound million dollars forty years ten years
"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"To kind of break itself up this is the whole issue of carl icahn backing newell and starboard value the firm you know that that's an activist trying to come in and take over another share that i was looking at why is glaxosmithkline shares up about five and a half percent on news that they are bidding thirteen billion dollars to buy a part of a joint venture they had with novartis basically they this would be the consumer type products like painkillers and a flu vaccine that they would be taking over and interestingly at least to me is that both the shares of glaxosmithkline as well as novartis are up on this news row and maybe a sigh of relief to some extent in glaxo's case because you have to bear in mind that the company was among the potential bidders for pfizer consumer health newton and then dropped out so the idea that they're focusing on their current business arguably going over well we're supporting the american depositary receipts glaxo up three point three percent at the moment and the eight ers of novartis based in switzerland up six tenths of a percent i would be remiss in letting you go without broad digging out a little bit and can we really give any narrative to yesterday's rally it was the best one day rise in us equity indices since august two thousand fifteen is this just like another demonstration that volatility exists this is completely normal and you know don't make too much of it sounds pretty much like you hit the nail on the head and you have to put yesterday in the context of last thursday and friday me was all about the concern that the us was going into a trade war that it would be back and forth with china and a whole lot of other countries can you get people took the weekend and realize what's going on here is just sort of an opening salvo and things will change over time and what eventually happens may not be nearly as dire as some people had anticipated a really interesting side note i was speaking with one wall street analyst yesterday who noted that a lot of companies have pledged to buy back their shares and basically they have told the buyback desks at bay wall street firms when our shares dropped to this level go by so it could be a question also of that.

carl icahn novartis painkillers flu vaccine switzerland china analyst newell thirteen billion dollars three percent one day
"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"glaxosmithkline" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Number of seats that the need to win or that are up for grabs in versus what they need to win so the i i the conversation will certainly come back the conversation is there hasn't really gone away just the tweets at cetera that might stop flowing again let's talk about perhaps some of the big names in the team cover you south along with michael shaw an you took up by drug licensing is being something very robust in 2017 and that that will sustain us activity remained at record levels in 2017 400 deals were struck for the secondstraight year do we get more of out or is this year of bedding it in what drives pharma 2018 here so you know actually this is entirely related to the top we've just me talking about if you innovate if you have drugs that are a differentiated that make a meaningful difference to the clinical outcome for the patients not another me too but really cut death risks by thirty percent forty percent you'll be able to get paid for them so in order to do that you need the drugs to do it and a lot of those drugs come out of biotech companies so what we've been hearing get jp morgan this big conference to speak going on is that not only there is an at least at as much of interest if not heightened interest in ma activity but certainly there's a lot of interest in licensing deals so we think that that number is going to continue to be at least as big if not bigger in 2018 let's just for instance the ceo of glaxosmithkline is that a said we are open for business we are looking to increase our licensing inlicensing activity in 2018 so i think a lot of pharma companies are going to be doing that whether.

michael shaw jp morgan ceo glaxosmithkline thirty percent forty percent