17 Burst results for "Gladys Woodson"

"gladys woodson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"gladys woodson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Today's new podcast called the city has been telling us a story. So Robin catches up. We've got a neighborhood. That's getting tons of construction debris from all over. Chicago dumped on them and the having trouble getting their voices heard downtown from what I know about Chicago politics when you can't get your trash picked up or your potholes filled. The person you call is your alderman, your neighborhoods Representative in city council was he able to help him. So Phil Henry was the alderman of the twenty fourth ward which included north Lonsdale and Gladys Woodson's block club wrote to him when they were trying to get rid of the dump Henry because he was a street person. You know, it was raised up on the street. You will let us all know. You know, you can't have everything you want. And if you won't something really bad, you figure out how bad you won't it. And you're gonna have to give up something to get something. Bill. Henry was first elected alderman in one thousand nine hundred three and he did what alderman often did to build support. They ended up favors like city jobs and contracts, but he was also known as a dealmaker. In fact, he was reportedly the one who introduced John Christopher to the owner of the vacant lot where the dump was and leader people would learn that he has also taken bribes from John Christopher like five thousand dollars a month to ensure that the city didn't interfere with the dumping operation. So the dump took on a nickname. This is Bill. Henry son Conrad. We was in the car lose driving past. And he said he called him out. He was not smiling. He was quite subdued about a quite sad about him. A lot of way he was like man nothing. I can do about it you like he'd been duped like he'd been used the dock that they're after the dumping started. They'll Henry was indicted on unrelated federal corruption charges. He lost his bid for reelection. He developed lung cancer and died the following year. His case never went to trial. One thousand nine hundred to John Christopher had dumped.

Phil Henry Henry son Conrad John Christopher Chicago Robin Gladys Woodson Representative lung cancer five thousand dollars
"gladys woodson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"gladys woodson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Revamp Chicago's aging downtown, and he paid special attention to tourist friendly destinations in the loop. And along the lakefront. He said about rebuilding crucial parts of the city's infrastructure, including its roads and highways by the spring of nineteen ninety the year after he took office. The city was full of workers and hard hats and orange vests breaking down concrete, Jack hammering asphalt loading it into dump trucks and hauling it away. Law abiding trucking companies Carter this debris to distant landfill. But some trucks headed west out of the loop over the Chicago river into the city's neighborhoods until they came to a vacant lot in north Lonsdale. When he visited there a met a woman named Gladys Woodson. She'd lived in the neighborhood since moving to Chicago from Mississippi in the nineteen sixties, and she told me how one day and the spring of nineteen ninety a neighbor knock on her front door. My first memory was the president of the forty one hundred block came down and ask for MS Woodson, and I told him what do you want would miss Woodson was the president of the forty three hundred block together these block clubs kept an eye on the street and made sure the community was safe. He said did you not know that is a dunk illegal dump over cross the street? And I say, no, it's a come on this. Okay. First of all, I saw a lot of trucks land blocking the view and Behan trip. There was towel stuff. Was accumulate. And so when you saw this line of trucks and this pile of rubble. What did you think.

Gladys Woodson Chicago Carter Chicago river president north Lonsdale Behan Jack Mississippi one day
"gladys woodson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:07 min | 2 years ago

"gladys woodson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That they were shocked to suddenly learn that the man that they've been fighting for six years was working for the FBI. We say this why we couldn't get any help. Get any help with it. They knew all this was going on all alone before we even begin to fight for in the reason why we couldn't get any Justice for anything because it was Oliver for me. And they knew it from the very beginning. We just figured that John Christopher had that concrete pal there. He was making money off of it. And that's the purpose of what civil shovel. That was my first thing what is civil shell. And they said, oh, you did dumpsite the Christian John Krystal Gladys Woodson the block club president and north Mondale told me that she and her neighbors were collateral damage. They'd been used they were never able to get traction fighting John Christopher, and now they could see why he had to have begging, you know, 'cause people that we will contact and seem to you know, was pushing it on the not answering forever. One in north Lonsdale whose children had been hurt whose property had been damaged whose neighborhood had been disrespected. This was a huge breach of trust this people asthma attack, the people that own own oxygen machines that we have few people to move out of the neighborhood just moved because they could no longer stand the dust and stuff the news about operation, silver, shovel seemed to confirm what they'd been saying for years about the government's neglect of their neighborhood because this face the fact they wouldn't have put that up in the white community. Not at all. John didn't have to be allowed to still have that dumb 'cause you had ammunition to use against him. What about John Christopher me? What happened to him? When the whole thing broke when operation silver shovel was revealed. Well, even though John Christopher had agreed to wear a wire for the FBI and had become the centerpiece of major undercover investigation his participation was not actually like a get out of jail free card. He did not have a deal with the FBI for full immunity. So FBI agent. Jim Davis told me that at the beginning of the investigation. He had worn John Christopher not to do anything illegal that wasn't part of the investigation. And I would just try and reassure them and say, look, if you're straight with us, you know, if you continue to do what we're asking you to do, you know, if you stay out of trouble, you're going to be okay. But John Christopher did not hold up his end of the bargain while the investigation was going on while he was cooperating with the FBI. He was still committing other crimes and he went behind the bureau's back in other ways. So for example, at the same time operation silver shovel was going on the FBI was also looking into this illegal gambling operation run by an alleged mob. Boss named Tony Centracchio John referred to him as his uncle Tony. And that was a problem for me because we had a wire Tony. The wire was a video camera hidden in the ceiling. Of Tony Centracchio office. And every time John went into see him. We were recording John in primarily criminal conversations. Would you was adding to the mounting evidence? That we going to have to present against him at the end of this case, it's not totally clear. What John Christopher was doing there because he was never charged in this illegal gambling case, but him showing up on another investigations wire meet things really complicated for Jim Davis and his fellow agents. I would have liked to have said John stay away from uncle Tony's office. But I can't tell John that we have a wire and uncle Tony's office. John Christopher also neglected to file his federal income tax returns in nineteen ninety two and ninety three. I know it seems so mundane, but ultimately this is why he went to prison. John Christopher was sentenced to thirty nine months in prison. But he was never forced. To clean up the dumps or provide restitution to anyone in north Lonsdale. And then after he got out of prison, he disappeared. Again. Maybe for good this time. You mean he's been gone for like twenty years. Nobody knows where he is. Did you try and track him down? Yeah. I've been looking John Christopher for almost three years trying to figure out what happened to him after he got out of prison because he co-operated with the FBI he could not safely returned to his old life or even be in Chicago without FBI protection. So I looked for him everywhere. I could think of an Al I just found nothing. Eventually I learned the FBI had set him up with a new name and a new social security number and a new life. And that there was this FBI agent in Saint Louis who might have all that information. So I asked if he would talk to me, and if not if you would. Pass john. Christopher message for me. And this was the response. I got from the FBI's public information officer. Hi, robyn. It's Rebecca ESPN. I spoke if he agent, and he says that he. I guess MVP for the force. Not surprisingly, she declined to participate. Again, he says it is his responsibility to protect your source that he hopes that you understand that. So thank you very much and let me know giving a question. Even after all this time, it appears that the FBI is still protecting John Christopher what about all the trash. He left behind. I mean, the dump itself what happened to it? Well, when the feds wash their hands of this problem and said by by Chicago, and with all the intense public scrutiny and the national media coverage that operation silver shovel had garnered the city finally stepped in and started awarding contracts to companies who could hall all this rubble away. Remember the lot were mount Henry once stood spanned twenty one acres and the mountain itself was six stories tall. So these cleanup contracts, we're going to be really big and really lucrative. The cleanup had just started in January nineteen ninety six when the Reverend Jesse Jackson stopped in. We have the right to remove the degree in our community because I was going to be a good lucrative job for someone to have the job. So Reverend Jackson the civil rights activist and to candidate for president. And I come to Chicago in the nineteen sixties his rainbow push coalition is headquartered here and the way Jackson tells it when he first learned about operation, silver shovel. He realized that this cleanup presented a unique opportunity. John Christopher had dumped in a black neighborhood, and he had helped take down black politicians, but someone was going to get paid to clean up. The dumps and Jackson wanted the city to hire black owned trucking firms to do it. That was resistance because. Those who use these jobs were demanding their right to get them. We demanded the right to circumvent the system so Reverend Jackson mounted a major protest to backup. His demands we organized the trucks and the land removers on the frigid Saturday in early February nineteen Ninety-six dozens of diesel trucks and bulldozers plastered with signs that said things like we want our fair share and hire us to clean up. The dumps all these trucks lined up in a convoy and headed for north Lonsdale. Full.

John Christopher FBI Tony Centracchio John north Lonsdale uncle Tony John Krystal Gladys Woodson Chicago Jim Davis Jesse Jackson Tony Centracchio Reverend Jackson asthma president Oliver mount Henry Mondale white community Rebecca ESPN MVP
"gladys woodson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"gladys woodson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Week on hidden brain from NPR. Brain will be coming up at two o'clock this morning here on cake, you E public radio, partly cloudy skies overnight. It'll be mostly cloudy for later on today. Temperatures are going to be near sixty degrees. From the center for investigative reporting in PR. This is revealed. I'm outlets. Today, we've been talking about a mountain of trouble in Chicago neighborhood, a mountain made up of construction debris greed and deception that six stories high and five blocks long, Robin Aamer of USA. Today's new podcast called the city has been telling us the story. So Robin catches up. We've got a neighborhood. That's getting tons of construction debris from all over Chicago dumped on them. And they're having trouble getting their voices heard downtown from what I know about Chicago politics when you can't get your trash picked up or your potholes filled. The person you call is your alderman, your neighborhoods Representative in city council was he able to help him. So Bill Henry was the alderman of the twenty fourth ward which included north Lauderdale and Gladys Woodson's block club wrote to him when they were trying to get rid of the dump a Henry because he was a street person. You know, you will raise the phone the street, you will let us all know, you know, you can have everything you want. And if you won't. Something really bad. You figure out how bad you won't that. And you're gonna have to give up something to get something. Henry was first elected alderman in nineteen eighty three. And he did what alderman often.

Bill Henry Robin Aamer Chicago NPR USA. Today Gladys Woodson Representative north Lauderdale sixty degrees
"gladys woodson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"gladys woodson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To revamp Chicago's aging downtown, and he paid special attention to tourist friendly destinations in the loop. And along the lakefront. He said about rebuilding crucial parts of the city's infrastructure, including its roads and highways by the spring of nineteen ninety the year after he took office. The city was full of workers and hardhats and orange fast breaking down concrete, Jack hammering asphalt loading into dump trucks and hauling it away. Law abiding trucking companies Carter this debris to distant landfill. But some trucks headed west out of the loop over the Chicago river into the city's neighborhoods until they came to a vacant lot in Northland L when he visited there a net woman named Gladys Woodson. She'd lived in the neighborhood since moving to Chicago Mississippi in the nineteen sixties, and she told me how one day in the spring of nineteen ninety a neighbor knocked on her front door. My first memory was the president of the forty one hundred block came down and ask for miss Watson. And I told him what do you want? Woulda miss Woodson was the president of the forty three hundred block together these block clubs kept an eye on the street and made sure the community was safe. He said, did you not know that is a donkey legal dumb over cross the street, and I. No, it's a come on this walk ban. You first of all I saw a lot of trucks lineup blocking the view and Behan the trip. There was pal stuff was accumulate. And so when you saw.

Gladys Woodson miss Watson Chicago Carter president Chicago river Behan Jack Mississippi one day
"gladys woodson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"gladys woodson" Discussed on KCRW

"In north L. When he visited there a met a woman named Gladys Woodson. She'd lived in the neighborhood since moving to Chicago from Mississippi in the nineteen sixties, and she told me how one day in the spring of nineteen ninety a neighbor knock on her front door. My first memory was the president of the forty one hundred block came down and asked for MS Woodson. And I told him would do you would miss Woodson was the president of the forty three hundred block together these block clubs kept an eye on the street and made sure the community was safe. He said did you not know that is a dump illegal dumb over across the street. And I say, no, it's a come on this woke ban, you first of all I saw a lot of trucks blocking the view and Behan trip. There was Powell stuff did was accumulated. And so when you saw this line of trucks and this pile of rubble. What did you think I think oh, no? We can't. This is bad. Children. It's just gonna take on neighborhood down. They couldn't figure out who was responsible for all the trucks coming on loading rebel in their neighborhood. So they held stakeouts and saw that the trucks kept coming by day. But also in the dead of night. We have come here like one two o'clock at night to watch the trucks go in and take down license plates number one and two o'clock in the morning. In the morning, and we used to meet.

Gladys Woodson president Behan Mississippi Chicago Powell one day
"gladys woodson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:17 min | 2 years ago

"gladys woodson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That they were shocked to suddenly learn that the man that they've been fighting for six years was working for the FBI. Well, we say this why we couldn't get any help. That's why we couldn't get any help with it. They knew all this was going on all alone before we even begin to fight for in the reason why we couldn't get any Justice for anything because it was all about for me. And they knew it from the very beginning. We've just figured that John Christopher had that concrete pal there. He was making money off of it. And that's the purpose of what civil shovel. That was my first thing what is. And they said, oh, you did dumpsite as the Chris John John Krystal? Gladys Woodson the block club president north Lonsdale told me that she and her neighbors or collateral damage. They'd been used they were never able to get traction fighting John Christopher, and now they could see why he had to have begging, you know, 'cause people that we will contact and seem to you know, was pushing it on the or not answering for everyone in north Lonsdale whose children had been hurt whose property had been damaged whose neighborhood had been disrespected. This was a huge breach of trust this people that don't had asthma attack. The people that own own oxygen machines that we have few people to move out of the neighborhood just moved because they could no longer stand the dust and stuff the news about operation, silver, shovel seemed to confirm what they'd been saying for years about the government's neglect of their neighborhood because this face the fact they wouldn't have put that up. In the white community. Not at all. John didn't have to be allowed to still have that dumb 'cause you had ammunition to use against him. What about John Christopher me? What happened to him? When the whole thing broke when operation silver shovel was revealed. Well, even though John Christopher had agreed to wear a wire for the FBI and had become the centerpiece of this major undercover investigation his participation was not actually like a get out of jail free card. He did not have a deal with the FBI for full immunity, so FBI agent. Jim Davis told me that at the beginning of the investigation. He had warned John Christopher not to do anything illegal that wasn't part of the investigation. And I would just try and reassure them and say, look, if you're straight with us, you know, if you continue to do what we're asking you to do, you know, if you stay out of trouble, you're going to be okay. But John Christopher did not hold up his end of the bargain while. The investigation was going on while he was cooperating with the FBI. He was still committing other crimes and he went behind the bureau's back in other ways. So for example, at the same time operation silver shovel was going on the FBI was also looking into this illegal gambling operation run by an alleged mob. Boss named Tony Centracchio John referred to his uncle, Tony. And that was a problem for me because we had a wire Tony the wire was a video camera hidden in the ceiling of Tony Centracchio office. And every time John went to see him. We were recording John in primarily criminal conversations, which was adding to the mounting evidence that we were going to have to present against him at the end of this case, it's not totally clear. What John Christopher was doing there because he was never charged in this legal gambling case but him showing up. On another investigations wire meet things really complicated for Jim Davis and his fellow agents. I would have liked to have said John stay away from uncle Tony's office. But I can't tell John that we have a wire and uncle Tony's office. John Christopher also neglected to file his federal income tax returns in nineteen ninety two and ninety three. I know it seems so mundane, but ultimately this is why he went to prison. John Christopher was sentenced to thirty nine months in prison. But he was never forced to clean up. The dumps or provide restitution to anyone in north Lauderdale. And then after he got out of prison, he disappeared. Again, navy for good this time. You mean he's been gone for like twenty years, and nobody knows where he is. Did you try and track him down? Yeah. I've been looking John Christopher for almost three years trying to figure out what happened to him after he got out of prison. Because he co-operated with the FBI he could not safely returned to his old life or even be in Chicago without FBI protection. So I looked for him everywhere. I can think of and Al I just I found nothing. Eventually I learned the FBI had set him up with a new name and a new social security number and a new life. And that there was this FBI agent in St Louis who might have all that information. So.

John Christopher Tony Centracchio John FBI uncle Tony Chris John John Krystal Jim Davis Tony Centracchio asthma north Lonsdale Gladys Woodson north Lauderdale St Louis white community president Chicago thirty nine months twenty years three years
"gladys woodson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"gladys woodson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Push to revamp Chicago's aging downtown, and he paid special attention to tourist friendly destinations in the loop. And along the lakefront. He said about rebuilding crucial parts of the city's infrastructure, including its roads and highways by the spring of nineteen ninety the year after he took office. The city was full of workers and hard hardhats and orange vasts breaking down concrete, Jack hammering asphalt loading into dump trucks and hauling it away. Law abiding trucking companies Carter this debris to distant landfill. But some trucks headed west out of the loop over the Chicago river into the city's neighborhoods until the came to a vacant lot in north Lonsdale. When I visited there a met a woman named Gladys Woodson. She'd lived in the neighborhood since moving to Chicago from Mississippi in the nineteen sixties, and she told me how one day in the spring of nineteen ninety a neighbor knocked on her front door. First memory was the president of the forty one hundred block came down and asked for MS Watson. And I told him what do you want would miss Woodson was the president of the forty three hundred block together these block clubs kept an eye on the street and made sure the community was safe. He said did you not know that is illegal dump over across the street? And I say, no, it's a come on this walk first. I fall I saw a lot of trucks land blocking the view and Behan the truck. There was pal stuff was accumulate. And.

Gladys Woodson Chicago president MS Watson Chicago river Carter Behan north Lonsdale Jack Mississippi one day
"gladys woodson" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"gladys woodson" Discussed on Reveal

"The cleanup continued through the spring of nineteen Ninety-six one by one dump trucks filed onto the lot and backed up to the mountain bulldozers began slowly chipping away at the tightly packed mass of concrete and dirt filling up truck after truck after truck residents like Gladys Woodson who'd watched in those early days as John Christopher set up shop now watch the process slowly rewind goon because I'm saying, wow. Now, we is gone. It's going to be gone. Can you tell us what that was like? Dusty Bodas with the trucks coming in to get the stuff. But at least they spray the street down, which Chris John never did never did eight years after John Christopher I showed up north Lonsdale. The cleanup was over. And it was all like a puff of smoke and everything changed miss here. Rita Ashford's, daughters sharia, and Michelle visited he just was then one day going rolling all my loan. They will be rolling all night long. Get it out of that once broke, and when you looked up the pow went from, you know, the kids used to run up and then on top it went from being up. That's it. It's just like a horse cone suburban what happened to this vacant lot in the end twenty acres located right there in the city. It must have been pretty coveted piece of real estate. Oh, yeah. It was basically like a blank canvas just waiting for the right kind of development. The kind the could build community ties or bring jobs and money back into the neighborhood. And. Especially after the embarrassment of operation, silver shovel. This lot offered a chance for then. Mayor Richard Daley's so-called renaissance to finally touchdown in north London. Not to offload on wanted trash, but to build something new. But like so many other opportunities in this story. This one was also squandered there have been several attempts to build on this lot over the past twenty years. But so far, none have been successful. And the law is still empty today. And for many of the north Lonzo residents. I spoke to a prime piece of real estate this big that sat empty for this long indicates a larger problem, a kind of neglect and abandonment that began long before John Christopher brought the first truckloads of debris to the lot and has continued long after what I want to say is like I can't believe that this happened in an American city, but the truth is. Can. What an incredible and frustrating story. Robyn, thank you so much for bringing it to us. Thanks for having me. Al. Oh, what a dish. Been over here. Twenty twenty six years. A lot of memories one day not too long ago. Daiki nichols. Took a walk in the lot with a mountain used to loon the home to the evil. Rabbit terrorize neighborhood kids Daiki was in high school in the cleanup started. We was protective of it down. That was going to does what we'd be Dickey left to go away to college out of state. And when he came back the hills and the mountain had disappeared. Heels going so going back to me being a kid and they took out hills away. But me grow into the man, I am now really appreciate with at note is gorgeous flaws. What a Houston leg before me. But it's still a vacant lot and the big picture problems greed and indifference that created the mountain are keeping the lot empty today. Thanks to Robin. Aim for bringing us today story and the rest of the crew of USA today's the city Wilson Sayer Jenny Qassiss Sam Greenspan, Ben Austin mad dog, and my friend Amy pop the city's executive producer is Liz Nelson. You can find the city

John Christopher Dickey John Christopher I Robyn Gladys Woodson Dusty Bodas Chris John Wilson Sayer Jenny Qassiss Sam Mayor Richard Daley Michelle Daiki nichols Lonzo Rita Ashford USA London Robin Daiki Houston executive producer
"gladys woodson" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"gladys woodson" Discussed on Reveal

"I mean, there are agencies that are responsible for cleaning up stuff like that. That's not our business. What about that? I mean, couldn't the EPA be brought in to help clean up the dump in theory. But the EPA looked at the situation and said, you know, there's no hazardous waste here. This is a municipal waste problem. It's not our job to clean this up. And so really the city was left holding the Bill here, of course, the city had already sued John, Christopher and one. But instead of forcing him to clean it up. He had just cleared. Bankruptcy and had affectively disappeared and the FBI in giving John Christopher cover while he was an informant for them made. This problem worse for all the people who had been fighting him. We they said about him being a mall does something that we never even tested on one of my visits north Lonsdale Rita, and Michelle Ashford told me that they were shocked to suddenly learn that the man that they'd been fighting for six years was working for the F B I say this why we couldn't get any help. This going to get any help with him. They knew all this was going on all alone before we even begin to fight for in the reason why we couldn't get any Justice point anything because it was all the government. And they knew it from the very beginning. We've just figured that John Christopher had that concrete pal there. He was making money off of it. And that's the purpose of it. What's civil Chauvel? That was my first thing what is civil shovel. And they said, oh, you did dumpsite as the Chris John John Christopher Gladys Woodson the block club president and north Mondale told me that she and her neighbors were collateral damage. They'd been used they were never able to get traction fighting John Christopher, and now they could see why he had the have begging, you know, 'cause people that we will contacting seem to you know, was pushing it on the not answering forever. One in north Lonsdale whose children had been hurt whose property had been damaged whose neighborhood had been disrespected. This was a huge breach of trust this people that don't have asthma attack. The people that own own oxygen machines that we have few people to move out of the neighborhood just moved because they could no longer stand the dust and stuff the news about operation, silver, shovel seem to confirm what they'd been saying for years about the government's neglect of their neighborhood because this face the fact they wouldn't have put that up in the white community. Not at all..

John Christopher Chris John John Christopher Gl EPA north Lonsdale north Lonsdale Rita asthma Michelle Ashford FBI white community Mondale president six years
"gladys woodson" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"gladys woodson" Discussed on Reveal

"And old mattresses the kids used for trampolines the story, we're going to tell you today is about how that landfill. King to be north longdale and grew to be six stories tall, two whole city blocks wide and five city blocks long imagine living right next door to that. This is a story about the strange complicated and crooked ways that power flows in American cities USA today investigated this story in a new podcast series called the city. Sch host and creator is Robin Aamer today. She's going to bring us that story here on veal Aron. Hi, al. All right. So we're talking about a dump that is six stories high in Chicago. Yeah. That's right. Six stories tall. And it was on this huge lot. Twenty one acres the size of thirteen football fields. The story of how this huge dump came to be in the middle of a residential neighborhood is one of the most striking stories of corruption. And institutional indifference that I've ever come across it stunned me when I first found out about it about a ruthless. This city can be about how stark the divisions are between black and white rich and poor between the people who hoard power and the people who have to fight for their fair share. There's one man at the center of this story who sets everything into motion here. He is. Okay. We'll show or all the boys at this table on the tangle. I was the first one basically that started all the dumps the I will I made a lot of money over there. They no balls about saying it made a lot of money you want to know, some I started a can of worms in the city that could haunt you for years to come. This guy sounds like a character straight out of goodfellas. Yeah, he's pretty unapologetic. The can of worms. He opened unleashed this chain of events that went way beyond Chicago. Eventually the FBI would be giving him cover as he built the dump. He's not at the very beginning of the story, and what we're definitely going to get back to him later. But why don't we want a little bit and take it from the very beginning. His inaugural address live on WB AM from office. In the months to come. Richard m Daley was the son of the beloved and feared mayor, Richard J Daley. He presided over Chicago's political machine from the nineteen fifties through the seventies. His son was sworn into office in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine it's time to leave behind all setbacks disappointments and battles because in the campaign for better Chicago for all airlines since the nineteen sixties steel mills and other factories had been shutting down all over the midwest. In Chicago, the city lost hundreds of thousands of jobs and nearly a million residents and the new mayor Daley wanted Chicago to wake up from this post industrial slumber and thrive we either rise up as one city or we sit back in watch decline. Daly began a major push to revamp Chicago's aging downtown, and he paid special attention to tourist friendly destinations in the loop. And along the lakefront. He said about rebuilding crucial parts of the city's infrastructure, including its roads and highways by the spring of nineteen ninety the year after he took office. The city was full of workers in hardhats, an orange vests breaking down concrete, Jack hammering asphalt loading into dump trucks and hauling it away law abiding trucking companies card this debris to distant landfill. But some trucks headed west out of the loop over the Chicago river into the city's neighborhoods until the came to a vacant lot in north Lauderdale. When I visited there a met a woman named Gladys Woodson. She lived in the neighborhood since moving to Chicago from Mississippi in the nineteen sixties. And she told me how one day in the spring of nineteen ninety a neighbor knocked on her front door. First memory was the president of the forty one hundred blunt came down and. S full MS Woodson, and that told him would do you would miss Woodson was the president of the forty three hundred block together these block clubs kept an eye on the street and made sure the community was safe. He said did you not know that is a dump illegal dump over across the street. And I know he's come on..

Chicago Gladys Woodson Richard J Daley Robin Aamer Chicago river Aron Richard m Daley USA president FBI Mississippi goodfellas Daly north Lauderdale hardhats Jack Twenty one acres one day
"gladys woodson" Discussed on The City

The City

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"gladys woodson" Discussed on The City

"Over the past twenty years with all the back and forth on potential development plans. Some north Mondale residents have become skeptical that a major development will ever come to the land where the mountain once stood, but they have always seen the lots potential to address the neighborhoods needs. What do you want on the lie? If you could snap your fingers and have sometimes school ago Oh, their there. stores or some that been we go so far to the stores being a senior black to see maybe senior housing there. Like to see something that will is going to employ people. I would like supermarket, you know, so you won't have to go out of the neighborhood in order to purchase food, though income houses, but people that can't afford. The have Rindt this in Chicago community centers something to build our children. I mean, anything a set of keep looking at all these Laugh. laugh. But for all the attributes that make this lot a prime piece of real estate. There are also some very real practical hurdles to redeveloping land. We started looking into those hurdles after we heard about the spacesuits. We heard about them from Gladys Woodson the block club president who spent so many years fighting John Christopher when she moved to north Lauderdale from her hometown of Vance Mississippi forty three years ago, she was considered the baby of the block now she's become the neighborhood matriarch and she still runs what's left of her block club. The first time. I went to the site with MS Woodson. She told me something that would echo through the conversations. I'd later have with other north Lonzo residents of this stuff. They don't hassle and you ask me how to pass call when the people come to remove. They was win math and spacesuit when she says spacesuits, she's talking about has not suits, or at least the white suits. Helmets. EPA officials wore when they came to inspect the lot. After silver shovel broke to me when I walked over there. I shouldn't have been over there and ever since the cleanup a question has lingered for MS Woodson and others how contaminated are these lots today? The city has never told them the answer to this question is important, not just for their peace of mind. But because the answer has implications for what can be built on the lot today soil samples from the lot Show Low levels of heavy metals in the dirt metals, like, lead, arsenic, and mercury. Those contaminants were likely there long before John Christopher turned the site into an illegal construction, debris dump they likely come from the factories that used to be on the lot including a tobacco factory a rubber factory and a door hinge factory. So the site is contaminated, but it's not a Superfund site land, the poses a serious danger to the general public. These lots are called brownfields, the contamination levels here are on par with thousands of other empty host industrial lots around the city, most of which are also majority black and Brown neighborhoods. But if a developer wants to build anything on a brownfield, they often have to jump through hoops to meet safety standards that would be easier to achieve on a pristine piece of land. There are many options for making a brownfield safe. The more expensive route involves digging down several feet hauling out, the contaminated soil and hauling in tons of clean soil as a replacement, but the larger lot in north Lauderdale is Twenty-one swear acres and remediating a partial that big gets very expensive, very fast one cheaper option is to cap the land with something like concrete to create a barrier between the contaminated soil and the people around it that was the plan proposed for the movie studio. So there are additional hurdles to developing a brownfield site. Hurdles that have come into play in the most recent attempts to redevelop this land Johnny's gonna pick it back up from here. Michael Scott, junior never did change his major and go into the movie business. Instead, he went into politics. He's the current alderman of the twenty fourth ward. He won the seat once held by Bill Henry, the former alderman who was an office. When John Christopher started dumping in the ward alderman, Scott was elected a month before north Lauderdale lost the bid for the presidential library and once in office..

Gladys Woodson spacesuits John Christopher north Lauderdale Michael Scott Mondale EPA Lonzo Bill Henry Chicago Vance Mississippi Laugh. developer Johnny president forty three years twenty years
"gladys woodson" Discussed on The City

The City

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"gladys woodson" Discussed on The City

"This portion of the cleanup was only one part of the solution. As reporter, Shirley, jihad noted even after Lindahl brothers cleans up its share of the mess, though. Six hundred thousand tons of crash will remain and at this point in the winter of nineteen Ninety-six the city had not figured out who would clean up the rest. Put this stuff too. Will get sick probably got all kinds of health habit in the first place. Rex cats goals. Just a health hazard. You can look at it entail. When John Christopher. I started dumping in north Lauderdale Gladys Woodson and her fellow block club captains had written letters to every public official. They could think of who might be able to help them city agencies mayor Daley at least one member of congress. We wrote everybody from who's who to who's that? Ms Woodson says they also wrote to civil rights groups like the AA C P and to Reverend Jesse Jackson, the civil rights activist whose rainbow push coalition is based in Chicago. We told him what with happening neighborhood, and we're skim could he come and MS Woodson says they never heard back from Jesse Jackson at least not until the camera. Crews arrived the sewage show story broke. And then the thing I saw was Jesse Jackson standing on top. Pals in. Oh, yeah, we did this. And and then you didn't. In credit for a lot of the stuff that had been done. But that was way after the fight. Jesse Jackson, the iconic civil rights activists and Baptist minister had I come to Chicago in the early nineteen sixties to attend seminary. He would later March with Martin Luther King junior in Selma and push for an end to apartheid in South Africa. But over the decades, his critics have also accused him of jumping from media storm to media storm of seeking the limelight as much as he sought Justice. To understand how Jesse Jackson helped ensure the cleanup of the Northland dealt dumps. But also alienated some north Lauderdale residents. We have to go back to his work on a program called operation. Breadbasket the program organized boycotts against white owned businesses like soda pop bottling companies and grocery store chains that made big profits in black neighborhoods, but didn't employ black workers on the heels of his success in that campaign. Jackson started hearing from small black owned trucking companies. Here's Reverend Jackson. And so for example, we guys who. Two or three trucks. And they would just kinda hustling as basic these truckers complained that they were not getting as many waste hauling contracts as their white counterparts. They weren't getting them from white owned businesses like grocery store chains that needed commercial trash pickup. And that meant that they were missing out on a lot of money. Good c three contract with trains tool. Six cans day. You can take live intent you little.

Reverend Jackson Gladys Woodson Ms Woodson Chicago Lindahl brothers north Lauderdale John Christopher mayor Daley reporter Martin Luther King Shirley Lauderdale Selma congress Baptist South Africa Northland official Six hundred thousand tons
"gladys woodson" Discussed on The City

The City

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"gladys woodson" Discussed on The City

"All through the winter of nineteen ninety six the cleanup continued removing the debris was as big undertaking as building the mountain had been block club. President. Gladys Woodson had watched in those early days as John Christopher set up shop and allowed trucks to dump a block from her home. Now, she watched the process, slowly rewind goon. Wow. Now, we valley is gone. It's going to be gone. Can you tell that was like? Dusty? With the trucks coming in to get the the. But at least they spray the street down, which Chris John never did never did. Northland L residents had conflicting feelings about the cleanup. And all this new attention being paid to their neighborhood on one hand, they were glad to see the dumps go on the other hand, they resented the public figures who had not seemed to care about their neighborhood before the corruption probe. Here's Rita Ashford who had protested the dumps and her daughters, Sharon and Michelle loan. We out the fighting that. Shovel, bro. And it was all like a puff of smoke. And everything changed his appeal. Right. It's just was there. One day going to Nick. They will be rolling all night long getting it out of that once it broke. And when you looked up the pow went from, you know, the kids used to run up and then on the top it went from being up. That's it just like a horse if it hadn't been for civil shovel. We still would have been dealing with down probably right now today. Yes. If it hadn't have been specific shovel, we would've still been fighting that. Others asked the obvious question. Where was all this attention and scrutiny when the problem was simply illegal dumping in a black neighborhood. Here's MS Woodson. Again, we live through five years of this stuff. You know? This people that don't hate Asmaa tech, the people that own own oxygen machines that you know, we have few people to move out of the neighborhood just move because they could no longer stand the dust and stuff. In late February nineteen Ninety-six about five weeks into the clean up the environment focused public radio show living on earth, central porter. Shirley, Jehad to check on the cleanup. She visited north Lauderdale and talk to people who lived in the two apartment buildings that stood on the very same lot as the dump one of the people she interviewed with Keith wardlow, a father of two who worked as a custodian at a local university the view from Keith ward, lows back porch isn't pretty, but it is awesome. It is simply called the mountain seven hundred thousand tons of debris. The mountain UCI tol at this. See I tol at is. Why? Now that amount. Heath wardlow, expressed many of the same sentiments as his neighbors. The feds should have cleaned up this dump years ago rather than letting it continue to grow while using John Christopher as a mole to catch politicians taking bribes weren't crook Jonah prosecute. To me. You know, if you so concerned about what the head. What why are you into the neighborhood trying to see who got infected from from the dirt, you You know? know? That's that's what you should have been doing firs who took some money. The wardlow family had suffered for years living next to the dump now the damage to their home, and they believed their health continued during the cleanup. He's one of those shakes every time trucks roll in and out of the dump site. He always keeps his windows closed and covered with plastic. Innovation effort to prevent dust blowing off the heat from settling in his apartment. He says his four year old son Keno has contracted severe asthma. The boy's mother. Deborah wardlow says the child has to breathe through a machine a nebulizer. He's on twice a day. And sometimes that machine doesn't work. So I had to rush him to the emergency room, the company doing the cleanup was Lindahl. Brothers. A well connected firm that had been owned by the same family for three generations, it had dug the trenches for the handcock building and other downtown skyscrapers and built the international terminal at O'Hare airport. And Linda brothers was here to do the clean-up because they were also one of the companies that had dumped there in the.

John Christopher Jehad Deborah wardlow Heath wardlow Gladys Woodson Shovel Lindahl Keith wardlow O'Hare airport President MS Woodson Chris John Rita Ashford Linda brothers Northland L Keith ward UCI Nick Jonah north Lauderdale
"gladys woodson" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

05:26 min | 2 years ago

"gladys woodson" Discussed on American History Tellers

"For the past three years journalist, Robin Aamer has been reporting on an illegal six construction debris dam that appeared in a predominantly black Chicago neighborhood in the early nineteen nineties her new podcast the city from USA today and wondering uncovered how Chicago gangster named John Christopher worked his connections with the mob and the FBI to literally bury a neighborhood and trash and how in doing. So he exposed to Kogyo's ugliest divides over the course of ten episodes. You'll hear how the dump change the neighborhood of north lawn Dale and how the residents fought back against John Christopher the mob politicians on the take and even the FBI. And what the story reveals about how power works in cities across the country. You're about to hear a preview of the city in which you'll meet host, Robin Aamer. And the Chicago residents who I encountered the legal dump. You'll also hear from John Christopher himself mysterious man who arrived in the limo and forever changed. The Chicago name. Hood. It's a story. You have to hear to believe you can subscribe to the city for free on apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts, and you can follow the on Facebook and Twitter at the city pod. Also, be sure to visit the city podcast dot com. To learn more about this story and to explore nineteen Ninety-two Llandough and the dumps in an exclusive augmented reality experience. There's this vacant lot on the west side of Chicago. It's about a half dozen miles from Chicago's downtown what we call the loop. And this lot is huge. This lot looks to me. Like, it's about a full city block. It gets. It's a big it's a big live. That's Gladys Woodson and Jacqueline Rodney who lived nearby. And it's now it's pretty overgrown like there's full sized trees, there's like freyre grass. So what did it look like when it was when he was operating a miss. It was a myth that this the best I can say for it. I I started visiting this lot which isn't a neighborhood called north Lonsdale. After hearing a story about something that happened here it I he hit. Oh, big eighteen wheelers. Mine up, you know, I just thought. Well, hey, somebody just parking the truck to nip to guide sate MS Woodson comedown look at this. Do you know somebody's dumping over? I've been reporting in Chicago for more than a decade, and I reported all kinds of stories about the built environment about secret tunnels hidden underneath the loop and about how your place a train bridge while the train is still running. I've also reported on housing discrimination, and predatory lending so stories about all of the remarkable stuff that gets built in Chicago. But also about how it gets built and about all of the foul and crooked things that people will do when they think nobody's looking. And so the story of what happened on this lot the story. I want to tell you stunned me despite everything I already knew about Chicago about how corrupt and ruthless. It can be about how stark the divisions are between black and white rich and poor between the people who hoard power and the people who will fight for their fair share. Anytime you see anybody drive over a vacant lot in a limo. You know is no good. This story is about a giant illegal dump six stories high. It was huge mountains concrete garbage built from the broken pieces of a city in the midst of a so-called renaissance thought that downtown city hall with do right by the people. You know, I didn't think they care less about us and built not just by dump trucks and bulldozers. There's and construction cranes, but also like corruption apathy and greed. So I said, okay, if a public official came by today and said, you know, I need five hundred dollars. What would you do any reached into his back pocket and he pulled out five one hundred dollar bills? The man who built this dump had deep ties to Chicago's criminal underworld. He looked at the honor of the restaurant. He goes if you don't pay your milk money. You're going to get a pineapple through the window. He profited at the neighborhood's expense. At this fucking. Table. The money over there. And before he was done. The FBI would be protecting him. I'm Robin Aamer. And this is the city a new podcast from USA today. Subscribe now on apple podcasts or wherever you listen. What if the experience of driving a luxury vehicle wasn't limited to just inside your car, but extended out into the world around you.

Chicago Robin Aamer John Christopher FBI USA apple Jacqueline Rodney Llandough freyre grass Kogyo MS Woodson Gladys Woodson Facebook Twitter official five one hundred dollar five hundred dollars three years milk
"gladys woodson" Discussed on Accused

Accused

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"gladys woodson" Discussed on Accused

"If you're a fan of this podcast, we have another one you might wanna check out for the past three years. Journalist, Robin Aamer has been reporting on an illegal six-storey construction debris down that appeared in a predominantly black Chicago neighborhood in the early nineteen nineties. Her new podcast is called the city from USA today. I'm wondering it uncovers how a Chicago gangster named John Christopher, worked his connections to the mob and the FBI to literally bury a neighborhood in trash and how in doing so he exposed Chicago's ugliest divides over the course of ten episodes. You'll hear how the dump change the neighborhood of north Lonsdale and how the residents fought back. You're about to hear a preview of the city in which you'll hear from the Chicago residents who first encountered the illegal dump. You also hear from John Christopher himself, the mysterious man who arrived in a limo and forever change this neighborhood. It's a story. You have to hear to believe you can subscribe to the city for free on apple podcasts or wherever else you listen, and you can follow the city on Facebook and Twitter at the city pod also be sure to visit the city podcasts dot com to learn more about the story and to explore nineteen ninety two north Lonsdale and the dumps in an exclusive augmented reality experience. There's this vacant lot on the west side of Chicago. It's about a half dozen miles from Chicago's downtown what we call the loop. And this lot is huge. This lot looks to me like it's about a full city block. It gets it's a big. It's a big live. That's Gladys, Woodson and Jacqueline. Rodney who lived nearby and it's now it's pretty overgrown like there's full sized trees. There's like freyre grass. So what did it look like when it was when he was operating? Amiss. It will miss. I this the best I can say for it. I, I started visiting this lot which is in a neighborhood called north Lonsdale. After hearing a story about something that happened here, if I he hit oh, big, eighteen wheelers, mine up, you know, I just thought, well, hey, somebody just parking truck to nip to a guy, say, MS Woodson, come down, look at this. Do you know somebody's dumping over. I've been reporting in Chicago for more than a decade. And I reported all kinds of stories about the built environment about secret tunnels hidden underneath the loop and about how your place a train bridge. While the train is still running. I've also reported on housing discrimination and predatory lending so stories about all of the remarkable stuff that gets bills in Chicago, but also about how it gets built and about all of the foul and crooked things that people will do when they think nobody's looking. And so the story of what happened on the slot. The story I want to tell you stunned me despite everything I already knew about Chicago about how corrupt and ruthless. It can be about how stark the divisions are between black and white, rich and poor between the people who hoard power and the people who will fight for their fair share. Anytime you see anybody drive over a vacant lot in a limo, you know is no good. This story is about a giant illegal, dump six stories high. It was huge mountains, concrete garbage built from the broken pieces of a city in the midst of a so-called renaissance thought that downtown city hall would do right by the people. You know, I didn't think they'd care less about us and built not just by dump trucks and bulldozers. And construction cranes, but also my corruption, apathy and greed. So I said, okay, if a public official came by today and said, you know, I need five hundred dollars. What would you do any reached into his back pocket? And he pulled out five one hundred dollar bills. The man who built this dump, had deep ties to Chicago's criminal underworld. He looked at the honor of the restaurant. He goes, if you don't pay your milk money, you're going to get a pineapple through the window. He profited at the neighborhood's expense. At this fucking tape. Table. I made a lot of money over and before he was done, the FBI would be protecting him. I'm Robin Aamer and this is the city. A new podcast from USA today subscribe now on apple podcasts or wherever you listen.

Chicago north Lonsdale Robin Aamer John Christopher FBI USA Rodney MS Woodson apple freyre grass Jacqueline Facebook Gladys Twitter official five one hundred dollar five hundred dollars three years milk
"gladys woodson" Discussed on The City

The City

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"gladys woodson" Discussed on The City

"Chicago is built on a prairie the skyscrapers downtown tower over a completely flat landscape which made it all the more remarkable when John Christopher's giant illegal dumps begin to rise out of nowhere casting their long shadows over north Lonsdale and the homes of Gladys, Woodson and Jacqueline Rodney. It was that. At least two stories right. Hall as all of these houses around us. That's so big and he didn't watery down. The dust was all over the neighborhood everywhere. I don't care how much you clean. I still can write my name all Michael's. I have glass tape. I still can write my name in the table. We left off a guy named John Christopher, had established a pair of illegal dumps onto vacant lots north Lauderdale on Chicago's west side, one down the street from his Woodson and miss Rodney and an even bigger one. Just a few blocks away across the street from an elementary school and not only was John Christopher dumping truckload after truckload of gravel and bricks and rusted of medal. He was also operating a rock crusher a giant piece of machinery, the pulverizes concrete into gravel. Whenever he operated the crusher we all know because our buildings would be shaking and you could hear the mortar falling could hear the more falling through the walls of sound like the house houses were about to carry van here. The rock crusher two blocks away because it was shaking ground. Not only could we at when it was shaking. Our houses are more was falling out of the buildings to the point where we could see outside from inside the house. MS. Rodney MS Woodson and their neighbors and north Lonsdale had confronted John Christopher the dumper and we're determined to take them to court. The got the city of Chicago on their side and sue John Christopher that was in June of nineteen ninety. He said, I'll do what I won't when all and how I want. And I'll stay there as long as I want to know. You won't. We, you definitely not going to stay here. Except he would for longer than anyone could have predicted. I'm Robin namer from USA today. This is the city..

John Christopher MS. Rodney MS Woodson north Lonsdale Chicago Jacqueline Rodney Hall Robin namer USA Michael Lauderdale