27 Burst results for "Gladstone"

"gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:24 min | Last month

"gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is on the media. I'm annalee newitz. And I'm Brooke gladstone. Our kinship with Neanderthals is at the heart of Rebecca rag Sykes book Kindred, in which the archeologist and science writer explores Neanderthal life, love, death, and art. But historically, the study of Neanderthals has been guided not by a sense of kin, but rather otherness. A search for Neanderthals defects to account for their supposed inferiority and their disappearance from the earth. But in recent years, we've learned a lot more about how they lived. And it isn't so other at all. They were living in caves or rock shelters, but also we know that they were living in the open air as well because we can find those sites, and they fit in with what we know from ethnographic research on living and historical hunting and gathering cultures all over the world. Most of the time, the people that you actually live with, that's a small number, maybe 25 maximum, the way that a Neanderthal of home might appear to you, you would probably see maybe too half active at the same time. Some that were blazing really hot temperatures much more perhaps a cooking half versus other ones towards the back of a rock shelter, which looked like they were smoldering, which matches what we see from the way hunter gathering people's live where you have like little sleeping fires to keep you warm at night. So they were using different parts of the site in a different way and we can see that also reflected in other kinds of material evidence, for example, animal bones. We can see different animals being prepared in different parts of the cave and there's even an Italian site called grotto for money, where it looks as if different body parts of birds that Neanderthals were hunting their were being processed in different areas. Like the wings all seem to be discarded in one area. We can even see in some cases there are like little middens where they're cleaning the half out and then they dump the ash somewhere else on that site. You say that there's evidence of furnishings made from plant material that they were picky about the wood they use, yet we can see really impressive wooden spears. They're selecting the wood, not only the species, but the parts of the tree, the lower part of the trunk or the base of the branch. For the tip of the space, because it's the strongest wood. They also are carving it away from the grain, so it's not going to shatter on impact. Talk to me about glue. How hard is it to make? So we know that Neanderthals were using stone. It's the basis of their technology, but they also are able to understand the concept of joining different parts together to make a multi component tool. So this is what we call halving, basically sort of sticking a handle on something. Sometimes they might be using plant twine or maybe sinews to do this, but in other cases, we have direct evidence that they were using adhesives in the Middle East in the near east. We can see that they're using natural asphalt, but elsewhere they're making their own glue. So in the European context, we can see that they knew how to make birch bark tar. So in the states you have very rich indigenous cultural traditions that use birch for all sorts of stuff, including glue. You have to cook this black tar out of the bark under controlled conditions. That's quite a sophisticated process to understand how to control the fire, less air is better because if you allow too much air and it just burns, also recently, we found new evidence from the Italian site that suggests that they are making glue recipes mixing together pine or Conifer resin with beeswax and when you mix those two things together it really improves the properties and it actually becomes more like birch tar. It's a part of the technological repertoire. So let's talk about culture now. You write about the bruniquel cave, the quote strangest Neanderthal site. What makes it so? People always want to know when Neanderthals making anything that we can call art. And there are an awful lot of different forms of evidence like color and pigments and engravings. But this site is in southeast France, and it was only discovered quite recently. When it was reported in the media, it was like, oh, Neanderthal Stonehenge and that's totally overblown. It doesn't look like Stonehenge, but parts of it have that same balancing pieces on top of each other. And it's basically an massive underground construction of two rings formed of snapped off pieces of stalagmite. The natural formations that you get growing in case look like fingers to come up from the ground. And in a chamber, 300 meters deep into a hill would have been totally in the dark. Neanderthals took hours snapping these pieces off and arranged them in two large circles with piles inside them. And then there's burning around on the edges and on the central piles as well. For a purpose that's not really clear to us because it doesn't really look like a living site. It's too deep inside. You have to have lighting all the time. It'd be very smoky and this was during a cold

Rebecca rag Sykes annalee newitz Brooke gladstone Middle East France
"gladstone" Discussed on Money For the Rest of Us

Money For the Rest of Us

05:04 min | 4 months ago

"gladstone" Discussed on Money For the Rest of Us

"Is a farm REIT. I have owned it in the past, and I have focused on the net acid. When I bought it, when I purchased gladstone in August 2018, it was selling for $11 and 75 cents. About a 15% discount to its net asset value, and the net asset value is calculated quarterly by gladstone. They get independent verification appraisals on the farms that they own. They primarily own fruit and nut farms. At the time, it had a dividend yield of four and a half percent. Right, held it. This was an experiment for me. And it was a successful investment. I sold it in February 2021, about a year ago. It's common stock had risen to $18 and 69 cents. Its net asset value was $12 and 23 cents. So now it's selling at a 50% premium. It's gone from a 15% discount to a 50% premium. And the dividend yield has fallen from four and a half percent down to 3%. I sold and then bought gladstones preferred stock shares. The series B because it was paying 6%, which was an attractive yield to me much higher than the 3% on the common shares, particularly because the net acid value of gladstone wasn't growing. That quickly. Turns out that was a mistake because gladstone's common stock shares are now selling for over $30 per share. The premium is greater than a 100%. The dividend yields now down to 1.8%, it has gladstone has grown their net acid over $14 per share. But what premium is too much. I like buying it at a discount when nobody was really that interested in farmland REITs. Now, apparently they've gotten much more popular, and I did leave a lot of money on the table by selling at a 50% premium and it continued to increase to a 100% premium. But I didn't know it was going to do that. It hadn't done that before, but again, with gladstone, what are we paying.

gladstone
"gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 7 months ago

"gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"FM and AMA 20 NPR news and the New York conversation This is on the media I'm Brooke gladstone Let's say you were enticed by those Super Bowl ads that you are moved to score some cryptocurrency of your own What can you actually you know buy with it Not a lot at least not consistently think about walking around with an early American Express card So instead many crypto rich are spending their dime on a one of a kind digital artwork and NFT or non fungible token It may not look unique but it's singularity is coded in the digital spreadsheet known as the blockchain The board ape yacht club is a collective that boasts some of the most expensive NFTs I like those apes What are their angry apes What kind of apes were they board apes Board apes And yes the image is actually depict blase primates wearing different outfits The cheapest board ape NFT goes for north of $260,000 Here's Jimmy Fallon in Paris Hilton showing off their bounty on The Tonight Show You taught me what's up and then I bought an ape I got an ape too because I saw you on the show with people and you said you got a moon pace I went and I copied you and did the same thing You did That's deep It's really cool The board ape MFT collection less than a year old started this month with a market cap of about $2.8 billion and their parent company yuga labs is supposedly valued at something like four or 5 billion But until this month no one knew the identities of the people behind the board apes That changed when Katie a senior technology reporter at BuzzFeed.

NPR news Brooke gladstone ape yacht club Super Bowl New York Jimmy Fallon Paris Hilton yuga labs Katie BuzzFeed
"gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:13 min | 8 months ago

"gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is on the media I'm Brooke gladstone Bill crystal has been one of the most ubiquitous conservative commentators of the past two decades The magazine he founded and edited the weekly standard was often described as the neocon Bible But as Trump ascended crystal found himself marginalized then ostracized by the increasingly Trumpist GOP After clashing with the magazine's owner he left the weekly standard which was shuttered two years later and became editor at large of the center right website the bulwark We wondered if as a man of the right who soundly rejects the big lie he had any advice about how to talk to those who espouse it First I asked where he sat on the political spectrum nowadays You know I've been using for two three years now Pete Buttigieg's line from the 2019 2020 presidential campaign Buttigieg said he wanted to appeal to Democrats progressives moderates and even Republicans and then I think he hesitated and said well maybe future former Republicans Which is a good way of evading the question of exactly what I am right now I haven't voted Republican in a few years because I think the party really is now not a reliably democratic small deal party as tolerated and enabled a kind of authoritarianism nativism and other things that I just find unacceptable As a journalist who once maintained the same political affiliation how do you approach a Republican politician who pushes the big lie I met rather few Republican politicians elected officials in Congress let's say who really believe the big lie that even the ones who sit and tolerated even some of the ones who actually do more than tolerated but promoted So among elites I think we have a cynical and opportunistic willingness to go along with something that Donald Trump is pushing and those elites don't want to see the conservative movement or the Republican Party split between Trump and those who tell the truth If they normalize the big lie then it doesn't matter what they feel in their hearts does it It's not quite as bad obviously is cheering it on or encouraging it or inciting it I mean we have to have some distinctions I suppose No we don't Well yeah that's not going to call out everyone on your side of the aisle politically if they say something a little foolish a little exaggerated a little demagogic That's sort of one set of things But that's if the move on on the whole is healthy cares about the truth is law abiding And so forth If the movement as a whole now gets taken over though by an authoritarian and truth denying personality yes I think one is much more of an obligation to actually speak up against it And at that point being quiet is just being complicit I think people blame Trump which is true People worry about the base and blame the base for believing all this dangerous Nazis They let off too easily The elected officials who have enabled this to go to the extent is gone and especially for me the conservative elites who themselves have come up with fancy rationalizations for this So I have friends who are still conservative as academics journalists opinion leaders and so forth They're swimming in a world of The Wall Street Journal editorial page and Nashville They don't quite believe the craziest stuff on Fox News But they believe the complicated rationalizations in The Wall Street Journal which a make you think maybe there's something there It's not quite as bad as you know as Trump says but yeah they were real problems Bill And the left is doing the same thing and they would do it in a minute And the elites have a lot to explain to my view for letting it get to the point they've gotten to Many journalists including the new MSNBC host Mehdi Hassan say that they simply won't give a platform to people who spread that misinformation even if it means ignoring the views of like a quarter of the country What do you think about that I'm really if two minds I'm just uncertain I've turned down invitations to beyond TV with Trump big lie propagators And even some of the rationalizes I would say I just don't want to do it I just feel like if it's not a common basis of truth and good faith that what is acting on how can you even have a debate I suspect if I had a TV show I'd be on the one hand think it's X percent of the country who knows 50 40 30% of the country People need to see what they think They need to be confronted And on the other hand you could also say that having them od gives them too much credibility So I think it's a tough moment for journalists for the media And for a sort of mainstream institutions in general You said 30 40% of the country I mean the entire Republican Party is less than 30% of the country If 70% of them believe in the big lie in a much smaller percentage of independent Santa minuscule percentage of Democrats that doesn't get you to 40% Yeah fair enough on the other hand 47% of the voters voted for Trump and I don't know fair about that So let's say I say 30% 25% 30% That means that in a Republican primaries it's often more than 50% which means that the nominees you get catered to those people And again I come back to this problem If all the other Republicans who didn't believe the lie then said well I'm sorry I can't vote for Republican nominee who embraces the big lie Then it would be a manageable problem Then you would sort of segregate the problem You know what I mean among a few members of Congress But that's not the current situation And this is where I come back to the responsibility of the more mainstream Republicans and the more mainstream conservative elites they say their typical reaction is once a Republican nominee gets the nomination who did vote overturn the election That's a majority of House Republicans remember You know we still got to support him to see the vote the right way on the issues we care about And he's not really going to overturn elections after all And so that is why you have it may only be 25% of the country but it's a higher percentage of Republican members of Congress probably It's a higher percentage of conservative activists certainly and it can keep on growing And that's what's most worrisome You've been a mainstay of the conservative press often on the receiving end of liberal snark You've seemed to shrug that off But now it seems to have become a battle of liberal snark on one side and owning the libs on the other Do you see any way out I think the way out is to win first and then to reconcile I guess it's the way I would put it The big lie has to be defeated Then I think taking a look at how social media work and what our regulations are for this and how we could have a healthier political process At the end of the day this is now an urgent enough problem that the people who propagate the big lie have to defeat it which is why it's not enough to say well I don't like why aren't you Taylor green But you know Kevin McCarthy's not like Marjorie Taylor green he has to tolerate her She's part of the conference No That shows the level of accommodation We've now developed the level of.

Brooke gladstone Bill crystal weekly standard Pete Buttigieg Buttigieg GOP Trump The Wall Street Journal Mehdi Hassan The magazine Donald Trump Congress Fox News MSNBC Nashville
"gladstone" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

07:09 min | 1 year ago

"gladstone" Discussed on On The Media

"Be feminine and tough. We don't run. Don't be foolish. I would say fuel cells in the my people in we'll do just that and you rafer red alert. Did you have to grapple with the idea of femininity or did you. Just leave that whole discussion off the table now. Of course a hand to grapple with it and it was one of the hardest things and it was in extreme evidence from the first moment. Kate mulgrew played captain. Kathryn janeway and i realized that what was at stake was their largest and most robust demographic young men from the ages of twenty to thirty five. How was i going to transcend the fact that they could be watching. They're potentially watching their mother. In fact they watched her for seven years. Even though the bodacious seven of nine was added to the crew to boost ratings but even she represented more than just sex appeal because in star trek humanity was always the real final frontier so the best loved characters were not human. The half vulcan spock in the first series the android data in the second oto the shape shifter in the third and seven of nine in the fourth. They showed what it meant to be human by reacting against it or more often groping toward it. Here's data on a date. This is all part of a program. One which i have just created romantic relationships. I've written subroutine specifically for you. I have devoted a considerable share of my internal resources to its development. That's the nicest thing anybody's said to me later. Data gets an emotion chip but ultimately rejects. It spock would approve. He never understood kirks infatuation with humanity. Both know that. I am not human. It's everybody's you'll find that remark salting. I love spock. He's really awesome. What's your name emma. How old are you fifteen. We found emma at the mohegan sun casino in northern connecticut checking out a display of star trek memorabilia soon to be auctioned by christie's like thousands of others 'em rights fan fiction original stories based on the series and she posts on her blog as do many of her friends from the original series. Kirk and spock either right slash or just friendship what's slash slashes. The game romance and it's very popular all of the web and i write some of it but i prefer the friendship. She says the fans she's met online hated. The last series called enterprise said in a time before the original series. And they're very riled up about the new movie another prequel which recasts. Kirk and spock as students at starfleet academy people. Say they can't do this to our franchise and they call it their franchise. I know it's definitely not our franchise. But i think we have a big part in. Because without the fans there'd be no like continuation there would have been known the next generation of deep space not or voyager through the fans star trek lives long and prospers in cyberspace where they create and consume thousands of news stories and hundreds of videos including new episodes. It's not what trekkers solemnly regard is star trek canon. It's called fannin. A tapestry of new plots and backstories endlessly embroidered by fans and for decades they have boldly taken star trek. Where no network everwood including his emma just said slash fiction as in kirk slash. Spock as in the love that dare not speak its name. Mit raf henry. Jenkins all fan. Fiction is interested in exploring the emotional lines of characters. Consider spock's death scene in the wrath of khan behind a wall of glass kirk is on one side of the glass. Spock is on the other end. Spot comes closest to speaking. The emotional truth of their relationship needs many way means us a few. Or the one shall be frank if we accept that the perkins or the most powerful friendship in the series and it. Spock kurt with sacrifice any female lover to see the other. Then we understand what's at stake. What slash does or kirk spock. Stories do was remove that glass sex becomes the vehicle for exploring emotional intimacy between these two characters. So it's an enormously innovative and rich site of grassroots media. I asked kate mo- grew what she thought of the trekkers she'd met whereas i may have looked once upon these people with john die. As the years passed. I began to understand. This was very uncommon group of extremely intelligent people who had thrown their imaginations into the final frontier. Till i find them very forward thinking very innovative and by and large extremely marl. We grew up really love star trek in the purest possible way reason. Magazine's tim cavanaugh. We just loved it. His kids you get to high school you get to college. Suddenly you become the super ironist and you realize how campy it isn't over the top and every joke about captain kirk getting it on with green women or about crew members wearing red shirts and dying. Or what mr spock found in the toilet. They've all been made to some degree. The show has outlived all of that stuff. Which may be irrelevant to fans for whom the show may have actually outlived the show. I don't think fans should worry about. They're not being a star trek series on if it's not a good star trek series if it's not showing us what we want to see in star trek. We don't have to have it there. For instance the most recent series called enterprise was not embraced by erstwhile. Whitewater juror barbara adams. And she's communications officer for her fan club called the federation alliance which requires most of its members to do community service to make this world now a better place. I think that we should work at that future. That gene showed us forty years ago. The ideals can still survive within our minds and certainly within our communities as long as we work at it at some point for fans like atoms star trek shape shifted from a franchise to a kind of creed perhaps because roddenberry made. It seem almost plausible because it made use of real science and referenced real history or maybe it's because his founding vision was bound up in the belief that ultimately it is our shortcomings our passion our restlessness that will save us that as much as vulcan logic and detachment are venerated in the track world. It somehow better to be human..

spock emma mohegan sun casino Kathryn janeway Kate mulgrew Kirk kirk slash Mit raf henry Spock Spock kurt starfleet academy kirk spock kate mo christie fannin connecticut tim cavanaugh mr spock Jenkins kirk
Suddenly, the Brisbane outbreak looks a lot more worrying

Coronacast

01:41 min | 1 year ago

Suddenly, the Brisbane outbreak looks a lot more worrying

"Here in brisbane. At least nome. I mean snap. Three-day looked down which actively contradicts the headline that we had on yesterday's podcast episode. Does how does it feel. It's really weird to be back where we were coming into east last year like they've even close schools. My kids are going to be at high over the next few days coming into look and honestly a very selfishly considering what the rest of the world is dealing with. I really kinda thought we would have had this leaked by now like it's been more than a year. We've got vaccines like when are we actually gonna say them getting to the stage where we don't need to have a lock down because we're we're well covered by vaccination. Here's some people are saying. Well there be a lockdown or should they have done it earlier and the public opinion swings around a lot on this. And let's just take the the arguments for and against so. Let's just take yesterday's discussion just to justify ourselves in our existence. there's a good contact tracing system. They seem to be on top of it although there was this long gap between the medical registered getting of the princess alexandra and these new cases emerging so that's a lot of potential there for this to spread the did seem to be getting onto the didn't seem to be many cases and then what happened. What happened yesterday and it's unclear. What would have happened by the time. You're listening to this podcast. Krona cast war has emerged but it was just looking a little bit wild yesterday. Where you've got people who moved into new south wales who'd gone up to gladstone. Not being quite sure haven't tied down what has happened in terms of context context moving forward and therefore the logical thing to do was in fact just to lock down for two three days to contact. Tracers can chop hard. Though that

Brisbane Alexandra Krona South Wales
How Media Differs in Coverage of Trump Impeachment Trial

On The Media

05:24 min | 1 year ago

How Media Differs in Coverage of Trump Impeachment Trial

"From wnyc in new york. This is on the media. Bob garfield is away. This week. i'm brooke gladstone writing early on friday. My impeachment experienced this week was incomplete consisting of an incoherent improvisation in the first act. That's a rare. Bipartisan view and a clarion concatenation. In the second try listeners. Too often with a phrase like that. And you're asking for trouble but it's so good clarion a clear ringing stirring sound concatenation and interlocking sequence in this case in unbreakable narrative chain. Wow nd around the senate to extract a verdict of guilty. Some senators said they felt the case presented against trump built on months of his words and deeds climaxing in violent rampage. Black physical memory of trauma. Indeed the point was to convey the truth in body as well as mind and the truth is president. Trump had spent months hauling his supporters to a march on a specific day at a specific time in specific places to stop the certification. You will not be hearing extended lectures for me because our case is based on cold hard facts at trial we will prove overwhelming evidence that president trump is singularly and directly responsible for inciting the salt on the capital. They took away your vote. It's rigged that was not true. According to judge after judge the truth was exactly the opposite president. Donald john trump incited this violence. This is what the evidence has overwhelmingly shown. And we'll show in this trial. it's also the truth. There are evidence came from an impressive array of sources. fbi affidavits media reports capital. Police radio recordings along thirty second videos captured by documentary ins citizen. Journalists capitol security camera footage live streaming insurrectionists and the presentation of trump's own tweets as. They were posted during the attack to prove to at least seventeen republican senators that he had not only incited the january sixth insurrection but helped plan it they had originally planned rallies for january twenty second and january. Twenty third after the inauguration but donald trump had other plants on december nineteenth president trump tweeted his save date for january six. He told his supporters to come to dc for a big protests the day billing it as wild just days later women for america first amended their permit to hold their rally on january six. That was stacey plaskitt delegate for the united states virgin islands for the prosecution. Here's what the fbi said. And i quote other members of the group talked about things. They had done that day and they said that anyone they got their hands on they would have killed including nancy. Pelosi and that quote they would have killed vice president. Mike pence if given the chance combining cctv footage with a diagram of the capital. She showed how very close members of congress had been to the mob and they showed video of the senators themselves watching themselves evacuate including a very close. Call for senator mitt romney. He shook his head. He told reporters he had never seen. Not video. before. I saw senator bill cassidy and important republican in this whole proceeding still as a stone except for his pen which was moving in his fingers. Josh hawley republican senator from missouri. The guy photographed holding up his fist in solidarity with the rioters on january six did not brandish his midst wednesday. He just averted. His is all the senators. Have the option to use the gallery. And the upstairs area for seating for social distancing. Josh hawley is the only one taking advantage of that opportunity. He's been sitting with his legs on the seat in front of msn reading non-related material in twenty minutes. or so. i was in the chamber just now. i didn't see him. Look down really at all to engage. Rick scott tom. Cotton marco rubio read during the hearings rand paul doodles nor was fox. News keen to engage it. Cut away from the proceedings on wednesday as the prosecutors were revealing some of their most potent evidence.

President Trump Brooke Gladstone Bob Garfield Donald John Trump Wnyc FBI Stacey Plaskitt Donald Trump Trauma Josh Hawley Senate New York United States Virgin Islands Senator Mitt Romney Senator Bill Cassidy Mike Pence Pelosi Nancy
"gladstone" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

The My Future Business™ Show

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"gladstone" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

"And most of what we've been finding with the skirt strategies at lot of it has been individuals that are finding us and coming to your. We're talking to different organizations. You know there's a lot of that talk about it. But they're talking about it to check the box research talking about it to make the difference so exactly and i don't wanna be. I'm happy to help an organization that is really trying to move the needle on women and leadership or trying to help the women that are in sales in their organizations but but they really need to want to do this jewett truly versus just saying okay. Yeah it's kind of it. The in vogue thing to do it has to be a cultural shift for the remaining doesn't absolutely absolutely all wonder if if there was one piece of advice you could give to female talent that was up and coming but there were a little bit quiet as you mentioned earlier would be to one piece of advice that would apply to all female entrepreneurs give i'm going to give to if that's okay absolutely i. It's the first. Is you have to find your way. You're comfortable way to stand out and make yourself known so not. Everybody is really good about waving their hands and saying mimi me look at me you know. They're not good about talking about their accomplishments. But there's if you're inside an organization there's other more subtle things you can do. That can get you noticed. So that's number one and if you're an entrepreneur the same thing you can find some subtle ways that you don't always have to talk about yourself you can find people that to talk about you. The second thing is that is find a mentor. Meant to me. Mentoring is first of all. I love being a mentor. But mentoring is such a great way to learn from somebody in a comfortable environment where you know. They're not somebody you work with or fourth they. Might you might work with them. But you're not working for them and you can learn about their journey and they can be sounding board for you for you know for your business or for your career and i promise you if you find somebody that you think you'd like to have as a mentor if you ask them. They're going to be flattered and if they have the time they're probably gonna say yes especially another woman yes absolutely in. This is great. This is a platform that provides education hopefully builds the confidence to take the steps necessary to get your career on the front foot and get it moving and get some results for yourself now. What's coming up for you next a you working on any projects and what's well as i said we just launched the skirt strategy program late fall and so that's starting to really get traction and in the works is going to be another one..

late fall first one piece of advice second thing one
"gladstone" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

The My Future Business™ Show

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"gladstone" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

"What happens when you're in a hybrid or a more male dominated industry or office is a woman wants to take the time and build relationships and get to know the people in their team and bring some of that warmth as you said that empathy and and it's not again man can't do it but they don't see the benefit of it exactly and again it's part of it goes back to how we reach raised. Though too young girls were raised to be you know to share and to be quiet and sit back and listen and boys were raised to competitive things yeah boisterous and competitive and it was okay so it just perpetuates itself into the business world. Do you say that as the sexist goes through time that we coming to a point in hitting equilibrium in terms of opportunities that are given to women because historically. That's not being the case. As i i would love to rick love to say yes but i don't really think we can say yes. Then i think there are moments and strides in different industries and it pops up every once in a while. But i mean look you look in the united states in women are still i think Might be up to. I think we might have just Squeaked up to seventeen percent in in the in the c. suite but yet women are fifty percent of the workforce. So so yeah i mean i you know yes and you know and i think when you see you know whether you see You know the office in politics or the women that are running organizations and companies and things like that. We all get really excited. But it's still a hard stretch to get there and it's still a lot of painstaking steps to climb that ladder and make it happen. It's a journey with traveling for sure and certain alexis. Now i'm looking over your Lincoln canton i'm saying in your image. The skirt strategy. Just i'm interested. Could you share what this means. Absolutely i would love to so this has to do with women in sales so Colleague i we have a program that we launched late fall for women sales in it's called the skirt strategy and the reason we developed. It is because with both for experienced in sales one of the things we realizes. Most sales programs are.

fifty percent both Lincoln canton one united states seventeen percent rick late fall
"gladstone" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

The My Future Business™ Show

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"gladstone" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

"You know line roles operational roles in gr- she was given the opportunity but sh- it made her this great empowering leader who really sits and sits back and thinks about how things can be easier for the team how things can be easier for people and how can people make decisions and if you let them do it if you give them the confidence to do it. They're going to make the right decision and that's kind of her philosophy and i really love that. What about that examples that you can't boy experience. She's been on the ground doing all of the different roles and i think that that is says a lot about the individual. I know that there are a lot of female ladies. We're gonna be talking about more in a moment. But i'd love to know where it was the genus into lead with. Did that. come from the day. Are you tracking the name. Just the business in general and the business okay. So the business came about because in corporate america of which are spent quite a bit of time. I was lucky enough to have a lot of different types of experiences. An opportunity to learn different things. And i was always in the realm of being connected to human resources bernardin in not in hr. So i never really did the hiring and benefits and all of that which people think a lot about hr that was always in the tangential things doing training and leadership development doing or change so it was just natural for me when i decided to go on my own. Well when that opportunity was presented to me. I'm go on my own to take that and be able to take all that experience and do For a lot of different organizations versus one. That's excellent now. this is a very interesting name. Headed that comeback. I actually have a friend. That i to grad school with. Who is in marketing branding. And she actually came up with it for me. I spent a we Spent a weekend..

america bernardin a weekend one
"gladstone" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

The My Future Business™ Show

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"gladstone" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

"After six o'clock at night i I've really tried to take at least one weekend day. Where i don't do anything work. Work related doesn't mean. I'm not on the computer. maybe doing something else. But it's been a long time. I've been doing this since two thousand four. It's taken a long time to get there. to one. Danielle business audience alexis startups their small to medium. Size business owners who are looking for ways to improve their business. This is very much about an education experience for some for them from someone who already walked the path before them and on that basis. How important have you found his time away from your business has helped you be more productive. Do you think. Oh absolutely. And i think if you have the foresight and the ability to do it and set your boundaries. Whatever they are because you want to be able to your building a business as an entrepreneur because you it's probably something you're passionate about and so you want to be able to enjoy business and you want to be able to enjoy your family. Whatever or you know your personal life. Whatever that is and if you don't really think about it and set those boundaries right away. You really can't do that so i talk about. When i'm even coaching even coaching people in corporate america. I talk about that because we're just so connected these days. It's really hard to step away absolutely. We seem to be always connected. It's very difficult just to shut down even of an of an evening do you. Do you have a routine where you actually put your phone in another room inadvertently. The reason i sleep with my phone in my bedroom is because it's also my alarm clock so you know as far as but i do put it on your i do. Have it automatically go to silent. Ten o'clock at night and i actually stopped responding to friends at nine. I don't answer the phone if they call i don't get into text conversations with them That's just something that i've done for myself because we have to turn off because if we don't turn off we're not gonna sleep and if we don't sleep or not good to either our business or our family. Thank you for sharing as an educator. Yourself a coach. How important is continuing education for you. Personally oh i i. I'm kind of like a lifelong learner. I've always liked learning So even after. I did grad school and got my mba. It's still always conference can go to and now there's so much that you can do online. Even before the pain pandemic there was so much that you can do online in terms of online learning. I'm always liking to learn new things and learn from other people who have already done it a different way to do it. Absolutely do you. what's your modus operandi ahead of you. The best you live in front of people reading videos. What you'd think if i want to retain it i actually live is best for me but i have to do it. I i don't retain very well from reading. I'm i'm a very tactile learner. So if i don't do it. I'm not going to retain quite as much. There are lots of ladies around that we can look to. And i have several that i think about what business leaders earn sparring. You at the moment in the one that i've been Following a lot is mary barra. Who is the ceo and chairwoman of gm. She took it over when things were not. That great in terms of there was Some recall that was going on there was something going on and she was within the first year so she was in front of congress but what was great about. Mary is first of all..

Mary congress america two thousand first year Ten o'clock at night After six o'clock at night alexis mary barra Danielle nine one weekend day one at least four
"gladstone" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

The My Future Business™ Show

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"gladstone" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

"Rescued pets yes. She's actually a challenge. Compared to the other three cats had had in my life. She's yeah she's been a little bit of a handful. I think she was a little younger than the rescue. Thought she was. She was still very much a kitten. Yup which i'm not used to. I usually rescue five years or so is usually my favorite age when it comes to cats because they're fully grown so what about you. What kind of a what was your. What's your rescue dog lover. We rescued a rottweiler of audio. And he has been an absolute handful. I have to be truthful. We think that he was poorly traded. And he's come around. he's taken some time. We would get very anxious. He seems to be very skittish once. You get to know him and you understand. He's traits he. He's beautiful but i can relate to that with with the cat i love dogs too. I just have never had the lifestyle to have a dog in the city before pandemic used to travel a lot for work so i just never thought that spare for a dog. I love to ask these precursor questions again. I love to learn more bad my now when you were growing up. What what is the one thing that you remember back growing up that you really loved about anything about my family or just thing that really sticks out in your mind that you really loved well i took ballet for eighteen years fantastic and i absolutely which i think is why i love the live theater in their damp damp and things like that but i mean i would spend hours. That was my thing i mean. The older i got the more i spent at the dance studio the morissette spent in rehearsal and performing. And i just have the best memories of the people that were danced with my choreographer. All of that is just very very fond memories..

five years eighteen years three cats morissette one thing
"gladstone" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"gladstone" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Media. I'm Brooke Gladstone. So back in 1999. In my early forties, I had a modest individual retirement account. And my account manager was Charlie who made suggestions when I had money to invest. I must have had a speaking engagement that year, something because I had $1000 to put in and he suggested that I buy 65 shares of a $15 stock. Total cost 975 bucks called Gamestop Now following my portfolio, as it were tends to make me bored or worse, Anxious or worse. Still greedy. So I pretty much ignore it. My husband doesn't Back in April, he said, You still have game stop. It's $3.50. And I said, Yeah, yeah, just needle him a little. I added. Hey, you never know when your investment shrinks from almost two grand to 50 bucks because you ignored it. Rational move I reckoned was to continue ignoring it. Game Stop is a corporation that sells digital cartridges containing video games and also video game consoles and other fun widgets from brick and mortar stores to flesh and blood customers. It's a thing of the natural world and so must abide by its physical laws. Stock. On the other hand, video game retailer Gamestop is set to continue their heads spinning ascent. Today shares an hour. Absolutely not. If you look at the If you just look at the volume in the last few days, there's never been anything like it in his history. For most of last year, the company was worth a pretty dismal $250 million. But game stops stock has soared upward into the X O sphere ballooning the company's worth to somewhere in the ballpark of $20 billion. It's suddenly have a new strategy to overcome the fact that people could download most of what it sells. That in person retails sagging for years had plunged into a virus induced toilet. Would even that caused the crazy speculation we've witnessed. No runs like that are fueled not by reality.

Charlie Gamestop Brooke Gladstone account manager
Biden vs Trump - who's spending where in podcasts

podnews

04:01 min | 2 years ago

Biden vs Trump - who's spending where in podcasts

"The latest from our newsletter pod News Dot net. I'm. Donald. Trump I'm Joe Biden and I. True. I approve this message. How have the presidential candidates used podcast advertising in the US election McGowan? Says that trump virtually stopped spending in September and only advertised in US and culture shows Joe Biden on the other hand started in late August to he was officially announced as candidate, but he's advertised a lot on comedy podcasts. It's not podcasting but Netflix's could soon allow you to listen to rather than watch your favorite shows according to new code in the APP back on January. The thirty first news reader can randall notice that TV shows with audio description would make for a great podcast. Agree with them. Using clips of comedy in your podcast expect to knock on your door before too long spoken giants has a new royalty administration agency for the spoken word much like a music publisher earns royalties, for Song, composers. Reuters has released its Reuters Audio Survey Global Survey of among others at ten days of the Voice Global Conference Daily News podcasts an interview podcasts are among the content most likely to increase in demand. The survey says Music Radio and serialized podcasts less so and eighty percent believe voice connected homes will soon become the norm. In podcasting read ads work better than non host read ads says, new research from Nielsen. It's the fourth anniversary of the New York Times audio team. The team posted in on what they're up to PR X has published an excerpt from the independent investigation into systemic racism. At the company we linked to that today Lipson have demonstrated their much-awaited Lipson five podcast dashboard it features and. You visual look and feel for stats and Simpler podcast Publishing Inc. quarterly results have been coming out this week. Amazon's net income tripled here on spotify now has three hundred and twenty million monthly active users up twenty nine percent year on year twenty, two percent of them used podcasts, and that's up slightly from last quarter and facebook's total users in the US and Canada has dropped slightly. Transistor has added. One quick submission tools to podcast directories in India today is spotify. Podcasters Day masterclass in networking. Day with more than twenty five thousand creators having registered National PODCAST post month starts on October. The first goal of NAPA called pomo is to use the challenge of podcasting daily as a form of Podcast boot camp and Yvo terrors changed his mind about pianos podcasters who don't understand RSS Editing tools or podcast tech podcasters in name only I just as valuable he says as the more full stack podcasters. And podcast news for the US presidential election on the media's Brooke Gladstone and Bob Garfield will be hosting their first ever live election night show featuring expert interviews, music comedy, and reflections and reactions from the on the media crew. It's free to watch as a link in our show notes and our newsletter today. The second season of Doctor Death has hit number one on apple podcasts. This season is all about doctor Farid. Fata who subjected over five hundred patients to brutal chemo treatments. They didn't need just to collect millions from insurance and it unveils a rotten system that tried to protect him. And lots of non US podcasts out there that are worth a listen foreign policy playlist is a new show from foreign policy magazine that will recommend one podcasts from around the world each week into the host and plan excerpts eyesight here

Joe Biden Reuters Mcgowan Podcast Publishing Inc. United States Donald Trump Netflix Lipson Giants Nielsen Spotify New York Times Amazon Brooke Gladstone Bob Garfield Facebook
"gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"gladstone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Adjustments. Donating to Gladstone Research Institute to fight covert 19 at X chair dot com. When I was a kid that's been most afternoons riding a flying object around trying, not other people up there flying ostriches with my lands while occasionally stopping to pick up eggs and off course. It was a terror occasions. Show up in a tip to crash me out of the sky. He could try, but I had that chair tackles Lumber. Still, it was dangerous, Dangerous work, not for the faint hearted and I was good, very good champion of the realm. No one could beat me. No one could take me. Not for the high score any going, But every once in a while, some clown did Mans to briefly unseating for my flying. Something in my temporary absence from the action. For a brief moment in time. I was no more. Backstage, being less body less. And I always love this part. Is there a brand new me generated itself in another part of the playing field? No scars. No hurts. No pains, my trusty steed and I would leap. Back into the air. We joined the fray. Find the maggot, not this out of the sky and extract suit really beings. I loved playing house. I loved it. My favorite video game by far and I always wondered what it would be like. If there really was a backstage Ah, place or he come back from Reset. And realize.

Gladstone Research Institute Mans
"gladstone" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"gladstone" Discussed on KCRW

"I saw her perform at the Gladstone hotel I want to say and like two thousand five or six they were probably only thirty people there what can you tell us about that night just pure joy basically I was just like in heaven standing right in front of the stage what would you like to say the joint and Walter hi Georgia this is robin speaking I wanna thank you for inspiring me with tear your freedom as a singer and as a musician and just thank you for putting the beautiful energy into the world that you are constantly putting up and George and Mildred joins us now from her home in Las Vegas welcome to play forward I need to be here and thank you rob yeah I I would love to just first get your reaction to what we just heard from robin van well you know I remember this show this show was really it was really a that is so good to know somebody took something away from that so because every musician has had the experience of playing a big hall with a small number of people in it and feeling maybe a little deflated by that so how does it feel to know that that night with just thirty people there left Seattle mark all these years later on one of the few people who showed up you know what I think one thing I remember about that show was the quality of people who work there I kind of focus on that like sometimes you can play in the packed house and you don't need that to people this is why we was out and about mingle in the mix.

Gladstone hotel Georgia George Las Vegas robin van Mildred rob Seattle
"gladstone" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"gladstone" Discussed on KCRW

"Time for play it forward our musical chain of gratitude where we talk to artists about the music they make and the musicians they are thankful for last time we spoke with robin Dan she is the lead singer of a genre bending band called Bernice there from Toronto and they make music using found objects and jazz robin told me she's grateful for the work of R&B singer Jorja and Mull drought last robin to tell me about George's music the first time I heard her voice I just I just felt my whole body responding you know my whole spirit and imagination I saw her perform at the Gladstone hotel I want to say and like two thousand five or six they were probably only thirty people there what can you tell us about that night just pure joy basically I was just like in heaven standing right in front of the stage what would you like to say to George and older hi Georgia this is robin speaking I wanna thank you for inspiring me with tear your freedom as a singer and as a musician and just for thank you for putting the beautiful energy into the world that you are constantly putting and George and Mildred joins us now from her home in Las Vegas welcome to play forward so I need to be here and thank you rob yeah I I would love to just first get your reaction to what we just heard from robin van well you know I remember this show this show was really it was really a that is so good to know somebody took something away from that so because every musician has had the experience of playing the big hall with a small number of people in it and feeling maybe a little deflated by that so how does it feel to know that that night with just thirty people.

robin Dan Bernice Toronto Jorja George Gladstone hotel Georgia robin Las Vegas robin van Mull Mildred rob
"gladstone" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"gladstone" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Equipment researchers from UCSF and the Gladstone institutes have identified several drugs that may show promise for treating cove it nineteen their study published this week in the scientific journal nature focuses on drugs that work not by targeting the virus but the host KQED's Peter R. Cooney explains covert nineteen in viruses in general heat host to survive so researchers started by identifying the human proteins the virus uses to infect ourselves and replicate Nevin program is a professor at UCSF we essentially created a blueprint of how sars Kobe to hi Jackson requires the hold during the course of infection fifteen then tested drugs known to target those proteins the virus meets tests were performed in a lab on monkey cells so clinical trials in humans are still needed several existing drug showed promise including an anti psychotic to antihistamines and certain cancer drugs some scientists say a cocktail of drugs may end up being more effective can anyone alone Dr Peter Chen Hong is an infectious disease specialist at UCSF we probably need multiple drugs like we've done in HIV to be truly effective channel worked on NIH sponsored trial for the anti viral Mendes of year which he says could be used in tandem with anti inflammatories to combat covert nineteen the research is ongoing and Peter Cooney KQED news more than three and a half million Californians have filed for unemployment since the shelter in place orders took effect that's according to the latest report by the federal labor department while many Silicon Valley companies have weathered the storm and even made profits many workers in the south they have suffered Russell Handcock is president of the joint venture Silicon Valley an organization that tracks economic growth in the region those at risk industries you know wasn't talking about retail construction the service sector those those jobs comprise about twenty seven percent of our workforce and they are already or will soon be without that paycheck that they're accustomed to the scenic Hancock says the shelter in place order is not disrupting the tech sector as much as the majority of the work force is able to work from home I'm Brian what KQED news I'm Rachel my rope increase your support for KQED with a special twenty five thousand dollar challenge that ends Sunday night world press freedom day we've cut our spring pledge drive to just two days so don't delay had to KQED dot org slash donate and thank you.

UCSF KQED Peter R. Cooney professor Kobe Jackson Dr Peter Chen Hong NIH Russell Handcock president Hancock Rachel Gladstone institutes Nevin Silicon Valley
"gladstone" Discussed on Drum History

Drum History

08:55 min | 2 years ago

"gladstone" Discussed on Drum History

"These guys drummers have very rare DNA that we are willing to share ideas. Absolutely no guitar players. Don't do this base buyers. Drummers will just share anything with you and that's like so Roy. Nap was a phenomenal influence on in the Chicago area of what was happening and and taught many many students that went on to play drums. Set you know Barrett Dean's a very bad teams are very very famous drum set player that was also in several movies in a very very fast player. He was a student of Roy NAP. So this Roy. Nap had his own lineage. So if you if you would put together the big lineage. You've got molar gladstone. In stone kind of teaching Roy NAP in the Roy. Nap was the next generation. That from the Chicago area created his own lineage. Okay an actual recordings on the Internet of Roy playing and just the precision and the accuracy that he played with really deepened. Really exciting. Gosh Man. That's unbelievable it's an as we wrap up. I just I feel like it's different now than you. Just you might get on. Not everyone does this but you see where like maybe you go to Sam ash and you say I wanna take lessons and you get the teacher they give you. I mean these guys are like does it. It seems like you have to already be a drummer to get in with these guys at that point. You're like I'm going to take it like Freddie Gruber something. I'm going to take it to the next level Like I'm Dave Wacko and I WANNA get better is that or did they. Did they teach guys? Who were you know? This is my first day learning the drums. I'm a you know a twelve year old. Would you go to like George Lawrence stone and learn the funny you mention that because vic firth who was a different mind of for a well over forty years was a student? George Lawrence Stone at the age of thirteen. Wow Cool yes these guys. If somebody was interested in in learning you took it. So look what happened. You know he teaches. You Know Vic Firth Young Age and and VIC firth turns into vic firth he's so he goes up from there but I mean. These guys are just absolutely phenomenal players and all this information what. I'm doing is I'm working with Francioni. The new publisher by Drummer as had said they have recently announced they want me to be worldwide education director for modern drummer. Great and part of what this is is. I want people to want this information to stop being put into modern drummer. But also it's an educational program where each magazine has educational history and information and stuff to practice from this great lineage. And and I tell him you went to go and subscribe to modern drummer and go to the website. Subscribe to because now with the David Francioni at the helm. That's going to be a whole new level of twenty first century. Modern Drummer Information. That's going to go out and pull from the past and lay the groundwork for the future of the Twentieth Century. So it's very very exciting. So subscribe and get involved. Yeah that's extremely exciting. I like many people grew up on modern drummer and love it. And just by the name. You think it's all new stuff but I just there's so many articles of just great things like I remember learning about the painted drum heads all these cool things from reading. Modern Drummer So I'm a huge fan. Congratulations to you on that. That's all and I think that's a great segue as we finish up here. Why don't you tell people what else you got going on? Where they can find you. The sessions panel all that good stuff. Oh this the sessions panel on Youtube. I S everywhere I go there and subscribe. It is a good over two hundred interviews and I've got a phenomenal not for profit organization that is investing into trying to capture the stories of all these great musicians not only drummers but bass player's guitar plays a piano place. I've had the chance of sitting down to interview. People like Steve. Gadd vinnie Dave Wacko Stewart. Copeland Steve Jordan. I mean just you know. I was able to interview some drummers. That are no longer with. Us JOBLESS STOCKS IN CLYDE STUBBLEFIELD. A to a great jumpers from James Brown. I sat with them in a room together. The interview was fantastic. It was emotional and within a few months after the interview. They both passed away. Hal Blaine I interviewed. How Blaine a great interview with how blame this is? The man that played all the soundtrack of the nineteen sixties seventies and he played on thousands of recordings. He just passed away a year ago and just to hear his interview when I sat down with him. I said this I said how I'm from. Long Island when I started listening to music of the sixties and seventies growing up. I had like my top ten favorite songs and drummers that I would listen to that I would study little that I realized that you and nine out of those young drummers. They're all him probably une credited obviously like the beach boys and all this stuff I mean. And that's a whole that's all boys Elvis Tra. I mean just incredible the carpenters all that fantastic music so these interviews are important because we're capturing their story especially before hopefully catch it had before they had chance to sit down with Roy. Burns the Lakers. Who played with Benny Goodman for many years? Had the chance to interviewing Ed Shaughnessy. We Lost Ed. Also so some of these guys that we've lost and and indigo chance to who played with Billie Jean Michael Jackson. We lost him a couple of years ago. These interviews have been very very important to capture the stories then. I've sat down with not only great drummers but base plays Leland sklar Billy Sheehan you know Darryl Jones who plays with the rolling stones. I've sat down with some phenomenal players. Nathan East Great Bass Player Guitar players. Steve Vai what a great interview. That was piano players. Chick Corea said that with chick. Corea you gotta go interview just to hear how great it was the question. I'm asking him or not what it was like. We played with so and so I'm not. I'm not that that doesn't impress me when I went to know is how did you start. What books did you learn? What teachers did you have? How'd you practice you? Know what motivates you who listening to then who he listening to now. What inspires you when you hear. These people speak about that. It is deep passion at its best. So that's going on with what it is. I'm still teaching out of my at my studio at my home. And that's going on fantastic teaching using the Internet for many many years so this is going on to global students around the world that I have so. I'm still traveling. It's I'm still at the thick of it. I feel great physically. I'm sixty six years young and I have no plans of retiring. I don't use the R. Word for retire. I use the word reinvent. They say you're not retiring. You're rewiring exits executive and I've got to publish a company called wisdom media that I that I put together with a phenomenal partner. Joe Berg Amini who plays all the Broadway shows and he's got several bands that he plays with. We've got books out Hudson. Music Dot Com has a digital books outfit has the physical books. We've got more material coming out. There's more stuff happening at my desk pumping out stuff because I want the next generation to really understand historically what is there for them and that's where I feel. My responsibility is to do as much as I can. For the next generation to be a part of this great lineage. You're no slouch. That's for sure you're you're always busy. That's well man. I am just blown away by. I just can't believe this. Just the the the like you can just follow the lineage of all these great drummers and I think it continues today and I hopefully try to think that In some way that what we're doing right now is passing on those stories to another generation into people like I didn't know any of us so absolute and what you're doing is great because this allows my voice to be heard and hopefully in in many many years when I'm long on that when someone hears my voice as I'm speaking late now they can sense the fact that the information is still alive might not be but the information is still alive seek out the knowledge and be a part of a journey of playing art and playing music I say art is about expression music happens to be my language but drumming. That's my voice. Really wet soil about beautifully. Said well dumb. I really appreciate you being on the show. I will put all of your information where people can find you in a link to that chart that you were talking about in the show notes as well so people can check that out and I keep up with you and all that stuff and and you can find dom on Instagram. At global number two DOM Lots of cool stuff there as well. In addition to the sessions panel. And everything there so dom- thank you for being on the show. This is just been an absolute pleasure talking to you bar. Thanks so much and thanks so much that you seek your responsibility to make this happen in touch base. There are so many more stories we can do. So we'll have to look for part to at some point in the future fans that awesome. Thanks thanks so much. If you like this podcast find me on social media at drum history and please share rate lever of you and let me know topics that you would like to hear about the future till next time on learning. This is a win sound..

Roy NAP vic firth Chick Corea George Lawrence stone Chicago Freddie Gruber Hal Blaine Barrett Dean Youtube Dave Wacko Steve Jordan Steve Vai Lakers Ed Shaughnessy Dave Wacko Stewart Benny Goodman James Brown Long Island Sam ash
Searching for Treatments

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

05:43 min | 2 years ago

Searching for Treatments

"First let's talk about how our government officials are describing a drug called chloroquine. This has been something that's been around for many years. Been phenomenon strong powerful drug for malaria. But we think it might work on. This chloroquine is used to treat malaria and has been around for decades but it has not been approved as a treatment for the corona virus. Here's C. N. N.'s medical analysts and infectious disease specialist. Dr Selene Gander. This is not a slam dunk. This is early promising research. But that doesn't mean this is GonNa work. The president also tweeted over the weekend. That a related drug hydroxy chloroquine in combination with an antibiotic commonly known as Z pack. Could become game changers. This is largely based on a small study in France that excluded some people who either left the hospital stopped taking the drug due to side effects or got worse including one person who died. We still don't have enough evidence that these drugs are effective in humans. That's why in some states. They are beginning to experiment. Hydroxy chloroquine which the president speaks about his optimistic about and we hope for optimistic results. Also were actually starting back today. That's New York Governor Andrew Cuomo. He recently announced that the state had procured thousands of doses of chloroquine hydroxy chloroquine and would begin trials. Starting Tuesday the state will begin testing another experimental treatment using the plasma of people who have recovered. It's called convalescent. Serum what it does is it takes the plasma from a person who has been infected with the virus processes the plasma and injects the antibodies into a person who is sick. The other drug name being floated around is an antiviral called. Ramda's Aveer it's already been tested on adults diagnosed with the krona virus in the United States and China director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dr Robert Redfield discuss trimmed reservoir in congressional testimony earlier this month. We're GONNA know probably by April whether that drug works or not and that's important because that's a drug that can save lives if it works. Gilead Sciences which manufacturers Davir is pulling back on emergency requests for the drug due to overwhelming demand. The company is instead focusing. Its efforts on giving out the drug in clinical trials hoping to prove its effectiveness against Kovic. Nineteen I want to reiterate that we don't know how effective any of these treatments will be while a number of patients have already received drugs like chloroquine and Rim desert. It's too early to know how much of an impact the drugs actually had. That's why doctors are conducting studies in the United States China. And all over the world to better understand what happens when you give these drugs to a covert patient. Getting the results could take months. And in the meantime we have to be careful about creating false hope. A man in Arizona has died. After ingesting. Chloroquine phosphate believing that it would prevent him from contracting virus. Banner Health a company that operates acute care. Hospitals released a statement on Monday confirming that a man in Arizona had died. After taking a form of chloroquine used to clean aquariums. His wife is currently in critical care. Nbc News spoke to the wife who said they learned of the drugs connection to corona virus during a news conference on TV in Nigeria. Health officials issued a warning about chloroquine saying three people overdosed on the drug after hearing it described as a possible treatment. I can't stress enough. How vital it is that you don't use or consume anything unless specifically recommended by your doctor. You are likely to soon hear other drug names mentioned as well Nevin Creggan. A senior investigator at the Gladstone Institute of Data Science and Biotechnology in San Francisco worked on a study published last weekend that identified sixty nine existing drugs that could be tested against the corona virus in total. We identified three hundred thirty two proteins talking to or connected to the corner viral proteins and we identified a sixty nine different drugs and compounds that are known to target at least one of these three hundred thirty two a proteins and this corresponds to twenty seven different. Fda approved drugs and the remaining are in clinical or preclinical. Trials Croghan said testing out drugs. That are already. Fda approved could drastically speed up the process of finding a treatment that is safe and effective for humans. And then there's the prospect of a vaccine experts. Say One wouldn't be ready this year. Vaccine Trials take months or years in order to be proven safe and effective for humans and there are multiple stages of those trials but Grogan is optimistic that the global response from scientists now will set a precedent for getting to a solution faster in the future for me. I would argue. That will be seen as a new carradine of how to do science. And I hope we're setting up an infrastructure here that could be beneficial not just for covert nineteen but for the future for covert twenty two Kobe. Twenty four or whatever virus comes online over the next several years and they will be coming our best protection for now social distancing washing our hands looking out for ourselves and our loved ones trying to help out wherever we can and behaving like we might have the virus.

Chloroquine Malaria President Trump Dr Selene Gander United States Us Centers For Disease Control Dr Robert Redfield Arizona China Governor Andrew Cuomo C. N. N. Banner Health Gilead Sciences Gladstone Institute Of Data Sc Nevin Creggan Grogan France Kobe Kovic Rim Desert
"gladstone" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"gladstone" Discussed on KCRW

"And thrilled surprised and thrilled maybe a little confused they he's family recorded the big moment and they share this video with what is it what does ten grand kids go to the same school in Gladstone Oregon but that school doesn't offer buses next year to more of them will start their days with Doug aboard the grandfather express they have always talked about I wish we could go on a bus and that's what kind of started the idea Doug's wife Amy teaches kindergarten at the school it's a few miles from their house so she plans to drive herself because teachers have to get there so much earlier Doug will only be making the morning ran to school because he needs to get himself to work by eight thirty but the pickup schedule is all planned out the first one will be seven in the morning and then another one at seven twenty and then we'll be there for the drop off before eight the first wave of the grandfather express is scheduled for January sixth when the kids go back to school and then told us this is just as much a present for him as for the kids well I I think it's mostly for me frankly it's kind of selfish Republic because I get to spend so much time with them Doug he's of Gladstone Oregon spoken like a true grandpa sorry grandfather.

Gladstone Oregon Doug Amy
French court rules Steam games must be able to be resold

Daily Tech News Show

00:39 sec | 3 years ago

French court rules Steam games must be able to be resold

"Tuesday the High Court of Paris. The Nile Gladstone's stone ruled that European consumers are legally free to resell digital games bought on steam French consumer group. UFC Cake Wassira are filed the lawsuit for years ago. The court rejected steams argument. That steam is a subscription service noting that steam sells games in perpetuity not as part of a subscription e u law allows all goods including software to be sold used however valve tilled polygon it will appeal the decision and the decision will have no effect on steam while the case is on

High Court Of Paris UFC
U.S. prosecutors talking with accused Russian agent to resolve case

All Things Considered

00:55 sec | 4 years ago

U.S. prosecutors talking with accused Russian agent to resolve case

"In US stocks today, though for the week the US natural markets still posted losses. The Dow was up one hundred twenty three points today to twenty five thousand four thirteen. The NASDAQ fell eleven points, the SNP up six points. This is NPR. And this is WNYC in New York. I'm Sean Carlson, New York City officials say plummeting temperatures and an unexpected amount of snow contributed to widespread chaos last night. Marital Bazi city Commissioner said they were expecting one to two inches of snow instead of more than six transportation Commissioner Polly trot and Burg says without enough warning the city was not able to salt and plow roads, effectively this event had been described to something where it was not going to get below freezing. And everything was going to it got icy and not just on the George Washington Bridge. Bayonne bridge cross Bronx major Deegan. A bunch of places where trucks and cars started slipping and sliding marital Bosnia said there will be an audit of how the city and other agencies like the port authority could have reacted more effectively. Meanwhile, New Jersey transit has suspended service on to train lines due to damage from this storm. The agency says the north jersey coast line will be shut down until tomorrow morning. That's because overhead wires came down in Middletown that significantly damaged signal lines. The Gladstone branch will also be shut down until Monday morning. That's to make time for repairs to a signal crossing in new providence where a strain or a train struck a car last night. Nj transit. Bus and rail tickets and passes will be cross honored across the system and with private buses for the rest of tonight. Mayor de Blasio says he has fired the head of New York City's watchdog agency to preserve its honor and integrity, the mayor announced this afternoon that he removed department investigation Commissioner Mark Peters. The Blasios said his decision was spurred by recent report, accusing Peters of abusing his power the very top leadership at DIO. I've repeatedly undermined the values critical to its mission. My job as mayor to make a change. So that deal I can do. It's important work going forward. Tensions between the two men were high after Peter's issued hard hitting investigations of the city's housing authority correction department and child services agency earlier this year to Blasi reportedly the ordered his staff to find ways to get rid of him. The mayor has nominated the state's executive deputy attorney general for criminal Justice says Peterson replacement for the rest of tonight mostly clear with a low of thirty five wind chills between thirty and thirty five wind gusts to twenty eight miles an hour. Support for NPR comes. From the YMCA committed to opportunities for all and the belief that no one should be defined by zip code. They're born into details on the impact of donations YMCA dot net slash for a better us. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Ari Shapiro. It's another day of counting actually recounting in Florida across the state workers are counting ballots by hand in the US Senate race where Republican challenger Rick. Scott maintains a narrow lead over democratic incumbent Bill Nelson in Broward County this morning. Local election workers went through a PowerPoint full of instructions on how to decipher ballots that have been remarked with crossed out. Check marks even written on by voters voter marks

New York City United States Commissioner Mark Peters NPR Mayor De Blasio New York Bayonne Bridge New Jersey George Washington Bridge Commissioner Polly Trot Sean Carlson Ari Shapiro Commissioner Bosnia Audie Cornish Middletown Bill Nelson
Nice People Have Emptier Wallets

60-Second Science

02:16 min | 4 years ago

Nice People Have Emptier Wallets

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. Are you an agreeable person? You know a nice guy. If so, a logical follow-up might be, how are your finances? And here's why grabble people have lower savings. They have higher debt, and they're also more likely to go bankrupt or default on their loans. Sandra, Matt's is a computational social scientists at the Columbia business school in New York City and using a combination of questionnaires and Bank data. She and her colleague, Joe Gladstone found that people who score as more agreeable on personality tests have a better chance of ending up in dire financial straits. Especially if they're low income to begin with the researchers also combined personality data on millions of people in the US and the UK with regional data on how many people were unable to pay their debts. And they found again that the nicer account to your local areas. People on average, the worst, their finances. Matt's thinks one factor could be that agreeable. People just don't care much about money. Maybe they pick up the tab more often or loan money when they can't afford to their generous to a fault. So how do you get him to wise up? So one way that we could actually kind of refrain this as saying, like, you don't care about money just for yourself, but care about it for your family care about it for the people that you love. Because if you mismanage your money, it's not just going to affect you, but it's also going to affect all the people around you that you care about, and that you love deeply which might translate agreeable people's superpower which is carrying about other people into better financial sense. The results are in the journal of personality and social psychology. So if Matt's does succeed in teaching nice people to be more stingy, who's gonna pick up the tab, then it's like a metric, negotiating, right. Then it should just be more equally distributed. So if the repeal person said me says, nobody con pay all the time. I'm very happy to do that once in a while, but I also want you to kind of give something back because that's what makes it relationship a relationship. And not a one way street, which might mean agreeable. People need to get a little more comfortable having disagreeable conversations. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds. Science. I'm Christopher yada.

Matt Journal Of Personality And Soc Christopher Dodd Yata Sandra Christopher Yada Columbia Business School Joe Gladstone New York City United States UK Sixty Seconds
Abernethy Bridge, Adriatic Sea and Portland discussed on Mark Mason

Mark Mason

00:10 sec | 4 years ago

Abernethy Bridge, Adriatic Sea and Portland discussed on Mark Mason

"A woman is in stable condition after falling from a cruise. Ship and, surviving in the water for, ten hours the woman a British citizen fell overboard. May Norwegian cruise line vessel in the

Abernethy Bridge Adriatic Sea Portland Gladstone Ten Hours
White House wants to privatize International Space Station

This Is Only A Test

04:23 min | 4 years ago

White House wants to privatize International Space Station

"A new report came out this week about the ISS the White House announced earlier this year. They would like to stop funding the ISS by twenty twenty five. Congress would like to keep funding for the ISS through twenty twenty eight NASA currently spends between three and four billion dollars a year. Yes, supporting most of that goes to private contractors like Boeing, that does the actual sort of maintenance. Boeing has said that the ISS can fly with the components on board through about the end of twenty about twenty Twenty-eight potentially twenty thirty. And one of the proposal from the government is to privatize the ISS. The White House specifically has wanted to say, we should privatize the NASA, inspector general came out with a report saying there was basically no business case for private company would want to take over the ISS. There just isn't benefits because of how much money is. Outlaid by NASA to maintain this, and there just isn't the economic incentive for them to continue to do it. And the whole idea around privatizing I s maybe a private company would find conclave ings verses what NASA could do also lowers the outlay to NASA the taxpayers are making. But at this point they don't see many good options on the table. And so I think we're careening towards just the going into planned obsolescence, probably late in the late twenty twenties at this point. All right. Two more stories. And I think this is the best science story at the week. So right down the street, probably like five blocks from where we are. There's a scientist Shinya Yamanaka he works at the Gladstone institutes. He also has a joint appointment at a university in Tokyo a few years ago, he took skin cells like if we scrape some skin cells from Jeremy rate here and actually through a really specific technique was able to revert those skin cells into stem cells. This is good. This technique is called induced pluripotent stem cells in one him Nobel prize and his collaborators in two thousand twelve. This was a monumental achievement. Now, in Japan, we have our first human clinical trial where they're using skin cells reverted into stem cells and being injected into a human to re-grow neurons to treat Parkinson's. They have. Eight patients. They're signing up for this study where they're going to be doing this. The whole idea of this is sort of twofold is like if it's your cells, the rejection risk is goes, goes way down and because it's harvesting from this, it takes also the ethical implications of harvesting stem cells from an embryo out of the equation. They still have to like the palm from this going from the basic research to the application is is multifold one is how do you scale that process? Because it's not like I can just scrape Jeremy skin and like a day later have sells like. So there's been a lot on the manufacturer of this and then just the the safety of doing this, will this actually be efficacious? There is some hints that this could work for Parkinson's a limited degree. So I'm closely watching the study and what's happening with these patients. This could be like one of those massive breakthroughs successful that'll probably fall somewhere in between, but I think this is the most exciting study I've heard about a long time and yes, it's very limited sample size only eight patients, but we're talking about Parkinson's here. So it's normal. We should also acknowledge this morning, Ellen Alda one out on TV and acknowledged that he had been has. Been diagnosed with Parkinson's. He's known about it for a few years and he's been quite open about it. I in private but proclaimed publicly. And I, I think it's always interesting. We know the huge number of Americans are just global population that's affected by Parkinson's. But we have very few examples of this. You know, beyond Michael j. FOX now, Allen all that coming out and saying it, I think we'll have more and more talk about this in the future..

Parkinson ISS Nasa Boeing Shinya Yamanaka White House Jeremy Congress Japan Twenty Twenty Scientist Nobel Prize Michael J Ellen Alda Gladstone Institutes FOX Tokyo Allen Four Billion Dollars
The migrant caravan denounced by Trump will end in Mexico City, but some people vow to go on alone

On The Media

02:08 min | 4 years ago

The migrant caravan denounced by Trump will end in Mexico City, but some people vow to go on alone

"And the listeners who support this npr station president trump promised to defend the country from all threats foreign and domestic we just never anticipated that there would be free two day shipping we'll ask alexa what's up with that plus we'll talk to ohio governor john casick and columbus about the days when politics were saved mostly join us for this week's news quiz from npr today at eleven ninety three point nine fm wnyc from wnyc in new york this is on the media bob garfield is away this week i'm brooke gladstone it's not a that a protest creates an international incident but here we are the pentagon has now preparing options after president trump signed a proclamation directing the national guard to be deployed to the us mexican border the move to mobilize came after several days of tweets which the president focused his rage on a group of central american migrants who have gathered to travel through mexico many are seeking asylum there summer planning to seek asylum in the united states and a few are planning to cross the border illegally now the caravan which is over a thousand people coming in from honduras thought they were going to just walk right through mexico and right through the border on thursday after five days of tweeting about it trump said the caravan was largely broken up no it's not carrie kahn is npr's correspondent for mexico central america and the caribbean they spent all day wednesday with them and there are hundreds of men women and a lot of children many sick now if i can have that in this park it's a recreational filled with soccer fields and a couple you know swing sets and stuff in this small town in southern oaxaca state and they're still there and they're united front and they're gonna continue travelling north just how far north.

President Trump Oaxaca Soccer Wnyc Ohio Alexa America Carrie Kahn Honduras Mexico Governor John Casick United States Donald Trump Pentagon Brooke Gladstone Bob Garfield New York NPR Columbus Five Days