22 Burst results for "Girard"

Street Photography in New York City, with Gerard Exupery

This Week in Photo

06:36 min | 2 months ago

Street Photography in New York City, with Gerard Exupery

"Back to another episode of this week and photo. I'm your host frederik van johnson today on the show got gerard exupery. He's a veteran new york city based street photographer. That knows more about street photography than than or has forgotten more about it than i probably will ever know about street photography. We're gonna dive into that a little bit as well as what. It's like shooting in and around new york city now and before pandemic all that stuff going to talk about gear all this stuff so gerard. Welcome to the show man. How's it going very well. Glad to be here. Yeah it is good to hear man. I'm excited to chat. So we've got you know. The the john mara of photography. And then this genre of let's call it of photojournalism or that that world of shooting. What's the difference. What's the difference between street photography. And that i think that in journey with photo journalism you tend to think in terms of projects. Not just one image. You know a a series of images that tell a complete story and i think with straight photography. is generally just one image. Okay okay has got to tell the story one at a time. So let let's rewind back to the time to. Let's let's do origin story thing so cue. The flashback so the origin story of girard. Where what was that moment where you knew that. Okay i feel like. I need to be taking pictures of this. This amazing city. I live in well on my planet. We didn't really have photography. And when i came to earth. And i'm sorry all right more and you know it's funny. It's the only thing i've ever wanted to do since As far back as i can remember one of my earliest memories of my father staying his role affleck's in my hand. While i took the first picture took and which was a ship underneath the verrazano bridge and it just stuck in my mind. He passed away about a year after that. And you know. I it just all these feelings about photography and loss. Let's say i don't know all came together. And i just knew that this is the direction i wanted to go. Yeah yeah and it's a good direction. It's the world photography from my standpoint on of you agree with this but it's it's equal parts. Geeky ray is we like the technology and all that stuff and then it psychology you when you're dealing with the public and trying to get the right shot or get the shot or permission to do the shot and the you know the all of this stuff in between psychology science physics wrapped up into the time machine that we call a camera to fast forward to now the president or the recent the recent present. Let's call it like this last this past five five or so years me decade your adventures in and around new york city. The i can't imagine being a street photographer. There for just an extended period of time when i'm there is overload. It's just like what. Do i take pictures of two months. It's too much going on you get analysis paralysis. What would have been some of the standout experiences you've had in city over the past decade or so that you like okay. I got to tell this bar story. Wow pick were got to pick one. I think defining Well this is. It's further back than ten years but sure for for the finding event was i was involved in a robbery and a camera store. And it's a long story but rather traumatic thing. Somebody was killed and and i got roughed up a little bit and it was it was. It wasn't pleasant. But it was. After that i i realized well putting yourself out there making yourself vulnerable and taking pictures strangers asking or you know. I don't think covertly taking pictures of people is for me. It's just not right so if you're going to ask or you're just going to be obvious bat it you've got to put yourself out and up until that point I didn't know what i was expecting to happen but After that i figured well. What's the worst that can happen. I already found out what the worst that can happen. And it really It helped me in. Maybe be taught me to be very aware of my surroundings almost in a comfortable way though. So that okay. Let's not ever forget. I've gone into situations where drug dealers on a corner. And i was taking a picture of this house that was closed and abandoned actually in patterson not beard city paterson new jersey which is really exciting. We've got a water tower waterfall. There you go and a crappy movie was made by. Jim jarmusch bad it. It lasts two years ago and any case so i am standing there taking pictures and You know. I hear this guy walking up to me and it was interesting because there were like three. Get two or three guys on each corner but not the corner i was on the house was and i'm i'm taking pictures and i hit. This guy comes up behind the camera up to my eye. And i can hear him. I'm aware of him and he said. Hey what are you doing. I told them flat out. I'm taking pictures of buildings that have been foreclosed on You know and properties that have been abandoned families that have gone kicked out. And what have you. And he goes off and you know then he goes How much do you think they want that house i should. Oh i don't know but whatever it is going to be pretty cheap

Frederik Van Johnson Gerard Exupery John Mara New York City Geeky Ray Gerard Girard Affleck Paralysis Jim Jarmusch Paterson Patterson New Jersey
"girard" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

The mindbodygreen Podcast

05:53 min | 4 months ago

"girard" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

"I felt a lot better. I started to lose weight. I felt we. We lost a lot of inflammation that we just kind of head. We were carrying around for years. And so that was a big thing for me and then became more than just nutrition for us. It was for animal reasons inver environment and it just seems the way better. Wait to be for us. So it's funny. You mentioned flavor profile. I spoke to dan barber. The chef had blue hill hill stone barns the other day and this is going to air airway later and he was talking about a carrot and the way spoke about a carrot. He was talking about the different types of carrots different regions you start them about flavor and mike the nutrient density and would so interesting is. He came out at his restaurants. He has meet grasp out and grasp finished but primarily. He's focused on vegetables and he came at it from like this is just a better way from a better way to do vegetables and for him nutrient density is about flavor. Not like he's not coming at it from the perspective of nutritionist. He's coming out of this. Just tastes better. Yes actually and but it's better for you and it's better for the planet and the soil and so forth and so just like the way was talking about a character drama flavor proposal like wow. I never got a whole new appreciation for the carry. I'll send you characterize and so. I'm curious i'm working on becoming a better quote unquote chef or cook. What's a tip that anyone would benefit from. That will instantly make them better at home. There are some things that we've learned over the years and heard from students that have taken rigby courses and now switch that learning basic night skills is life changing seems so basic but it's the first thing we teach in a lot of our courses and just how to hold a knife properly had a do from the ruling technique. If you're moving to a better diet you're breaking down whole ingredients and you're doing that with a knife or machine like a food processor or a mandolin. Typically it's everything starts with a knife even in professional kitchens were just chopping you. Think of chefs doing dinner service. They spent five six hours in the kitchen chopping. And so if you're not shopping not eating well and i think we say here you. Are you cut not what you eat and so learning how to use a knife properly and it's it feels more enjoyable when you become good at using your chef's knife it actually like when you're in the kitchen you're like damn look at these knife skills. Yeah and then you just end up. Yeah and then. It's just pick a technique a week kind of thing i think of. Somebody's trying to start off or just learn the fundamentals if you like stir frying how to stir fry how to heat a walk and seasonal walkin at the ingredients in win and get your reason plus ready and just the very basics and then you can google any stir fry recipe and they all follow the exact same process same technique so learn it and then we have recipes that will help you apply. The technique can develop a of compensation fluency to that technique and then pick another one steaming sweating surf. There's a whole bunch of different things but we have a thing called technique wheel on ruby and on switch that there's not a lot of techniques in the kitchen and if you just learn one week within a matter of months you're going to be really competent and you're going to become a long confident and i think that's what makes cooking fun and more enjoyable and people want to do it and we're trying to do so. Let me ask you this Sure you've heard the saying from the wars and carnivores butter makes everything better. Some people is people subscribe to that. So is there something and plant based diet is a great salt or is it like what is there. One thing that makes accept manner and like you said about the carrot like the quality of the ingredients does matter but is there one thing not really nutritional east everybody talks about nutritional eating eastern mich and use a ton of cashews. I make a really like i make this photo. Chicken bouillon powder that uses a seasoning. I use it as my stock base and so having the right ingredients to make the dish does make a difference for schumer. But there's no one ingredient especially now that we've gone plant based like there isn't the one thing that says. Oh everything's better with butter or cream because now our repertoires so big unfortunately. There's a lot of great vegan butters us. We still have butter nerve shoe cream and mix cheeses and so you can really replace a lot of the things that you are addicted to or that. You're comfortable with for me. The hard thing dairy. When i first went even during the thirty days at a tough time giving up dairy for when he first on a personal them we i went. I was one hundred percent in october. A guy drank the koolade. I'm not going back and joe's i'm not giving up gary. I would like buy him. A carton of milk with like a picture of farm raised and everything and i would put a note on it and it's like hi. My name's sheila. Enjoy my milk on the outside of it to make a real. Yeah but then we watched earnings and then getting changed for us so in terms of a lot of people stock up now because of covid they make sure their pantries false. I'm curious what's your favorite go to shelf stable item we have grains and lagoons that are inexpensive. And you take them anywhere in the world and flame. Anyway you want and cook them in a variety of ways but seasonings in spices. Don's fo- sort of stock-based powder is something we use all the time and and onion powder in garlic powder we use a lot..

dan barber inflammation mike cook google schumer gary sheila joe Don
"girard" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

The mindbodygreen Podcast

05:58 min | 4 months ago

"girard" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

"Health supportive at plant forward cooking education tool for everybody in this episode. We'll cover the early days of john. Joe's first company to their certification to what's next for switch the future of intuitive plant based cooking something we can all get behind. Don joe welcome. Thank you for having us. Jason wall my new friends from vancouver. What of my foot of my favorite cities. So but before we get in to your story. I guess this is part of your story. I want to get to the y. You're both classically trained. Shafts i think in the context of covid with a lot of people are struggling are learning the cook from home. I think we can all appreciate a classically trained chef. Why like why did you guys get into cooking. What is it about that experience. Lead you down. This path for me was when i was really young. I was in my teens and my father used to travel a lot in business. And he's a salesman and go to high in restaurants and he didn't start cooking these high end meals at home and then eventually he saw that i had kind of interested in cooking and he took me to some of these high end restaurants. Where did tableside the chef will come out and cookie. Your table side and so i was just has arrived by that A very early age. I started cooking when i was in my early teens. Just be became something that i thought. This is what i'm going to do the rest of my life. I'm going to become a chef and so threes. that's how i got started just stories a little more glamour than mine. Mine was that pros and cons list. I had a rather significant car accident than than i was like. Okay what am i wanna do. My mom's a seamstress. I made a couple of dresses. I made a couple of fancy meals is like okay. Let's pick those two things. I did a pros and cons list of which one i would do and cooking out. And so that i packed up my bag in my little red geo metro and drove vancouver. And because i lived in victoria at the time and went to culinary school and yeah and then i became super passionate about cooking and it was definitely the right calling for me and so how did you guys meet. And it'd be working together. I worked at the hotel vancouver which was a cb fairmont property at the time. And i was jeff depart. Tean don was my prentice. We worked at the same hotel but he was a couple of floors up. I was in as sub basement with no windows or anything but it was a kitchen that a lot of had come down to get supplies g. She was an intern. That came into doing practicum as motel. We've met so look i. It's hard to ignore the state of the world right now and covid and one of the reasons why we're getting hit so hard and it's complicated. There are many reasons but go back to how chronically well we are unhealthy. We are in america. I referenced since before. Only twelve percent of americans or metabolic. -ly healthy which means eighty eight percent of us aren't and if you talk to anyone whether things we need to do to become healthier eat more plants. It's oversimplifying it. But in some ways it is that simple there are things we can do that eating more plants vegetables for immune system dopamine resilience among lots of other things. And i i love what you do at switch and your quote unquote. Big promise is an to provide basic health supportive and plant forward cooking education which gets to like the information education. Because i think there are a lot of people out there who want to eat healthier. Who wanna do cooking with plants to people say. Oh that's hard work like. It's so easy to throw a steak on a frying pan. But oh wait like what do i do with the carrot. That's difficult and so your mission is critical. And you want to get every person on the planet you want to help those people the people who wanna take control of their health through food and cooking especially when we're all so many so many of us are still home so like talk about the why there and like why plant based for you guys like the. Why like why the mission why plants. Yeah well i'll start out by saying why not plant but it's a bigger question that and if you go back to taking our passion for food into building this company we started with ruby which is an online cooking school in two thousand and five and why we did that is that we are trained chefs and culinary school you learn basic cooking techniques and cooking fundamentals and methods and then you may use recipes to practice those techniques but how the world was learning at the time was completely backwards so we had just come through a food network era where everybody thought food was sexy again and they wanted to become cooks. Go by cookbooks. And that the lacked the skill to execute recipes. So we thought let's bring a professional cooking school to the world. Let's democratized access to education for everybody and teach them the right way so stepping back from a recipe and learning how to properly use your knife in a pan in a pot and develop flavor and stevens In all things that chefs learn. So that's how we started it and then fast forward to two thousand and eleven or twelve for us being french trained chefs. We need a lot of butter and will products and any better. I got at that time with all of those things. Yeah and we had a lot of users. Asking for more plant-based recipes vegetarian recipes healthier food. We to be honest with you. We fought it at that time. Because we're french trained chiasson said. There's no way we're going to do that. But there was enough demand for its without. Let's live it for thirty days. And so we got rid of all the animal products from her fridge and we stocked up on whole foods and galley plants. We dove in watch documentaries talk to doctors and long story short. That was nine nine years ago. We never went back. We learned way too much..

Don joe Jason wall vancouver jeff depart Joe john victoria america chiasson
"girard" Discussed on Desk to Quest

Desk to Quest

04:24 min | 5 months ago

"girard" Discussed on Desk to Quest

"Ladies and gentlemen welcome back to desta to quest. I'm super excited to share this episode. Featuring evan gerard with you. And here's what you can expect on this episode. We cover avon's journey from small towns to schedule on to competing on the international stage and both biathlon and off road triathlons. We talked about lavigne's completion of the absolutely insane. Everson challenge we explore. Evans heroin near death experience vancouver island's highest peak and we chat on a few more goodies in between so grab your favourite bevy and make sure your buckling up and checking airbags because this one is a wild ride. A do this a little bit differently..

evan gerard vancouver island Everson heroin lavigne Evans
Girard's late goal lifts Avalanche over Hurricanes 3-2

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Girard's late goal lifts Avalanche over Hurricanes 3-2

"Marine Samuel Girard's commandant goal two David thirty Berger seven left has to play ordered broke all a two Confederate two tie lift flag in the Colorado stickers Avalanche and other over paraphernalia the Carolina hurricanes to be three removed to two from marine Tyson corps bases Jost scored around in both the first the country and second period starting for Colorado this weekend to get them a a two spokesman nothing lead says after it's forty not due minutes to any one table incident teravainen although scored recently twice in the third for some Carolina members of the but military Dre are ultimately happened caught scored participating the game winner late in white papel supremacist Francis made activities forty five saves in the the win removal for Colorado of Confederate symbols the asset is three part points back to of Saint a sweeping Louis for the top cultural spot in the central change division with the commandant eighty three announced Carolina last is two week points back including of Columbus plans for the to final recruit wild more card women spot for in the east combat was seventy four jobs Dennis expand **** Raleigh maternity North Carolina leave and restrict marines convicted of domestic violence Jackie Quinn Washington

Samuel Girard Berger Jost Colorado Louis Carolina Marines Jackie Quinn Washington David Marine Tyson Corps Columbus Raleigh Maternity North Caroli
 16-Year-Old Girl and Baby Son Missing From DC

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

16-Year-Old Girl and Baby Son Missing From DC

"A sixteen year old DC girl and her six month old son have been missing since Friday and DC police are asking for your help finding them can I afford in her son's Amir will last seen on Girard street northwest in the Columbia heights area about one o'clock Friday afternoon we have pictures of them both right now on WTOP dot com anyone with information is asked to call DC

DC Amir
"girard" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

13:17 min | 1 year ago

"girard" Discussed on Venture Stories

"That kind of contradicts the the idea that you have to stop engaging in reciprocal acts of collective violence. I just want to know i mean in particular sir. Can you think of something because i have the <hes> the <hes> the the argument against it as much as i'm asking is there buyout intuitively lead sounds very true and i. I'm a believer in it and i'm pressure testing it. Is you know for it. I guess is the burden of proof to prove against insiders burden of proof <unk> again. I don't i don't i'm sure there's you can poke holes in it. I think trying to think of a good <hes> <hes> even within majority and scholar camp where what are the major disagreements. If any i've noticed that a lot of them seem to kind of assume that that the state they kind of acknowledged that it has a sacrificial component but it's like a necessary. Sacrificial is the tuition that we have to kind of live with. Just try to ideologically reform it so i've noticed there's a left leftward tilt a little bit with some of the fans but i see a lot of variety so again in see. I want to be clear. I'm not saying the answer is abolished government tomorrow. It's just we have to culturally early. Lose her appetite to purge this ugly behavior out of our lives. We are cultural campbell's cannibalizing each other all the time. We want to have more more money. We get ten million. We weren't fifty million. We want a billion now. We got a billion. We looked at the guys making ninety billion. I gotta get to that level. It's never enough. It's just cannibalism elizabeth consuming consuming. It's like drinking saltwater to to quench your thirst. It's just it's just it's a fool's game so we're gonna make you thirstier and s what these designers do their like cannibalistic little attempts to try to consume the being of another and we do that relationships we use people as tokens of status or tokens of of prestige or whatever and we consume they're being and it it leaves us unsatisfied that leaves us depressed anxious and so we medicate out in mid we numb ourselves from this this anxious digital despair that the more money we have and the more acclaim we have. We feel just like elvis presley. Who said i get so lonesome. In the middle of a crowd here's the king and his lonesome as hell and that we all feel the more power we get the more the cheerio mimetic conquest that we achieve it feels good but then it always has this little after this little hangover feeling we just <hes> just not enough. Give me what i thought it would give me when i saw the models having it that i think i achieved parity with you know and that cannibalistic a ballistic matrix one upmanship that never ends jesus saying look. Don't devour each other. Don't do like your age to ancestors. Thursday ritually cannibalized each other. Just eat me be me. Be me and watch how it will positively spread and page asli in your life in your relationships and your job in annual society. You know if if you're if you're a c._e._o. <music> over company and you're modeling narcissism or passive aggression or you know delusional usual kind of <hes> you know obsessions with things that are that are not really for the best interest of the mission of the company i mean you're going to you're going to create great medic culture of people around you that are going to you know that that that pattern going and it's not it's gonna. It's gonna poison the workplace environment over time and <hes> that's you know so. That's something you have to think about it. If you don't have to be mother theresa theresa it overnight to to practice imitating self sacrificing their two big questions. I wanna i wanna close on one is is quote. We have <hes> god technology medieval institutions palaeolithic emotions and so the user of upgrade the work on emotions are on the institutions one thing we haven't talked about as it relates to scapegoated that some people think may make it easier to i approve. This aspect aspect is changing identity from something. That's you know full name and explicit something more sudani mus and fluid and sort of makes it more difficult for cancel. Oh culture to to take place. Do you have any thoughts on that. I mean i think it's a great. It's a great option the problem with that becoming like the the main way we all saw all this stuff is that to me is it reminds me. The only thing i could see there was the the sacred games and rituals that would be done prior fire to a sacrifice and that would be <hes> so so in ancient community again. You've got this primordial scapegoat murder. That is the founding mechanism by which all these different different ubiquitous cultures in ancient primitive hominids cultures kind of fall into it could be like you know there's evidence that have <hes> ritual cannibalism cannibalism of a fallen alpha chip so we can see proto sketches of this mechanism in animals that have more mimetic wiring closer to us but still far away from our our ability the medically do things <hes> so then we see the pyramids which looked like a grand powell of stones right so they give us a clue these pyramids that's all over the world of these communities there what's in the middle of them a dead body at a cane which is also a god and so run as rod says we we didn't in humanity didn't invade tar god's we deified victims right and so that's what we've done all these monuments of power and structure at the roots we find hidden in its akra ffices remember recently. They looked at the top of the mountain where greek legend has it that zeus was born and they found the remains of a teenage boy at the top of it. I like to point out that therein lies the grand jury zeus in all of human anthropological glory a a hidden shivering teenage boy. Maybe in front of a lightning storm one night dying for the good of his people in jesus has come to expose that lie hi. I'm not saying that look guys. I know you may be a concern that this is a religious thing but i'm trying to tell you. This is an anthropological reality. Not jesus is story about uncovering the hidden victims of all of our cultures and by working our way out of that system not in revolutionary violent flipping of things like the some of the ideology wanna do in modern times but rather in kind of a bold courageous snap out of the bystander effect of going along to get along into saying all this nonsense just because one of fit in with a fashionable cashable trends of blame and shame and casting our shame onto the backs of a of a convenient enemy because guess what it's not only bad but it won't won't work because of the story of jesus it's going to continue to infect shape and undermine our ability to create midi but the idea of using a student and i don't like about that as as a solution for is i feel kinda like a stopgap because again it reminds me of the rituals that that societies would do do in remembrance of their primordial scapegoat mechanism that they unconsciously stumbled onto that their ancestors did so so you stumble onto this mechanism that relieves tension by killing a common enemy and then over time. It's orally remembered in an it's told through stories. The reason becomes a mythology and so the scapegoat becomes a hot because he brought people together united the people in a transcendent way. I mean he gave that wonderful. The feeling that you feel again when you're a kid watching star wars in the bag is beaten and you're like wow that relief is god like transcendent feeling that people felt in what what much more primordial and this r- away in ancient times so eventually that story is told in myth in its theology in its projected into the sky is god's doing these things but the ritual sacrifice would always usually take place after <hes> festivals and a festival would be like a carnival level or where they would wear masks and they would dance and they would have orgies and feasts these are all acts of undifferentiation she -ation right if you have a feast and you don't know who brought who to the feast table <hes> it's an act of differentiation because one guy could have brought a yam and the other geico brought a whole turkey or to a whole suckling pig and another woman brings a big old. You know a tray of large amounts of food and it feels like one. I was as angie person. The other person was contributing more. That's a crisis of undifferentiation that caused conflict when it's done on a regular basis right daily basis and so when you're talking about the pseudonyms i'm not saying that's the attention but i feel like it may actually open up an opportunity for more bullying more nastiness and and more awful things being set on wine when people have that anonymity when they don't have the skin in the game because it it's gonna create this on differentiation in which people can let loose and are taken orgies urges of aggression and nastiness and edo trips and stuff and there's no consequences and so they would do those on differentiation rituals and then they would conclude it with the ritual sacrifice of a person and that was a recreation in a microcosm scale of a process that they stumbled into through hundreds and thousands of years of of cultural memory. You say to me you know just and that's you know fairly short term but while we are talking about your the future here and we mentioned how much the world today is still very much as far by religion as it'll zoom out there have been <hes> you know species before humans no let me species after humans and whether that's you know <hes> ten thousand years now you know hundred thousand years from now thousand years now hundred years from now humans will will have their place place in let likely make maybe degree about this but i'm curious if we will need new mythologies <hes> or or or our existing technologies will will adapt to handle handle a and some of these other technological innovations that we don't know how to make sense of today that they come if it went well. I'm sure there's a lot of really smart nonreligious sophisticated people that would love a god. I'm sure they're just waiting. You know why do we. Why are we so sure that we figured out that again. I've been talking about jesus from an anthropological level in that means you don't have to have any invocation of god but why are we so sure that you know we really are the penultimate entity of the universe and the only thing we can do is unleashing a._i._b.'s that will probably devour us at some point. I just think it's so a product of our times that we should be very skeptical optical of that you know that we should be very open to the fact that we barely know anything about the natural world. I think we're totally a find out that so much of the foundation of our sciences we have this tradition of role models that present themselves as agnostics atheists or people who are you know not prone to superstitious there's lights and the belief that god that created the world or whatever and so because our society believes that the smartest people in the room <hes> who have been at the forefront front of scientific laws discoveries because most people in the room of our recent history are not believing in god therefore you know if we wanna aspire to be smart and sophisticated we would be well to kind of imitate minute their assumptions as well. I just finally reject that. I i just fundamentally reject it. I think we bake in all this expectation of despair into our pictures of the future but i.

elvis presley theresa theresa geico campbell murder a._i._b. rod angie hundred thousand years ten thousand years thousand years hundred years
"girard" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

11:57 min | 1 year ago

"girard" Discussed on Venture Stories

"True. It's just it's just a lie and we we wouldn't want any way to starve our family just for the greater good of us to get rid of trump right. I mean that what we want the whole world do to us. If you don't like trump for example it was just going to sanction and star of america until we bring them to the knees. They overthrow him. Whoever hero next little euro scapegoat in chief to be put in next i mean this is stupid. We don't sanction we don't sacrifice human flesh and blood because we don't like the leadership did they have this process and it's something that i think cultures that are not as inflected and not as infected with christianity. It's gonna take some time for them to work out their political systems to make them. I mean we're we're look. We're no country to judge at all but but it's just it's a story. It's a story process. It's a culture process where your culture and if you want to get rid of a bad government your culture has to lose its appetite for strong governments based on sacrifice and how do you get that way. You have to have a culture that has constantly being inundated with stories about the idea that jesus said it's it's god desires mercy not sacrifice and a story that always tells the vantage point of the person who lays down on his life rather than <hes> sacrifices what happened in the movie of an and globalism is spreading this christian in this christian aesthetic on a subconscious level all over the world very rapidly because i mean that's why the avengers is such a big hit. It's a global hit but everyone of those big top box office. Movies are all myths that are seasoned or if you want to say another word they're infected by this christian concern for not sacrificing facing your opponent by the end of injures. Someone has to lay down their life. As an order to destroy the enemy doesn't he doesn't make it doesn't strike the enemy down and a that's a unique story of judeo christian tradition and it has an effect on how that culture slowly but surely starts to see await. We need to have a protection for the individual await that means we need to protect the person against the crowd when it comes to whether they're greedy or whether they have you know bad speech that's uncomfortable or or they think a different theory about science or they were they. You know they pay their wages. Just below the minimum wage we've decreed or or they do a drug we don't like or they do sex work or something like that. They have to get to that point and that happens through the transmission of storytelling which undermines myth and myth is all about concealing and justifying might makes right. It's all about salient justifying the monopoly use of violence <hes> to maintain a sense of transcendent unity and peace and identity so that's you know that's what has to happen. It's all these cultures are going to work this out in different in different stages of our history that we're going through in tap it that that story of of the of the wine <hes> refusing to <hes> to accept the accusations of the the crowd that jesus gave us that story of the gospels is going to continue to infect it undermine systems of strong governmental power all all over the world by globalist by the downstream effect of of the christian motif in theme infecting. Even the storytellers of you are hollywood movies and in that kind of thing so it's it's like these structures again. The the bumpers of history are coming off and they're coming off at different paces depending on how long coaches have been steeped in this particular story and we have a radical choice what we're going to do in the midst of that so just saying it's not like we're on autopilot here. We have a radical choice about how we're going to work this out and just because i'm i'm not saying that the west is like not as violent because it's had this christians story. You know i understand that it's it's used the advanced nance technology that they've been able to discover because of their weaning off of older forms of scapegoat violence. It's used as technological advantage to do <hes> more pernicious at exploit of acts of violence against other countries no doubt by that's just the process of humans. They're very slow to let go of violence and collective violence right with his also this fear that if if you don't they will destroy you like you if you're too kind you'll be taken advantage oven and the specter of hitler only seventy years old <hes> years ago <hes> irradiators. Here's go prevents presents sort of that that challenge than any type. I mean you know like what why do we go into world war one. That was just a total sacrificial insanity insanity that movie by peter jackson you know they will never grow old which was just world war. One footage re colorized restored and they just show the battle footage. I mean it's just it's just an absolute stunning. A meat grinder of sacrificial madness are but people with time they really believed in it. They the soldiers to die as sacrificial fodder for some insane machiavelli ian might makes right religious desire which the government is and so what happens in there after fact right it creates this condition for hitler to be blowback for that right. So do you see how that's the medic reciprocity the property so sure yes obviously if you could. I'm not against. I'm not a pacifist if bonn hoffer you know these people were trying to get rid of hitler. I take it you know. Is that sacrificial. I don't know if he's engaged acts of violence. We have the ability to to physically restrain him meaning the only way. Are you gonna physically restrain him his killing because you arrest them. Get them out of his castle without everybody killing. You know what i mean if you're trying to be an assassin i think there's a there's an argument to be set for that right but the the idea is a defensive force in my opinion is not scapegoat but but the problem with that is that people start or aren't you give them an inch which they wanna take a bow and say okay therefore we can invade saddam hussein. No you can't is what you do. You did nothing but create more chaos more violence and why do we always quote martin luther king and all these people that are talking about jesus and yet. We don't actually apply it to anything that relates to our real life. You know it's like we always quote that. Little mean you know hate cannot drive out hate. Violence cannot drive out violets that martin luther king says and then we don't even apply it. You know say say saddam hussein's violet so let's go invade ate him and then that'll solve. No violence will not drive out violent. So why did we even do that is because you know we we just surrender and which is hypnotized the ties by our this bystander effect this collective bystander effect to just trust these high priests that we call politicians by the way in ancient times the priests could be sacrificed to if they did the ritual wrong they could be sacrificed you know and just imagine chris farley early chris farley character trying to go along with the ritual of sacrifice and they and they knock over the sacred bowl of trip over the knife. The knife dangles down and falls down in the whole rich was just totally ruin. You know what trump is by the way that's what he's he's ruining the sacred aura of the state hey and that's why most of the common tactic than have to do with each just presidential which means he's not hiding the knife of the state but darn it. It's like it's like a movie. He's turning on the light during my favorite movie and it's like imagine going to midnight premiere of star wars at back in those movies we're coming out and you have yoda come onto the scene and he's fighting or something and the crowd that you know the hardcore fans are going nuts and someone just turns on the light right when they have right which is what trump did the politics interesting going back to the martin luther king quote you you mentioned it's hard to know whether to take that quote literally or or take that as literal quote sort of a normative a predictive quote like the world to be this way and not just like but also the quote you know. The arc of the universe bends towards justice is a literal quotas. Is that a normative quote or the quotes like i last year before. I guess that's more more normative. Sometimes it's it's hard to know you even drives like how much of this is is literal rooted in fact or rooted in biology verse <hes> or something that that we wish were true and that's why when it comes to shove you know we go towards violence because we think that will actually work and they'd be right well but i mean so if we we adopt this idea that we have to keep initiating violence before somebody else gets us there. By what standard can we ever condemn liam any act of if we say look we have to <hes> sang center or bomb someone like saddam or assad because of what they are doing to their people or what they could do to us down the road. That's that preemptive. Violence logic behind drug war right idea is if i have to put this the person who's high on heroin into a cage with actual violent people where he may be assaulted or she may be altered and i have to do that because it's better than that one man or one woman heritage for the sake of the many and if i don't they might get high and they might run into a home come and go crazy and steal something or they might hurt their kid so we have to preemptively always initiate the sacrificial mechanism in order to to try to stave off potential future violence but it's always ally you know because again. I haven't played for defensive violence. I think if a country is trying to invade us. I don't think it's sacrificial violence for family too. You know <hes> you know put together a plan to be a part of a war effort to defend their their mantra from being terrorized and assaulted and rate. If someone's attacking someone you love. It's not an act of violence for you to grab the attacker. Put them on the ground around you know and if they're struggling done and you have to get the gun and it goes off and it goes on. I don't think you did anything evil in that. You're doing what you can to physically stop <hes> the the the assault and the violence against someone but but then you can't extend that to mean there's somebody in another neighborhood that looks real ugly ugly and dangerous and they're hurting their family. I heard they're abusing their family so i'm just gonna go into their house and killed. That's what we're doing with foreign policy right someone turning our assads in another neighborhood. He's a bad guy here. He's beating his his family so we're just gonna preemptively go in there and shoot and kill us oughta. Take him out. We have no idea about the context of what s going to do when we do it. We just think we're we're the sacrificial avenger of the whole world that the government is a mess messianic type of sacrificial force and so therefore it has that kind of privilege to do that so it is you use the term throughout anthropology asia and i'm curious why use that instead of by <unk> evolution valerie. I guess i'm just curious to what extent do the other people who disagree with gerard on a biological evolutionary surgical terms that that you find are sympathetic with what's a biological based argument that.

martin luther king saddam hussein hitler chris farley america us hollywood assault peter jackson gerard heroin liam assad seventy years
"girard" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

12:26 min | 1 year ago

"girard" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Driven solutions love driven solutions to bind ourselves together. We have to glue our communities. <hes> we have to glue our communities around nonviolent tolerance even for rich people run a lot of people on the left. They're mad at the rich and they're rich themselves many times and maybe that's why they're mad but they've got to learn to kinda learn to love the poorest of the poor in the richest of the rich because the kingdom of heaven in the kingdom of heaven everyone's equal at the table right. I am not a person who believes in just get rid of you know our institutions uh-huh of sacrificial violence that government does and just be happy with the status quo no obviously the west has a lot of true concerns. We all want a pollution free environment but i would say that if we would learn to stop looking towards politics and government from it coercion then we would have the opportunity to look around challenged the group that we have about how the natural world works expressig maple and we might find that we can create clean energy too cheap to meter without meeting a single government subsidy or a a single government central command policy that would be so much more cheaper so much more readily available for everyone and i i. I actually think it would be a lot easier to do but we're so fixated in our mimetic rivalry over the common objects that we find scarce which is political power right and that's why half the country feels like they're living in hell right now because they're guy is not in power and they feel like they're being occupied side by a foreign enemy right and it's because we're so mimetic league rivalries that it feels like we've just been conquered when when when wouldn't such a powerful government you know has this winner-takes-all system where it's like one team wins and they're just gonna rub the other teams face it. It's like no no the way out is to stop desiring the same object of your neighbor of your rifle to let go of your desire for political power over arrivals in to sacrifice your own pride in a knowledge that so much of the natural world that we think we know and we think we've figured out is so completely unknown. I read this book recently. How richard dawkins got owned owned. <hes> andy basically talks about how he thought he was sort of <hes> overthrowing christianity and yet he just you may have taken some part of it but you he sort of christianity by another name. He's so invested with the ideas that represents. You can't even see it right. You don't escape religion. That's my point is. It's like if you're atheists escape religion. If you believe elizabeth warren is going to save your life or trump. You're not religious because gotta understand what religion religion is. They always make it out to be oh. It's this famous fanciful metaphysical stuff. No no no. That's not that's how that's how they use that to justify. We'll all i am you know i believe in science have these dogmatic beliefs and and which settled what's not settled in there is no consensus consensus the enemy of science a descent. Don't you know courage to challenge hundreds of years of scientific inherited wisdom. That's what true science is about an obviously in in that process. You're going to get a kooks and you're gonna. You're gonna get weak. You know when you have we you're gonna get tears growing up in the in between the week i right and got a separate week from the tears but that's the process of human creativity left process of discernment. That's the process of being alive and freedom. It's not the process that you get with our one-size-fits-all system today and my understanding of anthropology has corrected my understanding of the world of physics and downstream from that chemistry and downstream from that tremendous technological things that we could do in the market system you know peter thiel has a great line says we haven't done anything in the world of atoms right. We've done everything in the world. We've done all this innovation in the world of bitch. <hes> you know that's where all the innovations taking place but very little has happened in the world of atoms and i would answer that by saying. We don't know what an atom is. That's why and that's it's for another topic but but it's just just really want to sink in how this understanding of mimetic theory can really help oriented oriented in how we have conduct. Our personal lives how we get along in the workplace. I've written articles about workplace conflict and how to resolve that how to set up an organization as a small business using mimetic theory as a toolkit to avoid waste and avoid senseless workplace drama my and <hes> inefficiency and then you can apply it to politics and understand why it's a wacky and weird and then you can apply it to to a a more narrow scope which is even bigger some sense like a how politics and government has retarded scientific development and it's not that ah intentional things it's just that human beings are more prone more owned by groupthink forces than we possibly even imagine asia and you don't just free yourself from group thing but you have to be cognizant of how much blind spots we actually have as a society daiei that if we start to eliminate our sacrificial behavior start to look outside and say okay hey i'm not going to rely on a one-size-fits-all clean energy deal that will pick some losers for wind farms and solar panels and stuff. I'm actually going to just challenge the the foundations of the atomic model when i do that able to uncover ample opportunities of experimentation or radical of clean energy technology that would not require us abolishing the last vestiges of a free market in the same thing goes for healthcare. Why haven't we solved the war on cancer cancer right nixon declared in the sixties. Why haven't we solved that. Well you know in my research because mimetic theory gives me this this prison to look outside side of groupthink and look for those little galileo's that would be otherwise scapegoated if they tried to present too much i can look and see people like a great great team at england in the university of salford. A guy named michael pila santi who is using antibiotics cheap f._d._a. D._a. Cleared are generic antibiotics doxycycline which is used for acne treatment and as roma aisin which is called z pack a common antibiotic people use and he's using them in conjunction with vitamin c. to have devastating affects against cancer stem cells now that doesn't go within the paradigm of the genetic paradigm of can't eggos to something more like the mitochondria theory of cancer but because our systems of knowledge are severely slowed slowed down by their protection by government finance and what i mean by that is a monopoly financing mechanism at the federal state and local level all shields these group thing ideas about the foundations of something like cancer and redirects hundreds of billions of dollars i into solutions that could be so much more costly and ineffective and toxic. Perhaps then something like an antibiotic. He's he's doing contrarian work and he's able to spot a solution right under our noses. That's taught that's not toxic now. Why would we need to talk about a political solution for diseases that we need to have single payer healthcare when someone like a darla santi and others that i can mention mansion are solving hanser with nontoxic cheap therapies. Let me as <unk> how you square this idea which i understand it from from this jude's actually jesus idea media of the first last last shall be first which sort of implies hey we're all equal here and if not equal you know the last time we first the first will be last i and yet there are equal unequal outcomes unequal contributions and a lot of conflict stemming from people wanting to be seen as <hes> as a parody. How do you square that. He's idea with with what's happening right now. And what should we do about well. He said many who are first shall be last kamini who are last shall be first so it's the of some kind of absolute marxist notion that everybody has to be you know like after something but it's taken to mean that way by yeah well meaning people in social justice circles <hes> who wanna appropriate that kind of language you cannot have. There's jesus jesus is completely incompatible with egalitarianism in in that sense. It's forced coercive sense. It's completely incompatible with marxist reality which i believe there's quotes from karl. Marx suggesting that blood is required to be sad to move history forward. That's completely incompatible audible because jesus said it is finished when he that was his statement when he died <hes> being crucified. He said it is finished. What was finished the sacrificial matrix that humanity kennedy had been using. It's still continuing but it's it's. He lodged a sword into the heart of the machine in its fail is falling apart the longer <hes> coaches doctors are steeped in the story of the man it has this technological effect wherein starts to it's like a it's like having flashlight and if you have the stories of the bible able obviously the church has misused those stories by the way and they haven't got it that was kind of the point when jesus said you re you know oh the scriptures but you can't even see me. I can't see you can't see what i'm doing right in front of you. As kind of a wink i think a metaphysical weeks like a meta text week at the audience audience who who is most inclined to read faxed including churchgoers. You're even attacks but you don't get me. You don't see what i'm doing. Imitate may be me. Be me in your context of your group. Think be the courageous guy who loves your neighbor as yourself. When everybody around you says destroy that <hes> democrat or destroy that republican be the guy says no. I see myself in the other and i and i have the choice to to to go across the enemy lines and to love him as myself. There's ways to foreign policy perspective to what would the drawer jesus <hes> foreign policy of twenty because you know as oppressive governments. Are you know you know russia china etc. There's a spectrum of hitler seventy years ago a quote unquote lesson that people learn about needs of appeasement <unk>. How how do you make sense of that well again. It's all reciprocity if you if you initiate in my opinion sanctions does nothing but it starves the population that you're trying to allegedly liberate and it emboldens and draws them into the hands of their of their local leader so oh and we we see that tends to backfire and it's again. It's not something it's not like the sacrificial mechanism of politics ticks. It can't get effects. I mean it's not like they haven't done anything they can achieve. Stop and there can be some good but that the overall framework is a net ah evil because again whenever you say well let's sanction iran and literally starve out there citizenry until they like just just put so much pressure revolt that saying that human flashes cattle saying that we're nothing but a jumble of atoms right..

cancer richard dawkins elizabeth warren peter thiel michael pila santi andy doxycycline hitler russia asia england darla santi iran jude Marx karl
"girard" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

13:26 min | 1 year ago

"girard" Discussed on Venture Stories

"In cinema and watch a movie you know what you see emperor palpitation thrown down the shaft right and star wars. You feel great. There aren't you. You're when i encourage you to do is jesus the most important man in history. He split time. You count your time by him so you don't have to get into oh as daughter but at the very least perhaps the greatest man of history and some of the greatest scientific discoveries hospitals that open up to anybody universally no no matter what your ethnicity is no matter what your social status is that we bring anybody can come to the hospital and healing as best as we can and hospitals. That's chris inspired by jesus role model. You know all these different things you know stopping the practice of child sacrifice amel sacrifice. That's one of the first things that indigenous tribes abandoned when they encounter the story of jesus when it's brought to them by missionaries so that another confirmation of of of the end sacrifice that effects cultures whenever they hear about the story of jesus so jesus had a very specific intention which was to get humanity to stop scapegoating each other as the way we get. We bind ourselves together in to create a nonviolent glove based a binding together so we're still going to imitate each other. We're not jesus not getting us to stop imitate he saying imitate me and by the downstream effect imitate other people who are imitating me and lay down your right to exploit loyd someone who you have leverage over and business rather than go for the throat lay down your life for a terms of your ego you know rather than to get vengeance on someone who hurt your feelings you know let go of your right <hes> to yourself another way of looking at it is sacrifice the fear of your neighbor rather than sacrifice your neighbor so that would mean you know in a political local context for our time that means if you're on a jury to decide the fate of someone who's selling drugs or selling unpasteurized milk or some other nonviolent thing you have the right you have the choice if you're imitating jesus to decide whether you're going to go along with the crowd aww which happens to be your jury pool and sacrifice your neighbor or show mercy and let them go so that they can go back to their family and workout whatever vice or whatever it is in a non-violent context. That's what jesus wants you to do. That's what he wanted to choose is not an ideology political. Liberal ideology doesn't give you a radical choice. Political ideology is like there's no free will you're either. You've got to go with the crew or your or your out. How would jesus it's always a radical choice. The choices you know to love your neighbor as yourself which means to operate with a the ethic of mercy and nonviolence and solve problems the creative and hard way of working things out with persuasion and you know creative market pressures to get people to stop doing bad practices or whatever or to use coercion and to us domination which is the way of government which is the way of politics and so <hes> that's. That's where we're at the that doesn't make it echoes. A lot of wood. Jordan peterson's been talking about right make make sacrifice internal rather than external. You gotta die to self mortification of the flesh. The mortification of the flesh is the realization that the things that seem to drive you mad about somebody. Else is usually a reflection of something in your own heart that it's reminding you. It's a mere so when i look at these people who are so terrified of trump. I'm not a trump supporter but i have to say this just to just to get the mob passions to try to hear what what i'm saying right. Which is the bad stuff about. Trump is just a reflection of the ordinary steady state that most people have been voting for their lives. It's just a mere reflection and so you know what i have interested in his you know why is it that his vulgar words and flip it language and you know playing with words away. That's kind of provocative and scarier dark for people. Why is that worse than actual human violence. You know what the last administration's both parties were they did two libyans was disgusted in what they did to series awful what sanctions have done when madeleine albright these on c._b._s. The asteroid is half a million iraqis children dying because because of the starvations cost by ourselves. Was it worth it. She said yes. It was worth the why is that right by the people who are supposed the post to be the raiders are culture. Maybe orcre new york times. You know these these elite institutions. Why is that sentence not nearly nearly as as awful as the things that you know trump says about someone's appearance you know who here's about name calling gestures awful but who cares about that comparison to human violence and murder in death. That's always he's in a in a healthy normal society. The protection of human persons to not be physically hurt is always first and foremost the most paramount should be the most paramount moral concern which is protect a person for being violently hurt through government or whatever ever means and so you know when people are so outraged about trump. It's because remember what i said. Language conceals the violence and all they past administrations and most of the politicians in congress they still operating under the same politically correct language matrix where if you say cool smooth rhetoric and you talk about how all together he us all the right language of diversity and all these different things you can still lock people up by the millions you can still bomb and sanctioned starve millions of people overseas and it's out of sight out of mind because it's almost almost like we get spellbound and hypnotized in ruthie that mimetic group say lulls us into this false slumber when the rhetoric is smooth mood and cool and victim protecting you know and so when trump says hey. I don't want to go to iraq. Wait a second that would have saved a lot. More lives lives than what bush and clinton did window iraq. Actually saved more lives if you actually went through with that. I'm not saying he says we. We shouldn't have been in iraq today. Says if if we were in it we should've taken the oil and everybody says oh my goodness how dare he he. He's just he's just doing. Statecraft left a amateurish way. It reveals the ugliness of government what he does that. Violence has been outsourced to the state. So how does that change how societies handle meta gregori well again. I think the government is a vestige of religious. <hes> sacrificial colts what's that our origins of our species came from this so it's it's. It's it's the transcendent that allows us to say. Look i just on the breaking news. My local news that whole drug house just got rated. How does that make you feel. I'm saying the average the person that heard that growing up in the eighties nineties or so when that when the cops come and arrest that drug house how does that feel when they hear that announcement on the news inc so that's it's the same kind of catharsis that same kind of myth making in real time that news plays a role in doing which is they shape and they kinda validate. Look look at what your transcendent society is doing now. The gods are still here right the gods odin for all those things we we just call them different things now. We call them the thin blue line we call them. The will of the people we call them democracy. We call him a presidential acting all these sacred language that we use <hes> but those are just ideological standings for the same function that the god stood in for which is a transcendent way of of creating order meaning peace unity by sacrificing one for the for the mini and kaya fist the man who the high priest who instigates the <hes> killing of jesus in his own time he sums it up very transparent we and radically so what he says. It's better that one man die by then the whole nation perish and so whenever you hear on the news this person got arrested or you know this person did this or that gives you a comfort. You're driving on the highway. You see lights. They're coming fast. Oh no. I'm i do something wrong. What did i do all of a sudden you see them switch lanes and they've speed on past ask you feels good right. You feel a moment like hey. I'm the i'm the good guy you know. I'm okay allow. Well hope that guy's not too bad. Go get the whoever you just feel a little bit of relief. It's unconscious catharsis from the mechanism that government supposed to provide so i i'm not saying government is a evil you know i think it is. It is evil in one sense but i'm not i'm not scapegoating. It like oh those guys right. It's a manifestation of of a culture that wants to dispel bad blood onto common enemies and so my project is always to say excuse me. The principle of the west was smell victim no crime. That's the foundation that's at least the ideal of english common law habeas corpus present. The body is the idea that you know you have to present. The person accused just put them in a dungeon without a trial but it also has a mere side to it which is present the injured party who who's injured here. Wait wait a second you want to put someone in a kidnap cage in the back of a car and fly them off down the road and warehouse them in jail jails oftentimes by the people i talk about prison jails oftentimes much worse than prison and that's where most people who get caught up in the law for victimless crimes. Go go to jail so even a week or two days in jail could be a traumatic violent experience and it's happening in every city whether they're democrat or republican own in no one's really talking about it at its core route. It's very fashionable about talk about criminal justice reform but it's that's a great thing but it's always kind of on the nibbling around the edges kind of like yeah. We need to reduce sentences and stuff. I'm saying look pharma. Mental obvious nature of what this is for this is a vestige of scapegoat violence this idea of putting a nonviolent person in a cage with violent people you know that people who've who've just assaulted somebody in there in a cage with the same person who got a suspended the license plate a suspended driver's license or even the guy celebrate milk or the woman <hes> who's doing sex work with consenting adults and she wants to do it. They're all into the same melee with violent people and they have no recourse for defense. They can't escape that room. If they tried to leave. They'd get to bob wire fence. I was with people with guards. This is a very inhumane and barbaric primitive way. That's happening and that's what's creating our our political system today. It's always built on the backs of hit. Scapegoats aaron regime art says that have escaped go is to not know you. You have one meaning. You don't know you know when you're scapegoating someone. You really think they deserve what you're giving them. I and you really you really believe they deserve the treatment treatment that they're getting from the collector but once you start to see this is barbaric and this is not appropriate to treat human beings this way it loses its power and when it loses its power what happens the community starts to lose its appetite to keep that law on the books it when the community starts to loot starts to lose who's the appetite to keep those laws on the books the institution of government loses its ability to maintain its transcendence its power in its ability to bind people together. We have to learn to look for alternative solutions outside of politics. We have to learn to look for mercy. Driven.

Trump scapegoating iraq loyd Jordan peterson madeleine albright new york raiders aaron congress murder bush clinton milk two days
"girard" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

12:22 min | 1 year ago

"girard" Discussed on Venture Stories

"That's where we get. The idea of you know. Black a bad blood or you know abdu your these ideas. It's it's there's bad blood in the community and it starts with you know little little things like you know i reached my hand to shake your hand and you pull your hand back and all of a sudden. I'm i take offense or what. I just did a good speech. You did like it you know and now i give you an indication that i'm displeased with. If you're bad behavior and then you look at that indication that i gave you and you your mind you confirm yourself you say well. That's why i didn't share that guy saying look how menia he is and so you do something back before you know it was a rivalry that's developed out of almost nothing perhaps theory game theory defecting in game theory all the way down yeah i mean and and so you see that that escalation on both sides and it snowballs and i tell people you know when i was in high school i remember you know like would do a high school and i remember there was a fight and you can just imagine this the scene in various contexts of life life but mercy like a fight breakout between kids and it was in one table and before you know what i saw chairs flying from the whole lunchroom you know i it is like a contagion spread. It was between two people maybe they were fighting over. Someone looked at someone's girlfriend or whatever but all of a sudden it's like contagious infecting the whole room and you can feel yourself kind of magnetically attracted to it because you're a drilling kicks in just by being in proximity you to it. You don't just sit there quietly like zanan eating your food. Your just your heart rate goes you feel kind of cool within you know you're fascinated by the spectacle oh but you're also it's repulsed by you know how dangerous and that's why people swarm around fights and that kind of thing because there's a there's a human the fascination with drama and conflict so you can imagine that you know of human beings if we're so imitation driven that there has to be a strict breaker there has to be a way to discharge that bad energy in a way otherwise we wouldn't even exist as a species you know now in animal species have proto forms of scapegoating. You could see a little bit. I think you know you could say that. The sometimes in some species like the bird the smallest bird is the you know in the mother bird in the other chicks just kind of tech that little bird and let them die out wilderness as but but that's kind of a proto oh you know shadow of of what we've perfected but typically animals resolve their conflict are they have imitation but resolve dominance submission mechanism anisim and <hes> you have alpha work and he defeats the beta was the beta wolf submits its neck for the alphabet to kill and typically the alpha wolf will will restrain himself you know they may kill each other and accident during a fight but there's no kill shot wants the other. <hes> you know animal has submitted but humans are not like that in the bible is clear. That's where you get that idea of the eye for an eye. It was an ancient way of charm to humanity off off bits reciprocity going while because if you in the ancient community is i came to your village and i saw aw you might come back to my village kill my family and then i'm gonna be stone angry. You know i'll get a whole army together award party and we'll go kill your whole village and then the survivors of your village we'll hear about it and they'll come up with a vendetta to feud but this other group you know and he'll be doing for generations is not what we see with the drug for right now by the way is not what we see with most war and conflict zones around the world. It's it's you don't north korea south korea alice fine israel all this it's never-ending an- so humans had to find a way to resolve this or else we would've existed as specie so as everybody's copy everybody finger pointing and pointing fingers. I know you're the problem. You're the problem no you're the appro builds tension two bills bad blood and eventually if everybody's imitating everybody's finger-pointing. It's very easy for those imitation of patterns of finger-pointing to to start slowing into one <unk> before you know they're all pointing in one direction and the typically gonna point at someone who stands out an arbitrary way that makes them different a differentiation from i say it this way in a sea of amorphous amorphous office blob of sameness. They're hungry or difference in need to eat different right. The whole community becomes an undifferentiated mov of a reciprocal behaviors and desires. It's almost as if it becomes a high in it needs to devour a vessel of perceived difference in order to maintain itself because on differentiating left alone will lead to war of all against install in the destruction of a community and so it's almost like they have to feed and that word farmer coast is helpful there right because as we were from pharmacy and far macos like the ritual greeks would do where they would parade a hunchback or a deformed person in the community and cast them out as a kind kind of antidote right there. Peterson's book an antidote to chaos. That's the antidote. The chaos is the ripple scapegoating a common enemy so so in a sea of sameness when people just they don't know what is going on. Maybe they're scarce famine a start to point fingers. I it snowballs into russian. It's building bad blood and it needs to be released. Bloodletting needs to be a safe way to get rid of in a in that city of sameness devours differentiation a person with differentiation and that person could be who ugly to beautiful it could be the prom queen could be the dwarf could be the rich billionaire who loses hair phony. It could be a race minority already. It could be a stranger from a far off land. It could be a person with a handicap and whatever it is that triggers the crowd prow the mob to perceive him as different. It's enough to trigger them to convince themselves together that this person i is the cause of their problems and we know this is true. Intuitively i mean we can watch modern footage of tribes types that are still in this indigenous environment and you know they'll talk about. This person is a witch and they put a spell on our community and that's why we can't you get crops to grow or that's why we had death in the a child died in the community and then he have a friend of mine from papua new guinea her name's monica palace louis. She's correspond with me all the time and she had to flee pop into getting actually because she to this tartu. It's to this day <hes> there. Is this a witch hunt practice where in the community in the tribal regions they we'll get whipped up into anger jealousy or they see it as a child gets sick or dies and they start immediately looking for a witch and sometimes if you yawned the wrong way. They think you'd let let out a spell. Let out even or a spirit of they target that woman typically typically. It's warmer and they burn them alive and so- monica policies. I told her you got to get out of often getting so she did and thankfully she safe now but that's an example of like frozen in amber what we've been doing all around the world since the the foundations of the world since the foundation of human society you mentioned earlier. We were talking about how timely this all. This all is back to today. You connect that back to you. Don't air of trump you talk about sameness but was it connected to the arab diversity connect bat too wide support. The people really understand that today right you got you. You have to understand how jesus no breaks that scapegoat mechanism as a write in he does it. He does it and <hes> so you scapegoat so when a society scapegoats or or devours has an i mean that literally because ritual cannibalism is ubiquitous feature of early primitive archaeological evidence of of different human cultures jim <hes> societies so cannibalism is is evidence of what i'm talking about. Human sacrifice is a <hes> another early early feature that we find human society go beckley taffy over a turkey is this ancient temple like structure dr with very advanced animal carves the indicates that we've been you know participating in the state grid at the very beginnings of our community not has some kind of after effect fanciful <hes> moment of a fantasy that are are <hes> in terms of myth making our myth making that were the way the the modern western mind thinks about myth a in an you know ritual religion is just a moment of fancy of moment of control. It's time of you know just having excuse to have power and control over people and makeup fanciful stories to make make sense of of the seasons changing changing or what have you but i would suggest that actually no religion is the placenta as regime yard would say religion is the placenta of humanity humanity. It's what birth dust is. What made us who we are as a species. It's what saved us if from destroying ourselves and so it's not but but see what jesus says he has that passage where he says i behold icy satan fall like lightning <hes> you know you cannot import sort of some kind of neo platonic or you know disembodied <hes> red demon with red horns into that language the words satan means accuser and so when he says behold i see the accuser falling light- lightening he's making an anthropological claim about what's happening anthony and humanity and what his work is going to accomplish which is the accuser and that's that's how the scapegoat mechanism awesome operates starts with an accusation. This person is guilty of infanticide. This person is guilty of incest. This person is guilty guilty of witchcraft or whatever it starts with an accusation that the collective unanimously believes truly believes and then it it follows with a murderer or explosion of the person and when you murdering expel that person suddenly you feel relief you feel tension release and you've dispelled that bad blood and so the problems between me and you eric would bid on the resolve because if you and i had conflict over hey i you stole where my chickens and all of a sudden we see a witch is being accused in the in the neighborhood right next door's. We run over. We say that's what was doing it. It was the witch rich she put a spell and she probably took that chicken and sacrifice or did something you know we're elvis it so he killed the witch and all of a sudden hey hey we feel a lot better now because that primordial killing life feels like a sacred act that we bound together around right and so that kinchen relief. That's what you get whenever you see. You're getting vestiges of that. Whenever you.

scapegoating north korea beckley papua monica palace louis Peterson eric tartu monica korea israel
"girard" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

14:21 min | 1 year ago

"girard" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Everybody welcome to another episode of venture stories by village global on here today david gronkowski a entrepreneur writer commentator thinker and and gerard scholar and we're here today to talk about gerard and everything he he represents a welcome to the podcast. Thank you for having me great to be with you here. On online talking about these issues very important very timely yes speaking of time. Let's let's zoom out. What you talk about the moment when you first discovered gerard and how that changed the way you thought about the world i i discovered a rene girard. When i was looking looking. I was never satisfied with the way some of the theological approach. I mean obviously theology is important. I'm chris should but you know i was always concerned about how the way theological conversations around jesus didn't scratch the itch for for what i felt was intuitive to you know what jesus was doing in his story and the stories that are told about him and always felt like what is going on here. This idea that you know jesus in some theological in christian circles is kind of a disembodied bodied deity is one that you you make certain mental assent you make start mental proposition ascents about him like do you agree that he was born in this time. Do you believe he died on the cross yes. Do you believe he rose again. Yes right. Do you believe that he's god yes. S you know all the different little doctrinal mental checklist that you're supposed to make and then you know who do you say sorry to oh jesus okay and then so you check that whole list off and then you put that in your pocket and now you're entering into a kind of social status asserting the inner inside club he gives you a ticket into and it's like you know you kind of you know you ready to go go to afterlife now that you're in the in crowd and i don't. I think that's what christianity was. All about. Jesus had really had to do it and so i always bug me that i didn't feel like whenever i read the stories that i saw regina when he's standing up against the crowd when he's deconstructing human desire it felt very down to earth and practical about understanding outstanding the roots of our conflict understanding the roots of our social ordering how we order our businesses how we order our communities how we order our our politics ar neighborhoods. It had everything to do with what he says. The kingdom of god is within you all right so it's not some place you go up into clouds when you're gone. It's something that you manifest in community this principle of a kingdom of heaven right and and so i saw very political deeply political message and i looked into nature and things like that make felt like nature it was closer to understanding some of what jesus was about the mini of the great you know christian theologians that i was looking at and then i discovered razor aren't so i kind kind of came to rene girard political search because i felt like i was starting to get this conclusion that ed <hes> government is a religion. It's not like a religion oftentimes. Libertarians will compare government that you know look how religious it looks folks you know but it's actually like it's not a it's not a pejorative when i say this necessarily but government is religion. It's a vestige of archaic religion in our modern modern times and jesus is the true atheist in my opinion. Jesus is the one who says the emperor has no clothes. There is no oh god and the god being government right and so that's the only application of jesus i there's there is a spiritual component to it but in my work what i try to do is say look you don't have to share my christian faith with me to even engage engage in this conversation about jesus because the lands that i'm trying to take is an anthropological perspective of jesus which simply means you you know i want to study the origins of man the origins of coach and i think i agree with renee jarrar when he says that the bible is the key to all all knowledge and i agree with that completely and i think christians oftentimes they have a theology of jesus which is the study of god but without an anthropology apology of jesus they'll miss the whole point because jesus calls himself the son of man more than you know. There's a reference to a son of god title and so if he's the son of man what he's saying is you know i'm the full picture of what it means to be human so if you study his life in the in the way people record the things that he did. You'll understand what it means to be human and so i invite anyone right whether you're as my job in this is not to you try to show you. Oh you need to have faith in a religious sense. I'm trying to show you that we are more christian. We could possibly imagine from an ethical aesthetic ascetic standpoint in the west and it has very important implications for how we work that out once we become cognizant of so yeah the emphasis in my work is is looking at the kind of practical an ethical implications of jesus and how imitating him can unlock block so much of the struggles and problems that we find in our personal lives in our workplace environment in in our political context and let let's unpack those implications. If people deeply understood your worker had the knowledge that you had around around jesus and around gerard wh what would those the biggest applications via our personal enter political life would be different. Well you know what the the gospel writers are. Good at doing is showing how jesus he deconstructs and deconstructs illusion of innate human desire the idea that desires that really you know ignite your passion are inherently yours that you really desire that beautiful mercedes mercedes or whatever because you just intrinsically desire and what jesus and the new tests as well as the old testament prophetic tradition that leads up to jesus life they show you that your desires are mostly borrowed from your neighbor borrowed in a kind of matrix of of other people's role modeling that are kind of coming into your life whether you like it or not and whether you're so you have role models in your life and some of them you choose and some of them are aware up and many others you're not aware of a you don't choose but they're all influencing you you can think of kind of like <music> out celestial bodies or something and they'll have gravitational pool and as you come in contact with any get pulled into their orbit so to speak a kind of collect all these other <hes> <hes> you know desires that other people have around you that really you know if you chase after them. It's like chasing after the wet because they're not really objectively true or not something from the foul of your heart. Your inner depths right <unk> desires for fame or fortune or social social status or wealth is different. Things are not inherently real. There are a product of human anthropology g the development of the human brain that makes it unique and different from animal species <hes> we have a supercharge brains that are able to copy and they're able to copy better than other animals and we don't just copy like rote memory like monkey see monkey do but we copy what we perceive our neighbors desiring what we perceive them <hes> motivated by and that's where all of most of innovation and creativity is you as an individual kind of having a humbling moment where you can say look. I am not the founder of all this unique stuff but rather i have to learn to imitate the great masters in whatever field of knowledge or work or are that you wanna do and then what you do is you you connect those dots in a more in a creative pattern that no one else is connected right so you have all these people. You're borrowing from and i think innovation. He comes from being able to to connect a certain pattern of dots. Those dots being role models in a unique way that others have imitated in that same does that make sense yeah and this is part of gerard's idea of visas right right so you but the idea is that you know innovation is it's learning how to imitate cert- role models in compounding together compounding their modeling their insights insights into a a new pattern that maybe others had not seen quite how that connected and how that system works is the good part of me says verse the type of movies the reason that leads to conflict or are they all connected. Usually this is what you know men. Mrs is just a part. It's like breathing. It's part of what we do. There's a way way of breathing. There's a bad way of breathing so to speak if you're if you're breathing in the process of hurting someone and killing them. That's a bad you know but it is just what it is art of human nature church art of our human design and this is tim. This tends to be on the more positive side of mimetic desire. I want to do great music. So i study the great <hes> composers. I want to write great novel so i read the great novelists and i observe human nature and honest about my own desires and that's what renee jarrar draw you know discovered mimetic desire in the works of the great western novels where he noticed that they had a moment where they kind of became came humboldt in the process of their work where they realized that so much of their romantic desires the romantic individuals itself that they had in their earlier works it becomes totally deconstructed and you get to see the triangular pattern of people people you know in conflict over scarce goods an in conflict for no other reason than because their neighbor wants they have and it's kind of a magnetic gigabit like magnetism you know the idea of attraction and repulsion and you know if you see someone in your life and they seem to ha- or someone on t._v. or someone in industry you're in. You're like there's something about that. Person just seems like they have it. They've got it. You may have to verbalize you. Just feel that way f- that magnetic desire that's that medic desire pooling you attracting you towards them because you perceive him as different as opposite as as having something that you lack in your being right and that's what kind of pulls you towards modeling winging imitating people on a subconscious level so this this underlies so much of what we do in politics are business choices. Why does everybody everybody have a crypto business. Why does everybody do a podcast. Why does why does is it fashionable to not talk about jesus outright. If i say jesus there are certain the people in in any audience may be in a public square that would say oh. He's trying to sell me on religion right and it's just because that's the medic which i'm not saying that they're wrong for that. I'm just saying the reason why that's more common as it's kind of a medic snowballing of of what people have kind of accepted after to be a true and not all of them have all thought out. Maybe it's not religious you know maybe jesus is the true atheist that deconstructs what what religion really is right so when i say religion i'm talking about in the root word <hes> the root latin for religion is to bind together her and <hes> and and so and so to bind together is kind of my definition of i'm using anthropological way of looking at religion is what what binds us together. What is the common transcendent 'cause that binds people together in common cause and usually what religion results in is the violent explosion of an other and that and that's what binds people together and that's what jesus is. That's why i say he's a true atheist because he does. He's he. If you imitate him will help you learn how to <hes> <hes> you know create community without violently expelling and other violently expelling a common scapegoat or a common enemy in your in your life i you know how do we get from memphis. Imitating your your pronunciation of it to scapegoating well when you in in the ancient context that you know a lot of mimetic theory advocates researchers point to is the idea that if you have scarce resources if you you have <hes> you know only so much food or you know you have imagine there is a plague or there's a famine. It's kind of tightening up resources. You're your mimetic. Desire is gonna put you into conflict with your neighbor because missus can be positive when there's a win win for everybody but when when things are tight when they're scarce resources or exceptional scarce resources doesn't have to be objectively a scarce resource what happens humans get into rivalry..

jesus gerard rene girard renee jarrar gerard scholar memphis david gronkowski scapegoating writer chris regina founder Mrs humboldt
"girard" Discussed on Caught Offside

Caught Offside

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"girard" Discussed on Caught Offside

"And I think if it was messy javale in in. Yes to that. We're on that field. Maybe the twenty fifteen version went neymar. They would have scored four before half. I'm telling you. It was unbelievable. I think you're right. Let's see we bring it down the straightaway. Whoa. We're going to have the Ray Hudson moment, we always have Ray Hudson moment. So this was his call for Vidal's gold, and in the aftermath of doubts v the D hetero Bassem, oh now would get dick the primrose where to go the mohican chaotic awakens asleep pick soda fall for number five typical docile a jazz football as you sketches of Spain. Sketches of Spain being a miles Davis album that was the jazz link. He did there. He is a national treasure treasure him. It was certainly will red card. What are you got? My red card is Stephen Girard's interjection at a Rangers press conference totals a play to hear you say if the place we have right now don't improve it's not producing a bit of quality in the final fed majo- is defined place. That will do it does not as a as a players out of motivational things. Well, I think at any award. That's for me. Not knowing him. He's being injured to use a big club. Get expect big plays to step will. And big occasions. I'm provide big moments. Not there's nothing about any big club. The monitoring that equipment defined better players will play. We will do. Like this has been universally hailed. As Henry winter say, oh, it's you know, it just shows what what clear thought it strong-minded manager years. I heard you gushing over it. When it came into the studio this evening. I wasn't gushing over anything. I just said I had absolutely no problem with it. I have a bit of a problem with it. First of all, this is your first management stint. You have to prove that as a coach on the train and field day in day out. You can mold this team, regardless of the personnel. You have you should be showing some kind of return, and you can argue that he has somewhat, but Rangers as we go into November iron faith dressed that up any way you want. I know how they've done well in certain areas in the Europa league during fifth second of all your at Rangers who are a big club in name only right now, they you're stuck with these guys Stevie you're not going to be able to get better players in so reading these guys the riot act is all finding good you. Come across as a hired gun during the press conferences, you look at have you look what's the word confident unique all those things. But that's not the facts. That's not where you're at. You're not Barcelona cheer. Not PS g you're at Rangers. And you have to cut your cloth to suit your measure with the players you have because you can't spend any money. Well, this this also could be a motivation tactic for the players. He had they of course, that's what it is. Maybe but and I kind of like him basically Jordan roster from heaven answer a question that shouldn't have been directed at him. Right fair enough. But I just think serving these kind of MRs this early in your managerial career spit. I'm not sure about it. I'm not sure about it. You are so soft. I'm not soft. I'm here. So I'm just picking it apart. And I don't want to go with the consensus that this. Oh, you don't mess Rhone Stevie g well Stevie get out there and to China feel make these pairs better. Well, let's see if it works now that say, we should perform a hit Lampard Jared watch on that don't worry and the other podcast..

Rangers Stevie Spain Ray Hudson Stephen Girard Henry winter Vidal Lampard Barcelona Davis China Jordan
Tennis: The Davis Cup gets a massive overhaul

Today

00:24 sec | 2 years ago

Tennis: The Davis Cup gets a massive overhaul

"And controversial proposals to. Revamp the Davis Cup and. Turn it into a season ending eighteen World Cup star Being backed by a majority of National Tennis federations the IT f. the international federation secured a two thirds majority. Of their annual general meeting and the twenty, five year plan will start next season in two thousand nineteen, it'll, cost, two and. A half billion pounds and it's funded by an investment group led by the. Boss Luna footballer

Danny Cipriani Supriyadi Grayson England Gloucester Matt Dawson Turf Moor Kent Spitfires Joan Jack Cork School Istanbul Assault Steve Diamond Sean Dyche Cariboo Cup Disney Bbc Sport Rugby Union Hilburn Coke Stephen Girard
After French Rebuke, Trevor Noah Defends World Cup Comments

Chicks On the Right

02:02 min | 2 years ago

After French Rebuke, Trevor Noah Defends World Cup Comments

"Mobile news on the level on the go Facebook will. Start doing it's mostly sunny eighty degrees on monument circle. I'm John Herrick and here's what's trending at ten thirty, one, Facebook will police posts on site could, spark violence FOX's. Tiny j powers reports comes after Facebook owned messaging service what's app allowed false reports to circulate on its service after deadly. Attacks on people mistakenly accused of kidnapping children in India the social media company says it will rely on local organizations to decide whether specific. Post have fake information and could escalate into something worse so who are these local partners and what is, the, criteria for, becoming one. That is still being decided Tanya Jerry. Powers Fox News the amber alert for nine year old John jury has been cancelled. After the boy was found safe by. South bend police he was found with his non-custodial mother Erica jury act, this morning at a BP gas station. In south bend and he was reported missing last night the amber, alert was issued early this morning just before six thirty the French ambassador to the Is slamming, the, host of, the daily. Show for saying Africa deserve the credit. For France's World Cup victory France beat Croatia four to two to win the World. Cup Sunday and on Monday Trevor Noah. Said Africa had won the World Cup referring to the African heritage of, the French players Noah joked they have. To call it a French team but look at those guys I, was shocked at how angry A lot of French people got The genuine a lot of French people were angry, and they were like are? Trevor how can you say, these where we say these things This is horrible while the French ambassador, to the US didn't think. The joke was funny ambassador Girard, Arado fired back at Noah yesterday and said by calling them an. African team he was denying their Frenchness he also said the joke legitimizes the ideology that claims whiteness as the. Only definition of being French I'm John Herrick, on the. Level on the go and on Twitter at ninety three WIBC and WIBC. Dot com it's ten thirty? Three back to the checks.

Trevor Noah John Herrick Facebook South Bend Africa FOX France Tanya Jerry Fox News Twitter Kidnapping DOT BP United States Girard India Croatia
"girard" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"girard" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Mr proper now introduces open your early history reminding the old city of both the southbound side zuma my correct well actually now the knocked bronx to knock franz i was getting the all over parking ticket critic a good part of the wrong track salih it's very interesting boycott of me you know and alan emma's anthony davis anthony girard warned that's my legal government name as they say uh my father my adoptive parents i was adopted on may 24th 1960 and uh to a mother who the teenage mother i never got mirror and because she decided that in order to have a good life she wanted to give you up for adoption obviously clean a teenage pregnancies was very different from what it is today back way the 50s 60s at a very different social stigma on it and of being a teenage mother i police she was pregnant rieti the fourteen or fifteen years of age somewhere of that nature and he decided that she wanted me to have a better life and he decided to give me a for adoption law was adopted by it and then hayward on it five days old abilty only parents out of the no and my own father my adoptive father whatever reasons where i have no idea why but and he wanted to give me his own name for himself and he gave me the name shali which is still c h o l l y okay so you'll see it as a quick to spell the conventional way l i e but i am telling you were i spoke of always grown up spilling if c h o l l y and that's the way muchlauded spelled it to a jolly not charlie so by that and we don't know how to handle with low yes yeah yeah yeah yeah so.

zuma franz anthony girard alan emma anthony davis hayward charlie fifteen years five days
"girard" Discussed on HOMOGROUND

HOMOGROUND

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"girard" Discussed on HOMOGROUND

"They could simone a cassini this jars wjr's ken geno just wasting time in the south the north to girard karzai who reminds minds two zero s and so shoes just law sh sh sh shh shh kurl kurdish law a g shh shh kerr sh sh sh sh sh adam rauner fearful too many body not eve but his shot his cousin mohammed at zelano as urged islamist out of them was some on the substitutes ieng fully no as donna purdue shh shh cry shh shh coup shh shh in chris correct chris this and soon.

ken geno chris simone girard karzai mohammed donna purdue
"girard" Discussed on The Big 98

The Big 98

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"girard" Discussed on The Big 98

"A good night's uh big to station the boring everybody transmitted across america the bothered washington yes florida and more hey so our producer raymond drives and he's been promoted dna live already yeah but about it so you were just driving gubernatorial pretty well in all take him to their destinations pick them up their house easy stuff like that and then over at a nowhere sends me an email and says you've been selected approved promotion to do they said hoover eats i'm now an uber driver so i can go to restaurants malls at different places he get people their food and then take it to their condos forum most people can't they said it's a select few uber drivers that they trust enough hst ain't gonna eat the food and they said i've had a dean wipes view said that driver so far in like my early stages raimodno prison so i'm very in hey give me that badge baby over e it's a bad guys nissan the eddie to girard with them the joe gene we're coming back from chicago offend thing i'd seen um i need a ride i'll pay need ever he's like i'll find the app or whatever knowing dino as i okay cool and then i said all right you can take me home he goes woah woah woah while not taking you home a you'll live far away and like you that buber that's how it works shaniqua good neighbourly nato is sorry to i'm going i'm going to my house downtown abc uber let them you any use it now he just jeremy to give him props it was like practice you know operatives raymond over overeats what's this a pretty much the same thing is like post may silver's of foods so do we but we can go to balls with your weight in the early part of the team can't do everything it can profit now we have no idea originated is not endorse yeah gene zico john of sudan roh's plea though visit nigger an to make all new bruce said a newly gotta have you free got a hamish yes well he had never be than they do napa bad man in all you look bigger league the penguin you founded uh yugolav new york brad mielke w often nadal you'll yours you is that well you know.

washington florida chicago dino buber roh bruce america producer raymond hoover dean girard jeremy hamish napa
"girard" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"girard" Discussed on KOIL

"Our next guest ken girard of arlington massachusetts talks about how he dealt with deteriorating eyesight step by step and what happened as a result i have always had good arcelor in fact i was the only one in my family that didn't work glasses and then around ninety ninety six i started noticing a deterioration in my vision i'm a composer a pianist bob and i teach privately have done that for three years so i am involved with lots of reading throughout the day gradually gradually i started to notice that it was becoming difficult to see the notes on the page and read words this also was a problem sense as a christian scientists dime reading the blessing sermon that's published in the christian science quarterly the lesson sermon uh consist of passages from the bible and prom mary baker eddy book science and health with kita the scriptures and i started to pray about this uh which is my natural reaction having experienced the number of healing through christian science and this is the kind of praying that's not a pleading to god but it's really coming to a deep understanding of who wbc god is and who and what man is both male and female universally however the situation continued to deteriorate as i mentioned earlier all of my family war glasses and it would seem that somehow this was the likely outcome for me to with one believed in the concept.

ken girard massachusetts arcelor bob arlington christian science quarterly three years
"girard" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"girard" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Our next guest ken girard of arlington mass talks about how he dealt with deteriorating eyesight step by step at what happened as a result i have always seen i saw it in fact i was the only one in my family that didn't work glasses and then around eighty ninety six i started noticing the deterioration in my vision i'm a composer a pianist bob and i teach privately have done that for three years so i am involved with lots of reading throughout the day gradually i started to notice that it was becoming difficult to see the notes on the page and read words this also was the problem sense as a christian scientists time reading the lesson sermon published in a christian science quarterly the lessons sermon uh consist of passages from the bible and prom mary baker eddy book science and health with john crypt yours and i started to pray about this uh which is my natural reaction having experienced the number of healings through christian science and this is the kind of praying that's not a pleading to god but it's really coming to a deep understanding of who and what god is and who and what man is both male and female universe however the uh uh continued to deteriorate as i mentioned earlier all of my family war glasses pendant would seem that somehow this was the likely outcome for me to if one believed in the concept of genes and of various uh characteristics being handed down from generation to generation so there was a belief of heredity involved in this and also of aging by prayed daily about this thinking about what was site what really constituted site and look to various passages.

ken girard bob christian science quarterly arlington john three years
"girard" Discussed on WHCP Community Radio 101.5 FM

WHCP Community Radio 101.5 FM

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"girard" Discussed on WHCP Community Radio 101.5 FM

"Two two jio no the gone away we just two the open the door village tpg now once told me unaccountable through girard the flow now the goal of the blood could the colin love freaky macos all being called brown long live these working playing normal.

girard macos colin
"girard" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"girard" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"I don't know bad advice or nervous serb will they won't make it if i don't do it this way they will all much power in no yeah there's an issue that is not right now is to slake what do i wanna do not yes were what's you know i i've gotten to this place and it's in its giving me a a a little bit of freedom to go no it's not even know yet no thank you are fuck now or or yeah i mean that's the best wind the i i'm not doing what i don't have fog you money yes but i have i don't think so right now and he i think i just think that that's such a that's where we should all be creating from and i think we got a little bit lost at least again i'll speak to studio network a little bit lost in ratings in but you know there were visionaries who used to just put on what they liked and leave at odds an and now i think that's what's happening at the streaming that cables were were really defining themselves by doing a caused are fx is a good example and you know what's going to be on fx i would know what to sell the fx i would know what not to take to fx yeah i know what they're making and i think that's kind of what the networks you used to be in it's an exciting time and and i love working for network tv i like to try and make tv for the masses i'm not done doing that yet i mean at some point i would love to go you know try at the at the get the cool places and see what it's like but but i think you're also i mean comical show you our meetings somebody wants to get no we detter lately live very easily on yeah i think i think that we think that that was the thing that i learned from girard was that you can just absolutely say no us stand up for it and.

girard