18 Burst results for "Gino Wakeman"

"gino wakeman" Discussed on The Art of Online Business

The Art of Online Business

05:17 min | 4 d ago

"gino wakeman" Discussed on The Art of Online Business

"What is your churn rate. What is your conversion rate on your sales page right. What's your profit margin. That sort of thing. These are all must know numbers for your business and have a direct correlation to the health of your business. Obviously if we're spending more money than we're making we are not going to be in business very long right now. There will be some similarities in vital metrics across businesses but really the critical metrics to be measuring will differ from business. A business like i might be measuring something very different in my not very different but different things in my business then what you might be measuring and yours and a great way to track these vital signs these critical metrics in your business is through a scorecard and that really came to a lot of popularity with the book. Traction by gino wakeman. If you've not yet read traction. Holy it's it's kind of operating bible of your business. It's a great book and having a scorecard allows you to have a pulse of the business. At a glance this is something that's generally compiled weekly again. The frequency that that the numbers are compiled. That's going to differ right. And when i say compiled that doesn't necessarily mean that you are compiling it. Hopefully somebody on your team or people on your team are compiling the the appropriate metrics that they are responsible for in their roles and then updating that scorecard for whenever you're going to review it as the ceo and also with the team. Okay so it's your job as the ceo to analyze it not necessarily to gather that data. Okay now when it comes to a scorecard. A good idea is to set. Kpi's right key performance indicators or your goals in these critical metrics these critical areas of your business these vital parts your business which you can then use the scorecard to measure against what i mean by that is. Let's just say that if you have a membership for example and you want to lower your churn rate for the next month..

gino wakeman Kpi
"gino wakeman" Discussed on Before the Millions

Before the Millions

06:32 min | 3 weeks ago

"gino wakeman" Discussed on Before the Millions

"Find multiple if not tons of millionaires in that niche. So let's take the money out of the equation. Let's figure out what you're good. Let's forget what you like forgot. What your long term goals are. And that's something that you did early on so that you sure you didn't go down the wrong path. Now on the other hand. I suffered from shiny object syndrome for a while before i kind of pieced together okay. This is what i good at. I'm good at. This is what i like. And this is where. I see myself building generational wealth now in terms of your future. I mean at this point. Now you've built a development company that does this all across the country. So tell me tell me a little bit more about what your role is and then in telling me that like an telling me that. Tell me how the team is structured. What's your team. Looks like right and then on a day to day basis what. Your interaction is with with each team member as your role. Because i think it's interesting once you aren't you build a business big enough to where you can have employees and team members taking over their responsibilities and you can truly like you said. Focus on what you're good at. That's when the business expands and that's when the business blows up so tell me a little bit more about your world today and what that team looks like. Yes so as you scale a business and the second you make a higher everything changes so if you're a solo for noor then you're operating a different kind of business. The second you bring on a person you now are responsible to feed that person. And i'm not just talking about pay them so they can put food on the table. That's obvious but you have to lead coach and hold them accountable and so in the background for those that are watching. They'll see a copy of traction by gino wakeman. Eos entrepreneurs operating system. I genuinely believe it's the entrepreneurs bible. It's the system we implement in our business and that's where elsa lead coach and hold accountable comes from that's your number one responsibility. The second you bring on someone like you are now responsible to lead. Coach and hold accountable. You're the visionary who has the cascade your vision down to your team in a way that they can like align with it and then execute on it if you're not managing people properly then you're you might as well be a solo per nor and you know that that's cap you can only grow so much so what it looks like for us is an. I believe that it doesn't matter. If you have a three person organization or a three thousand person organization the same org chart still works. So it's visionary integrator and then ahead of finance ahead of operations and ahead of marketing. Give them whatever titles you want. That is a core and from there all things flow. That's the org chart and so i mean visually people can see and i'm doing it with my hands for those that aren't watching but so your role is as the visionary to come up with a vision and then either you hire an integrator which would be your co or in like my world. I'm still the integrator. So i have this great vision. And now i have to cast this vision down to my organization. In a way that they can they can wrap their heads in hands around it and align and execute upon it and then i also have to lead coach and hold them accountable as the coo. To make sure that they're doing those things so it looks like that and then administratively. Your head of finance is doing all that acquisition stuff transaction management stuff your payroll account openings and closings your operations manager in our world. That's a project manager. That's a field guy or gal. That person is making sure that your projects are on time and on budget. They're receiving an awarding work receiving bids proposals and awarding work. There making sure that projects are on time and on budget like. I said they're managing tradesman. That's the project manager or your head of operations and then your marketing person Which is probably. I would say based on your listeners. I suspect that this is one that they are either going to struggle with or they're gonna wind up wearing this hat for way too long. So what we've found. Is that this person who's responsible for your campaigns your social media your newsletter essentially your brand how you appear outwardly to the world that person if you can find someone in house them great. What we found is that you can also outsource those individual parts and pieces to third party agencies and that's the way it looks in our world so we've had that seat filled internally a couple of times. it's a tough seek to keep filled Frankly that's been my experience for a whole host of different reasons. So i like outsourcing it to agencies that specialize in each one of those things facebook ads direct mail web. Dev like things like that january. I for us to go deep on this. We could spend a whole hour of what you've done. I love that was super thorough. And i appreciate that a lot and like you said if the listeners want like a super thorough explanation of what. We just kinda highlighted here on the podcasts. Definitely checkout traction. I mean it's a beautiful book. So we'll link to that in the shahnaz for sure but when you talk about being the visionary as well as the the integrator who what does that look like for you on a day to day basis. Yeah it's so here. Here's where it gets confusing because the visionaries responsibility is is relationship building above all. So you're supposed to be fostering relationships with lenders with jv partners right as like russ's developers were looking for other developer partners in our education business. I'm looking for people that are doing ancilliary things. Like so we teach fixing flip at a high level We're looking to partner with people that teach raising private money at a high level so Had a wholesale market for deals. What have you. So that's the visionaries rolled his high level relationship building and decision. Making the the integrator. The coo is about leading managing and holding accountable. It's they say visionary know thyself and be free integrator know thy self and be stressed right. It's it's a cheeky thing that they say right. And that's from another gino..

gino wakeman noor elsa Dev facebook russ gino
"gino wakeman" Discussed on The Art of Online Business

The Art of Online Business

04:00 min | 4 months ago

"gino wakeman" Discussed on The Art of Online Business

"Because there's all kinds of ways you can get a good job. You got podcasting. Va you could get an administrative va. Just because somebody's really really good at cleaning up. Your inbox doesn't mean they'll be good at making instagram graphics. For your just. Because they're good at editing. You're podcast doesn't mean they have skills to make stuffing javi for you. So it's become a really specialized industry but people always want like a magical unicom evil on the jack of all trades. But i want people to remember that the jack of all trades is often the master of none so i feel strongly that depending on what your goals are in your business to hire for those specific roles so if your goal is to improve your podcast. Guetta specialized podcast. Va if your goal is to grow your instagram. Get an instagram. Va somebody who specialized in that. Field is the best person to help you grow in field And then we see the terms. Pa sort of tossed in there as well. That sometimes gets lumped into that general. Va category In e as an executive assistant as a personal assistant these are terms that have carried over from the brick and mortar world and now they kind of also exist in the online world. People who are doing an ea or pa role generally will be a little bit than be as who are having specific business related tasks day may have business related tasks but also doing personal tasks non business related things for the ceo or somebody in the the founder role or the role. Something like that so generally you would not ask your kgb. Va to make sure that you know. They order your way flowers for valentine's day. That would be the wrong person to ask. Want to have an ea or pa in that role. Gotcha and then once. We get up to lake the project manager. Obm integrator stuff. Those are more supervisory roles so as e as as the people who are completing the tasks delegated by people in the supervisory roles who are doing bar strategy supervising the project managers. You might have a pm for some like a one off project. something like a launch rebrand merger. Something like that that might also be encompassed in an opium or integrator. All depending on your business set up. So i get into like the opium versus integrator thing. Which is what. I know people are like. What's the difference. Do i need one. Do i need both or some people have. There's plenty of people that haven't heard integrator that which you know as far as i know was first introduced in the book. Traction by gino wakeman and then he goes into the full relationship between visionary and the integrator in his book. Rocket fuel yeah. Rocket fuel is a great book to read if you are a creative visionary. You're somebody who's in a ceo role who's usually you know somebody. Who's the ideas person. They're the person who's always like. Hey we should do is e. If you're finding that you're having trouble with follow through on those are executing those ideas. There's probably somebody missing complimentary integrator role and the integrator role is sort of like the other half of that dynamic where they're taking care of the details are taking care of executing those ideas and take Visionaries ideas through into action. So where the whole integrator. Ob m thing fits in people have said that an opium is an integrator role for an online business. But to be honest these terms are thrown around kind of interchangeably. There's one difference that people sometimes used to differentiate the roles and that is the size of the business. You might find an online business manager. An opium in the six to seven figure business. They're often contractors. They might not be full time. They could be but might not be an integrator. We usually will see those in sort of like the..

six instagram gino wakeman both valentine's day first Guetta seven one difference Rocket fuel fuel some javi one half
How to Prevent Problems in Your Business Before They Happen

Marketing School

05:04 min | 10 months ago

How to Prevent Problems in Your Business Before They Happen

"Super committed to your success online. We've worked with them to a special offer just remarking school listeners. All you have to do is go to dream host dot com slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we are going to talk about how to prevent problems in your business before they happen. So in the early days of business, correct me if I'm wrong Neil I think for most people it's you're finding that you are constantly putting out fires you're dealing with the important and urgent. Now, the problem with that cycle is that more fires will pop up and just continue putting. them out and you never get to solve what is actually urgent or not urgent but important, and these are the long-term foundational things that will help the business and a couple episodes going and the odd turn it over to you knew you were actually just mentioning something about the number one way to scale your marketing. So I think that actually applies here is while they want to kind of go over that again. Yes. So we talked about the number one. Way To scale your marketing we broke down a lot of is process oriented as you're doing things that worked out really well create processes from sin. The way anyone can take him over and continuing going forward with it and scale it up for the things that don't work well document. Why didn't it work hypothesis numbers data backing everything up so that way people know hey, for all the towns that are working event, you'll have a ton of processes that people. Can take over and continue scallop for the stuff that's not working. When they're try new experiments, they can use the data on. Hey, why did this thing work in the past? Would we learn from that as for the stuff that worked? Hey, what were the processes what worked on that and how we can we apply those to these new towns were considering going after? Yes I'm GonNa get specific with these processes so if you are looking for every single companies have Operating System. Once you have a couple of employs you need to be thinking about can I be using traction, which is the entrepreneurs operating system or can be scaling up which is a when you're when you're falling traction. Make sure you by the right traction book. There's two of them don't buy the wrong one. I've had too many people that worked with by the wrong. Oh Yeah. So that's a good point. Gino Wakeman is the author of of this traction. And Scaling Up is from Verne Harnish, who is the founder of Yo entrepreneurs organization, and there's a lot of these different types of operating systems. But these are just two books that I've read but these will teach you how to set a cadence for your company each week. So week, let's say your leadership team you get together you talk about a scorecard that you're going through a real quick. You're talking about you know different rocks or objectives and key results that. You may have set and you are then going to spend a lot of time solving issues, right so maybe sixty minutes of the time, it's ninety minute meeting is ideas identified, discuss and solve, and you can do that. Once to get certain size, you might grow pass this Eos operating system and start to move scaling up or you might create your own version of it right now, the whole idea here is that yarn effect talking about these long term issues And putting a solution in place so you can actually solve that problem and not let it happen again I think in these books as while they also will give you a cadence for what is your quarterly planning every ninety days you do a quarterly planning, what is your annual planning look like as well? Also, there's a book called the three Hag way. So that's a three year planning. Okay, and then you have a be hag which was attended twenty five year. Outlook Right. So you have all these. Right and I think it's also really important. Every quarter what you're trying to do is you ask yourself, Hey, guys, what should we start doing? What should we stop doing and what should we keep doing right? So you have all of these systems in place denise point processes important process will help you scale. You have all these systems in place where hopefully anybody can run the business. Right? Let's say to see you maybe quits leaves whatever or get sick or whatever. You can just plug someone and you're good to go. Right you WANNA make your business defensible and that's what a real businesses otherwise at the end of date once the true business value. There Neil and another thing that you can end up doing to prevent problems I learned this from watching a lot of interviews online and funny enough walking the interviews is kind of similar to the advice that I got from watching Egon must and Elon Musk ended up saying look there's so many CEO's over the years business concepts principles haven't really changed too much. So there's a lot of books on tape of all these successful CEOS from like the IBM CEO to muster whatever it may be people talking about that airs mistakes they made read from, learn them and try to avoid the mistakes that they break down because he's concepts and principles are very similar. and. The moment that you start making the same ones that other people used to make you're going to not succeed really right. But if you avoid making mistakes that other great people have made before you, you're much more likely to succeed because although be left to the stuff that you should be doing. That's a really good point I think learning from CEO interviews or even joining peer groups like you know entrepreneurs organization or wipe yo or visages a lot of these different peer groups that are out there I know for me when I was about twenty seven when I took over single grain, there's a lot that I didn't know and you don't know what you don't know and. These people will guide you because they've been there before you know they'll talk about things that you would have never

Neil Patel CEO Verne Harnish Eric Su Gino Wakeman IBM Elon Musk EOS Founder Egon
"gino wakeman" Discussed on QA Selling Online

QA Selling Online

08:05 min | 11 months ago

"gino wakeman" Discussed on QA Selling Online

"What's your core focus as a company? What's your tenure target your three picture to there the one year plan goals that you have and and what are you going to do this quarter I just called rocks. What rocks are you going to accomplish to move yourself towards making that one year plan come to fruition bringing that three or picture into focus and making sure that you hit your tenure targets And I you know, you can do this on your own. If you're just starting out and there's a book traction by Gino Wakeman that I recommend is a great starting point and then as your company grows if you WanNa hire a consultant like me that can come in and help get perspective since I'm helping twenty different companies through the process at any given time. Then that's cool too. But really for companies that are having a tough time in this recession. That are that aren't you know dodging the downturn but I'm having a hard time I. think that's a great starting point is to use this time use this downturn to reevaluate the company to get yourself core values and then to figure out how you can rock the recovery. So if you're not able to rock the recession than at least use this time to get your head right and rock the. Recovery and remember that into in recessions and depressions lots of great companies get started. So I think that's part of the message to I was just looking in prepped for our show here I was looking at a list of companies that started in the last recession. It's like spotify square facebook right after the great recession Uber, a lot of great companies can turn on those lemons into lemonade. So hopefully. We've got people in the audience that are working on the same. And is it possible to to write a recession plan and? Maybe a recovery plan. So you know if you've been hit strong by by the recession. Should you have a plan ready for win? Win The tap gets turned back on. Should. You have a plan ready and kind of what should be in that plan? Yeah what I'm thinking right now is that everybody should have an emergency brake is what I call it. So before you can rock the recession before you can hit the accelerator and go one hundred miles an hour then I would always have your emergency brake. In case you get up to speed and it's not working. You want to know that you have that in place. So what that looks like to me and you know we lay all this out. In the book is that you've got four tears and so if you're a business and you're used to doing a million dollars a year in revenue and you start to see a revenue slide to nine, hundred thousand, then you would activate tier one of your emergency brake plan. What would be the expenses you would cut who would be the people that you would free up from the company in order to make sure that you can survive and break. Even if you saw your revenues sliding to eight, hundred, thousand what. Would be the additional expenses you'd cut and who would be the people you'd free up and you want to have that down to four different layers what that tier for being really you know maybe it's your million dollar company and the smallest you can imagine is getting down to two hundred thousand and that would require you and one other person from your team to stay on it's just easier to have that plan put together in the cool rational light of day then in the heat of the night when things get emotional. It's a lot easier to pivot to plan. You know to calmly walk over and break the glass and the take your plan and execute it rather than trying to have to put that plan together when you've got people crying at your door because they're not sure if they're going to be the next one to get fired and they're scared on, they're worried. You know I really liked that approach in you know you mentioned how sometimes we have to free people from the business. And so the business will survive a lot of people when they when they hear. Such thing being said, they'd think while you're all about the money you're not about to people but I often refer them to there was a scene in the Mad Max movie I don't know if you know the Mad Max movie there was a guy that was handcuffed to a motorcycle was burning and he said you either cut your arm off or basically you die in that's what it is right because if you try to do it all in without cutting the cost cutting some people, the whole business can implode in that everybody is out is not just a little few right so and I hope that the Pain of going through the sector size will make it so that the audience never gets to tear for because you'll fight like hell to make sure that you never have to do it but you need to have a plan and look the when we were writing the book we're reading all the academic research that's been written on recessions and one of the studies that I really love showed that your your people that work for you. Your employees want to know what the plan is and they don't trust leaders that don't have a plan and they actually do better even if the plan is negative so even if You tell your employees, which I don't think a lot of leaders do because they're scared to say, Hey, you know what Quinn if we ever get down to five, hundred, thousand in revenue then we're gonNA, have to free you up. You know the business at that level would be able to support your position leaders don't want to say that because they're worried that people will then just quit or they'll be angry but you know being able to have that conversation them lets you know that at least I'm thinking about the future and that I have a plan and then I'm going to fight like hell to make. Sure, we never get there. But if we do that will be transparent with you and that I'll be authentic and now you can go home and have a conversation with your spouse to let them know, hey, listen if our company got to half its size, I wouldn't have a role there and so we need to have a backup plan for us and I know that that's a tough conversation to have. But I think it's much better than, hey, what Quinn unfortunately, today's your last day because we just can't afford to have you anymore. So really appreciate everything you've done for US I. Wish it wasn't this way. But good luck. I think you just have to ask yourself what you want for your employees. What the most loving thing is that you can do, and if you feel that it's just a firearm, the same day that you have do without any heads up then that's your business as a leader my what I'm trying to get across the audience though is having that tough conversation up front aligns everybody so that you can make sure that you never get to that point if at all possible. I love it. Love at the transparency honesty and giving them the heads up not just by the way. It's today that you're done. Right? It's okay. There's a chance that within the next few weeks so. They can prepare. No Jonathan. Is there such thing as being recession proof? For Sure I. There are definitely if we think through different industries that do well in recessions and industries that can crushed, we can go back and look at the data we have. From the great recession, for example. So industries that did not do well in the great recession travel and tourism not a good place to be positioned in a recession. Jewelry Stores also not a great place to be positioned in a recession. But if you look on the other side of the ledger guns, ammo tend to do very well in recessions if you look at a basic industries, so grocery stores do well in recessions. Veterinary clinics so might not think about it but people still pay for their pets regardless of what's going on downturn and then right now I think with Corona Virus I was just looking at statistics. Everybody's adopting a dog right now. Everybody's adopting cats shelters are record lows. I believe with how many pets they have an inventory because people want the safety and the comfort of having an animal and home with them right now and I think people are just bored. They need something to do at home. So if you slow down my point is that if you slow down and think through what industries are.

Quinn Gino Wakeman consultant spotify US Jewelry Stores facebook Jonathan
"gino wakeman" Discussed on Duct Tape Marketing

Duct Tape Marketing

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"gino wakeman" Discussed on Duct Tape Marketing

"So so would you say that in order for a company to actually do there there there has to be somebody that has a different mindset than entrepreneur or at least a champion of you know the system police or something whatever we want to call it. Definitely. Long term you think about and you've had Gino Wakeman on your podcast he wrote Gripe Book called rocket fuel and he talks about the visionary and the integrator. That's the other person who really drives these initiative long-term they going to be the person that operations manager who takes the role over from you and leads the team and follow system and process and help to develop it. But even in the short term shorter than that, if you WANNA get started, the first thing you want to think about is who is a systems champion in your business who is the person who he's already gravitated to process in detail and they're very particular and Getting them a copy of system Al-Ajeen saying follow this Menu I. Want you system is business following this approach that is critical because The business is quite often the worst person in a business to creating the systems and the processes it is very common for. The same the dirty secret of Michael Guba, which we talk about Michael in the book but I lent this he used the godfather of business systems and I've worked with him. I've realized he is an assist demise person in that he doesn't like creating systems and processes. He is a big picture thinker. He understands the value and the importance of them and he has his team around them. That develop those systems and processes, but he is not a systemized personal creates the systems which Fa may was a huge. Moment to say as a business, it's okay if you're not a systemized person. I know another challenge the what's the house? The Chinese proverb go the journey of a thousand miles begins with one step or something like that. A lot of people I myself included look at how We're going to get systems here and then also you realize. You know we we need thousands of them. and. So then it's like it's too hard to even start. So you know how do you get over that because I think most businesses have been around for anytime they got five or six employees that got hundreds of customers that you know they could make a case for thousands of system. So how do you how do you get over that hurdle? And it's also that problem is exacerbated by a lot of the work that has already been down on the topic of systems. So if you look at Cigna and lean, they were all developed for very large businesses with hundred plus staff, and when you apply that.

Michael Guba Gino Wakeman Cigna operations manager Fa
"gino wakeman" Discussed on InnovaBuzz

InnovaBuzz

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"gino wakeman" Discussed on InnovaBuzz

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Well, it will <Speech_Male> be on Amazon and <Speech_Male> hopefully <Speech_Male> audible <Speech_Male> to for those people <Speech_Male> that like made <Speech_Male> like to listen <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to the audio <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> voice <SpeakerChange> and you're rating <Silence> <Advertisement> it yourself right. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yes, <Speech_Male> and I even got <Speech_Male> Michael to <Speech_Male> rate the fullwood and I've <Speech_Male> got a few special little <Speech_Male> Easter eggs. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Or Young <Speech_Male> It's <SpeakerChange> it's wanted <Speech_Male> to grab the show. <Speech_Male> I will look forward to the audio <Speech_Male> versions. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Okay. Well, who <Speech_Male> else should I get on <Speech_Male> this podcast <SpeakerChange> <Silence> last question? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yeah. <Speech_Male> Now that you've had <Speech_Male> Michael Good <Speech_Male> I feel like <Speech_Male> at of <Speech_Male> the top day, another <Speech_Male> great one <Speech_Male> and. <Speech_Male> That <Speech_Male> I respect they <Speech_Male> work I'd be thinking. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Gino Wakeman. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And? <Speech_Male> Off. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> It's okay. <Speech_Male> You're getting all the <Speech_Male> heat has then maybe <Speech_Male> John will reeler <SpeakerChange> which. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Was a world since <Speech_Male> we had John on <Speech_Male> Gino <SpeakerChange> is fairly <Silence> recent <Speech_Male> Yep <Speech_Male> Yep <Speech_Male> <hes> the women <Speech_Male> they you've <Speech_Male> got the WHO's who say <Speech_Male> they <Silence> just? <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Or. Right will thanks <Speech_Male> so much David for <Speech_Male> Utah Vendor insights <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and sharing <Speech_Male> your story <Speech_Male> Sir generously with today <Speech_Male> and also the <Speech_Male> wind some examples <Speech_Male> behind system <Speech_Male> all login why <Speech_Male> systems can be <Speech_Male> totally transformative <Speech_Male> in any business <Speech_Male> and I <Speech_Male> wish you all the best for the book <Speech_Male> launch <SpeakerChange> and <Silence> I'm sure we'll stay in touch. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yeah if it show. Thanks again. <Speech_Male> Yeah. Again, oldest <Speech_Music_Male> thanks Dave. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> Hope you enjoyed <Speech_Male> diving geeking <Speech_Male> out about systems <Speech_Male> and learn <Speech_Male> something from <Speech_Male> dives, ideas and <Silence> our conversation. <Speech_Male> If there's <Speech_Male> one thing <Speech_Male> you take away from today's <Speech_Male> Marijke recomendation <Speech_Male> would be to <Speech_Male> explore and <Speech_Male> investigate the <Speech_Male> idea of <Speech_Male> your critical <Speech_Male> client flow. <Silence> <Speech_Male> I'd love <Speech_Male> to know what you took away <Speech_Male> from Dodge episode <Speech_Male> leave a comment <Speech_Male> below the blog post <Speech_Male> which you can find it in <Speech_Male> other Biz Dot. <Speech_Male> C.. O. Forward <Speech_Male> Slash System. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That is S. <Speech_Male> Y. S. T. <Speech_Male> E., M.

Michael Good John Tony Dodge Gino Wakeman. Amazon Utah David
"gino wakeman" Discussed on Dentist Money

Dentist Money

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"gino wakeman" Discussed on Dentist Money

"Thanks for being here. What's going on how you doing? Yes. So Fun to be here and you know Ryan you know sometimes you get on podcast and people say like my friend and You know everyone's a friend but you guys really right right and I I think we were siblings in another life. Deers friends. I'd see. We do both have red hair and we. Do Chat a lot, and we do have an affinity for a Taylor swift. So Hey, share that right or not. People might know that about me cereal and Taylor Swift is what I'm known for besides a bad nickname from the Dennis money show but anyway. Thanks for being here you know go ahead. And if people don't know and I have toyed with the idea so I don't know if anybody out there likes this idea or not. Ryan I'm putting it out to the world. We. We were contemplating doing a serial podcast where we'll actually try all of our favorite studios on a podcast all the bats here. Here's all the cereals. Actually think having a serial podcast one. People here cereal and they're like, isn't it already big podcasts called serial and we're like, no no no we're literally eat bowls of cereal and then give financial advice to dentists and their businesses. That's GONNA do. Great Yeah I let us know in the in the social media comments and let us know I think it's a great idea. So how'd Cereal flavored chapstick one year for my birthday Oh. Yeah and Flavor on at one time. Yeah I was trying. That's probably actually terrible I. would not recommend anyone ever do it. That's fair. That's fair. You're listening later this is the year of Covid. It feels like a ten year period of time it's been about four months since it really started in the United States. So. If you're listening later, you have more hindsight than we do right now but it's been a weird year for practices. Unprecedented. Shutdown is everyone knows and remembers you know economic impact stock market impacts a lot of anxiety and worries it's an election year. There's just so many like unknowns. So today I thought we could do to be helpful since Kira and her team. If you don't know dental team we put some links and talk about how to contact you at the end. But you guys are in offices. Now, virtually a lot because of covid but you have been in office for years like every day all over the country training on systems and processes and teams and efficiency, and so let's talk about. Maybe. Some of your top things as you're still consulting with offices people reopening coming out of COVID. What should people be thinking about for the next six to twelve months there still uncertainty. But what can we be proactive about? What can we work on? So we'll just start there is an open question what you're seeing and kind of hit some of the things on your list of what people can be working on. Yeah for sure. Thank you Ryan and you're exactly right. We used to travel a ton and our dream was he know how do we? How do we still have as great of an impact virtually and is that even possible and I was really grateful for Kobe? To push us I, feel like every business including your dental offices right now I think one of the best gifts we've been given through code is the ability to innovate if you choose and how are you innovating and how you impacting your patients in a way that you never even imagined possible and that's what we've been able to do in the dental team. Yes. We actually just started traveling on our first coach actually went to our first office this week so. The traveling is going back. We're really excited but through COVID. It was really fun to be able to still help offices still help doctors and bill bat throughout Colbrad, virtually and realizing we can be just as good. If not better virtually for offices we're saving you on travel expenses, things like that. So it's been really fun. But I would say. Actually, came with a couple of things through. Sorry before you get there, I'm actually. Just want to off. Sorry. But you're saying something I think is really interesting I'd like to hear your take on as your business has been very. Highly dependent on being physically present with somebody and it completely switched for you guys in dental office is a little bit different but he speak to that a little bit like what have you seen in in the a team in your interactions with dentists learning now virtually and teams learning virtually what's been the pros and cons of that that you've seen that's just really fascinating. Yeah I. It was fascinating and I, when Kobe hit I remember had this Oh shes moment our gacy fizz like g rated. Oh. Believe it. I just don't think actually say that word so is a good choice but had this moment of I have a traveling company, and now we don't travel what are we going to do? and so it was like, Hey, there's got to be away and my famous quote that people quote on is there's always a solution. We just have to find it and I think for dental offices. What I really cool is I feel because of Covid, it force all of us to learn differently kids are learning differently. Teams are learning different Dr Learning different and I think it was something that we always have had. We just never had to learn it. Exactly, and so I, think virtual events are getting better I. Think Webinars are getting but I'm getting better at how I present I'm sure you are Ryan because that's my new mode of transportation take communicate so I am a huge huge huge Fan Ryan, you know this of traction, the EOS model, the Gino Wakeman I coached those eight hour meetings while used to fly to an office be there with the team per day eight hours and I had an office, call me through covert and sign up and said, we need leadership help. Can you help us now I thought? I don't know if I could run an eight hour zoom meeting with a team. At Reiner I got on my. Zoom. Video. I felt the same way and I was like, okay. Well, let's try next Tuesday. I'M GONNA wake up at five. Am You guys are East Coast?.

Covid Ryan Taylor Swift Kobe United States Kira East Coast Dennis Colbrad gacy Gino Wakeman EOS
"gino wakeman" Discussed on Marketing School

Marketing School

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"gino wakeman" Discussed on Marketing School

"Goal I'd like do more things just to give people things to do. Obviously, Neil now I've talked about different operating systems. Your Business can use. You can use scaling up by Verne. Harnish or it can use traction from Gino Wakeman and make sure you pick the right traction. Allow people in the by the book. They Google traction, and there's multiple versions on Amazon traction on is operating system. That's good. Call out the intuitive thing to call. Call out is and this applies to everyone, but I can save for us. At least we have started to give more time off like maybe it's every other week or every three weeks, or so you give Friday off on just so people can recharge and people didn't realize how big of an impact that would be like. Okay, whatever and then they came back on their like dude. We had no idea how much we really needed that. That's the sign of a good team. Thanks team, and then the final thing. I'll add to. If you want to check in with your team, you can use something like culture amp, or you can use something like fifty five is our employee engagement walls, so if giving you a ton of frameworks, we've gained a lot of different tools. Choose what works for you. Maybe none of these work for you, but we just WANNA plant the seed to make sure that you can work better remotely because Neil I have been working remotely for the longest time, and now the world is finally switching to to remote so that is it for today by the way Neal night? We are doing this virtual event. And the beauty of the virtual event is depending on the one that you pick. It actually includes a live events as well when we bring the live events back so good marketing school dot io slash love. That's L I v E and don't forget. Take a picture of this and then Taegu social that we will go ahead and reshare you and that is it for today and we will see you tomorrow. We appreciate you joining us for this session of Marketing School be sure to rate review and subscribe to the show and visit marketing school dot co for more resources based on today's topic as well as access to more episodes. That will help you find true marketing success. Tax Marketing School ISO until next time class dismissed..

Neil Marketing School Gino Wakeman Verne Google Amazon WANNA Neal
"gino wakeman" Discussed on Reinvention Radio

Reinvention Radio

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"gino wakeman" Discussed on Reinvention Radio

"Kind of what is an entrepreneur in his mind and is there. Does he see this element of? Usually getting pigeonholed in a certain way, or if he thinks there's a lot more levels of entrepreneur, yeah, well how about this? So since Gino's actually here and listening and can hear you and see you with those exact questions any any particular element of that you WANNA. You want to jump in on. Out of the. Game here Gina. Yes we're for diving in first of all excited to be here, really looking forward to this and love your conversation so so I'm an introvert the end of the day, and so if we're sitting around having a drink, the four of us I'm GonNa. Listen to the three of you talk until you ask me questions over what that's worth. I'll take that as the launching point for this. To open up a little bit. And so Oh my God listening to all of this and. There are so many thoughts coming to mind and so I just WanNa grab most recent one that you just said there. and I want to lead into it by saying you know. Hopefully we're going to be able to deep into all this content, but you know I. Certainly believe you are born in entrepreneur I believe every true entrepreneurs six essential traits. Hopefully we'll get into what those are I'm an open book I want to teach people that are listening so so let's go deep. With that said can textually this book that I wrote I wrote it in three parts, and it's a passion project to help entrepreneurs in the making get a huge jump start on taking their entrepreneurial, but my goal is to impact a million entrepreneurs in the making over the next ten years. The book is written in three parts as I said confirmed glimpse in path. Then what you're actually talking about rich is the the glimpse portion of the book and I had this Aha moment. And it's a really cool tool. That I created. That's free on the website that I'm about to talk about. But when I go really deep into it in the book, and what I believe is that you know not all entrepreneurs are built to be successful in every business, and I really believe each individual. Is Built for something is drawn to something, and so I created a tool called my match, and what it is is it's helping you as an entrepreneur, the making clearly understand the perfect business for you and what I get into. You are all of the industries that exist first and foremost, or you can start to feel what you're drawn to there. Then I get into types of businesses. Businesses meaning when we talk about business you need to decide. Are you a product person? Are you a service person? Are you a B. TO B. Entrepeneurship? Are you a beat AC- entrepreneur. Are you a high price? Low Volume Entrepreneur, you a low price, high volume entrepreneur, and then we get into sizes, and this is what you're talking about. Rich might my impassioned plea to the entrepreneurial world. Is that being attack billion, dollar Unicorn. Only pathway entrepreneur and it's dangerous how these people are celebrated because there's no shame in having a three million dollar heating and Cooling Company that generates a twenty percent profit, and so my Biz match in this whole conversation. What I teach in this third part of the book is All about freeing that entrepreneur by saying Oh my God, so yes, so I can go down a path and and go to trade school in learn how to fix a frigging air conditioner and a heater. An ten years from now have a three million dollar company. That's all mine, so there's just so much more than. What's being celebrated at the same time? There are people that will read this book and become tech, Unicorn Billionaires, but there's just so many more options and what I do is in the late in them. Hence the word glimpse as to what's possible online, they just click on a bunch of buttons out POPs the perfect answer. Here's the perfect business for you so long dissertation, but there's The answer to that question from my humble opinion. Great. Great, and just introduction to who you are, and your your focus around I. Don't WanNa. Get into a whole bunch a BIOS. Stuff and whatnot, but I will ask you this question. Because people can look Gino Wakeman he's. Well known author. Go look them up, Google. Google I'M NOT GONNA. Waste time and all that backstop, but I do want to hear from you. Directly? Qualifies you to be this entrepreneurial expert. Like because again, there's a lot of people a lot of people who are out there and they're saying you know those who can't teach in those who teach can't and let you know that sort of thing, and so I I just want to kind of break that that perhaps misnomer that some people have around who you are and what you've done, and what gives you the right, and when you're qualifications so to speak to be able to teach entrepreneurship at all. Yes, I really appreciate that because I'm a fanatic about that. You know there's not one ounce of theory in what I teach. I'm obsessed about. Proving what I teach a bunch of times experiencing personally what I teach, a bunch of times before eight and feel comfortable sharing with the world so lightning fast version of the story that leads us to today is eighteen years old entrepreneur in the making mislabeled derelict loss, confused insecure. New College was not for me. I did not go to college. Is All my friends went off? I wanted out of academia as fast as possible and found my way bumped along. Lots of different entrepreneurial endeavors ended up taking over..

Gino Wakeman Google Gina WanNa New College Rich Cooling Company
"gino wakeman" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"gino wakeman" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"But that he. Plays. There's me Gino, Wakeman she no Wiegmann. It is such a pleasure to meet you today, sir. To meet you as well, yes, I. as Klay was saying I think two thousand twelve was when I started the leadership initiative, and it was not long after that the clay introduced me to the book traction, and it has been highly highly influential book in my company as well as use it with all of our clients as well and I'm really appreciating this conversation today on the level tin meeting and stairs. You ask you ask away any questions. You have for the Whitman Okay I. DO I've got first question is? In your book when it comes to the the meeting pulse and everything we've got an annual meeting. We've got a quarterly meeting. We've got a weekly meeting I've got a client that I'm working with. And they've got about four hundred employees. They're on target right now to hit about five to six hundred million dollars, and they do a monthly meeting with the leadership, not weekly go monthly date. There are some weekly meetings they have, but as the whole team, and they're in three different states as well, but as a whole they all get together and do a monthly meeting, and so question to you is as their coach do i. continue to coach down this path with a with a monthly meeting, and if so, what does that monthly meeting like and or do I just say yeah. We gotta get out of the monthly meeting. Go to the quarterly. Yeah great question, so here's what I would suggest. First thing to do is to picture their accountability chart okay, and so e- Os. We call it an accountability chart, otherwise known as an org chart, but the accountability charter spent an org chart on steroids, and so if you picture that what you will see at the top of that accountability chart is clear illustration of who the visionary is for the organization, and who the integrator, and so that's typically the CEO, and or President or CEO something like that, and then you will see. See illustrated the major function that report up to that integrator obeyed, and so two pause there for a second, those major functions, the people sitting in those major functions are what we call the leadership team, and that's typically three to seven people, and so, what's vital and what we teach, and what is almost non negotiable is that that leadership team needs to do a two day annual needs to do a one day quarterly? It needs to do a ninety minute every week level ten meeting. They need to do that every single week. From there, then you look to each one of those major functions and let's say marketing sales operations finance are the functions while then each one of those leaders with their teams need to then be doing a weekly level ten meeting, and then you literally could carry that out to the entire organization if you have ten people in the company while it all stopped there, obviously, if you have ten thousand people in your company, obviously, this goes on for a few different layers, but it's ultimately A. A small team of people based on that department as you as you look down that or charge you look down that accountability chart, and they are each each one of those teams are in a weekly meeting post in the belief in the philosophy, and the power of it is that each team is pulsing every single week, and if you understand the power of the agenda, just laid out, all the sudden information is flowing talks about him throughout that organization no less than every seven days. And so all that said that's what were prescribing the only time I see a monthly meeting and value. A monthly meeting is when the mid managers need to come together, because there's a lot of value in bringing your mid managers together for education issue, solving etc, and so that's when I see on occasion twenty-five percent time my clients. They're breeding bid. Managers Together for a monthly meeting Gina. Gina I. I hate to ask this question, and that's probably obvious to to to our listeners, our listeners the day. They would never do this, but some some people listen to other shows. Need to hear this okay..

"gino wakeman" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"gino wakeman" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"Have. You ever found yourself in a meeting that you didn't need to be in. Use to there's this thing called death by meeting where you have very ineffective meetings to waste everybody's Oh. Yes, but on. On today's show, we're interviewing Gino Whitman for interview part two and he's going to teach you how to lead the perfect meeting I love it how to lead a meeting. That is just as long as it needs to be. I'm good. How ride immediate engages everybody. To lead a meeting that actually results in action either. Are On today's edition of the thrive time show as Gino Workman teaches you how to lead level ten. Meeting. You can't miss this show three to one and. Get ready to enter the thrive time show. The bottom now on the top. To give, we got fixing books. Operative books sees brackets of wisdom and the look at the father of five. That's I'm adopted, so you see my kids. Please tell them. And see what you're taught now three to what? Yes yes, yes. Yes My. Back part two of our rendezvous with the man, the myth, the legend bestselling author of the Book Traction Gino Wakeman..

Gino Whitman Gino Wakeman Gino Workman
"gino wakeman" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"gino wakeman" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"Probably half the time so many interventions, some group therapy in the sessions with the leadership team, the other half of the time with a deep psycological issue that stems back to when they were seven years old, and they need about seven years of therapy before. They're ready to ultimately solve that issue. Z. It's time for you to ask your offensive questions as you often do. Your questions. To ask questions that are so offensive that our listeners of our guests will. We'll just hang up. I mean we. Theory could've could've happened I know. Questions, you want about. Do you know where when America's golden baby of consulting? Gino if you could go back if you get the time machine, the delorean, go back twenty years and have a meeting with Yo self. Time! What would you say to yourself? Oh, What would I say to myself? Yes, I would say to myself. Let your freak flag. Fly Lower your guard. Be One hundred percent you and don't apologize for. I love that Zeno. What I would say to my younger self. You WANNA here. Hear every prerecorded potato I. I was thinking. About Yourself, you know, they say, see abroad booty. Down a snack. Lack, of yeah, that's what I would say about twenty years ago. That was about you okay. Two more questions for Gina Whitman Quicken America's golden baby of consulting. What's next Gino? Are you just? Are you on a beach somewhere? In this I mean in the Winter Detroit snowbird I mean you? You are what's next for. You gotta be buying building. You're building a beach house somewhere in the Caribbean you can't tell the exact location and you're ordering a bunch of umbrella for your drinks and all that kind of stuff. What's next? Yeah far from writing off into the sunset I've got many decades of work left to do, but this next ten years is focused on entrepreneurial leap and impacting one million entrepreneurs in the making over the next ten years. I love that. That's awesome buddy. If you say listen. have. You picked a time in the future. We say you know what that's my goal. When I hit that age I am rolling up the sleeves, peace and peace announcing and see you later alligator. Far From It so this next ten year goal will take needed sixty, and then there will be another ten year goal at sixty, and another one at seventy, another one at eighty, and like Keel over I'm going to die in the middle of a project I love that. Okay, my question I have. This is the one I sincerely want to know the answer to. Because this is one that I get asked this question so much by our listeners. They want to know Gino Wakeman. How do you organize the first four hours of your day? Like what time do you get up? And how do you organize the first four hours of your day? Because you're a very productive man, how do you do? So. My advice to the world is when you go to bed. Go to bed knowing your plan for the next day. Do not go to sleep without knowing your plan for the day, and so what I do somewhere between five o'clock and eleven o'clock is lay out my next day so when I wake up I hit the ground, running as opposed to what most people do get distracted by emails. Phone calls at Cetera and let the world takeover, and so those first four hours you know I wake up at various times, not always the. The same time, but I wake up. I typically have a morning routine which is some thinking writing and some white exercise. And then I hit the ground running with whatever that first item is on my list. My days are very What's the word I'm looking for very each day. The bit different days I have a session some days I'm doing podcasts like this, but whatever that first thing is on my schedule I attack that I and worked my way through my plan for the day. What's the average time you wake up? On average I would say six, thirty, six thirty. This is like a fair time. It six thirty six thirty, do you? Do you talk to a lot of people? During those first hours of your day or do you take more time? I'm talking to people as early as seven thirty gun. I would say he if I'm driving I'm always scheduling my calls during drive time, and so if I'm in the car at seven thirty I've got a caller to scheduled for that drive time. Gino I appreciate you being on the show so much and I encourage every listener out there to check out your new book the entrepreneurial leap. Do you have what it takes to be an entrepreneur I? Really do appreciate you. Making the poor life choices needed to end up on today's show and I just remember. Thank you so much. Yeah. It was a blast. You guys are absolutely nuts, but it was a true blab flying the freak flag and listened whenever you get that package delivery from ups Fedex. Open it quickly because it's probably going to have a golden baby in their search. Totally that? Holding Baby Statue Store Oh. It's a it's an extension of a library that you can live extension ABC's optometry clinic. It's often the back. There's a room where we sells the golden babies. Thank you, too? Thank you Gino. Thank.

Gino Wakeman America Caribbean Gina Whitman Detroit ABC Keel
"gino wakeman" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"gino wakeman" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"Golden Diapers, I have tips, can I? Can I give you some tips? I've had some eyebrows about a decade I. Think I've wanted to interview Gino Wakeman here. This is sort of an answer to prayer, and so I have I. have some tips I want to give you and feel free to to not you're. Not to implement them. It's fine means. He's doing well. Things are going well here. I'd be apparently. Doing all right so. Proper to one up me, but isn't tips. Okay, one I think moving forward you should. You should insist that people introduce you as Gino. Men Quicken. I. Sound! I think it's I, think. Man That would correct people that say Whitman. For example you met me for the first time today and I would Gino Wakeman pleasure to meet you and you could say no. No, no, it's Whitman prints where prince, constant friction with everyone. Oh, yeah, because people were like hey, good to see a prince and he's like. No, it's a symbol. You see what I'm saying, so you think about that? It's hot. It's hot sauce. I'm writing it down as you speak. Could really rate now drags it bill. I think you have traction with that. Your is a good idea. Your Newest Book could be called Friction keys to the Golden Baby I liked that. Friction. People would go I, don't he's written three books maintenance tiny. Baby. Painted Gold and take a picture of it on the cover I. Don't think that hot. How many books have you written at this point Gino? This is the. So if you wrote friction, the Golden Baby, people would buy it almost like mercy purchase. They're like it's like it's like some princes. Music got kind of weird there for a while. And people are going. To like this music, but it's packaged in a glass sphere of some kind of gold. The Golden Baby. Here's precious go rhino. I'm GONNA I'm. GonNa drop that down a notch. Klay always shoots. He's always swinging for a Grand Slam every time me I'm good with base head. Suggest your keep up the. Kind of person, so I think it said of doing a whole book cover on that I challenge you and your next book somewhere in there get the phrase golden baby somewhere in the book Golden Baby Golden No it's for US challenge and it'll be just a little love, duggan. Tear. POPs shift. Somebody now you can use it in your in your in your perfect level, ten meetings, and your level ten means you can. You can just kind of say no guys as an example, golden baby would do. I we continue Gino when you talk about here. Mistake number five is not charging enough as an example. You didn't charge US enough to have to put up with the personal hell of being on the show talked about not charging enough point exit. Yes, the classic mistake here is. undercharging for your services, and so it's literally a psychological issue, it's an insecurity and so almost every entrepreneur when they take their leave for some reason, they charge less than they should and most startups. They're literally. A ten percent price increase from being profitable or having a loss. That's good work, and so there's two two great disciplines here the first of all. There's a great Ted talk by Casey Brown who goes right to the psychology of this but number two Dan Sullivan. Mind mentors talks about when you're pricing. Think about the number that scares you the most, and then add twenty percent, and that will force you to kind of break through that insecurity, but a common classic entrepreneurial mistake in is the difference between staying in business in going out of this edgy. No I. Want to add to them on a pile on pile. The other thing too is is the drift in.

Golden Baby Gino Wakeman US Whitman Klay Dan Sullivan Ted prince duggan Casey Brown
"gino wakeman" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"gino wakeman" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"Italian restaurant after they finally lifted the Covid, nineteen restrictions, and allowed you to serve as a bartender again for the first time. Calm down, I'm going to get Gino Wakeman books on the show. It's GONNA be Great. He's GonNa. Love it I promise you. It's going to happen. Is The Godfather. Of. The ball really you visited since reopening is. The power power powerless. To hit a by two CLA- Shirk I want to hear audio confirmation right Gene-o Whitman. Didn't fact love his appearance on the drive time show or I'M GONNA? You're a bartender. No longer serve you beverage. You are something else I mean it is so good. Holy Cow! It was there were belly laughs going on during that. and. Start at the bottom now? The systems to give what we got. into, books Books sees wisdom in the. Revived. So if you see my kids, please tell them. See NC. Now three to what He. Thought. Yes yes, yes, and yes, it's always ecstasy with your next to me, but today's show over. There's something super going on today. You see years ago. You invested in a in a bank. You invested in a bank.

Gino Wakeman Whitman NC
"gino wakeman" Discussed on Early to Rise Radio

Early to Rise Radio

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"gino wakeman" Discussed on Early to Rise Radio

"Time. I think in the nineties late nineties where they weren't good. They it had a bad culture. There was too much drinking. There was too much complaining and you look at these guys now and go. I can't imagine these guys would complain. Imagine them drinking. I just can't imagine complaining and fighting the infighting in the wine this that accompanies in fighting and they had those issues and then they brought in some guy. I can't remember his name and he just helped graham something any built the culture he built the culture and so now they have a legacy. That's passed down they pair new person with a veteran and they do a lot of great stuff that can be used in your business to because they do a lot of business consulting or business speaking or whatever i think that was kind of the point of the book but it was is valuable very valuable. I although i will say i didn't love how it was written. I thought it was poorly written the book who am i to judge but anyways legacy by james kirk check it out. It's a short read so you can ignore the <hes> the not so great writing. The next book i read on leadership was outrageous. Empowerment by a canadian guy named ron levitt lots of funny stories in there. This is a guy who very much like phil knight started from scratch shouldn't have been an entrepreneur made some huge mistakes almost crushed him like for example this guy ron love it ran the security companies providing personal security and you know he would he would promise like a concert of forty thousand people that he was going to deliver all the security and then he would have to go invite go okay. I just made this promise. I don't have anybody to deliver this figure out how to do it so he was definitely moving really fast fast and then one time he was doing jay z's the rapper singer artists jay z's personal security at a concert and some guy i i got up there and looked like he knew jay z and was going to like i dunno attack jay z or whatever and ron almost let the guy through true and then he stopped him at the last moment once he's like he saw this look on jay z's face like who is this guy and it almost it would've been like a big media <hes> it would have been something in the news because i possibly this guy was going attack jay z. Maybe just give them a hug who knows but it was a moment. In this ron's john's life where it's just a lot of crazy crazy stories that are stranger than fiction and so anyways he builds up a team and he empowered his employees and it's a very very valuable story for leadership in this day and age empowering your team members to make decisions so it was very good as well and then the third book on leadership this one a highly recommend as well if you're going to read one of these three. It's definitely this third one and the third one is how to be a great boss by gino wakeman. He has a co author on this. If you've ever heard if you've never heard of gino wakeman he has another book called traction which is highly highly highly recommended and helps you put systems in place in your business and and then there's another book after that called rocket fuel which is about the relationship between the visionary in the business and the integrator in the business and you reside so those are a couple of good books. Now those are good books that are nonfiction with lots of great stories in them and i love history which is like stories so it's true stories. Obviously <hes> a lot of fiction anymore and history your sure yes..

ron levitt jay z phil knight gino wakeman james kirk graham
"gino wakeman" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

12:10 min | 2 years ago

"gino wakeman" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"If these folks are not very intelligent that you're working for than that's one problem. Maybe they're very intelligent and they've just simply chosen to go in a different direction. Well, that's another problem too. If they're open, and if you can show them not tell them what they can do differently. But show them some wins by taking the rains during a new business conversation and closing something at a higher price point that they thought was possible. All of a sudden, you'll get you'll earn a little bit of moral authority to. Keep moving the conversation forward. What you don't want to do though is. I think this is the unethical part is to complain about this to your fellow employees and drive a wedge between them and the owners. I just think you you need to talk with the right people and the right way without a bear seeing them and be realistic about the degree to which they're willing to change and accept it. If they will accept it. If they won't we are not as humans change comes very it's very difficult for us. And I don't think you wanna fall on that sword is just just not typically worth it. It's it's worth having a conversation because that's just what good people do. They look around them, and they're not afraid to impact their world. It's worth having that conversation, but it's not worth falling on that sword. Because people I see that happen all the time. And if I don't have if it's the owner, it's not the owner whose contact. He me and asking for help. And I just simply immediately don't pursue it. Because it's not it's not going to go anywhere. You don't have to buy raid. Yeah. Right. So so let's talk about specifically dead owner. I'm sure you've run into this. I know I have but in terms of managing folks when you have that that sort of shiny object leader that in renting a place, that's very shiny object. Maybe they tell you, you know, over a cocktail like, yeah, I don't really want to be working with half of the clients. I'm working with and I want to focus on this area. That's good. But they're very shiny object. People like how have you found success in managing shiny object. People like, I know what you just said there where you're like show them a better way. Right. Is that is that would be your vice for that? Well, I've never been able to solve that very, well, I have found that the traction system to book that Gino Wakeman wrote called EOS entrepreneurial operating system. I have found that. Implementing a system like that will help tame that shiny object chaser. I forget forget what those two there's two people. There's the basically the person that dreams up future directions. And then there's a more realistic person. I forget what those two are called in that system, but I don't believe in the whole system, but I found that that that does help. So it's a way to park the nonstop crazy ideas that somebody has and then concentrate on one or two of them to see if they're worth it rather than than spreading out your focus across all of them. So that none of the can't succeed that that's one area that I found that works. The other thing too is just to be aware that people adapt differently as they as age so younger folks are for more life are more likely to be pursuing all of those things and older folks are more likely to settle in. The other thing is true. As employees the average age delta between the principal and the employee's remains. About the same. And so those employees are less resistant to change as well. So discounted pick your battles and be realistic about what's possible jumping around a little bit here. But there's so much good stuff in both of the books. I can't help it. But one of the things I like about where you talk about demonstrating expertise. It's diff-. It's definitely see the same sort of advice. I've got in the past. Which is sure you do. Good work, you deliver good work. That's great. But in order to stand out you need to you need to demonstrate the expertise in that doesn't mean necessarily doing the work. One of the things you call out in here is doing research on the be on behalf of the client, like don't wait for them necessarily to come to you with a specific billable task go out and try to get ahead of things. Right. Bring be the person. That's delivering value. Not just an invoice. Right. Right. Yep. And which also means viewing every opportunity you have to work with the client. As an opportunity to solve a problem that a lot of clients have. So rather than just earning whatever you already rate is for sixty minutes thinking about it as a well. I'm going to solve this problem. This is my first opportunity to look at this holistically. And if I do this, right? I'm going to come across a lot of other clients because of my positioning who suffer from the same struggle, and I will be able to reapply with a little bit of modification. This insight that I'm getting so in that way, your insight just builds layer after layer, and and it's a lot more efficient way to solve folks problems. I love that idea about being proactive not sitting around and waiting for the client. But just like you said being able to look at that problem holistically, maybe put it in the lens of their industry or their company size or the type of widgets, they make or whatever the case may be and looking for other people that might have that problem and saying, hey, I solved that problem for people. I'm sure maybe you have that problem. And I think that's where I found some people. Get tripped up a bit. Because the assume that oh, well, this is seems like a very unique problem for this organization. Right. I'm sure that you know, that this is for a credit union that big bang doesn't have this problem. I'm sure they're big Bank crate. Yeah. Well, and and in many cases, it's it is a unique problem because the firms positioning has been sloppy enough that they haven't put themselves in similar enough situation. So yeah, it's really useful to do. And then, of course, all these things can turn into so many other opportunity making events as well. So you can start writing about these things that you see and apply in your expertise. Just generally broadly without knowing Pacific letting people see themselves and those mirrors, and then when they really feel like they need to reach out and hire somebody they're going to be more willing to reach out to you not just because they know about you at this point. But because you've demonstrated so clearly how get it. That's what that's what thought leadership does especially in an in an inbound versus Mel bound world. So if it's the case, let's say, I'm listening to this show right now. And I'm I'm one of these people that's working in one of these one of these organizations, and I'm Anne. Expert, and I feel like I've gotten a lot of value. Lots of people have told me I've added lots of value to the work we do here. And I'm and this is the this is the golden age of the gig academy. And so maybe I'm thinking about stepping out of my own. You starting my own practice of some kind or I'm going to be a consultant like what when you hear that. Like, what some of the first advice that you might that person. Yeah. Well, obviously positioning, which we've talked a lot about I think that's really important. And it sounds like in your example, that person would would know what their positioning is and embrace it. So that's good. The other has to do with money more than anything because I find that. Most people have the innate skills to be good at selling advice what they lack is the ability to make strong or sound business decisions around that. So they either borrow money, or they misunderstand how much cushion they need. That's a big one. That's a really big one right there. So what is the what's the primary driver of compromising decisions that you make is always financial pressure. That's the major one. There are other ones. But it's always financial pressure at the top of the list. So if you start your business too early, and then you look around and realize oh my goodness. I need a lot more business. You will begin to compromise on your fees? And so that's an example of how not running a sound business will sort of pollu- all the other decisions that you might make. So when I hear somebody starting a business, I wanna make sure they're positioned. Well, I wanna make sure that they're not going to be desperate for new business. And you know, there are lots of other follow on decisions on the one is always how big do you want to grow? Because growing means one thing primarily it's about the only thing that means for sure, and that's your role is going to change. Do you want to do less and manage people more or? Do you struggle with those difficult conversations people if you do then don't hire them, you know? It's just yeah. So those are the things I would think about one of the things you call it in the book. And and it's kind of what you just said kind of inspired me back. I know this isn't directly meant for that. But I think it's also really taken stock about who you surround yourself with two as as maybe you're going in adventure. One of the things you say in the book is gravitate towards world citizens. Those are people you want in your life. And that struck me as if I am out there, and I'm not consultant, what do they say? You're like the some of the five closest people to you or something, right? I think I think that's very applicable in the expertise department. Right. I mean, you want to you surround yourself with smart people like Blair, for example. Yeah. Right. No. It's the other way around Blair associated with me. That's what makes him smart. Well, I mean, I did it every with him, that's obvious. But the point being is that would that be something also that you feel strongly about? Yes. And it really should be people. If all possible, I mean, if you're on an island, and you can't do that. And you could associate yourself with release. You know, I don't know that it has to be people. I think it should be because these people will be able to observe and speak to you. But there are so many brilliant people from the past that are dead that we have. No, we don't have the option to be with. And I want to learn from those people too. But, but yeah, I do think that's really important and having this this overarching sense of history and how we are not the center of the world. And how the social media driven world around us is so prone to overreaction like just having a clear sense of where you are within history. We'll keep you from. Making a lot of stupid mistakes as well. Yeah. And that goes to something that's I feel like it's tied very heavily in both sides of the books. One is about managing being first time manager and the other is about being this expert. But I think there's a tie in here. In terms of something is about having a vision right is about having a vision that you can communicate while positioning. I think is obviously it's part of what that vision is. But I think you even talk about it in here about really understanding. What's the dent in the universe? You wanna make? I the more. You know, I think he said this. I think heard you say this before, but you know, if you don't know who you are and the value you want to display it's going to be very hard to do any of this stuff. Right. Right. Yeah. And where does all that stuff start? I it starts by the kind of life. You've lived through in maneuvered through and existed in spite of you know. It's back to the people thing your parents. Maybe maybe they were idiots. You know, maybe maybe your parents had no positive impact on you. Maybe it was just some friends. Maybe it was people you heard at a tax talk or whatever. But. Yeah. Just when I think about how

consultant Blair Gino Wakeman principal EOS Mel sixty minutes
"gino wakeman" Discussed on KPAM 860

KPAM 860

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"gino wakeman" Discussed on KPAM 860

"Walt disney lost it all twice henry ford five times yeah actually we had outgrown our location we'd been out from ninety seven to a one and we had a grand opening in our new store that happened to be nine eleven two thousand and one all of our marketing said we're having a nine eleven nine one one shell of course everybody knows what happened that day and the next year of the jewelry business was terrible and we opened we grow we increased our size four hundred percent our staff four hundred percent are overhead or one hundred percent needless to say the cell did not follow so that was probably our most trying time over the next three years and figuring out how to survive now the book traction on the book the book traction by gino wakeman he writes he says if you're like most entrepreneurs you're probably experiencing one or more of these five common frustrations lack of control you don't have control over your time to people you're frustrated with your employees your.

henry ford gino wakeman Walt disney four hundred percent one hundred percent three years