24 Burst results for "Gingras"

How Many Angles are in a Circle?

Breaking Math Podcast

01:51 min | 4 months ago

How Many Angles are in a Circle?

"I don't quite recall what the specific question was started the conversation but at one point the question was asked do circles have zero angles or do they have an infinite amount of angles. These students were allowed to think about it and then discuss it. Following basic rules of discussion. I found this question fascinating and again. I don't remember where it came from it. Just it was brought up in the natural flow of this conversation now. I do want to specify that by angles We can also call it points as well. Of course a point would be where two lines intersect at any. You know degree. Well i think Like specifically of definitely. What you mean is like because an angled gingras between the three points or the intersection between two lines. Right cry and point is just where they intersect. So you could see every point on the circle as having an angle. Because there's a line going into and out of that now it was cool is is again. This conversation was with middle school students. And we're not grading for mathematical rigor or even necessarily correctness for just grading on pursue on participation. The discussion followed. Like so you can start off with a single point. And then you can add another point with which you can make a line between the two points. You can add a third point and you'd get a triangle. A fourth point would create a square. And you can keep adding points in this general shape and again. I realize we discussed this on previous episodes. But it's worth bringing up again you. Can you know add eight points and create an octagon essentially you can add n points and create an n cited shape that that that essentially approaches a circle. So the argument could be made that a circle has infinite angles infinite

Gingras
First sentence handed down in college admissions scandal

News and Information with Dave Williams and Amy Chodroff

00:44 sec | 2 years ago

First sentence handed down in college admissions scandal

"Former Stanford sailing coach will serve no jail time in prison. In connection with the college admission scandal, Brynn Gingras, reports, John van damore is the first of fifty defendants to be sentenced John van, damore apologized to the university, his former student athletes, and it's family just before the judge handed down a sentence of two years supervised release and ten thousand dollar fine. And prosecutors had recommended he spent thirteen months in prison after he pleaded guilty to one conspiracy charge admitting that he took bribes to get to students into Stanford sailing recruits, neither student actually attend the school and banned damore never pocketed the money exchanged, instead, he put it toward the sailing program bridging grass New

John Van Damore Stanford John Van Brynn Gingras Ten Thousand Dollar Thirteen Months Two Years
"gingras" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"gingras" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Now at a federal prison in Otis fill New York. Correspondent Brynn Gingras says he's been given a green prison uniform officially now has an inmate number. It's eight six zero six seven dash zero five four and a spokesperson for the bureau of prisons said this, quote, he is now the responsibility of the otas Ville facility, there's the ice cover of the Arctic milk to way, the US is charging Russia and China with trying to gain a foothold in the region. Secretary of state Mike Pompeo address the concerns in Finland today. We walk cooperation to continue, but we can't have one side cooperate and the other side derogate its duties were concerned about Russia's claim over the international waters of the northern sea route including slowly announced plans to connected with China's maritime silk, route the US hopes sending an aircraft carrier group to the Persian Gulf. Will send a strong message to Iran. Correspondent Ryan Brown is at the Pentagon this show of force the deployment of this carrier strike group. It's escort vessels and his father taskforce are in direct response to new intelligence that Iranian forces and their local allies could pose a significant increased risk to US troops in the region. Prince, Harry and wife Meghan or proud parents to a baby boy correspondent max foster in London. They talk about wanting to keep things private because they as a private event. So we didn't have this big appearance on the hospital sets used to in recent decades with the Royal family. Megan clearly, deciding isn't the way to go. She doesn't want to appear in front of the public and the fact of cameras a couple of hours after giving birth. The owner of maximum security says the horse will not run in the Preakness and will appeal his disqualification at the Kentucky Derby on Wall Street. The Dow is.

US Russia China Brynn Gingras Mike Pompeo Megan otas Ville bureau of prisons Persian Gulf New York Iran Kentucky Derby Ryan Brown max foster Finland Pentagon Royal family
"gingras" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"gingras" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Of the race has been disqualified for interference take a look at this number seven. Maximum security is not even going to be placed among the top by the winner is country house with second place going to code of honor in Florida NTSB investigators trying to learn why that Boeing seven thirty-seven slid off the runway into a river at naval air station. Jacksonville have some of the information they need. They have recovered the flight data recorder, but not the cockpit voice recorder because according to them a portion of the plane half. Bottom of the plane is underwater and cockpit voice is in that part of the plane in Waukegan, Illinois one body has been recovered, but it's still too dangerous to search for two people still missing after yesterday's explosion at a silicon plant. Correspondent Brynn Gingras reports. Search crews are worried about the stability of the remaining structure total of nine employee's working last night inside that building. When this blast occurred will blast was so. Intense. It could be felt miles away in Wisconsin after HAMAs fired over two hundred rockets into Israel, the Israeli military struck back. Correspondent Oren Liebermann reports on the UN's response UN special coordinator for the Middle East peace process. Put out a statement, saying the UN Egypt or working between Israel and Hoste. Try to restore a ceasefire. We'll see if and when they're successful Turkey is calling on the international community to act on what it calls the disproportionate actions by Israel in Gaza. Palestinian officials say four people including a pregnant mother and her baby daughter killed.

UN Israel NTSB naval air station Brynn Gingras Oren Liebermann Waukegan Boeing Jacksonville Turkey Florida Middle East Gaza Illinois Hoste Wisconsin HAMAs coordinator Egypt
No Charges in Sacramento Police Shooting of Stephon Clark

790 KABC Programming

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

No Charges in Sacramento Police Shooting of Stephon Clark

"Thing. No charges for the Sacramento. Police officers who fatally shot stuff. Fon Clark year ago, Sacramento county district attorney and Marie Schubert defended her office's decision, and it's sixty one page report saying, quote, the evidence in this case demonstrates that. Both officers had an honest and reasonable belief that they were in imminent danger of death or great bodily injury. Correspondent Brynn Gingras says investigators referenced footage from police body cameras text messages detailing a fight between Clark and his fiancee days earlier and detail the drugs that were in Clark system at the time. He was

Fon Clark Sacramento Sacramento County Brynn Gingras Marie Schubert
"gingras" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

13:01 min | 2 years ago

"gingras" Discussed on KGO 810

"AM on K G O eight ten. Aaron Segers is an entertainment reporter focuses on popular culture, nerd culture, horror movies, and and the way in which the confluence of some of these topics and he noticed that d'appel gang has been one of those subjects been coming up a lot in in entertainment. And so we were talking about Doppler Gingras. Both is this idea of the the passive sort of modern diluted version of Doppler ganger is being your look alike. But it's not just looking like d'appel ganger is at its core. The concept is a much creepy for a place to start. And that isn't just that. There's another person that looks like you who's wandering the planet. But that person might actually be you. And or a part of you that has become disconnected from you, and it's wandering the planet, and that's kind of the horror of it that you're d'appel getting or might be having a lot more fun than you. You are. And and so Aaron as you mentioned, how this has been seemingly this has become sort of a theme and a lot of different under different entertainment platforms. I I have to wonder why I kind of go back to what one does that wouldn't that happens? Why does it happen? Is it just a matter of Hollywood doesn't have any really good ideas. And as soon as somebody has some success with something of what your other people rushed to duplicate it. Because we saw this with cloning in a clothing became a hot topic and clothing is totally different than than a d'appel ganger. But somehow that often gets thrown into the mix too. But I wonder whether some of this isn't just speak to the two our fractured nece as a country right now that we kind of like like people can't believe the place that they're in. Maybe that's an economic thing. Maybe there's a maybe it's a lifestyle thing. Maybe people are they really track with this notion that there has to be some other part of them has to be somewhere else, enjoying it. Because if this is what life is limited to it's not working. What do you think? I think that that's a I think that's a very fair point. And a great observation. And I definitely think that that is. I think people do feel like they're sort of out of place right now, and they do feel separated from their reality. Or from the reality that they believe that they should be existing. And I also think part of it is kind of goes back to where we get the word Dabo ganger, which is in the late seventeen hundreds. And it was where a character in in a a book by John Paul character meets it exact double and the exact double is sort of doing better than him. And I think that that kind of is relatable and a twenty nineteen cents. Because what do we do every day? We're posting on Instagram on on Facebook and Twitter. And we are we are projecting. A better version of an avatar in avatar or south, right? This is me with a Tiki cocktail. This is traveling. And you don't see the darker side. The sad moment. Or whatever we're projecting the best version of ourselves, and that's not reality. But we are creating these digital doubles. And I think that that speaks to a lot of reason why we are seeing the ganger within pop culture and within paranormal pop culture it. It speaks to this other version of us that we have essentially created and given life to. That's an interesting idea, the the digital double as d'appel gang, or we have a digital d'appel ganger, and there will be photos of us, it replicates our life, but it isn't our life because as you point out they didn't have to take out the garbage the digital d'appel ganger didn't have to show up at work in a snowstorm. The digital double ganger has much more carefree existence, and perhaps the photos are with a lot more red solo cups. The digital Doppler ganger is a little more tipsy than real person. And and that we are we're trying to reconcile these versions of ourselves that maybe we ourselves are creating and the same time. We we we can't always we get ourselves in trouble. Like like, the d'appel ganger is do when they were doing if the original notion of adopt ganger going out causing mischief perhaps is that's really what our digital d'appel ganger can do to us as well as create miss. Jeff by being included in photos that go on for eternity on on the web at this point. And the our digital d'appel ganger will live on long after we're gone. Yeah. And and I mean touching it kind of going back for a moment to something you said in the first segment, you you were speaking about the duality of of people, and I think that this kind of is related to it as well. And it was something that you saw lot in a gothic literature. It was something they tapped into even stories like the strange case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, this duality of good and evil in the fractured, self it. Like, even during the rise of win when Freud was emerging on the scene and psycho analysis was becoming popular they were kind of speaking about this fractured self as well. So even what you're talking about relates back to that as well. Yeah. So the the hor- the notion of d'appel ganger in. Horror and paranormal horror also goes back to the invasion of the body snatchers, which is a reference I'm hearing all the time these days. And so I I heard it just the other day on good Morning America. Again, people will often reference when somebody is doing something that's out of character. They'll say, it's the pod person version of them or am I have I in Catholic. I heard pod person reference to. To Lindsey Graham the other day when he came out in in in support us, President Trump had said after having spent years he would never support whatever that was a camera Boorda was and he said it and that people like, oh, so there's Lindsey Graham's pod person has taken over. And obviously, I think to some degree that the d'appel ganger is part of that same notion because the the pod person was developed out of the existing person in invasion of the body snatchers. Right. It took just like a little I forget what it was the original thing. But the seed that would that once it went into the pod and the other person would come out, and then even the concept and a lot of horror movies where your pod person or your d'appel ganger would have to eliminate you. So they didn't have the competition anymore, and they could they could completely subsume your life, and you know, science fiction has been science fiction and SCI fi horror has been. Been such a great territory for seeing these d'appel ganger stories like like invasion of the body snatchers. And and and it's really it's a psychological horror because as you say like, the double has to eliminate you. And. There's a movie called the man who haunted himself, and it was Roger Moore. Of course, we know him as JAMES BOND, but in the man who haunted himself, there is a guy and everybody is saying. Yeah, you did this you did that. And and he knows he didn't any eventually asked to encounter his double in it. And it drives him to the brink of madness or even vertigo which is not so much paranormal. But Alfred Hitchcock movies really is like a thriller that involves stop looking and. Yeah, it messes with your head, you know, when you encounter someone that looks like you, and they're telling you you're doing things, and you know, you're not you know, that's not your pushed to the brink of sanity. Right. No under the theme gets used to all the time. And what was what's the original German meaning of d'appel ganger? What is the what does the word exactly reference? It's kind of funny because we got it wrong. The original word d'appel ganger. It was just invented by the author John Paul, and what it actually means. He was using it just say sort of two courses of a meal being presented at the same time. Sort of like, you know, you're at the restaurant. You don't know whether you want to order the eggplant parm or the spaghetti. So you order both. And you'd get to two courses at once by the word he used for a character who encountered his exact double which he meant the name for people who see themselves with actually dot bolt ganger with a t. And then over the course of translation, we we kinda got it wrong. And and another author later on with a big fan of of the concept of Dabo gainers. And she started using not Dopp old. D'appel genners interesting. So really, it just means double serving double serving. Okay. Sounds creepy. Well, yes. And no lake that that I read that. That tweet from the woman who said that she had seen. Which like the d'appel ganger of an ex husband. But it was of him if he had let himself go, and I wonder whether that that also is kind of the same notion is that we have these dual existences or that. We we are always trying to reconcile the road not taken this interesting idea of a sort of a double entree. That that we could go this way or that way. But we we're gonna take a both and see what happens. But only only, you know, it's like Highlander, you know, they can only be one. So what's the where else you, you know, about you you track these things and d'appel ganger? I agree completely has just been one of these steamatic things which I've been seeing a lot more of which sort of surprised me made me wonder about it. The movie us wasn't a big hit though. So what why why do you think it didn't catch like get out get well, actually, I have not been released yet? I thought it was out. Yeah. I it's not coming out yet. It's oh never mind that sorry. I thought it was out in kind of bombed because I'd seen all these ads for it. And I thought it was I thought he'd come and gone. Oh, it hasn't come out yet. So I I actually think that this when this movie is released it's it's going to connect with a lot of people because of the popularity of out. Of course, Jordan Peele brings his own name. Recognition to it. But I think that people will will really relate to this concept. And and I think it's going to be a successful movie. Well, I hope you're right. I mean because I like his stuff, and he does have a lot of fans, I think this is this speaks to the fact that I've seen trailers for this movie going back now like three months, and so I've been seeing the trailers for so long. I thought about it came out at Christmas or something it kind of just didn't go anywhere. It's well, maybe maybe there was a w ganger. Yes, it's possible. Well, I've I've already sort of going this way. So I gotta tell people we'll go to the phones probably a little bit early because I'll be curious to see whether you've had d'appel ganger experience of your own and you want to share it with us. So we'll do that probably like halfway through next hour. So a little earlier than we usually do. But I wanted to ask you because I saw that when you had. When you had tweeted out on the show, you'd mentioned haunting of hill house, which was the the net flicks version, I'm assuming you're talking about. Yes. Well, I mean, I love. Yeah. I love the book, and I love the original movie. But which original movie, isn't it? There's like four versions of that movie. Some of which have been called haunting of hill house and others just ripped off the book without actually calling it that. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. The, but it is a it is a great story. I mean, and and really a great piece of the original novel. Shirley Jackson it heavily revolved around a paranormal investigation. It was a piece of paranormal pop culture, right? Yeah. I thought the Netflix series was awesome. I thought it was really I thought they reinvented it. Reimagined it in a in a way that didn't..

Dabo ganger John Paul Aaron Segers Lindsey Graham Doppler Gingras Hollywood reporter Shirley Jackson Netflix Alfred Hitchcock Roger Moore Facebook Dabo Jordan Peele vertigo Freud Jeff JAMES BOND Twitter
New Mexico compound taught children to commit school shootings

Ethan at Night

00:30 sec | 3 years ago

New Mexico compound taught children to commit school shootings

"New mandatory. Evacuations were ordered, for several communities as the wildfire burning in the Cleveland national forest draws. Closer correspondent Jim Roop says in what is expected to be the worst fire season ever for California the largest wildfire in state history rages on the Mendocino complex fire really, to fires in one have devoured nearly three hundred thousand acres that's roughly the size of. Los Angeles, not. Just downtown all of it or using a lot of different strategy. And tax it hell fires Jeremy Ron says. Ground and Air Resources are being utilized in the fight

California Attorney Suraj Iban Hodge Chris Collins Jim Roop Jeremy Ron Cleveland Orange County Mendocino Barbara Kusak Los Angeles New Mexico Air Resources John Stolnis United States Brynn Gingras Congressman Three Hundred Thousand Acres
Trump administration asks Supreme Court to vacate Obama-era internet rules

Red Eye Radio

02:18 min | 3 years ago

Trump administration asks Supreme Court to vacate Obama-era internet rules

"North Korean nukes separation deadline I'm Barbara Kusak confidential United, Nations, report, finds North Korea has not stopped, its nuclear and missile programs in. Violation of UN sanctions as reported by. Reuters meanwhile correspondent Barbara Starr, fills us in on, what's secretary estate Mike. Pompeo had to say on pay, oh telling reporters? Chairman Kim made. A commitment to denuclearize to the extent they are behaving manner inconsistent with that we can see. We still have a ways, to go to achieve the ultimate outcome we're looking for correspondent Diane Gallagher reports a federal judge rejected a Trump administration effort to shift the burden of tracking down hundreds of migrant parents deported without. Their children to the ACLU and other such nonprofits judge slammed the government essentially for offering nothing when it comes to To a plan saying that at some point by Thursday next Thursday they need a point person they need somebody who, is a commander of some sort to take. The lead and find these parents who, were deported after being, separated from, their, children by the. Government the woman, known as the Manhattan Madam Kristin Davis, met with, these. Special counsel Robert Muller's. Team for voluntary interview this week correspondent Brynn Gingras reports investigators appear to be interested in her ties to longtime Trump adviser Roger. Stone knows and how she fits into the bigger picture isn't. Exactly clear but sources tell c. n., n., Muller's team, would, like her to testify in front of a grand jury so this really, points to the. Fact that the special counsel seems to be focusing on stone as they continue this. Over arching investigation into. Russia's interference in the two thousand, sixteen election the Trump administration asked the US supreme court to vacate at twenty sixty an, appeals court ruling that upheld Obama era net neutrality rules. That barred internet service providers from blocking or prioritizing content the question for The court was whether the now superseded order was invalid because it exceeded, the FCC's statutory authority among other such claims. I'm Barbara Kusak Are you sick and tired of being sick and tired. Wouldn't you rather be healthy energetic and fit, I'm Dennis black ten years, ago I developed. A Texas, sized solution to America's health crisis I make my Texas SuperFood from fifty five raw vine-ripened fruits and vegetables lost sixty pounds I mean. That's huge since I've been on, superfoods, I haven't.

Barbara Kusak Special Counsel Robert Muller Brynn Gingras Stone Barbara Starr Texas UN Madam Kristin Davis North Korea Reuters Donald Trump C. N. Pompeo Diane Gallagher Dennis Black Aclu Manhattan Secretary
"gingras" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"gingras" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Our work every day and every query you can with machines assess that and come back in criticize us for what we do right but there's so many areas with that's not the case we want to be careful about when people whatever their political motivation might be an often and you do have to look at the motivation what are they trying to achieve they trying to simply shore up their own position in the world in an environment which is open to far more competition which their political motivation so when some gets to those questions of algorithm view like free expression is be careful what you look for who decides who decides what who decides what the algorithm should be you know who decides what's thawra tatum and what's not who decides what is acceptable free expression and what not and these are important questions but i think we also have to be just as cautious if not more cautious to make sure that we don't take steps particularly in the legal regulatory environment that have deeply concerning negative consequences because the one big concern the public policy environment as we all know and i've worked in that environment as well is easy to come forward with a purported solution very very hard to step back and tune it and address it if you've got it wrong and the unintended consequences are typically giant i said it was the last question back so i have one more because i'm legally required ask you about you to pr is gdp are in the long run going to be a good thing for the open internet i'm not the best expert on all the nuances of gdp are i mean i think clearly look again here too in the world of algorithms in the world of data should there be ample means for us as individual citizens to be comfortable with how that information is used certainly and so i think there can be very good steps forward in this regard hard for me to make a complete analysis of gdp are interestingly as we had bought you know we we had a greater understanding of the means in technologies necessary to address it and could that's not necessarily available to all the players in the ecosystem as readily as was for us but you know as i said i mean we practice in a sense what we speak we would we say you have always been able to do your date not always but certainly last several years you can view all the activity all the data that we have on you and yeah you can down like that five gigabytes violence go god five gig about file but we also have very clear in how we use it we're very clear how we don't turn i've information over third parties and never have but obviously we have to be continuing good stewards of that too i think maintain our position in the environment to me back to the word trust google position the ecosystem particularly with things like google searches entirely based on trust right billions of people come to us every day they do so because they trust us to do the right thing to the extent that we don't things can change change rapidly and i said that recently in someone asked but richard richard google you know you're like ninety percent of the search share in europe and i said well you know in an earlier life i was head of a search engine called excite who was number two to a larger more successful search engine called yahoo that were kings of the world in we could not figure out how to unseat them but what happened to guys in a garage in palo alto came up with google in blue us both away so maintaining the trust of our users is i think core to what we do if we make missteps than we'll pay the price i think that's what drives us anyways it google but that's our model okay gretchen i'm gonna leave it there thank you so much and thank you all for listening and thanks in particular to nick cicero who tweeted just this week just finished at rich antonello episode on the digital podcast hashtag mustlisten for anyone in the media business today fire emoji and then emoji that i think is a mobile phone thank you very much nick.

five gigabytes ninety percent
"gingras" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

04:32 min | 3 years ago

"gingras" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Time because e mail in very similar was was an open system that quickly became abused because that's what happens i think a lot of times with open systems and that's why people end up questioning open systems explain a little bit your experience good mail and whether that is applicable at all to the fight against disinformation misinformation and propaganda i think it's informative in the sense that if you're not cognizant of the trust of the user base in whatever you're providing in that case delivering email in today's case i delivering what we hope would be thar tate of content that the trust of the user matters and that if you don't embiid asli in aggressively pursue how to build that trust you can lose it all and i don't say that hyperbolic i mean to me the biggest question facing our societies is this how can open to side and open democracies survive and thrive in a world of unfettered free expression and it sounds paradoxical because we all believe in free expression or not all our country already well we previously but we've always believed that more speech is better a trite right and i i think some people are starting to question that because i hear that in in in for the most part it gives me concern it we should think about that in the the connection to me back with good mail is there is a greater value than ever in the world of information expression to an ascent own your word to been transparent about who you are if you want to be trusted to help people understand the providence of what you are spewing into the ecosystem right that'd be usually helpful across the board usually helpful to us have a better sense of that that's trying to get at and when when i helped co found the trust project was how do we get more signals out there to understand the nature of the source of expression not to constrain it but i've always believed in the notion of own your own words if you want someone to believe in you then be willing to stand up and say i said this and this is why and this is why i believe this and here am my cited facts that's what makes journalism at its best and so when we get concerned about free expression quotes being out of hand i hope our response that is to address it with a further interrelation of the norms of what trusted expression such as journalism should be in does not turn into the very dangerous ground of trying to conflict it and sadly that's what we're seeing now in many spots in the world fake news misinformation disinformation however big an issue that might be in reality and i'm not saying it's a small one it is also become a stimulus for regulation and laws around the world which come dangerously close and in many cases go across the board in terms of constraining free expression yeah well it's interesting that a lot of publishers are now coming over on the side of regulation and pushing google and and and also facebook to play more of an active role in choosing truth and what is what is real and what is truly fake and it's such a concerning in if that is indeed a trend it's a deeply concerning one becau an and not all feel that way like marty baron said something that i thought the of the washington post someone asked him about regulation folks like google with regard to say fake news and marty's answer to that was if the coming after google the coming after us right so we need to look at these things carefully algorithm mc review board i looked at that and say look algorithms are used in so many consequences in our world today so many environments so many circumstances yes on the internet with folks like google and facebook by the way not i don't know a publisher who isn't using some degree of personal recommendation technology to tune their sites or algorithms everywhere you go outside of publishing algorithms driving decisions about whether or not to get a home loan what are get.

"gingras" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

04:06 min | 3 years ago

"gingras" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"The big ideas that inform their business decisions we've had guests like jeff good be linda baath and mark pritchard this week charene is hosting the cmo of northwestern mutual dd go klay give it a listen i also wonder you know google has a long history with publishing and thanks you know large part to double click it has seen the inside of the publishing business quite upclose whereas facebook doesn't have that insight and they i don't know if the word has stumbled but you know they quickly arrived in a position where they were playing outsize role in the news industry and i don't think that they were necessarily internally prepared for that or really even understood publishers businesses i think that's true look i think we we a benford effect our model as i said a being more open for the open platform the web is by definition the better place to be but we learned along the way yes we've been added at this a long time in newest many gradual steps i can tell you back six seven years or so ago you know i said to folks internally because obviously there were challenges in the ecosystem and publishers were challenged and unhappy i said you know i think we got to step up our game right now it seems to me the primary contact point between google a publisher is the account exact on our ad technologies right so if we really want to drive in an able further success with news organizations and publishers than we have to engage in many different ways beyond selling our ad technologies we have to understand their businesses we have to understand the product needs we have to understand how we can take evolve in tune our own products that enable them in a healthy ecosystem didn't happen overnight in the collaboration you know we started collaboration with amp we'd set up working groups with amp and i specifically used the term working groups intake now these are not advisory working groups want people to dig in on this we want to collaborate want this to be two way street to me the primary benefit of that was getting our own google executives to have a deeper understanding of the nature of the business in the nature of what we needed to do outside of having ad tech lead with publishers any mistakes you would point to over the years that that you had cop to for rubbing publisher feelings a little role i think just not being you know again it it it you don't know what you don't know right if you don't understand the nature you know and it was this was more clear to me i had my span of time at google is almost nine years a little bit more two stints i was there earlier as a visor to eric schmidt and jonathan rosenberg and left a running salon media which i had helped get off the ground in the late nineties so when i came back to google i had that i in my intent was working the trenches understand true nature of the business and how it works today right that was really valuable to me but that was obviously that's just one person so i think is much as anything it was just not knowing what we didn't know and not necessarily realizing how important it was for us to know that and that's a progression that's a progression it's not like we're not gonna make mistakes like is what i say about the algorithms the algorithms on perfect they won't ever be it's an evolving progression of effort against an evolving ecosystem in the same it's going to be true for all the issues we talk about so final thing is on the spread of disinformation misinformation propaganda through the internet because i think a lot of the promises of the internet about it being more open people were going to be more informed all of a sudden we're starting to question those and you have history i'm going back because i used to cover email marketing you ran good male which is actually a very interesting company at the.

jeff linda baath mark pritchard six seven years nine years
"gingras" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

04:44 min | 3 years ago

"gingras" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Initials is is how do we at the local level identify in nurture success at the local level such that their models for other entrepreneur moore's to follow with they'd be for profit or nonprofit entrepreneurs and i think that's i'm seeing i'm through the dust of disruption as it were i'm seeing a lot of seedlings of success their village media in eastern canada fascinating company fascinating entrepreneur and jeff algae right he has nine digital pure plays in nine cities in eastern canada that are profitable including in cities where he's competing against local papers but he came in with a very clean approach to what it meant to be a local news organization what it meant to do custom advertising for his local merchants how he engaged his audiences in different ways and found that success you know so it can be there but he also didn't come into it with the notion that somehow it was going to be you know that his business in vr was going to be a fifty million dollar a year business it didn't need to be a fifty million dollar a year for him to be successful and profitable and then a sense that's one of the challenges that the legacy news industry is facing in it's a it's an inescapable one right the legacy newspapers that became chains for instance the didn't become chains because there were looking to figure out how to provide better news properties they became chains because it was an incredibly good advertising business and they found through greater efficiencies they could improve margins but they're now in a position of having to recognize it to business simply is not going to be is what it wants it has to get smaller when everyone goes back to i don't remember whether it was even four hundred or eight hundred but the san jose mercury news that's never coming back it's never coming back it trial not which right and necessary i bet the san jose mercury news had a tokyo correspondent and stuff it there's no need for it which right there's a need to cover silicon valley for sure on a local level and housing and transportation and all sorts of scooters i haven't been there in a while apparently scooters have taken over the entire area i haven't seen him i don't know i think it's one of those memes the internet read fact bars i know san francisco's just been taken over by scooters maybe it should be so you gave an interview i think it was two times where you had said you compared your role versus campbell brown at facebook and you said that i can make change and you said basically think the same over there and you said you feel for her how is your role different because i think a lot of people when they lump facebook and google together i often hear that they send people they send very nice people to say very nice things and then they make decisions that are completely contrary to those nice things in that quote on the times was it was much longer than what i've heard i've heard reporters do that it became a kind of a snarky comment that wasn't what i intended at all what i actually said was yes i do feel for her because i think she's in a very difficult position and it's simply this as i mentioned platforms are different facebook is a closed platform it is in effect a walled garden the direct comparison is instant articles and amp yeah the came out with instant articles is that you want your content to be fast on our site use instant articles and by the way here the rules here's what kind of advertising you can do not do what networks who can use not so on and so forth it's on our site fine that's the way you approach it if you're a closed environment as they are right whereas we took the approach that no we want the internet to be fast we want the web to be fast so let's come up with an open source approach to fast pages where no one sets the rules outside of basic technical parameters right whatever advertising you wanna do do you know as long as it satisfies the technical parameters eeg content lows before ads so be it right and so what i meant there and what i actually said there was yeah i feel for her in that she's in the difficult position of trying to defend closed environment with publishers who frankly will arrive will rely on and be successful only in an open environment quick break to tell you about starting out this is our podcast hosted by schrimm potluck charene talks to leaders in the marketing industry about.

moore fifty million dollar
"gingras" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"gingras" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"And maybe you'll cook on an ad right yeah that's a good business to be in but there are other use portions of it where that ad revenue is on other sites and yes we do have ad technologies for that they use our tools said two million publishers but what gets not calculated when people state duopoly or state google's presumed percentage is they don't include the fact that for instance last year we sent twelve point seven billion dollars to those publishers using our ad platforms at revenue shares of seventy percent and beyond to the publisher you send big checks the publishers are they still i don't know i don't have to go back to the figures of the overall industry but i mean google still you know we take a big piece you take your a successful business question no there's no apologizing for that won't just say to pregnant if i made craig newmark did this outrageously generous thing of giving twenty million dollars to shit for it to a lot of crap for it and you know i very seldom engage in twitter battles in that case i said i can't i can't bear that craig is a guy who is walking the talk and by the way he didn't destroy the news business your a great service to his community with craigslist well i mean a lot in that had secondary impacts on the news industry so be it i mean it sounds like i mean look a lot of publishers need to sort of take control of their own futures instead of blaming exogenous forces right i mean at the end of the day like i remember i've covered google for many years and i remember i would meet with different entrepreneurs over the years and i would always ask the question i will well why won't google just like kill your business or whatever and and one finally said to me you know google's environment it's not the competition and you just deal with the environment you control the things you could control you don't control the things that you can't control i think there's a lot of truth to that and i and again i'm you know i all my background is in news i'm optimistic about the future of news i'm extremely optimistic at at those who you more optimistic now than you were say like four years ago i am actually simply for the fact that now people i think have gotten over the hump of recognizing that the internet is a different marketplace of information and ideas and services right and they're now we're seeing legacy publishers now finally beginning to grapple with that and look at subscriptions and look at their value propositions some will make it some will not but we're also now seeing more pure plays come into play you know who have a better understanding of the market to begin with and that's one of my objectives my probably my leading objective with jianye and we have these internal objectives we set up against it sit google isn't it google news initiative yeah sorry to go to the the.

twenty million dollars seven billion dollars seventy percent four years
"gingras" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"gingras" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Some form right meters and memberships and all sorts of different there's a diversity there what is the role of google now to to help publishers drive towards those those paid goals versus advertising it's typically been in advertising by the way i prefer not to use the term help it sounds oddly patriarchal when i but it's you know again and i say that it vies that's where we are is because we're not i have i do have i have had publishers come to me and say richard just tell us exactly what to do to be successful say i can't do that right every publication is different your market different right i can't tell you that what i can do and what we are trying to do is how do we enable success through various means and capabilities are there further things we can do an advertising to generate more advertising i am saying advertising is going to go away as a revenue source for news public doubt on advertising as core sustainable model going forward mostly because google and facebook take a lot of them sure you hear all the time the statistics about about google and facebook taking do that but even there and again i just you know i did a medium post recently off of a keynote a gave in europe and my tweet on it was how can we affectively design the future of news based on a broken understanding of the past right so if to be careful with the memes we have to be careful with playing in a sense the blame game and even the duopoly notion so what do you mean the the duopoly mean explained to me why because it is used as shorthand as it's not our fault google and facebook did this to us they've owned businesses so again as i said if you go through the business model right we saw a whole lot of it go from classified advertising into internet marketplaces frankly that's not part of our business at all do we have an effective advertising business both through google search ads extreme if you're looking for a refrigerator pretty you will come to google i look for a refrigerator.

google europe facebook richard
"gingras" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

03:59 min | 3 years ago

"gingras" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"The episode so what is the role of google in supporting subscription businesses because i know you said before the the google didn't necessarily point publishers in the direction of relying completely on advertising but with policies like first click free google certainly in view of subscription pope publishers penalize them for having subscription it's but that to that actually isn't too if i can take you through what happened there was just not an accurate characterization i would say look your average executive at google does not understand the news business any more than your average news executive understand algorithms at tech companies they just don't right there are people like me and obviously i think there are more folks there now who understand that nature of that beast so it's not like they were saying ten fifteen years ago oh subscribe suck well it's an open environment get enough reach advertising dollars maybe it'll all work they just didn't ever think any further from that first click free he was the origin of first free by the way at the time it was created there were probably fewer than a dozen paywall properties right but they were struggling with a policy that we haven't searched it continues to be a policy called anticlogging which basically says if you want to search engine to index or content you have to show the search engine the same material that the user will see right for the obvious reason you know i can put up of green vegetables and sell you powder to make you live to one hundred and fifty well a paywall technically is cloaking in the sense that it showing the user a snippet of the article in not the full article and what they preferred is for us to index the full article and so what we said as a work around was give i click free and we'll take an index everything right now over time that changed and certainly we got further wisdom in the last several years of studying this and again thanks to more collaboration with publishers in this case the new york times in the financial times we did a bunch of analysis we did a bunch of experiments because what we were concerned with i was very comfortable saying let's go to flexible sampling whether it was very uncomfortable with is is publishers not fully understanding the dynamics in getting themselves into trouble because if you very quickly went to a hard paywall which happened in some cases the wall street journal flip to a hard paywall they said we don't like your first click for you we're going to a hard paywall well they harvested some immediate gain circulation uptick but that a longterm significant drop they're still trying to correct for because guess what they taught their users they taught the users of google anyways to look at wsjcom url as pay walls in didn't click it's a learned behavior so i was very concerned as well as the team we were very concerned about how do we go with flexible sampling in give appropriate guidance to publish it says they can experiment and find the right level the right level is typically not zero you know maybe if you're a very niche publication that has very high value content but if you're doing general interest news coverage you have to provide sampling here as was always the case right it's just that you samples happened in different way in the world of print you put you put free copies on the seats of airline planes you know and you made it easy for people to pick up a copy for twenty five cents before you try to get them to a full subscription same thing today so just to build off that so google has long been involved in the monetization for publishers thanks to doubleclick thanks to add sense and so on and so forth most of it on the advertising side now more publishing is going towards a multi revenue model that involves subscriptions of.

google ten fifteen years
"gingras" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

04:33 min | 3 years ago

"gingras" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"The head of the page for adds at the bottom of the page that might not ever be seen there are smarter ways to do this so it is again classic tragedy of the comments in that individual participants whether they recognize it or not or damaging the commons and i think that's basically what's happened with the ad in bonn so what mistakes you think were made at the beginning of the web publishing industry that were sort of feeling the effects of right now are publishers are feeling the effects of right now when i think of that in particularly in the context of news publishers i two chains of thought on that one is which i think is absolutely case is that many publishers and i don't say this is a criticism i was there and i can go into the details on that with publishers did not recognize the internet was an entirely new marketplace of ideas and information for too many years twenty they thought of the internet as simply an additional means of distribution for the content products and business models they already had and that was a devastatingly bad lack of assumption on their part understandable see craigslist yes and i say that understandably because put yourself in the shoes of a major say newspaper ceo in nineteen ninety seven or eight when his cash cow or her cash cow is classified advertising coming out and reporting to the analysts on the street for your quarterly call and saying oh by the way we're going to give away eight out of the ten categories of classifieds because this guy out in san francisco named craig newmark with this really ugly site that's basically going to destroy our model how could they do that you couldn't do that so i think it's understandable big my second thought on that is it's not clear to me how much it would have mattered because in introducing the internet in putting the printing press in everyone's hand we did create this vast marketplace of services and information in what's really changed for the news business model is human behavior in if you step back simple example if you subscribe to a newspaper in one thousand nine hundred five us subscribing to the internet of your community it was not interactive but it was the interview community was everything you needed to live your life and i don't mean the city council coverage if i wanted to you know when my dad wanted to buy me a used car when i turned sixteen he went to the classifieds of the providence journal when i graduated college and moved to dc i found my first job in the classifieds of the washington post my mom fung recipes for sunday dinner in the food section of the paper right we all looked for movies to go to on a saturday night based on the reviews and ads we looked at in the newspaper all those behaviors don't happen that way now right and if you just unbundle it all good unbundle right and i just asked people those questions i don't try to explain it in terms of economic analysis anymore just say no tell me your kid just turned sixteen where you going to buy us car for them and no one's going to say the newspaper they're going to say i'm going to craigslist or i'm going to what oh scalp twenty four in europe or wherever that might be perfectly understandable right in fact interestingly so the behavior's changed in the model obviously deteriorated because the model was largely based on those behaviors of soft content access wasn't about hard news was about the soft content and that generally has operated in fact classifieds i find it interesting when people make comparisons today when people say oh the platforms google destroyed the news model industries it is so it is so deeply incorrect does it just didn't happen that way behavior's changed in specifically if you look at classifieds which by the way with thirty to forty percent of the revenue of the typical newspaper in the united states in pretty similar outside the united states that's not even considered advertising anymore it goes to the marketplaces you know if you do an analysis no one says oh money spent on craigslist is advertising it's not it's a marketplace but what about the one thing that publishers didn't stay true to which is charging people for access i mean they charged people to get the.

forty percent two chains
"gingras" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

03:19 min | 3 years ago

"gingras" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"In the app store not sometimes that's controversial that's the way they operate their business obviously social networks facebook is it's about friends and family right it's about a controlled environment it's about what happened on time on their site it's what i would call a walled garden i ran a walled garden when i ran an online service at apple that's their platform and it's a great product you have to analyze their decisions based on the nature of their model as a platform when you look at google in google specifically because i could say youtube to is a different form of platform we host everything on you too but google our platforms basically the open web google search the relevance in value of google search or billions of users is based on the concurrent depth and breadth of the knowledge ecosystem of the web to the extent it deteriorates that is good for google search our ad technologies which are now used by some two million publishers around the world the success of those at technologies it's dependent on the success of those publishers on the open web so we have a vital intrinsic i would say business interest in the ongoing success and vitality of the open web how imperil is the open web now i mean because a lot of publishers obviously they're feeling the pinch right now right from different sides i'd say it insignificant peril and i will i will continue to state that until i'm comfortable that it's not an as you know we we went down this road initially with the project which is still ongoing and has i think had a significant impact but you know how do we address simply the fact that the webb isn't something you surf anymore it's a slog through mud how do you deal with the fact that advocate who become so out of hand to tragedy of the commons is destroying a vital source of revenue for those same publishers i don't blame the publishers for that who do you blame you know you have to look at every participant in the system the advertisers to some extent are it blame you know one of the things that we didn't have not and i don't mean to say that get very specific with amp one of the decisions we made with amp was we were going to load the content i in the add second ideally they'd both be there at the same time but the point in doing that was recognizing because i've been a publisher iran salon media and i knew i had no leverage over the advertisers they wanted a roadblock on my site and i would do it at the right cpm and i had no ability to test out their server performance what test out their individual impact on my page be just didn't i didn't have the technical resources to do it so i can't blame publishers for the fact that they have added networks that might not be super high performing but the truth is the reason we did that and you could see it in the early days with amp the content would load and that'd be this big white space and some people would say that's a problem and i'd say yeah but it's a problem that the advertising community can fix but that's also why we came out with amp ads which say there are better architectures to support highspeed highperformance attractive ads in ecosystem than what we've been doing right why why does on average a web page one hundred and seven ad server requests all at.

facebook
"gingras" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"gingras" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Hello and welcome to the digital podcast i'm brian marcy on this week's episode i am joined by richard gingras vice president at google news and a veteran of both publishing and tech worlds each week i have publishing executives on invariably talking about the big tech platform so it's nice to put their concerns to a platform exac although richard cautions that lumping platforms together is a big mistake we talk about whether google really has a responsibility to build a sustainable publishing ecosystem how google can assist publisher is building direct reader revenue and much more hope you enjoy it richard welcome to the podcast thank you i have so many guests here week after week talking about google and facebook that it is amazing to have someone from google here that i can now turn all the questions on fair enough okay so the number one thing that i often here is the question about what is google stake in finding a sustainable model for publishing it's a great question and i do get asked at once in a while because they say you know like we announced google news initiative why are you doing these things is because you wanna you know have better relationships with publishers and and and assuage your critics i mean neither one of those are bad objectives but they're not the primary objective i like to think yes we have some sense of societal value of journalism in open societies that's important but i think it's also important to recognize just the nature of our business right i have been frequently these days challenging folks when they used the term platforms as generic because it's not mind platforms particularly the ones we typically refer to dramatically different i worked at apple apple's a great hardware platform proprietary os proprietary hardware provide a great experience it's their version of a clean well lighted place they'll make decisions about what goes.

brian marcy vice president google publisher apple richard gingras facebook
"gingras" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"gingras" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"Protestor pulled to safety facebook blacklist expose i'm barbara kusak an immigration protester taken into custody by new york city police hours after she climbed the base of the statue of liberty correspondent brynn gingras says a thorns attached to harness to bring her to safety after she failed to come down and i was told by a source that she was saying she's not kinda come down because she wanted to quote all the children to be released remember she was part of a anti immigration group protests that was there earlier this this evening or this afternoon so it's possible when she said that these officers made that decision to go up there themselves seven other protesters were arrested earlier as they were holding a sign abolish is a hazard worse than fireworks in the wrong hands this fourth of july comes on the road in car wrecks is correspondent bill michaels explains according to the insurance institute for highway safety over the past five years in average of just over one eighteen people have died each independence day making it the day of the year with the most fatal car crashes the second highest number of fatal car crashes over the past five years occurred on new year's day you might want to check your facebook blacklist as our jim roope explains facebook says a bug that operated between may twenty ninth and june fifth may have unblocked your blocked list facebook says as many as eight hundred thousand users may have been affected it's the second bug in a month for the social media platform in june a bug caused about fourteen million users to post publicly regardless of their settings more utah residents have been ordered to evacuate their homes as crews struggled to gain control over a wildfire burning near a popular fishing reservoir the fire burning near strawberry reservoir has grown to sixty two square miles over three.

facebook brynn gingras bill michaels jim roope strawberry reservoir barbara kusak new york utah five years sixty two square miles
"gingras" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

03:26 min | 3 years ago

"gingras" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Are believed to be protesters correspondent brynn gingras says police are talking to the woman perched on the statue of liberty three nypd officers those are emergency service unit officers are highly trained highly skilled officers that really do multiple practices we've been on some of them with them for these type of situations that they are on a ladder and also connected to each other through harnesses and what they're doing right now is trying to deescalate the situation trying to talk to this protester to try to get her to come closer to them so they could put a harness on her and safely get her down protesters held a banner over the railing at the base of the statue those seven people are now in custody two people were killed and five others injured after a tree branch collapsed on them during a fireworks event in rock island illinois it happens suddenly last night at a celebration while dozens of people were sitting under a tree many got away safely and others tried to lift up the giant branch to help those trapped beneath it the rock island sheriff's department says the branch fell without any warning crushing families sitting underneath the tree the sheriff says daniel mendoza senior sixty one rock island was pronounced dead at the scene and lawrence anderson seventy two a moline was transported to a hospital where he was pronounced dead fireworks are thought to be the cause of a fire that damaged several buildings last night in franklin park are nick gale with more the franklin park fire department responded to a call of a fire at the franklin park ice arena firefighters found two garages fully engulfed which then had spread to the ice arena officials say the owner of one of the buildings admitted to lighting fireworks police are investigating to determine whether charges are warranted nick gale wls am eight ninety new an employee has been seriously injured in explosion at a pyrotechnics plant in south west missouri the fire subsequently broke out in the am pyrotechnics plant in pleasant hope which supplies big firework shows firefighters say most of the workers left the building before the fire but one person remained inside that woman was removed from the building with serious injuries and flown to a hospital the cause of the explosion is under investigation with a self imposed deadline for announcing his choice to replace retiring supreme court justice anthony kennedy president trump is moving swiftly with interviews and has narrowed his choices down he spoke of the process to tuesday night west virginia dinner honoring military service bob costantini with more on that the president has spoken directly with seven potential candidates for the opening that includes senator mike lee of utah who has no particular judicial experience police a rock ribbed conservative susan very talented people brilliant people and that you're going to really love it like just as gorsuch we hit a home run there and we're gonna hit a home run here the front runners are appeals court judges already vetted by the senate and a few put in their posts by mr trump if there is a favourite among favorites court watchers believe it is amy coney barrett of the seventh circuit she could be the first conservative female on the court someone who is previously questioned the roe versus wade precedent for that she's bound to bring significant opposition from the left bob costantini washington the government's dietary guidelines making americans fatter correspondent john stolnis talked to one health expert who says yes about ninety three million americans were considered obese in two thousand fifteen and sixteen roughly four in ten of all americans according to data released by the cdc last month but it may not be our fault according to nina titles executive director of the nutrition coalition and author of.

brynn gingras
"gingras" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"gingras" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"Off the eighteenth green what has adviser kellyanne conway tried to distance the trump administration from responsibility for jump in the number of migrant children being separated from their parents at the us mexico border conway told nbc's meet the press nobody likes saying babies ripped from their mother's arms from their mothers williams frankly but we have to make sure that d h asses laws are understood through the sound bite culture that we live in nearly two dozen people were injured following a shooting at an art festival in trenton new jersey that police believe was the result of a neighborhood beef correspondent brynn gingras has more on the suspects one of them was killed according to law enforcement by police he actually was just out of jail on parole from homicide charges a second person is in police custody custody on weapons charges and then a third person is in the hospital he remains the only person currently still in critical condition an earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of five point nine rocked western japan the chief government spokesman says no major damage has been reported hooley giuliani says president trump has no plans to issue pardons now in the russia investigation but could choose to do so once the special counsels work is done the president's attorney told cnn state of the union that issuing apart in now would cloud what giuliani believes is a very clear picture of an extremely unfair investigation i'm barbara kusak ever wonder why european seemed to speak so many languages maybe it's because they use babble the number one selling language learning app in europe variables awardwinning.

kellyanne conway us nbc trenton brynn gingras japan hooley giuliani trump president barbara kusak russia attorney cnn europe
Panama City, FL | WJHG Newschannel 7

The Drive Home with Jillian Barberie and John Phillips

00:53 sec | 3 years ago

Panama City, FL | WJHG Newschannel 7

"Friends that his longtime personal attorney handled only a tiny tiny fraction of his legal work a new york judge ruled that an independent evaluator will determine which if any of the files sees by the fbi from michael kohn solomon and office are privilege correspondent brynn gingras says that federal prosecutors use the president's words as part of their motion today is what the government was arguing all along they said we've always said it's a minimal work so there really isn't privileged information here and that's why they put forward this motion and the judge here in this federal case agreed and so do the cones attorneys and now we have a special master and an explosion rocked parts of town wisconsin jeff whittle has released eleven people were injured today when a tank of crude oil or asphalt explode loaded at a refinery in superior wisconsin the blast set up a noxious plume of smoke that forced evacuation of home schools and one hospital and talk radio seven.

Attorney FBI Michael Kohn Solomon Brynn Gingras President Trump Jeff Whittle Wisconsin New York
Barbara Jones, former federal judge, appointed as special master in Michael Cohen case

Dr. Drew Midday Live with Mike Catherwood

01:12 min | 3 years ago

Barbara Jones, former federal judge, appointed as special master in Michael Cohen case

"To see who who he really was cosby was found guilty on all three counts of aggravated sexual assault against a woman back in two thousand four he will remain free on bail while he awaits sentencing james haas kabc news atf and fbi agents along with santa ana anaheim police officers served warrants at six locations in santa ana this morning as part of a nine month investigation into illegal gun and drug sales and orange county seven people were charged an eighth person was arrested today thirty four guns a hand grenade and four point four pounds of math were also seized the new york judge who's overseeing the case against president trump's personal lawyer michael cohen appointed a special master today to determine what materials that were seized recently from cohen are protected by attorney client privilege correspondent brynn gingras reports master is a neutral position for this case separate from the government separate also from cohen and his attorneys and again she will oversee how these documents move forward federal prosecutors dropped their objection to the appointment of a special master to review the seas materials today after trump told fox news.

Cosby Santa Ana Donald Trump Michael Cohen Fox News Aggravated Sexual Assault James Haas FBI Anaheim New York President Trump Attorney Brynn Gingras Four Pounds Nine Month
"gingras" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"gingras" Discussed on WJR 760

"A limited time only seven sixty wjr news dick hafner michigan attorney general bill schuette he says he thinks more complaints may come in about dr williams trample the former dean of medicine at michigan state solid michigan state police department of attorney general and you know arlene is is about who if any new what nasser was doing it and whether or not they did anything to stop or just let it go by who'd he was on with paul w end on the frank beckmann show scramble is free on bond after he was charged with misconduct in office and fourth degree criminal sexual conduct a special prosecutor appointed by shoot he says several female medical students say they were propositioned by strangle who suggested to them that he might be able to help them get through medical school the deputy mccomb county clerk is placed on leave deputy clerk jackie ryan was refusing to leave office earlier this morning a day after her boss the county court keren springer was removed from office for lying about residency ryan eventually left the office she says that she's going to expose corruption bocom county judges will meet and she was a temporary replacement for springer a murder case against a detroit man is apparently being dropped after he served forty five years in prison seventy one year old richard phillips and a co defendant were convicted of first degree murder in one thousand nine hundred seventy two the case was based on testimony of the victim's brotherinlaw the co defendant admitted a few years ago that he killed the victim was somebody else and didn't know phillips at the time phillips was released in december these eggs won't hatch the ceo of cleveland for tilleke clinic as apologizing over the failure of a storage tank reporter brynn gingras says four thousand frozen eggs and embryos were lost when a temperature alert system was shut off particular tank ashville admits with having technical issues for several weeks they were in the process of fixing the problem knitting the embryos but that had isn't yet happened when this all now functions ohio universities hospitals for tilleke clinics acknowledging that a special train into beijing carried the.

michigan beijing ohio reporter first degree murder detroit murder mccomb frank beckmann nasser dr williams attorney arlene dick hafner ashville brynn gingras tilleke clinic cleveland ceo richard phillips