13 Burst results for "Ginger Kerrick"

"ginger kerrick" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"ginger kerrick" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Offer rate for the pathways in terms that are graduating each year are between ninety to ninety five percent annually. And so it's a really good statistic for us because the folks that are coming into the program, they are getting jobs upon graduation, and they're getting jobs in places that they're going to want to stay in for for years to come. You know, part of that is due to the fact that they're bonding with each other another big pieces. That they're kind of bonding with Jay ac- in general. I mean, so many opportunities for the students to to kind of lift their heads up and see what is available across JSE. In addition to the rotations. We do have tours of different facilities that the students can go on. We have different lectures that the students can attend where the here from current managers and astronauts and just NASA legends, and those kinds of folks and Alexis, I think you're actually working on that committee, correct? I'm on the toys and lectures committee. It's one of our professional developed committees that the interns have. So I was able to schedule a couple of tours. We're going to do tour of the Aries lab where they process the moon rocks. And we also have a lot of great lectures, come in because a lot of the senior level staff and also several prominent figures at NASA were also wants members of the intern program. So they really love giving back I will to reach out to ginger Kerrick talk her before as well as gene Kranz he'll be coming to speak to us next week. So we're all very excited. Very cool. Yeah. I've had ginger Kerrick on the podcast before she is. She is a wonderful person. And and I think I went to everyone her lectures when I when I was a student. I I was I was here for three tours like like most like most students, and I think I went every single year because she's just a fascinating person. And again, those people can inspire you not just ginger, but like everyone that that gets up there. Everyone has a different story. A different unique perspective. And it's it's it's amazing. I think we also had Chris craft one year, which was absolutely fascinating. We had gene Kranz as well. I kind of wanted to backtrack a little bit because before beginning to the nitty gritties of just what the pathways internship is all about you were talking about, you know, we're talking about fifty students. You're talking about a turnover of ninety five percent of the students that come that are offered the fulltime job take it. And and that's that's huge. But I think a lot of that is because of the students themselves. It's very selective process. Healing you only get a couple at a time a couple dozen shirt. But but they're they're off. Eighty talented people. So if you are looking for someone to say, yes, I'm going to offer you a pathways internship here at NASA. What are you looking for in a student? That's a really good question. And you're right. It's it's a highly competitive process. We have we have announcements that are open twice a year. And in those announcements, we get thousands of applicastions that come through, you know, each each cycle in the spring and the fall were were whittling that down to about forty five students that were selecting. So it it definitely gets very competitive. And I get that question a lot, you know, what are some of the things that set me apart from the rest of the candidate pool. And you know, the answer probably isn't as surprising as you might think, you know, here at NASA we rely on on every single employee to contribute as offensively as they can to make the mission happen. And so, you know, teamwork is something that's really important to us..

NASA ginger Kerrick gene Kranz JSE Jay ac intern Chris craft Alexis ninety five percent one year
"ginger kerrick" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"ginger kerrick" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"It was it was fantastic. And that's how the program is designed as everybody starts on the same day with orientational and the kind of go through that as a as a cohort. And so what you see from semester to semester is a group of students that are coming from all sorts of places down to Houston where they don't have any homework. So nice nights and weekends. I mean, they're doing road trips exploring the Houston area exploring, you know, Texas and. And just having a lot of fun together. I find that that actually you end up building a strong relationship with Texas and with with coming here knowing that all your friends are going to be here that you're going to have a friend base. Because a lot of when you're talking about students coming in. It's not it's not all like you Jonathan where you were already in the Houston area. And let's just go down the street. I'm not exactly sure where in the Houston area, you're from, but I came from Pennsylvania. So I had to leave a lot behind. I am my road trip to get here was about twenty four hours. It was we we made a thing out of it. But it was really fun. But I knew when I was coming here fulltime accepting the full time position was that much easier because we had explored a lot of Houston because I knew I was having a refrain creep here. I'm sure you you're kind of thinking the same thing Lexus, right? When you first come here, especially if you're not from Houston you off millions of Texas. It's a lot of like it's a lot similar to your freshman year in college that you don't know anyone you're kind of scared. The Johnson Space Center is a is a big place, and I can be overwhelming if you. Don't have a group or friends to support you in that. But yeah, we've definitely bonded a lot. We do go on some road trips. There's a group of interns that drove to see the Cretan launch a couple of weeks ago. Nice. We really become more of a close knit community. It's definitely made the transition to kind of moving and living in a new place. A lot easier. And I think that makes a pretty again, not only just a bond, but a strong bond with with coming here. Because I think I mean on the Jonathan if you know the statistics, but I know just personally anecdotally, a lot of my friends, we're here for a long haul. You know, where we're here, and we're going to stay here because of the community. Yeah. That's one of the really cool things about the program is that it's our primary mechanism for fulltime hiring so impermanent hiring about fifty percent of our total centers. Hiring comes from pathways conversions to full-time and our offer rate for the pathways in terms that are graduating each year are between ninety to ninety five percent annually. And so it's a really good statistic for us because the folks that are coming into the program, they are getting jobs upon graduation, and they're getting jobs in places that they're going to want to stay in for for years to come. You know, part of that is due to the fact that they're bonding with each other another big pieces. That they're kind of bonding with Jay ac- in general. I mean, so many opportunities for the students to to kind of lift their heads up and see what is available across JSE. In addition to the rotations. We do have tours of different facilities that the students can go on. We have different lectures that the students can attend where the here from current managers and astronauts and just NASA legends, and those kinds of folks and Alexis, I think you're actually working on that committee, correct? I'm on the toys and lectures committee. It's one of our professional developed committees that the interns have. So I was able to schedule a couple of tours. We're going to do tour of the Aries lab where they process the moon rocks. And we also have a lot of great lectures, come in because a lot of the senior level staff and also several prominent figures at NASA were also wants members of the intern program. So they really love giving back I will to reach out to ginger Kerrick talk her before as well as gene Kranz he'll be coming to speak to us next week. So we're all very excited. Very cool. Yeah. I've had ginger Kerrick on the podcast before she is. She is a wonderful person. And and I think I went to everyone her lectures when I when I was a student. I I was I was here for three tours like like most like most students, and I think I went every single year because she's just a fascinating person. And again, those people can inspire you not just ginger, but like everyone that that gets up there. Everyone has a different story. A different unique perspective. And it's it's it's amazing. I think we also had Chris craft one year, which was absolutely fascinating. We had gene Kranz as well. I kind of wanted to backtrack a little bit because before beginning to the nitty gritties of just what the pathways internship is all about you were talking about, you know, we're talking about fifty students. You're talking about a turnover of ninety five percent of the students that come that are offered the fulltime job take it. And and that's that's huge. But I think a lot of that is because of the students themselves. It's very selective process. Healing you only get a couple at a time a couple dozen shirt. But but they're they're off. Eighty talented people. So if you are looking for someone to say, yes, I'm going to offer you a pathways internship here at NASA. What

Houston NASA Texas ginger Kerrick gene Kranz Lexus Johnson Space Center Jonathan Jay ac JSE Pennsylvania intern Chris craft Alexis ninety five percent twenty four hours fifty percent one year
"ginger kerrick" Discussed on Other Side of Texas

Other Side of Texas

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"ginger kerrick" Discussed on Other Side of Texas

"Dr Ted Mitchell as we roll along. You got on the green stripe shirt. And some Wrangler 's that what you were to work today. And it's what I wear to work most days in the jacket. No, no jacket today. Now, only forty four when I left the no nobody can tell you what to do. Well, you haven't met my wife. But but miss. No. Fortunately, she wants to wear a jacket. She was out feeding horses when I left. Okay. And so you don't want the chancellor's house setup. It take you win the place where you can keep your horses. Well, you know. Yeah. Because the chancellor's house is up for sale right now it is. And here's the thing. If you look at what we're trying to do as a system. When I started in two thousand and ten the state was having a tough tough time with its Konami and during periods like that it's really easy to go in and cut a budget because there is no money for anybody. Anyway, it's tougher to do that when you have a lot of money and right now during the session, we have a lot of money, but what we're trying to do is make sure that within our own system. People understand we're being good stewards of everybody's money. And so we're going through an and we're analyzing things the system level to see where things may be better served at university level. But that also includes the trappings and that includes the chancellor's mansion. And I know I've had pushback from some people about doing it. But that money in my people just friends of mine, but in my estimation, the money could be spent better for other things. And so and we have beautiful venues on our campus. To show off when we're having events we've got beautiful places on campus to take people if you're trying to show off what Texas Tech's all about. We've got great places to do that right there on the campus. We don't need a separate mansion to do that. Region change at Texas Tech. We're look here's my plan. We're in Carey you for the next thirteen fourteen minutes or so K let you get back. Bob. Huggins says is came is not dead West Virginia can let you out of here and see if that team's dead or not coming up in the big twelve turnament, a big regions change, the governor announcing that ginger Kerrick Mark Griffin Desi wobble to replace s. Bras, Lancaster in Francis at Texas Tech. When did you first learn what are your initial thoughts on this region? Change verse some that we've that I can tell that you've had three straight region change 'cause region are up every every two years in Sessa three right here..

chancellor Texas Tech Dr Ted Mitchell Konami Sessa West Virginia Huggins Bob Mark Griffin Francis thirteen fourteen minutes two years
"ginger kerrick" Discussed on Other Side of Texas

Other Side of Texas

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"ginger kerrick" Discussed on Other Side of Texas

"On a jam packed program. Got Ross Ramsey ahead for you, executive editor of the Texas Tribune. And folks, how long has it been since you heard this music? Had. It's been the wall. Eight years reaching eight apparently coming to conclusion today apparently. This news out just this afternoon. Ginger Kerrick of Webster. Let me start with the headline governor abbot appoints three to Texas Tech university system board of regents Austin, Texas is the dateline. Texas governor Greg Abbott has appointed three to the text university aboard regions with terms set to expire January thirty one twenty twenty five lots of people ask me have text me called me message me had texts here on the show. What's going on? We'll now we all know together. What's going on? Ginger Kerrick of Webster is the flight integration division chief for NASA. Johnson Space Center and has served embarrass roles and capacities in human spaceflight training in operations for twenty seven years. He's a member of the society women of women engineers, volunteer coordinator for Trump and fynt triumphant excuse me, so used to sing a T R U Impe and saying Trump triumphant tales Inc and is annual MC as Galveston polar plunge benefiting.

Ginger Kerrick Webster Texas Texas Tribune Greg Abbott Texas Tech university Ross Ramsey Trump Johnson Space Center executive editor division chief volunteer coordinator NASA text university Austin abbot tales Inc twenty seven years Eight years
"ginger kerrick" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"ginger kerrick" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Was. That. Okay. Chuck that up to my age. But I was I was gonna say this if you are working on a program. Be committed. It's not just a job. It's so much better. If you are. Into that. And you've watt into what they're trying to do. And you're gonna add what it takes to make it as success as I look back on it. I feel so fortunate at this stage in my life. I've done a lot of other things. But I feel so fortunate to have had that eight years here back when that was the criteria. Well, I want you guys to join me and thinking our panel. No, this was a tremendous conversation. We just thank you all for all of them formation that you shared the advice. Thank you very much. Bring your. Space. Hey, thanks for sticking around. I hope you enjoyed that. That was a little different from what we usually do. It's a onstage presentation. But there was a lot of great stuff in there. And of course, not many times. Do we get that many legends altogether to talk about some of the great history? We have at the Johnson Space Center. So hope you liked it. Where game we're in the middle of the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo missions. You can check out some more at NASA dot gov slash specials slash Apollo fiftieth. Otherwise, you can check out some of our other NASA podcasts on NASA gov slash podcast. There's some great ones that I know. I'll be binging on on the mission invisible. Network gravity assist. Nessin Silicon Valley rocket ranch. Yeah. We got a lot. Now, you can go to NASA gov slash ISS. To learn about the information on what's going on. Now, we got some commercial crew launches coming up. So make sure to check out some of those NASA gov slash NTV to find out how you can watch them live and join us on all of the social media's Facebook insta-. Graham and Twitter at NASA at NASA Johnson Space Center, what have you like the hashtag ask NASA and submit a question on your favorite platform for either us or for either the Joneses space in or for Houston. We have a podcast, but if you wanted on the show, make sure to mention Houston, we have a podcast. So this episode was recorded on November first twenty eighteen thanks to Alex. Perriman. Pat, Ryan, nor ran and Kelly Humphries thanks to Vanessa white for moderating. This this episode and to our panelists while Cunningham, Glenn Lenny, Jerry, Griffin and ginger Kerrick. Happy fiftieth anniversary to Ness as Paulo program that'll wrap up our two part series for Apollo eight. And we'll be back next week.

NASA NASA Johnson Space Center Johnson Space Center Chuck Apollo missions Nessin Silicon Valley Houston Ness Alex Facebook Kelly Humphries Vanessa white Twitter ginger Kerrick Pat Cunningham NTV Joneses Graham
"ginger kerrick" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"ginger kerrick" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"You got. Companies that are outstanding that can can do a lot of stuff. And you got I keep telling people around the world that people didn't ask her just mart is in fact, there are less smarter and more your. And smarter is probably the better word. I'm looking at Brown money. But I really think you're you're off on an adventure meal and think of it that way, that's what I'd say. It just dawned on me too. I think you've got like forty five or fifty astronauts in the astronaut office now. As wondering. Opinion. Those people are here. Can I see the hands? Anybody that's working astronaut office couple. Thank you very much back there. Okay. The. There was another thought I had that. I thought it was gonna find interesting. But I forgot what it was. That. Okay. Chuck that up to my age. But I was I was gonna say this if you are working on a program. Be committed. It's not just a job. It's so much better. If you are. Into that. And you've watt into what they're trying to do. And you're gonna add what it takes to make it as success as I look back on it. I feel so fortunate at this stage in my life. I've done a lot of other things. But I feel so fortunate to have had that eight years here back when that was the criteria. Well, I want you guys to join me and thinking our panel. No, this was a tremendous conversation. We just thank you all for all of them formation that you shared the advice. Thank you very much. Bring your. Space. Hey, thanks for sticking around. I hope you enjoyed that. That was a little different from what we usually do. It's a onstage presentation. But there was a lot of great stuff in there. And of course, not many times. Do we get that many legends altogether to talk about some of the great history? We have at the Johnson Space Center. So hope you liked it. Where game we're in the middle of the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo missions. You can check out some more at NASA dot gov slash specials slash Apollo fiftieth. Otherwise, you can check out some of our other NASA podcasts on NASA gov slash podcast. There's some great ones that I know. I'll be binging on on the mission invisible. Network gravity assist. Nessin Silicon Valley rocket ranch. Yeah. We got a lot. Now, you can go to NASA gov slash ISS. To learn about the information on what's going on. Now, we got some commercial crew launches coming up. So make sure to check out some of those NASA gov slash NTV to find out how you can watch them live and join us on all of the social media's Facebook insta-. Graham and Twitter at NASA at NASA Johnson Space Center, what have you like the hashtag ask NASA and submit a question on your favorite platform for either us or for either the Joneses space in or for Houston. We have a podcast, but if you wanted on the show, make sure to mention Houston, we have a podcast. So this episode was recorded on November first twenty eighteen thanks to Alex. Perriman. Pat, Ryan, nor ran and Kelly Humphries thanks to Vanessa white for moderating. This this episode and to our panelists while Cunningham, Glenn Lenny, Jerry, Griffin and ginger Kerrick. Happy fiftieth anniversary to Ness as Paulo program that'll wrap up our two part series for Apollo eight. And we'll be back next week.

NASA NASA Johnson Space Center Johnson Space Center Brown Houston Apollo missions Nessin Silicon Valley Chuck Twitter Ness Alex Joneses Graham Facebook Vanessa white Kelly Humphries Pat ginger Kerrick Cunningham NTV
"ginger kerrick" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"ginger kerrick" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"He sten. We have a podcast. Welcome to the official podcast of the NASA. Johnson Space Center episode Seventy-seven Apollo eight part two I'm Gary Jordan. And now be just introducing you today. If you're familiar with us, this is where we bring in scientists engineers and astronauts Alta, let you know the cool stuff about what's going on right here at NASA. So on today's episode we're doing something a little different something special in celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of Apollo eight. You'll notice that this is part two for part one. We had the resident historian. Dr Jennifer rosina's Zell of the Johnson Space Center in the studio to take us back fifty years on the golden anniversary of the Apollo eight launch. We discuss details on the mission itself. And even broaden some interviews with some of the astronauts of that flight today were moving out of the studio and onto the stage to bring you some of the legends behind Apollo eight. We had a panel discussion hosted here at the Johnson Space Center for our workforce. And today, we're bringing that discussion to you just trying. Something a little different this time. The event occurred on November first twenty eighteen it was moderated by Vanessa white. The current deputy director of the Johnson Space Center seated next to her on the stage where Apollo astronauts, Walt Cunningham, the Apollo seven lunar module pilot Glenn loonie flight director for Apollo seven and eight Gerry Griffin. Apollo seven flight director and former director of the Johnson Space Center from eighty to eighty six and ginger Kerrick. The current chief of the flight integration division. And a former flight director white pose several questions to these legends to get some insight into what made these historic flights successful and how we can apply. These successes to our future endeavors. So continuing our celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of Apollo eight and the historic achievements of the Apollo program. We bring this special presentation on Houston. We have a podcast enjoy. County. Mark. We have. It is my pleasure to introduce the panel, and then to moderate these are folks that have a luxurious careers was going to take a little time to go through introductions. So, but please applause after each one as I go. So I we have Colonel Walter Walt Cunningham Walt has forty five years of diversified management. Experience accumulated at the highest levels during separate careers in private industry government service and the US military with notable achievements in each he was a United States, Marine corps, Colonel and fighter pilot. He was a NASA astronaut and program manager, he was Apollo seven, astronauts and lunar module pilot, his private sector career included venture capital real estate offshore pipeline and consulting engineering industries chief executive and senior operating positions. A few of his many awards include a national NASA, exceptional service medal distinguished service medal a medal valor American Legion. Nineteen seventy five and he was named to Houston hall of fame and international space hall of fame. Walt cunningham. Next. I'm going to introduce mister Jerry Griffin. Mr. Griffin is the former director of NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston. His career included senior positions in government and industry at NASA. In addition to his position as director. He also served as deputy director of the Kennedy Space Center in Florida and Dryden flight research center in California, Mr. Griffin also held the posts of associate administrator for external relations and assistant administrator for legislative affairs and NASA headquarters during Nasr's Apollo program. Mr. Griffin was a flight director in mission control and served in this capacity for all of the Apollo missions. He was lead flight director for three lunar landing missions Apollo twelve. Fifteen and seventeen during the flight of Apollo thirteen. Mr. Griffin was scheduled to lead the lunar landing team in Michigan. Troll when the land was cancelled after the oxygen tank explosion. He led one of the teams flight controllers who were responsible for the safe return of astronauts, Mr. Griffin was a technical adviser for the movies. Apollo thirteen contact and deep impact in the private sector. He held senior engineering post with Lockheed, and General Dynamics, Mr. Griffin was president and chief executive officer of the greater Houston chamber of commerce, and he is currently a technical and management consultant for Korn ferry international. Mr. The

Johnson Space Center Gerry Griffin Apollo NASA director deputy director Walt Cunningham NASA Johnson Space Center Colonel Walter Walt Cunningham Apollo missions Kennedy Space Center United States Houston Gary Jordan president and chief executive sten Vanessa white Houston hall of fame Zell
"ginger kerrick" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"ginger kerrick" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"And now be just introducing you today. If you're familiar with us, this is where we bring in scientists engineers and astronauts Alta, let you know the cool stuff about what's going on right here at NASA. So on today's episode we're doing something a little different something special in celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of Apollo eight. You'll notice that this is part two for part one. We had the resident historian. Dr Jennifer rosina's Zell of the Johnson Space Center in the studio to take us back fifty years on the golden anniversary of the Apollo eight launch. We discuss details on the mission itself. And even broaden some interviews with some of the astronauts of that flight today were moving out of the studio and onto the stage to bring you some of the legends behind Apollo eight. We had a panel discussion hosted here at the Johnson Space Center for our workforce. And today, we're bringing that discussion to you just trying. Something a little different this time. The event occurred on November first twenty eighteen it was moderated by Vanessa white. The current deputy director of the Johnson Space Center seated next to her on the stage where Apollo astronauts, Walt Cunningham, the Apollo seven lunar module pilot Glenn loonie flight director for Apollo seven and eight Gerry Griffin. Apollo seven flight director and former director of the Johnson Space Center from eighty to eighty six and ginger Kerrick. The current chief of the flight integration division. And a former flight director white pose several questions to these legends to get some insight into what made these historic flights successful and how we can apply. These successes to our future endeavors. So continuing our celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of Apollo eight and the historic achievements of the Apollo program. We bring this special presentation on Houston. We have a podcast enjoy. County. Mark. We have. It is my pleasure to introduce the panel, and then to moderate these are folks that have a luxurious careers was going to take a little time to go through introductions. So, but please applause after each one as I go. So I we have Colonel Walter Walt Cunningham Walt has forty five years of diversified management. Experience accumulated at the highest levels during separate careers in private industry government service and the US military with notable achievements in each he was a United States, Marine corps, Colonel and fighter pilot. He was a NASA astronaut and program manager, he was Apollo seven, astronauts and lunar module pilot, his private sector career included venture capital real estate offshore pipeline and consulting engineering industries chief executive and senior operating positions. A few of his many awards include a national NASA, exceptional service medal distinguished service medal a medal.

Johnson Space Center Apollo Colonel Walter Walt Cunningham director Walt Cunningham United States deputy director Zell Vanessa white Dr Jennifer rosina Gerry Griffin ginger Kerrick Glenn loonie chief executive Houston Marine corps program manager forty five years
"ginger kerrick" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

08:34 min | 2 years ago

"ginger kerrick" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Pushed and I pushed myself outside my comfort zone. It is. It's, it's got to be that persistence right? Because even through the discomfort through all of that, you just push anyway. And even though you're like unsure and you're uncomfortable, it's it's through that pushing that you kind of get to where you want to be and is it, is it fair to say that this is where you want to be that this love it? I love it. And and what I love about it. Is that people write the P the organization is a fantastic organization. We have a variety of work, and we like to tell people we put the human in human spaceflight, right? We're the organization that make sure that they are sustained that they're successful and that the performance meets the requirements of the programs. And that's exciting to me. That's puts us right on the edge of everything that that we do here at JC in everything that we do at NASA citing. I love this theme of persistence to and just kind of pushing through. I wanted to go back to you gave like a nice snapshot of your biography in the beginning, but the first couple of moments of of your interest in stem in when your dad to get into it. But then also this this inspiration to say, hey space, how did how did that happen? Was that? Was that push something that you wanted to do in the first place and maybe your dad helped you? Well, so it was kind of, you know, I grew up in in the nineteen sixties, right? When space was really cool. I remember watching, you know, Apollo eleven. What thinking? Well, that's really cool, but why is everybody so excited about this? Of course, we can do something like this. We just have to put our minds to it. Right? And so all through my education, I really my, I was pushed more from a disciplined standpoint to just excel unto do well. I never really knew that I could have a career in anything space related that I grew up in a suburb of Chicago. There's not a space business anywhere close by. And so for me, it was when I went to call to actually start out in chemical engineering. That was my major because it was the hardest curriculum to get into at the university of Illinois, and it was the easiest to transfer out of. And so I knew that it was something if I could get into that, I could do anything and I did. But then after awhile, it really didn't interest me. I had a friend who was in ERO and, and they said, hey, come sit in our some of our classes and see what you think. Maybe this would be something that interests you, and it was only then. Then that I really felt like, oh, I could actually do this for like, this could be a career for me. I could be involved in space stuff and not be an astronaut, right? I mean, that's what everybody that all want to be an astronaut. I really never wanted to be an astronaut. The idea of leaving planet earth just didn't. It was very intimidating to me, but the idea of being involved in that kind of adventure was very exciting. And so it really wasn't until I was in college that I knew that that was even a possibility for career. So what kinds of challenges do you have in college? I'm sure I'm sure being in a woman at certain challenges you to go. Yeah, especially in that in that timeframe. My I was only one of four women in my graduating class graduate work for the year that I graduated because there just weren't that many people going into aeronautical engineering at the time of a class of how many, oh goodness. I don't remember. I'm sorry, or is it? No, it's in the hundreds. Oh. Yes, so, but. It never dawned on me that that was that was odd. I think because I was in a lot of head a lot of guy, friends I was in classrooms with lots of it did that never occurred to me that that was unique. In fact, early in my flood-control control career when I was a propulsion officer, there was a shift a shuttle handover. So handovers when you go to teams of flight controllers, one is handing over to the other team. And so two full teams of flight controllers during a shuttle mission. And someone pointed out to me that I was the only woman in the room. Which is very different than it is today. But at the time I was the only woman and I thought so. Because it didn't dawn on me that that was unique. But somebody else saw that as unique because at the time right there weren't that many women in engineering disciplines and they're certainly weren't that many women working in mission control since then that's changed dramatically. If you look at a flight control team now it's probably half women, which is fantastic. I love seeing that. So then how about the your journey to the become a flight controller? I'm sure that was pretty challenging too because it was so abnormal. Well. So when I when I came here to the Johnson Space Center, I was hired into a flight control position so that I don't know that that was so much of a journey. Okay. I'm Ben becoming a flight director again with an at that level was I was somebody that I enjoy being a flight controller. In fact, I initially didn't apply to be a flight director, and then I Wayne HALE actually of all people suggested you should consider applying. And I said, well, why is it because you should consider applying? He was one of those folks that kind of pushed me outside my comfort zone. And I applied, and I was like I said, fortunate to be selected in the class of two thousand a net Hasbrouck who was the other woman who was selected and when we were selected there were only prior to us being selected. There had only been three other women who had actually been flight directors in the history of the American spaceflight programme. Incredible. Yeah, pretty pretty amazing. So we feel we felt very fortunate. Do you think it was that idea of persistence that really made Wayne HALE want to say you you should be the person to apply, or was it other characteristics that really stuck it? I suspect he saw some things to me too. He saw leadership qualities in me that maybe I didn't recognize myself, and he saw that I both had the technical discipline but also could lead and manage a team of various people because at the time I was actually a group lead, and so I had a number of people working for me. So he saw things in me that I maybe didn't see myself and later. Has and still continues to say to be a mentor of mine. Oh incredible. Yeah. All right. We'll look at where you are now. Now you're now you're director of of an entire division. So that's directorate directorate. That's right. So awesome. Cathy, thank you so much for coming on and kind of sharing your story. Glad to be here. Thanks so much for having me. Of course. Well, Jenny, that wraps up our guest for this episode. Thanks so much for helping to get these incredible women and leaders at NASA on the podcast today. My pleasure. Thanks so much for having us and for teaming up with us to do this really excited to get these incredible role models out even for myself personally, no, in many women are in the center. So I'm glad that we can highlight some of those stories today. Definitely even talking to them, it's just like, wow, she's like, I love that idea of perseverance and this this whole theme just coming together. So I'm glad we can team up for this. So usually at the end, we do some places you can go to get more information about NASA. So I'll just kinda start with the Johnson Space Anderson's. Well is a part of it, right? So NASA dot gov, slash Johnson. You can learn everything that's going on here. And then also on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. You can look for the NASA Johnson Space Center accounts, and then Jenny follow those accounts. Of course, good someone. If you're here, you have to fall. Okay. But if you're if you're listening to this, you can use the hashtag NASA on one of those accounts, whatever platform that's is your favorite to submit an idea or maybe a question for the podcast, and we'll make sure to answer it on one of the future episodes. Just make sure it's for Houston. We have a podcast because that's how we find it. There are plenty of other podcasts out there. Particularly NASA wants NASA in Silicon Valley, our friends over at Ames. They're doing some great stuff with twitch TV doing some live podcasts on TV. And then also you could check out Nastase gravity assist hosted by Jim green up at head dream green up at headquarters. So this podcast was recorded in March twenty eighteen. Thanks to Alex Perryman Kelly Humphries end Jessica vase and Chris Davis over at well. And of course you Jenny coming on to help with this together and thanks to all of our guests for coming on the show. Dana Weigel, ginger, Kerrick. Julie Kramer white. An Kathy Kerner happy women's history month. We'll be back next week. Hey. Myspace.

NASA Johnson Space Center director Jenny NASA Wayne HALE university of Illinois Chicago Dana Weigel Myspace Kathy Kerner Julie Kramer head dream Jim green Alex Perryman Kelly Humphries officer Houston Hasbrouck Facebook Ben
"ginger kerrick" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"ginger kerrick" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Well is a part of it right so nasa dot gov slash johnson you can learn everything that's going on here and then also on facebook twitter and instagram you can look for the nasa johnson space center accounts and then jenny follow those accounts of course good someone if you're here you have to fall okay but if you're if you're listening to this you can use the hashtag nasa on one of those accounts whatever platform that's is your favorite to submit an idea or maybe a question for the podcast and we'll make sure to answer it on one of the future episodes just make sure it's for houston we have a podcast because that's how we find it there are plenty of other podcasts out there particularly nasa wants nasa in silicon valley our friends over at ames they're doing some great stuff with twitch tv doing some live podcasts on tv and then also you could check out nastase gravity assist hosted by jim green up at head dream green up at headquarters so this podcast was recorded in march twenty eighteen thanks to alex perryman kelly humphries end jessica vase and chris davis over at well and of course you jenny coming on to help with this together and thanks to all of our guests for coming on the show dana weigel ginger kerrick julie kramer white an kathy kerner happy women's history month we'll be back next week hey myspace.

twitter houston nasa jim green alex perryman julie kramer facebook nasa johnson space center jenny head dream chris davis dana weigel kathy kerner
"ginger kerrick" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

08:17 min | 2 years ago

"ginger kerrick" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"You allow yourself that time to mourn that loss that is human nature. That is. Normal, but don't get stuck there. So whether it's asking help for Frank from friends or family, pick yourself back up and dust yourself off and look around and see if there is something else out there for you. Did your your passion, your passion for what you do is extremely expiring. You so much for coming on today. Thank you very much. And that was ginger Kerrick talking about her journey to her current role as the leader in as one of leaders actually inflator operations. So Jenny, who do we have next up next, we have Julie Kramer white. She's the deputy director of engineering for all of Johnson Space Center. Okay. Getting a little dizzy flying through these warm home, but let's do it anyway. Producer, Alex, bring us through. Jill. Thanks so much for coming on the podcast today to talk about your story and kind of how you are now one of the leaders in engineering. Right. That's my pleasure. It's great to be here. Thanks for having me. Fantastic. I kinda wanted to start with your inspiration for getting into this field stem. You said that you might you didn't really have a lot of, I guess, engineering influencers, but you ended up in engineering, right? Yeah, I, I grew up in the midwest. I grew up in Indiana, didn't have any engineers in my family, but sort of a product of the nineteen seventies push to put matchup women who had aptitudes in science and math to scientists them type fields. And of course we didn't call it that then, but, but that's a sensually what it was. And so I was very good at math and had a definitely had a mechanical aptitude, and the teacher saw that. And they started saying things to me like, well, gee, you ought to go into medicine or you ought to go into engineering. This thing engineering that I really didn't know too much about what it was medicine didn't really interest me. Gory. So. To start to understand more about engineering, luckily growing up in Indiana Purdue was a local school for me. It was a local option. So in state tuition, couple of hours from home, you know, mama do my laundry on the weekends. Yeah. So I wound up pursuing an engineering degree at Purdue kind of not really knowing what that really meant in terms of connection to NASA. But I knew really early from high school that if I was going to go into engineering, I was just going to go into engineering. I wanted to go work at NASA shuttle was starting, you know, in the eighties. And so I saw shuttle program start up, and I thought, wow, what a great way to do engineering would be to work at NASA. So that's what I had decided when I was in high school, what I wanted to do. So I guess it was watching some of the shuttle launches. And were you a, I guess a tricky at that point. Really hardcore old school Star Trek, not this new stuff. You know, the old school Star Trek Scotty, big fan club that nerdy. And so, yeah, has a big, big Star Trek fan. Cool. So I guess this, these sequence of events, this influence in the shuttle mission and and the Trekkie nece and then the go into Purdue, which ultimately had a great NASA connection kind of lead you to, I guess, when do you start thinking, okay, now's the time to apply to this sort of stumbled in actually, it's kind of embarrassing to admit now in retrospect, but kind of growing up in Indiana. I really didn't appreciate the connection that Purdue had to NASA. I mean, obviously, I went to do I studied in Grissom hall that probably should have clued me in, you know, given the first man that walked to the mood was from Purdue those things. Those connections I probably should have made, but I really didn't go at it that way. I mean, I, I wound up at Purdue through combination of circumstances really glad. I did bound up in coop program because when I started expressing to my professors an interest in working at NASA, they said, hey, you gotta check out this co-op thing, you'll you'll love it, right? So you go off and you work some and then you go school work. And so I wound up hiring in as you pretty do five coop term. So hard as a freshman. And so came here as a co op literally having had only three semesters of college. You know, basically my first couple of classes in calculus and my first class in physics, and they sent me to NASA came build a spaceship. So that that certainly led to its own combination of interesting circumstances. But when when they signed me to my first assignment and the a lot of old Apollo engineers that worked in the group that I was in, one of my favorite stories is the first office they assigned me to was three, three Apollo guys, and one of them has his favorite thing to do to co ops. I know now what is to drop a bunch of differential equation books on their desk and tell them this is what they need to know to work at NASA. And of course, I'd had two classes in calculus, horrible, horrible, horrible. I went home and I cried. I try my mom. It was just awful now, you know. So it's now it now it's it's fine but but it was a little bit shocking at first. Yeah, that'll definitely make your eyes go wide yet. So not ready. So not ready. So not ready for that. Right. So a lot of it was just, you know, not not being intimidated, really, and I, you know, I think I look back on a lot of my experiences early on in in NASA, and I'm sure we'll talk a little bit more about them, but that was a lot of it was just not being intimidated. Right, you couldn't. You couldn't be intimidated. You could never let somebody who's rank or their age or things kind of throw you off point you had to stick with it. So did you have a mentor that sort of helped you along or was it like this was like an internal decision like. Yeah, absolutely. I definitely had several mentors, but my probably my biggest early career mentor was a guy named Dan Weiss. He was a structural engineer. He worked Apollo, he'd work the Lander and then had come into the early shuttle orbiter program in orbiter, subsystem manager in primary structure, which was what I would eventually become. I was his protege. I was told that I was number six and that he'd been through five. And so far they'd all kind of cried and got home. So I was sort of the, you know, I was the sixth one. No, they told me that we're after me. They told me afterwards that, you know it was good thing that I had finally stuck because he was getting close to retirement and they couldn't find a good match. But I stayed with him for a couple years retired. She'll be the ropes. You know, introduce me to all his connections, sort of a ready made network, which is hugely important. And I think when things we struggle with today with how lean lean, the budgets are the Halloween, the staffing profiles are it's hard to double up in a lot of these areas and people in the kind of relationship that I had with stand. But it's so fundamental because I mean, basically when he retired, I inherited his network, right? So I started with a, you know, a fifty two year old man's network at the age of twenty five. Okay. It was a pretty amazing step in terms of your breadth of ability to to talk to people and get information and influence decision making. I really kind of picked up where he left off rather than having to start fresh on my own. So I, you know, when I do a lot of my discussions with young folks, I talked to him, people say, hey, your mentors are important in developing these networks are important. You can't even imagine at twenty five. You know how important that is, because it gives you just a massive, massive leg up in terms of your ability to to solve problems in gathering information and perspectives. Would you had to put the work in as a co op to you had to have the the derive I guess, to follow your mentor and say, yes, these are relationships. Even while he's still here and then look how it turned out. Now he's retiring and you have this network of people. You bet. And by the time he retired, I probably had about a probably almost a decade of works across the various organization. I was mostly instruction mechanics division, but I'd spent time in the machine shops and I'd spent time in all the branches of ESO. I had worked all different aspects of the product line that are structures and mechanics division support. So I'd done thermal and I'd done materials and

NASA Indiana Purdue deputy director of engineering ginger Kerrick Frank Jenny Julie Kramer Johnson Space Center Jill Dan Weiss Apollo Producer Grissom hall Alex engineer fifty two year
"ginger kerrick" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

11:04 min | 2 years ago

"ginger kerrick" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"You know, even though I thought it was odd how they were, you know how they were managing that. And then about a year end to it to my surprise, they gave me the largest assignment. The first biggest. I haven't really of the whole class and everything changed. Really. Wow. Okay. So you had to prove you're basically putting your head down and saying, okay, sure. Give me whatever you want, but whatever you give me, I'm going to own it. And I guess that's sort of showed the it showed that you could take on this largest ability. Exactly. What was luck responsibility out of curiosity. I actually ended up being assigned to the first increment. So I think most people are familiar at least work station with what our increments are, but basically we've got, we've got a set of crew members who fly up honestly using come back on the Soyuz, and so we've got a period of time that that is an increment so I in and then also assigned to lead the first shuttle assembly mission for my class. Wow. So all right. Yeah, very big task and very new. Two. So how long were you reflect rector then? I did that for about. Ten years total in the office. The last three years I was the deputy of that office allow. All right, Lisa flight directors leading more flight directors. That's something else too. Really. So then what what made you want to what opportunities came up next that you wanted to not be if like director anymore or lead fight directors. So this next change wasn't really my choice necessarily. Okay. During one spacewalks was VA Twenty-three. We had a crew members, Chris Cassidy and Luca parmigiano doing a spacewalk in about an hour into the spacewalk Lucas started noticing that his his Comcast, which is kind of a spandex type cap. It's on his head felt a little moist felt wet as the one on sort of getting wetter and wetter and it became apparent that he had water in his helmet. It's pretty pretty scary. Most severe contingency we've ever had on space station. The water ended up on the back of his head and worked its way across his eyes and over his nose. Oh, and luckily his mouth, you know, he still, he still could breathe, could've drowned. He was very calm when the actions he took, saved his life. But after that major failure, the program manager at the time, Mike suffered any kind of tapped me on the shoulder and said, hey, I need you to go lead this investigation. It was because you had the VA. Background. Because I had the background, but also he had worked with me another number of other contingency situations in mission control. Okay. And had kind of seen me leading the team's new you can do it. He knew I could. I didn't know. I. All right. So then that this was the, I, I guess it took you away from this deputy role and now you are leading this investigation fail failure investigation. What what's guessing you had a lot of challenges there too. I did. You know, I, you know when he first asked me to do it. I said, I'm Shirley. You have someone else who's qualified to lead failure investigation. I come from perations. I don't build fault trees. I don't. I don't. I've never seen someone go all the way down to root cause investigation. And you know he made the point that what's more important as having a strong leader, not having someone with the right knowledge, right? Because he surround yourself with people with them. That's the point is a leader right. What you know it's about what you can draw out of people. So I, I lead that that was about a year long investigation. Lot of hard work van tastic team. We've got a lot of expertise not just here, but, but at other centers that helped us out learned a lot about errors. We'd made with water behavior on the ground versus on orbit. Okay. And then so I guess, so that was your new job then for a whole year. And I guess you didn't go back to flight directing. Then after after that, the program manager have happened to have an opening in the space station program, and he asked me to come in lead one of the offices there, which is what I'm currently doing now, the vehicle office. Right. So what are you doing. So what do you do in the vehicle office? So the vehicle office is responsible for building all of the. Vehicle hardware, the system hardware, thermal systems, Power systems. There's a lot of building a maintaining that hardware and then also payload facilities. So there are a lot of multi user payload facilities that we have on the vehicle to do science club boxes and combustion racks, fluid racks, a lot of other things we build and maintain that hardware. Okay. So basically the the vehicle being the international space station and you just gotta make sure the gas is going the, it's running? Yes. Okay, that's that's a nice simplified way saying, one of the other really neat things that we're doing that with with the vehicle, we're working on building the exploration, grade life support systems that could take to Mars, and it's really important. We test those in microgravity and in a relevant environment. So you can't really, you can't really relate that on the ground. You gotta make sure it's working in this. Okay. So that's on the international space station right now. Then we are starting to build. In fact, the first. Piece of hardware should go up this summer and we'll continue adding over the next three or so years. Three to four years, and then we're hoping to test it for few years and wow, get ourselves in a much better position for having reliable life support systems that could take us on to Mars. Extremely important job. That's really, really cool. So along this along this path that you're talking about from maybe starting with, you know, spaces there, but it's maybe I want to go into prosthetics to eventually working your way up the up the management chain now and now leading groups leading teams doing things that you didn't think you were going to do leading failure investigations teams. What sort of traits did you have or maybe work on to get you to be able to do these things. I mean, one thing for sure is being persistent. If you wanna do something, don't give up, put, put your head down, keep working towards it. You know, I, I built my career on assignments that were not necessarily the most interesting or or sexy assignments. It doesn't matter what it is if you do it. Well, people will recognize it. You know, a lot of times I took the harder jobs that people just didn't wanna touch because they they didn't look fun. And those can be some of your biggest successes. The bigger the challenge, you know, the more you're going to grow if you wanna grow as a leader, you've got to put yourself into positions where you don't know everything, right. You've got to really stretch really far so that you have to rely on the team. You got to kind of make that switch from individual contributor to to leading and being reliant on the team. I mean, that's key. You know, a leader is only as good as the the team that's following them, so seems like you you weren't looking for. That's not fun. I don't really want to do that. You seems like you were almost seeking the challenge. You're like, yeah, I want to do that. This is going to be hard, but that's something that I want. To do if something's broken and you can go fix it. You know that you'll, you'll learn a ton. You'll grow a lot from that. All right. I love this idea of persistence of even if it's hard you someone's got to do it, and I think I can do it. I'm going to challenge myself and improved my skills to get to that point. Very cool, Dana. Thanks so much for coming on and telling your story and and really inspiring this idea of persistent. So I'm pretty you coming on. Thank you very much. Okay. That was Dana Weigel talking about her journey and her current role is a leader in the international space station program. So Jenny, who do we have next? So next we have ginger Kerrick. She's from the flight operations director and she's currently the chief of the flight integration division. Okay. Through the wormhole we go. Ginger, thank you so much for coming onto podcast today to talk about your story. Thanks for having me, of course. So. Kinda wanted to start from the beginning, just kind of kind of establish the baseline of how you I even got into, I guess your interest in NASA, but just stem in general. What was the? What was the inspiration there? Oh, sure. I used to check out books from the library every Friday, and I brought home one book when I was five years old called a strana me and astronauts, and I read that book cover to cover and proudly went into the living room and proclaimed a my parents gave early on. No, what I needed to do for the rest of my life. And I, I absolutely needed to be an astronaut. Wow. So whatever course was gonna take you there. That's the one with. Okay. So then you start at pursuing physics, right? Yes. And that's when you started going to, I guess it transitioned into university. Right? So he started taking classes there? Yes, early on in childhood. We didn't have honors classes, and so my mom would meet with each one of my teachers and tell them that ginger was special. So they would give me extra work and project. And so that worked out well early on, and then eventually in in high school got into honors classes and then is zeroed in on. I wanted to major in physics. So I started off at the university of Texas, El Paso in physics and then eventually transferred to Texas Tech. Okay. Did you did you. Was it? Was it this goal that you had in the back of your mind that really helped you to kind of excel because you were you graduated in the second of your class in high school, right? Yes, yes. By one thousand of a point. Not that I carry that with today's day. It was it was the goal, but it was also my upbringing. When I, my dad died when I was eleven years old, and my mom explained to me that I was not going to be able to go to college unless I had scholarships. And so she explained the way to get scholarships as you do really well in sports, or you do really well in school. And so I thought, well, okay, I I need to go to college so I better do really well and both. So when I graduated, I had a lot of different academic scholarships to choose from and some athletes scholarships choose from really what you play basketball. Oh, I was voted on El paso's female athlete of the year for the city the year that I graduated to. So I played basketball and volleyball and I had offers in both to go play. Okay. So what made you choose the academic right over the over the sports route? Bigger scholarships and bitter school. Oh. That I knew I could get a reputable degree from that. NASA would recognize. Okay. Oh, that's right. Because the ultimate goal is astronaut, right? So so you were doing a lot of things to to get to NASA, particularly the actually wrote to them when I was eleven and asked what it took to get here, and they wrote me back there. So cute and they said, you know, stay in schools, stay out of trouble. Listen to your parents and I had my little letter so proud. That's very cool. And I would inspire me to if I can get a letter.

ginger Kerrick Dana Weigel program manager NASA El paso Comcast basketball volleyball director Chris Cassidy Lisa VA perations university of Texas Mike operations director Jenny
"ginger kerrick" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"ginger kerrick" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"You seems like you were almost seeking the challenge you're like yeah i want to do that this is going to be hard but that's something that i want to do if something's broken and you can go fix it you know that you'll you'll learn a ton you'll grow a lot from that all right i love this idea of persistence of even if it's hard you someone's got to do it and i think i can do it i'm going to challenge myself and improved my skills to get to that point very cool dana thanks so much for coming on and telling your story and and really inspiring this idea of persistent so i'm pretty you coming on thank you very much okay that was dana weigel talking about her journey and her current role is a leader in the international space station program so jenny who do we have next so next we have ginger kerrick she's from the flight operations director and she's currently the chief of the flight integration division okay through the wormhole we go ginger thank you so much for coming onto podcast today to talk about your story thanks for having me of course so kinda wanted to start from the beginning just kind of kind of establish the baseline of how you i even got into i guess your interest in nasa but just stem in general what was the what was the inspiration there oh sure i used to check out books from the library every friday and i brought home one book when i was five years old called a strana me and astronauts and i read that book cover to cover and proudly went into the living room and proclaimed a my parents gave early on no what i needed to do for the rest of my life and i i absolutely needed to be an astronaut.

dana weigel jenny operations director nasa five years