18 Burst results for "Gillett"

"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

05:32 min | Last week

"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Medicine doctor? And even if there isn't someone in their area, perhaps some resources that would be valuable and helpful. Yeah. There are obviously many good doctors out there, even in traditional health clinics. Just like if you're searching for a mechanic or someone to fix your fence or whatnot, it is totally okay to read profiles and reviews of healthcare providers online. I would emphasize for the average person at least try to have a nurse practitioner or PA or MD or DO that they see. If they have someone like a D.C. or an ND as part of their healthcare provider team or dietician, whatnot or a health coach, and that is also okay. But they would just kind of be part of the team. If they're specifically looking for obesity medicine, advice as many people are, then looking for a doctor that is board certified in obesity medicine, of which there are tons all around a bomb is the certifying organization American board of obesity medicine. That is also a great place to start. That's good. And if somebody wants to get a blood panel or let's just assume maybe there isn't an obesity medicine specialist in their area or there isn't a Doctor Who's sophisticated and hormone health. But this excited individual wants to get a picture of their hormone health. Maybe they can tell their doctor like I want to make sure that we test for these things or whatever to the extent that they can shoulder responsibility for their health and be a little bit more active and have some agency in this relationship. For that individual, I would advise them to be brutally honest, even down to the tiniest little niche if they feel like their energy or focus or libido or athletic performance is even a little bit off or their sleep than tell the healthcare provider that and tell them that they would like diagnostic labs specifically to look for that. The healthcare provider could potentially use those changes, even if they're not severe, even if they're, let's say, moderate, they can still use that as a code to where potentially the insurance might cover it. However, conversely, fortunately, there's many different services that patients can use to get their labs done without having to go through insurance. I would venture to say for 90% of people, they're just best off, not even bothering with insurance, especially if they don't have anything if they're looking for a true baseline panel, then your insurance is very unlikely to cover it. It's not going to cover it. Looking for another service to cover for that. At some point, I will post my recommended lab panels at Gillette health dot com. But it's perfectly fine to shop around for labs just like you shop around for everything else. Yeah, cool. Meanwhile, you are practicing in Kansas, the Gillette health clinic. People can come and see you if they want to travel to Kansas, right? So they can go to your website to contact you. If they're interested in that, correct. They can go to Gillette health dot com and it tells a lot about our in person options and also our telemedicine options for many individuals that you just described. I would consider that individual underserved, I recently wrote an article that was published in the MSL journal with my friend Alec McCarthy about the role of medical affairs in telemedicine, basically the balance between on one hand, yes, in person medicine is always better than telemedicine, but on the other hand, telemedicine is a whole lot better than nothing. And a lot of individuals that we see via R telemedicine, let's say maybe this person sees this one time in person. And then after that, almost all their follow-ups are telemedicine for things like lab reviews or even meeting the patient, seeing if they're a good fit, telemedicine can be a wonderful option for that. Yeah, very cool. And if people want to learn more about you, they can listen to your podcast, the Gillette health podcast. You've done, you've done a couple not a ton of. Did you just start it? Or do you just do it intermittently? It's brand new. We're trying to figure it out. But we do plan on talking a lot more and bringing a lot more content that is applicable that is an actionable item to the public. We kind of do every other one. We do one where we just go way down the rabbit hole that's very niche, and then we do one that's kind of in layman's terms. Right. Cool. Yeah, I enjoy it. Check that out. I did say at the outside of this podcast that we were going to kind of get into the supplements. We didn't do so much of that. There was a million things I wanted to talk to you about that we didn't get to. But you and Andrew huberman did a great job of that was a very supplement centric conversation that went on for at least two and a half hours, so people can check that out. I don't know that I could do any better than you guys did on that regard. And that's it, man. I think that's it for today. I just wanted to kind of end it by saluting you. I think it's really cool what you're doing. I think it's important work. And I really think that you are a model of the future and a role model for future doctors and I really appreciate you coming here and sharing time and space with me and the audience been and I'm at your service if there's anything I can ever do to support you or help you out. Thank you. It's an honor and a pleasure. Yeah, cool. Instagram also drop your Instagram. You do a lot of cool stuff on Instagram. Instagram is definitely my main hub. It is Kyle Gillette MD. And Gillette health on all other platforms. Yeah. Right on that. And always welcome to come back here. There's plenty of other stuff I could talk to you

obesity American board of obesity medi Gillette Gillette health clinic MSL journal Alec McCarthy Kansas D.C. Andrew huberman layman Instagram Kyle Gillette MD
"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

06:51 min | Last week

"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Effects that I think of. It's effect on SHBG. It might likely bumps your SHBG up just a bit. Partly due to its action on insulin, IGF-1 and IGF binding peptide one, which is the protein that binds up IGF-1, which is kind of like think of it as your growth hormone. Long term. And then also it works on your glucose and insulin. So for an individual that has insulin resistance, metformin is a amazing anti aging intervention or for someone who is just has one of those things that are off. You can target that specifically to intervene. Same for mTOR. So let's say there's someone that is huge into intermittent fasting and they have great fasting. They don't have very much cancer history. They're not worried about cell senescence as much, which is kind of like zombie cells, if you will. Precancerous cells. They're probably not as good as the canon for rapamycin. But if there's someone on a very high protein diet, a lot of proteins like branched chain amino acids will activate mTOR. So they might be a better candidate for rapamycin, especially if they have a family history of cancers that can likely be prevented with it. Now, it's all still theoretical, but it is a very well tolerated medication. With NMN, there might be such a thing as too high a dose of cinnamon. It might be difficult to get because if you're not consuming it with fat, perhaps it's not absorbed as well. And also the, I don't think the debate is over about the absorption of intamin compared to even NAD, getting inside the cell, getting into the mitochondria, where CoQ10 can convert it to ATP. So I don't mean to be overly verbose. The thousand foot view is each of those is clinically applicable. But some individuals benefit far more from others. Like any growth agonist, whether it's growth hormone or a growth hormone releasing peptide or NMN if you have a very, very high dose and theoretically it can cause increased cell overturn and cell growth. Which can be potentially linked with cancer risks. Cancer is the big thing to worry about with that, obviously, right? So you don't play around personally with any of these protocols. I actually do. I do. Yeah. I don't think it would be harmful to most. Of course, what I do is not what everybody should do. But every two weeks I take rapamycin and I alternate days between nicotinamide riboside, which is NR and NMN, which is nicotinamide mononucleotide. And I usually stay around a dose of 250 to 500 milligrams of in a minute and again, I don't think necessarily anybody should do this. Cancer does run fairly strong in the family, both especially like the hormonal cancers like prostate cancer and breast cancer. I do take metformin only with my rapamycin. I obviously think it's a full protocol. I think it's clinically applicable. Yeah, that's super interesting. Do you notice, is there any kind of lived experience difference as a result of taking it or is it just something that's in the background doing whatever it's doing unnoticeable to you? That I know if I haven't developed cancer yet and hopefully I wouldn't have even if I hadn't taken it. But no deleterious side effects. Right. And no, but no, like noticeable energy boost or anything like that. Not from taking those, I also take ubiquinol, which is the active form of CoQ10, again, thinking about NMN and NAD precursors in general. If you're on NMN, the rate limiting step is likely not NAD+ for your energy. Many powerlifters and other athletes take ubiquinol, which is the, again, the active form of CoQ10 to help with energy, just like if you're fueling up a race car, you can't just keep giving it more fuel and expect it to function. At some point, the lack of fuel is not the rate limiting step. It's the fuel pump, which is L carnitine or the converting enzyme, which I suppose could be seen as octane booster or the backup fuel tank, which could be seen as creatine. Right. I could be wrong, but I seem to recall that here at Tia talked about his experience of being on metformin. And I think he did it for quite a while, but ultimately got off it because he felt like as an athlete, he couldn't hit his top end, right? There was some kind of energy limiter on it that was problematic for him. It likely goes back to metformin three main effects if you're taking metformin one evening every two weeks. It's very unlikely to have a significant effect on those parameters. But it can decrease your active or free IGF-1, just like you have a free testosterone, you have a free IGF-1. So both increases the IGF binding peptide one and decreases IGF-1. So if you're already suboptimal when it comes to growth hormone or IGF-1 that could certainly affect your performance. If you were free testosterone and free androgens are relatively low, then metformin can also slightly decrease your free testosterone because again it increases SHBG. And then also a lot of athletes are hypersensitive to peptides. And bodybuilders are this way as well. They know them as peptide guys. Where something that will increase their insulin. Of course, some bodybuilders do take insulin. But in general, if something increases your insulin and growth hormone and IGF-1 that can certainly be performance enhancing and metformin will decrease all three of those. So it kind of depends on what your baseline is. Yeah, interesting. That's wild man. Wow. Very, very interesting. Let's turn to women's hormone health for a little bit. You know, conversely from men who are obsessed about testosterone and virility and what we just talked about. From a women's perspective, I suspect they're concerns orient around fertility, what happens with menopause and the focus being on estrogen and maybe progesterone, right? So talk me through how you think about women's health and hormone health specifically and what women should be thinking about. Women obviously have a unique decision to make when it comes to hormone health because every woman will inevitably go through, at least with current technology, will go through ovarian failure, also known as menopause. There are many things that can likely prolong this. The health and the production of both the ovulation from the ovary and the production of hormones from the ovary. But when you're thinking about hormone health for women, you think about it actually very similarly to men where they just have a little bit less testosterone, so maybe one less let's say rooks and knights and bishops are testosterone.

cancer intamin prostate cancer breast cancer Tia ovarian failure
"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

03:24 min | Last week

"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"So you have pluripotent versus multiple potent. So that's why stem cell banking is something that each individual should consider. We actually chose not to stem cell bank with my one year old or my two year old, perhaps my decision will change in the future. It is something that is emerging and theoretically it can help cure a lot of diseases, some people have heard of a family that had a baby specifically just to help cure a rare bone cancer or whatnot. So a lot of this stem cell transplant or stem cell therapy can help with severe diseases, but it can also help with less severe diseases as well. It's only a matter of time until the technology catches up and we have no idea when it will. Yeah, it seems to be accelerating though quite a bit. It's interesting that you didn't that you didn't bank cells from your kids. What was the rationale for that? It can be relatively expensive. And I am not a 100% convinced that it will be clinically significant for individuals that do not have a rare disease. So for, for example, using stem cell therapy for a joint or a ligament healing, I think there will be excellent alternatives to that, whether it's PRP or peptides, I think that there's going to be, I don't think that in most cases stem cells will be the only thing that you can do. Unless you're trying to get a stem cell transplant for a rare hematologic disease. Right, right. So it's not necessary that you would need your own genetic code in those interventions in which case the importance of banking your children's stem cells become less important. Correct. But 50 years from now, who knows, man. It is a long time. It's a tough decision. And what makes it tougher is that often the individuals making that decision are very early on in their life when they are not as financially stable. So the opportunity cost for that is pretty high as well. Exactly. Same thing with freezing eggs or child storage for sperm. Yeah, yeah, yeah. I want to turn to female hormone health, specifically in a minute, but on the subject of stem cells, I can't help but think about what's going on in longevity science and anti aging science. And I just, I have to ask you kind of where your head's at in terms of some of the science out there, like what is the path that we are we on? Are we out over our skis when we're starting to talk about NMN and NAD and all this kind of stuff? I'm trying to get a sense of what's real and what maybe in the near or distant future, my sense is that it's really cool to talk about all these things and think about them. But in terms of their immediate practicality and applicability in our lives, like not so sure. So where is your head with all of that? So interventions, anti aging interventions we could talk about mitochondrial or growth agonist intamin in our even NAD ion patches or NAD infusions. And rapamycin correct. Rapamycin. That's a little different. Correct. Does that works on mTOR, so mTOR is mammalian target of rapamycin. And I think that has amazing promise as well. And it is currently clinically applicable as is NMN as is metformin. Metformin has three main

bone cancer
"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

07:31 min | Last week

"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"You produce most of your testosterone and growth hormone when you sleep. Testosterone has a pretty big spike in the morning, cortisol actually does as well. And then in the evening your melatonin spikes, these different spikes can be offset so they can happen at the wrong time. Growth hormone is released. It's a very short half life of just minutes. And it's pulsatile. So you'll get a pulse and get a pulse, and then that'll secondarily help increase IGF-1. So if your sleep is disrupted, it's very common to have decreased levels of testosterone or decreased growth hormone. In fact, obstructive sleep apnea or sleep apnea in general is one of the main pathologies that you see as a cause of hypogonadism. Right. So I want to get into testosterone in a few minutes, but if you're thinking, well, my testosterone is low, but my sleep is dysregulated before going on. Testosterone replacement therapy may be dial in the sleep. Yes. I have seen it be extremely efficacious. It's a much better testosterone booster than any supplement if you happen to have a sleep disorder. And you do want good quality and quantity. So a general thumb is 7 to 8 hours each night. Try to go to bed at the same time for some people like shift workers this can be particularly difficult. And then you're looking to have good deep sleep and good rem sleep as well. Yeah, and there's a relationship between rem sleep and fertility, right? So talk about that a little bit. Rem sleep along with zone two cardiovascular exercise are kind of the two best interventions to help with mitochondrial health. And the mitochondria, just like anything else in the body, they will produce energy to help you do things like meiosis or to do things like forming a spindle, which is basically you're pulling all your genome apart and then putting it back together. But just in two halves. So for both males and females, they help the mitochondria in the germ cell line, which is like the gamete line. Function. So that rem sleep will help your body correctly put all the genetic material where it is supposed to go. So on a typical night, like I wear a whoop, I pay attention to my sleep metrics. If I sleep 8 hours, sometimes my rem sleep is two and a half hours, sometimes it's one and a half hours. There tends to be a pretty consistent ratio between deep and rem, like I'm always striving to get like, I feel best when I've had a minimum of two hours of deep and two and a half hours of rem, like that. I don't always hit that, right? But when I hit that, I'm like good to go, right? So, is that ratio on par? What's interesting is, like, I can sleep 8 hours, but sometimes those numbers between deep and ram are all over the place. So just saying you got to sleep 8 hours isn't really the best metric or indicator for sleep hygiene. Correct. You can sleep a very long period of time, but the quality of the sleep will not be very good before stressful events, your sleep tends to be shorter duration, but actually higher quality. And part of that could be the cholinergic nervous system. Acetylcholine is the neurotransmitter that can help with different receptors in that system, like nicotinic receptors that nicotine also binds to and muscarinic receptors. So you want to ensure that you have optimal acetylcholine throughout the body. Some things that uptake acetylcholine like who perrine is a supplement that some people take to theoretically improve the rem sleep, especially if they don't have enough acetylcholine can potentially help with that. What is that called again? Who Perez in a it's a very weak acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, so it basically can help increase acetylcholine. There's also different cholinergic precursors like phosphatidylserine or phosphatidylcholine or alpha GPC that are precursors to acetylcholine. And then some people that are trying to optimize rem sleep will take things that are nicotinic receptor agonist, like tab X or sodium, which is a different plant, not a tobacco plant that forms the alkaloid nicotine, but a different plant that forms the alkaloid cysteine. And those are over the counter supplements that you have a penchant for prescribing to people who are dysregulated in their sleep. At times, rem sleep can be particularly difficult because it's one of the hardest to track baseline heart rate and heart rate variability tend to be extremely accurate on wearables, but rem sleep is kind of more like the gut microbiome or even cholesterol, where you're really looking at the trend within the individual, rather than the actual level. Yeah. But your sense is HRV is pretty accurate with things like this and the aura and stuff like that. How do we think about HRV? Like I'm always comparing mind and my friends and I know it's a highly individualized thing. And I guess intellectually I kind of know what it is and what it means, but I don't think I really know what it means or why it's important. It can tell us a ton. There is a scientist also at Stanford, doctor Michael Snyder, I believe. And he talks about his experience with heart rate variability and predicting periods of stress or even predicting illnesses. And within the individual, if you're very accustomed to knowing what your heart rate variability is and what makes it trend up or down, then it can tell you a ton. But if you're going to put on a wearable and then wear it for one day and look at your heart rate variability, it's going to tell you almost nothing. Right. So to define it though, HRV means, I don't know that I can say the eloquently, but it's the variability in the amount of time between heartbeats, right? Correct. You don't want that intermittent in between B to be the same amount of time every time. When it varies quite a bit, the greater the variability there, the greater indicator of health. Yes. Why is that? You have two different parts of your autonomic nervous system, your heart, you're not consciously telling your heart to beat. So it's maintained by a balance between your sympathetic nervous system, an example of that would be adrenaline makes your heart beat faster and your parasympathetic nervous system. The main nerve that that controls is called the vagus nerve, which is actually a cranial nerve, and then it runs down, innervates some of your gut too, by the way. And then it goes back into your heart, and you have the sinoatrial node and the atrioventricular node. So depending on how much activity your nervous system has on those two nodes, that will determine what your heart rate is. One good way to see how your body can adapt to this is taking a deep breath that's also known as a physiologic sigh. To where you can take one example is two deep breaths or three deep breaths through your nose and then a deep breath out through your mouth. As you do that, you can have one thing is called physiologic splitting of the heart sound. You can actually hear the ventricles and the atria contract at slightly different levels because as your lungs expand, it basically pushes on

sleep apnea apnea Michael Snyder Perez Stanford
"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

06:37 min | Last week

"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Helpful or even being around more sunlight. But from an androgen standpoint, I am not sure if it would optimize your testosterone or estrogen. But clearly effective. It's one of your pillars, right? You stand by it. Yes, for sure. Well, it gets into it kind of gets into your next pillar of the sunlight pillar, which is kind of about being in nature, right? And there's also a microbiome piece to that as well, sort of breathe your biome like being immersed in a multitude of species of plant and animal life and breathing that in and grounding your feet in the soil and doing the sun gazing as an Andrew talks about and all of that. Our kind of western minds are very dismissive of that, but this is the missing link we've become so detached from that very healing and primal fundamental aspect of what it means to be human. Humans have definitely adapted to be outdoors, even if it feels easier to be indoors. There are so many regulatory checks and balances that come with being outside and being in nature. That it is very difficult to have optimal health if you are not doing that. So people have studied cognitive function if you have a vista. So if you have a view and you can see a mile, then it is significantly better than if there's another house right next door. What about when you're walking through the forest though, the D forest? Yeah. I would say being around the new clean fresh air in the forest is helpful, being around the green is also helpful. Being aware of your environment, even if there are no dangerous animals in the area, then you're still just more peripherally aware. You can discuss the benefits of using your peripheral vision, not looking directly at something. And your mind will shift focus and there's many different benefits from that. You also happen to be moving at the same time, perhaps you get some cold exposure, heat exposure at the same time. It's a very high yield intervention. Right. So what is the prescription? What goes on your notepad to the patient when it comes to the sunlight pillar? Often trying to get good morning sunlight, being outside throughout the day, often you can combine this with exercise, for example, if you work a desk job and are indoors all day, then take a walk after lunch, maybe even with your coworkers and colleagues to hit the social piece as well. If someone does work outdoors, then perhaps it's not, they've already dialed in that pillar, and they don't need to do anything at all. But making that some kind of daily practice or habit. And that can fold into the exercise piece as well, obviously, right? Often you can do two or three or four at the same time. Yeah. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Well, you mentioned cold and heat exposure. So maybe this is a good time to kind of explore some of those therapies. It's all the rage right now and much like intermittent fasting and all of that. Everybody wants to talk about their ice baths and their saunas and how do you think about these protocols and their impact specifically on hormone health? They're good protocols for the individual attempting to optimize things. Like any other intervention, you need to be careful of the common missteps. So I would say if you're an asana is not as much this way, but jacuzzi and hot tub or even heated seats could definitely be this way. If you're trying to optimize your fertility, then be careful for heat damage to the testes, the testes like to be several degrees cooler than the rest of the body. So if you're in, especially very warm water for a long period of time, then that can decrease sperm counts. Right. As far as the benefits of cold exposures like cold dunks, you're avoiding frostbite and you don't want to get hypothermia as well. So usually it is a very quick intervention. I cold shower can be, it's not quite as good as a cold dunk, but it can be a good start. So for the individual trying to get the most bang for their buck, a cold shower, and then if you have access to a sauna, a sauna from time to time is a great place to start. Do you have a sense of what's more efficacious from a hormone health perspective, cryotherapy versus ice baths? There seems to be a raging debate about the pros and cons of these two things. From a hormonal standpoint, let's say there's an individual with a varicocele, which is basically varicose veins in the gonadal area, then they are often already too warm. And cooling can be particularly beneficial. And the more dose of cooling, the more helpful it is. So for that individual, where their testes are likely too warm due to varicose veins, it is extremely helpful. The more cold exposure you have. But I think that you were asking about cryotherapy versus ice baths, ice baths, perhaps slightly more helpful from like a hormonal, but perhaps just from a spermatogenesis standpoint. There's been a lot of debates on whether or not ice baths are helpful for recovery specifically of endurance athletes. I used to run track as well. And always had to take an ice bath. And I don't believe the evidence on that came out to be as helpful. Right. I mean, the debate has something to do with the greater conducive Ness of temperature in water versus air. So you're in cryo for a shorter period of time, but it's also much colder than the ice bath, but the water and the ice bath is going to conduct that heat transfer more effectively. I would think that the ice bath is more helpful for those that have more heat damage to begin with. Probably a nice bath. Right. Well, as a former track and field athlete who has experience with the recovery benefits of being in an ice bath, I often wonder, I'm interested in your perspective on this. I often wonder about many of these recovery enhancement tools, whether it's Norma tec boots or ice baths or sauna or turmeric or some of the foods that are hyper antioxidants. We're all trying to expedite that recovery window so that we can wake up the next day and go harder

Andrew hypothermia
"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

06:38 min | Last week

"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"So how are you thinking about this in the context of hormone health? Yeah. A lot of people have this kind of encompasses mental health as well and social health. Maybe we do need to add a 7th one there. But you want to have something that requires great effort. Life is extraordinarily difficult. And you want to be able to have a positive mindset or a glass half full or even glass quarter full. Outlook on your stress, there's a lot of tools like mindfulness or meditation or even prayer, which kind of delves into the spiritual pillar as well. But you want to be, you want to have just enough effort in the areas that bring you purpose. But you also want to control your stress. Fortunately, we are concentrated on the self actualization part of Maslow's hierarchy of needs. So we're not as concerned with our physical or bear essential needs. But the level of stress is still there. So humans have had a very stressful existence. When the stress is not proportionate to the threat, it can be unnecessary and it can affect your hormone health and it can affect the health of the rest of your household as well. Acute stress in certain controllable scenarios good, chronic stress bad, but as you know, we live in an epidemic of chronic low level to high grade stress. And we've kind of acclimated to that as a normal, right? Everybody's stressed out. Everybody's anxious. And our lifestyles are kind of oriented around being an environments that produce it, support that. And you could tell people you need to meditate, you need to have a mindfulness practice. But the boss is yelling and the kids are crying and they're all of these sorts of things that are just part and parcel of getting through life, which is difficult, have created in the western industrialized world, this epidemic that's driving downstream, all of these metabolic health problems from obesity to diabetes, et cetera. So talk about the get into the hormones of chronic stress and what that's doing to us and how it's dysregulating our health and how that impacts us down the line and all these other ways. We can think about the adrenal axis of stress and we can also think about the neurotransmitter access of stress. So one of the ways that your body will acclimate distress, including physical stress is increasing cortisol, which is a glucocorticoid, which can decrease muscle mass and cause an increase in blood glucose. If you give someone a medication like prednisone, which is basically a medication version of cortisol, then any of you give them to them for a long time, then they will develop diabetes. And also excess body fat and decreased muscle mass. Wow. So basically, like sort of extrapolating on that idea, essentially what you're saying is if you're in a chronic state of stress, it doesn't matter how great your diet is or how well you're sleeping, cortisol issue could create type two diabetes in you nonetheless. Correct. A pathologic overproduction of it is known as Cushing's disease. So that can also be very detrimental for your health and needs to follow very closely. But there's a continuum or spectrum in between where you can have cortisol overproduction. There's even supplements that can potentially help control cortisol, ashwagandha is likely one of them. And emo den is another one. I think it's derived from rhubarb. So again, with cortisol, the dose can make the poison as well. The other main axis of stress that would be hormonal would be your adrenergic nervous system. You also have things like dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine, catecholamines, basically think of this as if you're acutely stressed, your fight or flight nervous system is activated. Classically, this would be, you know, you would either fight a lion or run from it. So you have an increase in those hormones, epinephrine is also known as adrenaline. If they're elevated for a long period of time, again, it can lead to body fat accumulation, excess hunger, and it can also lead to desensitization of those receptors. Dopamine receptors and also adrenaline receptors can be desensitized very quickly. That's why many individuals that are on medications that stimulate or simulate your dopamine and your adrenaline or noradrenaline require higher and higher doses Adderall would be the main example of one of those medications. Sure. And obviously, that's applicable to the addiction scenario as well. Substance addiction or behavior addiction, right? Because hormonally, does your body even know the difference? And there's many scientists, for example, Andrew huberman that talk in detail about the dopaminergic system and how it affects your motivation and how it is closely related to testosterone. So your androgens and your dopamine are very close to the related. I describe your dopamine as a pool specifically a wave pool where you do expect natural fluctuations up and down. But depending on if you have an overflow of dopamine, your body can make that wave pool deeper to try to accommodate for that. And then you're only filling up half the pool. And even if you have a normal amount of dopamine, you can feel depleted. Interesting. So for somebody who has enough self awareness to know that they go in and out of some level of chronic anxiety or stress, what is the science look like in terms of from a hormonal perspective, like if you adopt a consistent meditation practice, like have they studied, okay, here's how this is impacting hormone regulation in the body as a result of like a formal practice or some version of that that is a de stressor. From the cortisol or sympathetic overdrive that has been studied and a meditation or relaxation practice or even just walking and being around green plants and trees can be helpful or even being around more sunlight. But from an androgen standpoint, I am not sure if it would optimize your

diabetes Cushing's disease Maslow emo den obesity Andrew huberman
"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

05:35 min | Last week

"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Help optimize your androgen profile specifically testosterone. If you do this just one time in the testosterone is not going to be around systemically for a long period of time. If you look at the graph, it decreases pretty quickly. So if it becomes a habit, then they can help in the long run. But if you're just, if you're only doing it once a month or once every other month, it's very unlikely to have a clinically significant effect. Right. On the subject of overtraining, the kind of catch phrase that comes up often is adrenal fatigue. My sense is that adrenal fatigue is not a thing. It's something that we attach to a sense of not having energy or general lethargy, but if somebody says, I have adrenal fatigue, Kyle, like help me out. What's going on? Like, how do you figure out what the problem is? And identify, is this an overtraining thing? Is this a stress thing? Like, what is happening? Adrenal fatigue is still not an ICD-10 code. What does that mean? There's different codes that you can put in and order tests and diagnostic under. And adrenal fatigue is still not one of those. You can have Addison's disease, which is a lack of adrenal hormones. They're made in this specifically cortisol, and I believe DHEA are made in these zona, which is a part of the adrenal gland, a small gland on top of the kidney. DHEA in particular is very interesting. One, because it produces all of the estrogen and postmenopausal women and then two because DHEA is like the pawn on the chest board of hormones. So if you're looking at your hormones like a chess board, specifically your androgens and your estrogens. Let's say your queens are estrogen. You don't have very much estrogen, but they're really important and it can be extremely beneficial for your health. You also have your, say, rooks or androgens. But your pawns are DHEA and through life as your hormone health progresses, your pawns can be queen. So DHEA can convert to both testosterone and estrogen, which it does quite often. So if you have worsening function of the ovary or testes, the adrenals can back up your hormone function. And DHEA is something that you get through omega threes. Is that correct? DH. DHA is at omega three. I get confused between all the DHs. However, DHEA is an over the counter supplement. So in some countries I believe the UK and Canada, it is a medication. There is a scientist recently passed away. I believe his name was doctor fernand lobby. And he's interesting because he was the one that showed that prostate cancer treatments that basically shut down the pituitary from producing the hormones that cause Android general release. If you treat that, then prostate cancer is not as bad and it actually extends life. So that was like the first prostate cancer drug that extended life. However, he also studied DHEA for quality of life. So it's interesting the same scientist studied both a cancer treatment to decrease hormones and also studied DHEA. However, the data on DHEA is kind of unclear because there can be a widely different and a full order of magnitude or ten times between individuals, some produce a ton. And that can be called adrenal hyperplasia. A lot of people have a gene for this called NCCIH. And then there's also a phenomenon that's known as adrena pause, which is similar to menopause or andropause, but where your adrenals shut down. And this happens for everyone, but just at very different times of life. And if somebody is truly over trained, what is going on with them, hormonally, and how do you help them get out of that hole? Often they have a decrease of cortisol and also DHEA and downstream to that testosterone and estrogen that are peripherally converted. So their adrenal glands are not working as well. If you look at the enzymes in the steroidogenesis cascade, it's very interesting. A lot of the same enzymes that Ali works on. Also known as long Jack. But a lot of the enzymes that that works on insulin and IGF-1 work on. So things like fasting or things like a lot of cardiovascular exercise can down regulate those enzymes. Also, the stimulating hormone that comes from your pituitary to stimulate cortisol production also stimulates DHEA to some degree. So if you're very insulin sensitive or if you're eating one meal a day, then that is going to detrimentally impact the production of adrenal hormones and also down regulate the steroid genesis cascade and each tissue. Right. Got that. Huberman got me on the tongue at Ali a while back. Like he's a big, he's all about that. But that would be one prescription to address that dysregulation. Often you hear with athletes who truly are overtrained, like elite athletes who just dig this hole. Like it takes them. Sometimes it takes them 6 months. To truly come out of that phase and I can't help but wondering if they go to see you, perhaps there's a way to, if somebody oversteps and is in that situation, is there a way to shortcut, not shortcut, but just compress that time period of getting somebody back to baseline. There is a lag in the upregulation of those enzymes. Urinary metabolite hormone test or

adrenal fatigue Addison's disease prostate cancer fernand lobby rooks Kyle chess DHs adrenal hyperplasia Canada UK Ali cancer Huberman Jack
"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

07:02 min | Last week

"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"You usually want a medium or a high SHBG, a good rule of thumb and men is that you want estrogen to be as high as they can tolerate without many symptoms. But you want a total estradiol about two to three times a free testosterone. And you also want SHBG on the high end as well, as long as you can maintain adequate free androgens. Right. So when you say estrogen and men, people lose their minds. It is certainly good unless it is high relative to testosterone. So often you want to keep the estrogen nice and high, but just increase the testosterone congruently. And are there typical foods that can help balance that or buttress things in the right direction for that individual? Ensuring that you're getting optimal essential fatty acids and essential amino acids. For example, omega threes or your essential amino acids, that's first and foremost for many people, that might be more than the RDA. Of that nutrient, and then depending on what other pathology that individual might have, that would come next, but many people are the most common problem is too many calories, especially processed calories. I think that the effects of phytoestrogens are quite weak and most individuals, including males, and I think the effects of xenoestrogen. So phytoestrogens are things that can potentially be estrogenic, for example, soy. Most individuals do not consume enough to have a clinically significant effect, perhaps it's statistically significant if you design a study to see that. Xenoestrogens likely do have a touch of an effect an example of that would be bisphenol a and that would bind to an estrogen related receptor, the gamma receptor. So that could have hormonal effects, but again, likely these are not significant compared to everything else that is happening. But it's certainly something to keep in mind. And what foods are xeno, what did you say? You said Zeno, xenoestrogens are estrogens in the environment like BPA, which is known as bisphenol a, so you might see your water bottle. It's BPA free, which is great. And then a phytoestrogens are somewhat estrogenic from plants. But usually they are very weak, right? Okay. And if anything, they're beneficial. Right. Okay. Let's talk about exercise. Talk to me generally about how you think of think about exercise as this second pillar. Exercise, and again another analogy, it is how you keep your body using. So it would be like, you have a new brand new car, and then you put it in a garage. And you put it up on a lift. It's like being in a chair. And you never use it, you never drive it. That car is not going to function well. Even if you leave it there for a year, you're going to have to change the oil and whatnot because it hasn't been moving, but the humans are the same way. You can't just put a human and sit them down in a artificial indoor environment. They're designed to move. You have anaerobic and aerobic exercise and both are particularly important. Whether it's the easier exercise, I know Peter atia talks a lot about zone two cardio, which is particularly important. But vigorous exercise is also important, of course, as is resistance training. So zone two, how much when, how does that differ with age would be my first question? And how does that mix in? Like if you're looking at somebody who's pretty busy and you're saying, you got to do zone two, you got to do resistance training. You got to do some interval high output stuff, like what is the ratio of those activities to your mind? The law of diminishing returns applies in this case as it does in almost everything in medicine. So it's hard to say, this is the amount of zone two that it's beneficial for you. And after that, it completely drops off. A good rule of thumb is three times a week, 30 minutes for zone two, and at least one time a week of very vigorous cardio. And at least twice a week for resistance training. So that would be pretty reasonable for a busy person to do. Right. How about 25 hours of zone two a week? I've been there. That would be a lot. The aerobic base is huge. Well, the great thing about zone two is it's a day in day out thing. The way I think about it is that's the kind of thing where you can kind of wait. If you're doing it properly, you can kind of wake up every day and do it. You're not going to be overly fatigued. But your high output stuff, you got to pace it out because you do have to allow your body to recover. So it's about being mindful of spacing the workout so that you're giving your body time to heal and get stronger. Absolutely. True overtraining is relatively rare, although perhaps an individual like yourself. Would not always be on in your world, you're probably always teetering on the edge. But for the average American, most are not over trained. They're just getting used to that adaptation. And for an individual like that, let's just say the average American, starting an emphasizing vigorous exercise can be detrimental because they feel so tired or sore, at least the first month to where they're not wanting to incorporate things like zone two. And walk me through what's going on hormonally when you exercise and I'm sure it's different depending upon the type of exercise. But bring the hormones into the discussion. So hormones during exercise have been very well studied. There's a ton of clinical literature published on it. And there are effects on not only testosterone and estrogen, but also growth hormone and IGF-1. A lot of this is released in and amongst muscle cells. So not necessarily endocrine, which is between body systems, but autocrine or paracrine. And usually these effects are very short, so if you do it just a couple times, it's not going to have a sustained effect. But over a long period of time, it is likely clinically significant. So ways to optimize a lot of people ask about how to optimize your growth hormone. You have peripheral and central growth hormone. You don't necessarily want to optimize both. And you also have testosterone that can be increased, one of the studies that many people have talked about is if you do a set of resistance training with legs, I believe squats is usually the example. And you do a medium rep range for a medium number of sets, three to four sets, 6 to ten reps, then it can help optimize your androgen profile specifically testosterone. If you do this just one time in the testosterone is not going to be around systemically for a long

Peter atia Zeno
"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

04:17 min | Last week

"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"So on the subject of diet, obviously, what comes to mind is weight management, you practice obesity, medicine. I'm sure you see a lot of obese patients or people that are overweight, who come to you and say, I've tried everything. I can't lose the weight. And assuming that the laws of thermodynamics are in place and on some level, a calorie and a calorie out is the truth. There are people who no matter what they do, they can't lose the weight. We dismiss them as people who have poor self will. But in truth, there is hormone dysregulation that creates a different relationship with appetite and hunger and also for whatever reason is making their bodies hold on to weight in a manner that's different from somebody who doesn't suffer from that. So there's a lot of these people out there and more and more every day. So walk us through the experience of treating a patient like that and how you counsel them and try to better understand their hormone health and how to improve it. When I'm counseling a patient regarding improving their hormone health specifically from diet or nutrition, part of the food is medicine, philosophy, which is absolutely true, then let's look at two different patients. One has tried a lot of different things. They've done calorie counting for a long time. The strict calorie county or even going on a very low calorie diet, it has not helped and they have either not lost weight or they regained weight and perhaps their metabolism is lower and their caloric maintenance is lower as well. Versus an individual who hasn't tried anything. And the individual that hasn't tried anything, calorie counting is a wonderful tool. Because in many it does help, that being said, even the average doctor or dietician underestimates how many calories they consume by at least 10%. So even doctors and dietitians don't accurately track accurate caloric intake. But in the individual that has tried calorie counting and tried very low calorie diets, that individual likely just needs other tools. So sometimes that is tracking your eating speed, sometimes it's tracking the timing of eating. For example, in the morning versus the evening, sometimes it's number of meals per day. Sometimes it's carbohydrate or macronutrient content. Sometimes it is the nutrient density versus caloric density of the food. So all of those things can work, but if someone has already tried strict calorie counting, usually they just need more help or more tools. Okay, so that's that person. So some people will be able to cut onto that, resolve their problem, go off into the world. But let's talk about the person for whom that doesn't work. And sometimes you can work in between as well, but if that doesn't work, then your tools are those dietary tracking mechanisms. Occasionally, you can also give patients a list of 5 foods. So this is a good actionable takeaway. You list the foods that you really like for me, those might consist of Greek yogurt, unsweetened Greek yogurt. Eggs or egg whites, spinach, I can eat spinach all day. I love it. Some people do not like it. Spinach also has oxalates, which can potentially help bind up heavy metals in the gut, which could be helpful as well. But you also don't want it too many oxalates if you have kidney stones. It's just another good example of individualizing a dietary protocol. But those are just some examples of food that you can eat a lot of and you're likely to be satiated and unlikely to be depleted of nutrients. Right. Higher fiber, higher and nutrient density and lower in caloric density. Yeah, is a good principle. But I guess what I'm getting at is the person who's hormone dysregulated, right? And you have to like see what's going on with that and kind of calibrate the hormones so that there's a better balance that's getting struck and the body then becomes like the metabolic system of the body becomes more robust and able to metabolize food and perhaps lose weight like a normal person. Yeah, and this would likely require blood tests, which I'm a fan of, even if you don't have any pathology, even if you feel completely normal, if you've never gotten an excellent baseline panel right now is a great time to do it.

obesity
"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

02:38 min | Last week

"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"By indeed the hiring platform or you can attract interview and hire all in one place. Finding great talent doesn't have to be a second job. It doesn't have to be a needle in a haystack, a colossal time suck. Thanks to indeed powerful tools, you can reclaim all that time. Laser in on top quality candidates fast with indeed suite of powerful hiring tools like indeed instant match, virtual interviews, and what I think is their coolest feature assessments, which helps star applicants show their skills before the interview so you can dive deeper into talking about what's important to you, save time and reduce the stress of the entire ordeal. So stop spending hours on multiple job size, looking for candidates with the right skills. You can do it all with indeed. Indeed, knows when you're growing your own business, you've got to make every dollar count. That's why with indeed, you only pay for quality applications that match your must have job requirements. Need to hire, you need, indeed. Visit indeed dot com slash rich role to start hiring now. Just go to indeed dot com slash rich role, indeed. Dot com slash rich role, terms and conditions, apply. We're also brought to you today by levels, metabolic health, how our bodies control metabolize glucose is super important to feeling your best. Things like sugar highs, insulin spikes, afternoon lulls, food comas, even bonking, which is when you run out of gas during training. These are all examples of when our ability to properly manage glucose and in turn even killed energy and optimal metabolic health are, let's just say out of whack. In other words, poor glucose control, which is a subset of poor metabolic health, includes this inability to efficiently metabolize the foods that we eat that over time can lead to chronic issues like weight gain, fatigue, sexual dysfunction, and even type two diabetes, Alzheimer's, heart disease, and stroke, which is not good. So how do you know if you have poor glucose control? Well, it's actually not all that intuitive. It needs to be scientifically measured. And there was no way for the average consumer to actually do this until now with levels, a new app connected to a continuous glucose monitor called a CGM, which is a small device fixed to your upper arm. That measures blood glucose providing real-time feedback on how

"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

02:13 min | Last week

"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"And I think that journal is going to be the tipping point or the inflection point to where all lipid panels will reflux. So if your LDL is above, say, 100, then it's just going to go ahead and the lab is going to go ahead and test an apo B after that. Right. Because now, or at least recently, you have to request that. It's not part of the typical panel. But that's changing, hopefully. It should change the title of the article if it means anything was the debate is over. Apo B is a better marker to check than LDL. Yeah, yeah, yeah. You mentioned prebiotics probiotics. We were talking about fiber. Talk to me a little bit about the relationship between the microbiome, gut health and hormone health and how what the interplay is between those two things. I consider the gut microbiome the front lines of your immune system. So your immune system is like your military and each any good military worth their salt will practice drills and it practices drills against your gut microbiome as an easy adversary. If your gut microbiome is dysregulated, for example, after an antibiotic, there are certain antibiotics that kill more of your gut microbiome and you see far more AP, which is allergies asthma and eczema and also far more inflammatory diseases like Crohn's and ulcerative colitis. Even after one course of antibiotics, your odds ratio, which is kind of like think of it as how many times you're more likely to get that disease of something like Crohn's can increase three to four times. Wow. So if somebody comes in and you're trying to diagnose them, you're going to have to look at gut flora as a marker of hormone health and hormone health as a marker of gut health, yes, like these are not separate entities. Some gut microbiota like E. coli heavily produce an enzyme called beta glucuronidase. And your enzyme metabolizes steroids in part due to glucuronidase. For example, estrogen is metabolized significantly by beta glucuronidase. So if you have an overgrowth of E. coli, you're going to recirculate your estrogen and it could relate an estrogen surplus.

allergies asthma Crohn's ulcerative colitis eczema E. coli
"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

09:39 min | Last week

"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Cold exposure. Heat exposure even moving your body. And being exposed to the elements, and then you have spirit. And that's just the self actualization piece on Maslow's hierarchy of needs. And everybody has spiritual or metaphysical health, which is important because that's what their purpose is. Yeah. I love that you have that as a pillar. I feel like that's something that's often overlooked or sort of somewhat dismissed on some level. And I think it's really important. And I can't help but ask, how did you divine these pillars? I assume they're evidence based premised on all the work that you've done as a scientist. But when it comes to the spirit thing, you know, I think of Lisa Miller's work at Yale on the science of spirituality, which I think you've probably are familiar with. She's been on the podcast, but also the blue zones work. There's a lot of just population studies or anecdotal evidence to suggest that longevity or kind of health long-term is rooted in someone's sense of purpose in life and their connection to something larger than themselves. I would say listening and learning from people who have healed themselves, there's another mindfulness book and I think the title is healed thyself. And it's specifically written for healthcare practitioners. And they teach a lot of these lifestyle modifications and these lifestyle modifications are more powerful than any supplement or medication. Now the balance to that is I also read a lot of literature. So listen and learn and also read literature, so you're hearing anecdotal experiences and many people have the experience of a friend or a family member that is on a dozen different medications. And I was very unhealthy and another one who is on no medications and who is very healthy. In fact, at the place where we were staying, I overheard a conversation of an individual say, you know, I'm 70 years old or just an example. And I'm on no medications and a healthier than ever. And often when you see that, they have already dialed in, if not all 6 lifestyle pillars, they have at least dialed in the diet and exercise. So those are like, they're the foundation of the pyramid. And the Gillette hierarchy of needs for hormone optimization. Yeah. And I think that an individual such as yourself has also emphasized and healed yourself with a lot of these lifestyle pillars as well. Just learning it anecdotally through life. Yeah, sure. I was curious why sensibility would be that there may be room for a 7th pillar, which would be community, maybe that weaves into spirit on some level because it is about connection. But community seems to be a big piece, especially as we really get old, like the people who seem to have a higher quality of life are the people who really have deep connections to family community, Friends and the like. Yeah, they're probably needs to be a 7th, maybe social if we continue with alliteration. Yeah. But that's definitely true where your health is deeply connected with your loved ones around you. Right. Well, let's go back and go through diet. So talk to me about the relevance of diet with respect to hormone specifically. Diet is one of the main modifiable interventions. And you can write nutrition prescriptions as well. They're a little different than cookbooks, but you can write nutrition prescriptions. And it is one of the drivers of metabolic syndrome, which I would consider and by the way, metabolic syndrome is just the insulin resistance, increasing abdominal body fat, dyslipidemia, is part of it. And pre diabetes. It's the most common cause of low testosterone in men. And also, it leads to other pathologies like an ovulation, not ovulating, insulin resistance, infertility. And diet is one of the best ways, if not the best way to fix that. That's why many clinics that you see. They used to have endocrinologists and then cardiologists and now they have cardiometabolic clinics at most academic centers because they are really addressing metabolic syndrome. Sure, because metabolic syndrome from there we see cardiovascular disease diabetes, obesity and the like, right? It's interesting that we've treated these as separate specialties. And yet they're all rooted in this one thing. Yeah, that's certainly true, obviously there's no perfect diet and you have to be careful with diet because you can almost swing too far to the other end where you develop orthorexia where you're terrified of eating things that aren't perfectly healthy. There's no good or evil foods. They're certainly foods that can be better consumed in higher quantities than others. But the best diet is just a habitual eating habit that can last a lifetime that someone will adhere to. Yeah, I saw a quote on your Instagram where you said your diet isn't a diet at all. It's a lifestyle and it's evidence based habit formation. Yeah. So like elaborate on that a little bit. If you do something for a long time and you are teaching yourself the tool to adhere to eating, then many people may have heard of instinctual eating or you're eating and it's intuitive, intuitive eating. And that will work if you've given yourself the tools to be able to intuitively eat. Right. There's a problematic aspect of that. Like we're both smiling, right? Intuitively, I just feel like I need this thing. Like, is that really a trustworthy narrator? Not particularly because it could be that the center in your brain largely it's in the hypothalamus that regulates hunger or not being hunger. There's two centers, the anorexigenic center, which is exactly what it sounds like, and the orexigenic center, which I call the hangry center. And if those two are not balanced, you're not going to be able to intuitively. Right, you'll be overridden by some craving that doesn't serve you that you're powerless to resist. And those cravings are being driven by hormones. Yeah. Super interesting. You mentioned orthorexia. We were chatting a little bit before the podcast. I think that that is a often ignored aspect of the kind of biohacking universe of people who are interested in exploring human optimization through diet and other protocols. But can easily sort of shadow disordered eating behind like I'm fasting. It's intermittent fasting or I'm doing this quote unquote protocol when in truth they just have sort of a real problem with their relationship with food, whether it's addictive or some other symptomology. Yes, and I think the same can be said of supplements. Many times patients have the best intentions, but they're taking three dozen or even four dozen different supplements. And you can almost take on a role, which has been termed the sick role from taking on that many different supplements you're taking 40 different pills every day. And it's difficult because theoretically a lot of these can help and usually they have been started on this by a physician or dietician or they've heard that it can be beneficial. And on one hand, do you agree that many of them are beneficial, but sometimes you're taking on a bad guy role when you're trying to pick which are least efficacious. Well, also, everything that you put in your body, like if you're taking it for some primary rationale, there are all kinds of secondary and tertiary downstream implications of that, right? That might be doing you more harm or if you're taking things multiple things, they're counteracting each other in certain ways. And often that is the case as you introduce more and more supplements and or medications, which are the same, by the way, one's prescribed in one's not. Both of them have pharmacodynamic effects, which is what the drug does to the body and pharmacokinetic effects, which is how your body metabolizes the drug. So if you're taking that many things and there's certainly going to be interaction. Yeah. And look, everyone loves talking about supplements. We were also joking about this beforehand. It sort of like, yes, spirit, I get it like sleep, okay, but like, tell me what the supplements are that I want to take, because that's the easy lift. It's the easy fix. The other lifestyle modifications require work and habit formation, like you said. So I'm not against supplementation. I take a bunch of supplements. But I'm much more cautious, I think, than other people who would consider themselves to be self experimenters. And we'll get into it. I want to get into the supplements, but on the subject of the foundation of establishing hormonal health and just health generally talking about diet and exercise, these things have to come before all of that. They're like the cherry on top, right? Achieving optimal health is kind of like standing at the top of a quicksand pit. You're never really truly going to get there, but there's many ways that you can not be sunk in the quicksand. That would be pathology. And

metabolic syndrome Yale on the science of spiritu Lisa Miller Maslow cardiovascular disease diabete Gillette dyslipidemia obesity diabetes
"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

06:07 min | Last week

"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"There's many things called feedback inhibition or feedback mechanisms that can be positive or negative. And hormones can act on these to try to preserve your health. But when it's in a dysregulated state, pathology can occur. So they're just the signaling molecules that control all of your health. Right. So it's a good place to start when you're diagnosing someone. Let's look at what's going on here, right? And if your hormones are off, then there really isn't a need to analyze anything else until that's addressed. It's sort of a top line. And this is more from this side of my practice that also emphasizes integrative medicine or functional medicine or holistic medicine, whatever terminology you want to use with it. I like to find the cause if any biomarker is off, hormone or otherwise. I like to see the cause because perhaps it is a benign cause and perhaps it's not. Let's define what a hormone is. You called it a signaling molecule. But what is it specifically? I mean, I think for the layperson, when you say hormones, they think about testosterone, they think about estrogen, you know, many people might not even know that insulin is a hormone, like there's a lot more to this world. It's a very complex world. So let's just begin with some basic definitions here. There's three main classes of hormones are signaling molecules. Most people are familiar with the first two classes. Those are your sterile hormones or your cholesterol based. They have a cholesterol backbone. Androgens are one of those, for example, testosterone, estrogens are another one of those. For example, estradiol, and also progestogens are included in there. I would also include vitamin D in that class as a hormone as is cholesterol based as well. You also have peptide hormones. So a lot of people think they talk about peptides. And culturally peptides are more known, not really as hormones, but as cutting edge treatments, kind of in the same class as PRP or stem cells, but a peptide is just a chain of amino acids between about two and a couple hundred. So it's a short protein. And they're also hormones. So growth hormone is an example, insulin is another example of a lifesaving peptide. And then you also have hormones that are based just on amino acids, for example, thyroid hormones based on tyrosine. Then we have melatonin, adrenaline, prolactin, growth hormone, epinephrine, there's lots going on here. Yes, and I would consider all those hormones, things like norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin, those would all be amino acid based hormones. They would be based on dopamine and then serotonin and melatonin are based on tryptophan. And the definition of hormone health would be an appropriate balance of all of these important hormones across the spectrum. Correct. So if somebody comes into your clinic and says, I don't feel well or maybe this thing is off or maybe they feel fine and you want to diagnose this person. What is the process by which you begin to get a picture of their hormone health? You want to get what we call subjective and objective information. All this means is subjective is how the patient is feeling the biofeedback. Do they feel normal? And this could be their cognitive health. It could be their focus. It could be their libido. It could be their athletic performance. And the patient is telling you that information. And then you also use objective information, for example, blood tests or diagnostic imaging. You synthesize the two, and that's where a lot of the practice of medicine comes in. And then you come up with a plan. Has anybody ever come into your clinic and you've done this panel? And you said, no, you're in perfect balance. Is that a myth that you could achieve total optimization with this? Because of just the daily life stressors and the way we live our lives, right? On some level, we're all dysregulated to some extent. Yeah. There's always more that you can do. And you can always do more digging. So it's common for a patient to say, I've had half a dozen doctors say there's nothing else that we can test or there's nothing else that we can do. It might be the case that there's nothing else that insurance will cover. As it benefit, but there is always more digging that you can do. If you do more digging, you will find things, right? And how does this mean maybe this is a longer conversation that we can get into later. But obviously, this is going to depend on your sex, your age, what span of life you're in. That picture and what you have kind of come to expect is going to change and how you optimize is going to be different, depending upon all those factors. Absolutely. So you could have two individuals, let's say they're identical twins with the same genome. And depending on what their goals are or depending on what they are trying to achieve, they could have a different plan, and that would include the lifestyle pillars or perhaps supplements and medications as well. Right. So that's probably a good place to drop the disclaimer that although your medical doctor, there will be no medical advice being given today. This is general information purposes only. Correct. And even when medical advice is given, it needs to be given for an individual because it's different. Sure. So I guess the answer to all questions is it depends. Right. It depends. Yeah, that's always a frustrating one, right? Everybody wants the answer. And you're the guy who's supposed to have the answers. But it's complicated. So the pillars that you mentioned, let's go through them. You've divided these 6 pillars that kind of encapsulate what it means to have optimal hormone health. So maybe we can kind of go through them Syria. Yeah, the 6 pillars, the first two are diet and exercise. And they kind of have the, they're the most powerful pillars, if you will. And then the last four I used alliteration, so you have your stress optimization. So you want to have some effort in life, you want to have something that you're working towards. You also have sleep, and that's quality and quantity of sleep. And you have sunlight and that really just means the outdoors.

Syria
"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

05:46 min | Last week

"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Okay, so this was a fascinating and stimulating conversation. I think we're going to really dig it. So without further ado, this is me and doctor Kyle, she'll ask. Right on. Super nice to meet you, Kyle. Thanks for doing this. Really appreciate you coming over here to spend some time with me today. We're going to get geeky. I can't wait for it. But I want to start with just a little bit of your background. I mean, you're a young man. What do you like 31, 32? 32. 32, right? Practicing out of Kansas. Where did this whole fascination maybe borderline obsession with human health and human optimization? Where did that begin and how did that arise? I think it's stemmed from my childhood education. I was homeschooled and I noticed that a lot of individuals, for example, been Greenfield. It's also into homeschooling, but it allows you to explore a lot of things that are not part of the norm to discover your unique eclectic self. But I began to realize that I wanted to go into medicine when I was in high school and I kind of structured my education in order to do so. So you were homeschooled throughout. Your entire academic career up until college. Correct. Right. But you went to college and then you went to med school. You didn't homeschool your way through college. No, I don't think you can do that. Yeah. Yeah, that's really cool. I mean, we homeschooled our kids when they were younger, and then at a certain age, all of them said, we want to go into normal school. So I have quite a bit of experience with that. My sense is that it's really well served when the young person does feel directional and what they're interested in and it sounds like you kind of had that early on, which could really drive the focus of what you were immersing yourself in. Yeah, I think it would have been very difficult. I think I would have done very poorly in a traditional school. Why is that? I tend to get on these tangents or obsessions, for example, health optimization. And then I'm really interested in athletic performance or cognitive performance or just the metaphysical. And I concentrate on that rather than whatever happens to be on the agenda or schedule. In your case, though, your dad is a doctor. So you had that in the household. Yeah, my dad is also a family doctor, and he delivers babies, kind of does full spectrum medicine. There are still many physicians in Kansas that do so. And in the Midwest in general. And I saw that he was also, it was very rewarding. I think he finds a lot of purpose in it. And that was part of wanting to go into medicine as well. Because of the immersiveness of it because you're really working with families and young people throughout the course of their life as they progress, right? There's a different kind of emotional attachment to it. So that was the impetus to get into family medicine yourself. And then why obesity? Like, why did you choose these specialties? The most common problems are what full spectrum or primary care physician should be the best at. And I've noticed that, well, many people have noticed that there is an epidemic of obesity, and it is technically an epidemic according to, I believe the CDC and there is also an epidemic of hormone pathology. So obesity and its related pathologies like metabolic syndrome and also different hormonal pathologies like sub fertility or PCOS are extremely common and many physicians do not treat these conditions at all. So there's an excess demand and very little supply. Yeah, and those are the very subjects that we're going to dive into today, hormone health, metabolic syndrome, obesity, et cetera. And just to kind of further your point about primary care medicine, it is fair to say that primary care practitioners aren't really practicing for the most part primary care. Are they? They're really practicing sort of secondary care. It's diagnosed and prescribed, whereas you are one of the many kind of burgeoning functional medicine holistic medicine practitioners. And as a young person, that gives me hope. I feel optimistic about the future because there is so much interest in expanding what's available from our healthcare system is your sense optimistic as well. I mean, there's a long way to go, right? But the fact that you can create these clinics and they have viable business models and you can kind of prove that out, establishes that this isn't just doable. This is like a really good way to establish yourself. I agree, I'm also very optimistic, even looking among my colleagues during medical school at the University of Kansas or during residency. Many of us not just myself, you still listen. We would listen to Peter atia. And read the content that he would put out. So there is many many, many physicians not just myself that are very interested in true preventative medicine and health optimization. So let's get into hormone health. I mean, first, you know, my first question to throw to you is, what is when we're talking about health? Is there a difference between talking about health in general and hormone health like, what is it about hormone health that perhaps sets it a little bit apart and has sort of garnered your intrigue. Hormones are the literal signaling molecules that will communicate amongst your organ systems. That give signals of what to do for your health.

Kyle obesity Kansas Greenfield metabolic syndrome Midwest PCOS CDC Peter atia University of Kansas
"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

02:07 min | Last week

"gillett" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"And right now, athletic greens is making that whole process very easy by sweetening the pot with a free one year supply of immune supporting vitamin D plus 5 free travel packs with your first purchase. All you have to do on your end is visit athletic greens dot com slash rich role. Again, that's athletic greens dot com slash rich role to take ownership over your health and pick up the ultimate daily nutritional insurance. We're also brought to you today by whoop. The world's most powerful personalized digital fitness and health coach. Here's how it all works. Whoop is an app connected to a sensor affixed to your wrist or if you're like my video guy here Blake, you can wear them in your boxers or your shorts, your compression tops, your bralettes, or leggings, with whoops, body sensor enhanced technical garments, but I digress. What I'm saying is that this sensor sends a ton of biometric data to the app, the app then crunches the information and translates it, delivers it to you with actionable insights on everything from your sleep to your exertion to your recovery. And then in turn provides personalized direction via their intuitive dashboard, including exertion targets, as well as irregularities and vital signs over time. All designed to help you consistently operate at your best. You can even export 30 day health trends to share with your coach, your trainer, your PT, or your physician. I have gotten a ton of benefit from using it over the last two years or so. I honestly never take it off my wrist, and it truly has helped me tweak my training routine, recover better, and just function consistently at a higher level. So, sleep better, recover faster, train smarter, and now feel healthier with whoop. The all new waterproof device is free when you sign up for a whoop four membership. And right now, whoop is offering 15% off when you use the code rich role at checkout. So go to whoop WHO OP dot com and enter code rich role at checkout to save 15%

"gillett" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

Mark Bell's Power Project

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"gillett" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

"And so on it can have tremendous benefits but i think people are kind of misrepresenting thinking like if i really jack my stash thrown up This is going to be great and this is going to do all these amazing things for me. I'm going to be a monster in the gym. Getting monster in the bedroom. And you're going to be able to do all these miraculous things but it doesn't really work that way. Yeah absolutely so. There's actually not super strong correlation between testosterone level If you're natural endogenous producer and how that will translate to body composition or even athletic performance so It varies a lot individual now. Obviously if you're on history and there's a pretty strong correlation within the individuals you mind repeating that so you're mentioning amongst natural athletes. It was that right. Yeah so people will come in often and They'll come to america for hair loss prevention or hair and skin optimization and They may feel totally fine. And they might have a very low testosterone level like truly clinically hypo battle and no symptoms at all. It actually happens quite often. It's just We usually don't test those people Unless we're testing them for hair. Loss prevention you know. Try to try to prevent and ask some like dried syndrome. One of the biggest risks is a low free testosterone which is extremely easy tests pest for and most doctors would likely test for that four starting up an asteroid however some people come in and they think they have symptoms of low testosterone and Those patients who had the highest disaster and overseeing one guy had naturally as you said over fifty free casaus stroz judas. Total was almost fifteen hundred. Yeah and he came in with symptoms of low testosterone. So there's You know some correlation. But it's not a super strong correlation. What does a boost into stash ron. Do for somebody that You know is maybe getting older. Maybe there's just ostro and starting to go down. What are some of the positive benefits that you've seen happen. People a lot of positive benefits of testosterone especially if an aging male is truly. Hypo battle is ins them. Back the tools to take their life and improve their lifestyle to the they feel like they did when they were younger. That's a lot of guys say so They have the ability to have a healthy lifestyle to exercise. Like they did before sometimes when You know it's always a risk benefit discussion right. So if there's an aging mail that might have low testosterone perhaps their lifestyle and diet and genetic factors have not been optimal and they reach a point in their life where this australian replacement where exogenous ostra would be too dangerous and that's unfortunate because perhaps if they had addressed those pathologies earlier in their life then they would have been able to change their lifestyle perhaps take some meditations change their diet. And then that wouldn't the pathology wouldn't have happened. Can you explain that. A little bit further i. I don't know if i totally not getting this. But you said there would be a point. Where like actually taking exotic testosterone for an individual would be dangerous thing to do. What would cause that would be a dangerous thing to do for that type of person so known coronary artery. Disease is one of the kind of strict contra indications to Just ostro replacement so If someone has something like You know several stints in the past Known significant coronary artery disease. It's more dangerous and you might not want to start that patient on rt. Especially if they're not at a place if they're so conditioned perhaps they're not even a cardiac rehab candidate Which is the rehab that you do after you know. You're in the cardiovascular. Icu for a stint or bypass That person's not very good candidates to start on rt horrible one actually so That's an example of one thing but there's a lot of other risk factors as well so one cloth is risk factor if someone Is very adamant about hair. Loss prevention and likely prone to it if they're prone to prostate cancer or prostate issues at another one if they're prone or already have gynaecomastia worse than you the gun masta. That's another one liver disease Kidney disease and congestive heart failure so There's a lot of contra indications that the rt interestingly the american academy of family practice which is Organization one of the largest organization of family doctors mentioned They have a recommendation as well. Then i guess not too many not all family doctors know about the recommendation. But they want you to share decision-making especially if there's an ag male with low testosterone that also has low ito because the afc recognizes that are of quality of life is important enough to You know admit there's some risks but the benefits maybe more now also Curious about this.

ostro Hypo ron america coronary artery disease liver disease Kidney disease american academy of family pra prostate cancer congestive heart failure prostate afc
"gillett" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"gillett" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"It is possible this team this franchise is not afraid to make big, surprising moves like to Argel on being fired after a three game losing streak. That the Knights were up 31 in this syriza. This is the team that a lot of people believe a lot of fans believe is the team that can win the Stanley Cup finals. If the Knights lose this seriously, the Minnesota wild has it crossed your mind at all that there is a possibility that Pete the Borg, it's let go. I don't think so. I don't think so. You know when you've already made a coaching change, um, you know, in the organization's young history to make another one is a reaction to losing one Syriza. I'm not sure that that Z the way the organization thinks again. They did have the most wins and hockey this year and sometimes you run into a good opponent and things don't go your way. Not that the Golden Knights would use it as an excuse, but they're leading goal scorer has not been available for this series. Max Patch ready, So I think that pizza boy I think is actually done a very, very good job with this group. Has pushed a lot of the right buttons, so I would say No. When George Gillett was let go, it was not in. You know, it was not in response to losing a particular syriza. It was a variety of other Disagreements or approached from how the management of the Golden Knights coaching staff of the time We're looking at it corrected, and I agree with that assessment. All right. So last question to you, Dan, I'm not asking you for prediction. I'm not putting you in that spot. But I will ask you this, though. Who do you think is the key to the game? And who do you think is the guy that can make the difference for the Vegas Golden Knights? Tonight. Now, obviously, I say, Marc Andre Fleury. I'm speaking a Viasa. He's there. I do believe that the Knights are resilient group and they'll get it done tonight, but Nemea guy, or maybe a few players that you think could be the difference site and we could be talking about them tomorrow as the star of the game that got the night's over the top. Well, the first one that comes to mind would be Alec Martinez. Sometimes my gut instinct as to who I think could have an important game leads me to that player to choose for pre game interview. So that goes Alec. For that the interview today might lead you towards something with me. He's the guy who scored the most recent goal for the power play goal in Game five. I mean, he's been very good on the power play in the Syriza, and he has the most blocked shots of anybody in the regular season or the postseason. Gary Lawless said it on our broadcast that he might not have an A or a C honest weather, but he should have a W for warrior and the fight with Matt Dumba the other day, just a second. That was awesome here and all that. So he's one player who comes to mind. Of course, he's 12 cops, amenities played 90. Stanley Cup playoff games on Don't forget about Alex. The Trans Hello? Who's tonight? Bling is 99 on and then you know, it's you can't help but wonder you can't help but wonder as Max Patch ready is miss now 10 games. You know, I said it going into the series. Could there be a Willis Reed moment That's ready in the Golden Knight. I don't know He was not on the ice with the team for the optional morning skate today, so that could be a pipe dream. But it's hard not to think about what Max has been trying to deal with and trying to go through a boy. It would just be so hard to watch your team go through all of this and not be able to contribute in some way so Again. It was when Willis Reed joined the next 1970. You know, it was he hit the first basket and really didn't play afterwards was the emotional boost. I love it that you're I love it that you're a New York guy. You brought that up because I remember I used to watch the footage that what Willis Reed came out and msg and the crowd just went crazy. Uh, you know, Yeah. I love it, Marv. Yes. Why does it always sound like Marv is on the toilet when he spoke, But anyway, that's another story. Yeah, Anyway, anyway, that That was more Sean Connery than Marv Albert. Just mix of the hybrid was interested it would be. It would be a pretty interesting point while taking Danielle, if that's already somehow and you're right, it could be a piper in but you never know. I mean, if he's out there tonight, I think that would be that would just give that team. I think that extra boost even if he's only 80% just to see him out there in the uniforms skating again. I think that would be a huge boost. Dan, You're always so gracious with your time. We always appreciate it when you join us on the show. It's gonna be a fun one tonight, my man, so hopefully next week. Hopefully we can Get you on the show will be talking about this series against the Colorado Avalanche. At least let's hope that But Dan do with the voice of the Vegas Golden Knights. Thank you so much as always, for your time and appreciate you. My pleasure guys enjoyed tonight. Thank you. Thanks a lot, Dad. All right. There you go. Dan do for the voice of the Vegas Golden Knights. You heard it on this show. Daniel Grant movie Geek, a Super fan. Don't wanna put Dan do in that situation because he worked for the Vegas called the Nights I don't want to ask him for a prediction. Danny Negreanu, who usually always has a prediction. He basically said. This is a coin flip game, and he doesn't know what's going to happen. Very smart guy saying that it sounded to me that yes, if he had to, he would lean Vegas Golden Knights. That's where I'm at. I wouldn't put.

George Gillett Danny Negreanu Matt Dumba Alec Martinez Marc Andre Fleury Gary Lawless Sean Connery Alec Marv Albert Pete the Borg Danielle Dan Daniel Grant next week 10 games Marv 12 cops Colorado Avalanche 31 tomorrow
Young conservative speaks up about the climate

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 years ago

Young conservative speaks up about the climate

"Twenty four year old tyler. Gillett. Of Ohio has cared about environmental issues since he was young and growing up, he says that sometimes made him feel like an outcast among his conservative peers everyone would call me a liberal or tree hugger or a Hippie I. Thought I was the only one out there that hey, conservative values cared about the environment. But Gillette was not deterred in college. He studied environmental science and he began advocating for free market solutions to climate change for example, by writing an op-ed for a student publication. That op. Ed. Caught the attention of national climate organizers. Soon, the leaders of Republicans in a group that advocates for market-driven climate solutions invited Gillette to join their group. And the citizens climate lobby asked him to come to a lobbying event in DC Gillette says meeting with legislators for the first time was empowering. I felt like I was participating in democracy united playing an actual roll. Through these experiences Gillette says, he's found other like-minded conservatives. Now I know that I'm not the only one that sees things the way that I do. So he encourages others to speak up to.

Gillette Gillett Ohio