28 Burst results for "Gillard"

6 essential lessons for women leaders

TED Talks Daily

05:06 min | 5 months ago

6 essential lessons for women leaders

"And goes ten years ago. When i became prime minister of australia i assume that at the start they would be a strong reaction to me. Being the first woman about it would obeyed over time. And then i would be treated the same. As savory out. The prime minister head bain was so wrong. That didn't happen the longer. I governed the more visible the sexism became. I don't want any other woman to be blindsided like that. That's why i'm so excited about working with you to help. Women get ready to lead in what is still a sexist world. I share that sense of excitement. After i was finance minister of nigeria was overwhelmed by the number of women who wanted me to be the mental. It is terrific that aspiring young women are keen to learn from those who have gone before. But they're still too few female role models especially women of color now. As a result of the work we have done together. I can offer everyone. Class standout lessons. That tabbies just of my own experience. What on the global research on women and leadership and the candidate sites of leading women one of the things to share. Is that this joy in being a leader in having the opportunity to put your values into action emphasizing. The positive makes a real difference to the power of role modeling if we only focus on the sexist negative experiences. Women may decide that being a latest. Sound so grim. They don't want to do it on the other hand if we pretend it so rosy and easy women and girls can be put off because they decide. Leadership is only for super women who never have any problems. We all have to get the balance right but in ghozi. It's impossible to talk about role models right now without asking you. How does it make you feel to see. Camera harris elected as vice president. I'm delighted it's important to the association of girls and women that they see role models. They can relate to vice president-elect terrace exactly that kind of role model particularly for girls and women of color and every woman who steps forward makes small space for the women will come next of course both of us know from and experiences that even win women get to the top unfortunately too much time and attention will be spent on what they looked like rather than what they do and say and ghozi for women. Is it still all about the head. Certainly julia. I laughed when hillary clinton said she envied by dress style and particularly my signature scuff. So i don't need to worry about my hair. Like many of women leaders have effectively adopted a uniform. a colorful one. it's african. it's me. I have developed my own style that i wear every dan. I don't vary from it. That has helped protect me from endless discussion of my appearance. It's helped me to get people to listen to my words not look at my clothes. Hillary told us she lost the equivalent of twenty four four days of campaign time in the two thousand sixteen election getting her hair and makeup done every day but actually contemporary problems for women leaders go far deeper than anything to do with looks at better. Warn now about to use the would. Many people would find rude. My favorite funny moment. He now travels was discussing resting bitch. Face with prime minister earner solberg of norway. the global research shows that if a man comes across strong and bishops. Even so faking. That's fine but if a woman does it in the reactions against her can be as visceral as revulsion or contain. They pretty mind bogglingly. Strong words happy. They certainly are women. Lee does talk about intuitively understanding that to be viewed as acceptable as a leader. They have to stay balanced on a tightrope between strength an empathy if they come across as too tough there viewed as hard unlikable but if they come across as too soft there seemed to be lacking the backbone needed to lead the problem. Is we still all have sexist stereotypes wearing in the back of our brains. I was portrayed as out of touch. Because i don't have children as even compared to a barren cow in the bush. Distant to be killed for hamburger means. That's horrible at you. Face that stereotype. While i was worried that people will think i couldn't do my job. My family was young. I enjoyed token to new zealand's prime minister justin that dan about experience as its second woman ever to have a child while being national leader. I was very taken by. Has saying she doesn't think she gets the work life balance right

Ghozi Camera Harris Association Of Girls And Women Bain Nigeria Australia Prime Minister Earner Solberg Hillary Clinton Julia DAN Hillary Norway LEE Bush New Zealand Justin
"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

01:42 min | 5 months ago

"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"On a podcast one signing twenty twenty. I spoke to women. Lady in healthcare politics comedy sides activism academia film television and trade unions tonight mainly he. This story sustained an inspired me and left me optimistic. We are still making progress on gender. Equality twenty twenty. One will no doubt taste us but it will also the time in which ways a global community can fairly shave..

"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

05:59 min | 5 months ago

"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"And we're trying to be contact with your face and we're trying to set it all up and all plans are in place and just before we're due to leave a very senior meal advisor comes to speak to me and says what do you think you're doing i was like i'm setting up a meeting with hillary clinton he's like no you're not and i was like why he's like he was like if you understand how politics works but hillary clinton is one of the most important people in american politics. Her time is really pressure. She's only going to give up one slot to see one british politician within a certain timeframe. And if you think we're wasting that slow on like you and harriet you've got another thing coming. She needs that slot for a proper politician. I e like a man and we're going to waste that slow talking about gender issues and he was basically like if you go ahead with his visit the there will be serious consequences to to pay and we were explicitly told to back off. I mean ended up. Frank's we met nancy pelosi instead. Who was like such lawf- an amazing. I mean we were just. She was super the kind of thing we would encounter in a day-to-day basis. Many of us spent the year gripped by the unfolding trump goose's biden campaign in the united states and on the podcast. The way explored the role of changing politics with some episodes focused squarely on the us presidential election. Jennifer palmieri political adviser and former director of communications to hillary clinton who also worked for president bill clinton and barack obama. Join me to analyze what we might be able to expect. Once votes were counted an on reflection. I think maybe if a predictions held up one surprising element conversation however was abd discussion of monica lewinsky. Who was genesis intern. When the served in bill clinton's white house in this next clip jennifer reflects on that time. And how she and the rest of the world massey's things differently when main of influence abusive power of women want to was my intern. And then i worked for a us. Senator john edwards ran for president and had ended up that he had a child out of wedlock while he was married to his wife during the presidential campaign. So i've had a lot of experience with this and you know when the lewinsky story broke not says Clinton had affair with her. You didn't believe it 'cause it was like how could it be so stupid right phuc because that would be so incredibly reckless to do and that was that was my thought about him in real time watching the way monica was hunted was so chilling. You know she was treated like a pond in a game. That was all about men in power right. So the independent counsel ken starr who sort of sought her out and interrogated her. They basically scooped her up. That's like the terms of the..

hillary clinton Jennifer palmieri president bill clinton harriet nancy pelosi biden Frank monica lewinsky united states barack obama Senator john edwards massey phuc white house jennifer Clinton monica ken starr
"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

03:36 min | 5 months ago

"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"Langston is someone who spent her life. Spotlighting the grievous inequalities faced by ev original australians especially women goes. I found a conversation about her childhood growing up in australia to be compelling. I wanted to know how. Masha not only survived but thrived in an environment with racism was the norm well. The mine strategy was reading books. I found school libraries and public libraries at a very early age. an account. Remember when i first started to raid. I suddenly started to read before. I started school. I became fascinated by all the signs and images around me and i was compelled to decode them. And i loved to draw. And i've eventually i think pretty much taught myself to raid and i read books and learned how to type books out of the library from a young age so that was strategy number. One strategy number two was well. I was brought up in a particular way a very old-fashioned aboriginal why children were taught in my amongst my paypal not to speak to adults and certainly not to be cheeky or to speak back at adults that were very strict rules so i could live in a world of silence and so when i wasn't going to school doing chose you know sitting around the fire or the dinner table i would go into the bush and sit under a tree and often in a trie would pick my favorite tree and sit in a tree and read a book so i think having time to myself in the bush and think about all that had happened during the day and to think about interactions that i didn't understand some teachers were very cruel. Some of my fellow students were very cruel and it required me to think about it. Because i had no defenses so i think i became an intellectual in grade one so it silence in the scholarship and trying to yank about racism and your treatment not that you would have used those words the inbound all. I didn't hear the word racism until the light nineteen sixties so. There were no words for me. I didn't know of any words that described mine counts. So you know. I didn't hear the the word sexism. Feminism until the early seventies shade many deepen thoughtful conversations with my guest this year. I also shared a lot of laughs. Especially with none other than deborah francis. What who hosts one of the most popular podcasts of all time the guilty feminist which is a confessional style show where women share the way they have failed s feminists. Deborah was a fabulous guest and lots of fun at conversation covering many of her life experiences including how she was a jehovah's witness but the faith and she found didn't align with a famous principles. Deborah started ad in the world of comedy which is a space that has traditionally been reserved me. She told me about the continuing and pervasive view. That women just aren't cut out for comedy. So if i go out to a regional comedy club and i have done it many times i will see people in the front row of the audience. Look at each other and in front of my face..

Langston Masha bush australia paypal deborah francis Deborah
"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

05:22 min | 5 months ago

"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"Kind of courage types to play. Rose as an actor when you have to this much of yourself a character maybe so unlike you to my surprise cake families question. What amusing and talk this conversation to a place. I didn't expect with asking questions of me. I find it hilarious. Julia the you talking to me about courage you you one of the most courageous women in politics..

Rose Julia
"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

05:36 min | 5 months ago

"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"We talked about how women in leadership positions taken less seriously. Because we don't know enough about the women leaders of the past. So how do we fix that problem. It's dots by sharing the stories from history building statues famous women and visibly recognizing their contribution. He talks about the importance of the. How retail retailer stories of women from the past using a mythical example. I was just reading this morning. I have a friend who's just had a baby. And because we're all in lockdown. And i bought a book on the baptists into two minutes a book of greek myths. Because he's named is child atlas. Actually which is quite beautiful holding the world on his shoulders. So i was just having a look at the greats i was looking at the one about pandora's box and i hadn't actually realized quite how sixes these stories off i mean the story of pandora's box we think about that now is being kind of letting the cat out of the bag moment. Once you've taken the lead off something you can't push it back again. But actually the story is that pandora's curiosity Rebelliousness in taking the lead of this vessel that the gods had said not to look into Every terrible evil piece of misery. Poverty seen vice that the world was perfect and then pandora came along and stuffed it up but through intellect in her curiosity. So i suppose that is the kind of underlying archetypal. What i'm calling it kind of a bedtime story there. That women who dare to step out of the confines of the roles that they've been expected to play all the qualities and values that this to carry of nakedness of reserve of a purely of care and compassion and women who exert any kind of influence agency curiosity intellect descent resistance rebelliousness that the whole union ceiling comes down upon their head. Of course these women are to be feared if they are the source of all of the world's ills than that i add to feed. You know we still see that kind of sorry. Say but you experienced it yourself. You know all of us who lived through your tenure as prime minister..

pandora
"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

03:43 min | 5 months ago

"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"Been proven inside. That's becoming an impediment for hearing women's voices during even across this like this though i suppose a Would sei whale massey's maths and does it really matter who's crunching the numbers and presenting it. Even there are always going to add up to be the same though. I don't think they do always add up to be the same. I think there are toys that you can make as you go along. And i think that it's incredibly important that those choices are made by people with a wide range of life experiences as possible to that commotion sadly the criticism of women and their appearances was happening along time before the covid nineteen pandemic. It's been a disappointing but common discussion thread amongst many my podcast guests. We conduct they careers in the public spotlight. They've had to contend with harsh media an online commentary about their appearance. That would make even the most resilient wanted crawl under a rock and not come out. That's way british historian and classicist and some woodside living national treasure. Mary bid decided to take a different approach. Mary is a mainstay on british television but it was a role she came to reluctantly. He marry discussing review. She received in the sunday times science. She was quote too ugly for television. She describes how it felt to read those words about herself. Well if he's a show coming it'd be nice to say. I was very blase about this. Put you pick up the sunday times a new thing. It's a bit like someone punching you just a little bit and then you you think. Few minutes later thought is just ridiculous. I mean it was went on and on about you'll coming into our living rooms. You might make yourself look presentable. And couldn't you brush your hair and those tombstone teak god their dreadful. You know on on what i thought was interesting about was i thought i'm not gonna have this. This ain't on really so. I saw two fought back and it became a little co celebre thinking long run as done good relate to the argument partly because it it extended beyond middle class. Liberal guardian readers caused thought. This was terrible and i wrote something for the daily mail about was likely trepidation about doing that because i thought gosh i've got a stereotype may be wrong of daily mail readers and i thought they would all be on gil site but nevertheless i can say look. You know i'm likud nery in this. Would i looked like looked. Like what a fifty fifty five. I looked fifty five year. Old woman looks like unless she's had an enormous amount work done. And i wrote this in the mail and what. I was really surprised at was the comments under the line. I mean you're always told. Never look at the comments on the line particularly not in the daily mail in a better to preserve your sanity than to do that. They want all supportive of me but the majority were unless really realize. The demographic of the readers of the daily mail has middle aged women like me. They don't like gilson is either 'cause it's about them as much as it's about me so it was quite sort of cheering to feel that. What he thought was a nice piece of laddish wit..

Mary bid massey Liberal guardian likud nery Mary gilson
"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

02:39 min | 5 months ago

"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"Hannah used maths to predict the effects of global pandemic on her baby show. Contagion i spoke to hinder is the global effects of covert nineteen began to emerge and it became clear in the discussion around pandemic response and policy women's voices where the politicians scientists would not been probably heard in this next clip. Hannah wrapped light some of the reasons. Why well credentialed. Women who are experts in mayfield might not put themselves forward publicly. I have noticed actually intensive certainly the uk that the people that we hearing from the uk. I'm noticing a real lack of female voices at she even from the scientists as as the political leaders. And i wonder about that is because it's not the case that there aren't any women working on this response in the scientific advice side. Which is the site that i learn more. There are a number of really brilliant. Really brilliant women who are working on this. Say in fact she partition. Tell you this but to this program for the bbc. The moment and i was determined. I was like i know that there are these female experts. I i mean i know them. I want to put some female faces on this because the public thinks that it's just completely this wall of men who are doing this and talking to these female experts trying to persuade them to get on the show. I mean the number of people that we try to do. We contacted to try and get them to talk in public and just not been able to persuade them. I can't help but think that their public reaction to what the scientists say is so fierce. And so i don't know spiteful and full of just anger. There's one mathematician or couple ashley particularly in the neil ferguson. Who is the sort of famous one. His now gang hate pieces by the press to by his love life on splashing on the front pages of newspapers. Right isn't mathematician. For goodness sake. Another guy graham. Medley was on the front page of the times. You know his co. quote. I think presently being taken very unfairly and the emails these people are receiving an. I think it's it's really not a surprise that the women who will get this stuff far worse i just taking a bit more of a backseat and i think that's something that's a real shame about that is he. That were being so angry about this. That we're the we're stuffing. The women coming forward and being more vocal at ease it certainly depressing circle that we do know that women get more abuse online. That's clearly.

Hannah uk mayfield neil ferguson bbc ashley Medley graham
"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

03:37 min | 5 months ago

"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"An always fantas style of ladyship refreshing now is head of the australian council of trade unions. Sally is leading the conversation about the impact of the pandemic on the economy and working life unlike earlier disruptions often major adjustments in the economy iran manufacturing affecting time mile jobs covid nineteen disproportionately bang about women's work. We saying the impact on part-time casual work the hospitality travel and tourism industries. Sickness where the workforce tends to be a feminist one. It's become clear we need more secure jobs and less sick maintained light before the new ways of working we a pioneering now could and should stay with us and give us more flexible and gender responsive workplaces. My conversation with sally took place before curving really made an impact. So we didn't discuss these issues but i conversation went in directions. I hadn't experienced before in podcasting and really experienced in conversations with other women seven said she done things she was white for it. good at. It's so unusual to hear a woman. Say good things issues telling me a bad childhood soccer dreams. Well this is why back in the dice obese. Would've been in the early eighties. And i was really good at soccer. And i had two younger brothers so sort of used to roughing it with my brothers and always the name to stronger than them to until i hit puberty and that was something i was happy about but anyway i was. I used to play soccer at lunchtime with the boys. The boys doing so. I used to play soccer after school and the coach would just let me join in and always the best in the team and really really wanted to play because it go to the way candid that be the match on and i couldn't fly because ridiculous rules saying that goes couldn't play in the boys teams. They ended up taking it to through the hierarchy of the soccer club and they had a meeting in that. Assad no goes cop. Line the team and for me as a ten year old it just same so ridiculous but so deeply unfair like this is something that i love but not only did i love. I was better than all the like. Why couldn't i use that skill at a my simple child mind back then. I thought well it's just because i'm not a boy. Well that's it so. I bought my brother's school uniform and i went to school the next day and are lined up in the boys line and i said i'm no longest sally shine and that's it. I thought that that would as a successful way of getting into the soccer team. Now did that word. Disaster a total disaster. That school didn't react well. My parents certainly did not react. Well i think thought it was probably more than it was. It was just simply may wanting to play soccer. I'm sure schools would deal with this much better these days but they did not deal with it. Well so i remember the next time on the sent me to school with the clip. Some buzzy my hair which julie ripped off the minute. I got around the corner but unfortunately it didn't make it into the soccer team selling so f- recognition of talent is something we see two little off-limits women even in leadership positions. This makes me think of a discussion. I had with. Hannah fry was a mathematician broadcaster author and journalist. Hannah replies max to human behavior looking for where you wouldn't expect to find them in fact in two thousand eighteen..

soccer australian council of trade un Sally iran sally sally shine Assad Hannah fry julie Hannah max
"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

05:32 min | 5 months ago

"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"Hello listeners will here. We are at the end of twenty twenty. Finally this is year any of us wanted. And if you feel as though you're limping through to the end of it you're not align wave face challenges individually and collectively as a result of covid nineteen. It's been a big adjustment for all of us to navigate life in this you way. I now familiar. Normally spain. the traveling the world for the different roles zion to take for organizations like the global institute for women's leadership and the global partnership for education. This year. I've been very much at home in adelaide. I've missed face to face. Contact the new places in the energy ideas and excitement that generated in a room full of people but there have been some upsides to not traveling. My bay my life. And i've been to sing more of my family including baby here for the start of my new great nieces life. Baby gwen joined us july. I've come to both the lies and love digital platforms and new ways of communicating and fortunately with global commitments paying online in the middle of the night has been far too common experience this year. Podcast of oncein reflected the new normal chilly while i haven't been to travel my conversations of still traverse the globe back from the safety of my home. Many of my guests reflect on the pandemics impact on gender inequality we have discussed women. The workforce and how we structure working lives leadership. And what. We want a nate from our world. Latest now they seems to be a race thinking of the traditional styles of leadership and a focus on the need to incorporate other traits like kindness empathy and compassion as we approach the end of twenty twenty. I've gone back through the many episodes we've released the and picked up some of my favorite discussions for you to enjoy someone. I've always admired. Is sally mcmanus of non sally. For many years three professional life an always fantas style of ladyship refreshing now is head of the australian council of trade unions. Sally is leading the conversation about the impact of the pandemic on the economy and working life unlike earlier disruptions often major adjustments in the economy iran manufacturing affecting time mile jobs covid nineteen disproportionately bang about women's work. We saying the impact on part-time casual work the hospitality travel and tourism industries. Sickness where the workforce tends to be a feminist one. It's become clear we need more secure jobs and less sick maintained light before the new ways of working we a pioneering now could and should stay with us and give us more flexible and gender responsive workplaces. My conversation with sally took place before curving really made an impact. So we didn't discuss these issues but i conversation went in directions. I hadn't experienced before in podcasting and really experienced in conversations with other women seven said she done things she was white for it. good at. It's so unusual to hear a woman. Say good things issues telling me a bad childhood soccer dreams. Well this is why back in the dice obese. Would've been in the early eighties. And i was really good at soccer. And i had two younger brothers so sort of used to roughing it with my brothers and always the name to stronger than them to until i hit puberty and that was something i was happy about but anyway i was. I used to play soccer at lunchtime with the boys. The boys doing so. I used to play soccer after school and the coach would just let me join in and always the best in the team and really really wanted to play because it go to the way candid that be the match on and i couldn't fly because ridiculous rules saying that goes couldn't play in the boys teams. They ended up taking it to through the hierarchy of the soccer club and they had a meeting in that. Assad no goes cop. Line the team and for me as a ten year old it just same so ridiculous but so deeply unfair like this is something that i love but not only did i love. I was better than all the like. Why couldn't i use that skill at a my simple child mind back then. I thought well it's just because i'm not a boy. Well that's it so. I bought my brother's school uniform and i went to school the next day and are lined up in the boys line and i said i'm no longest sally shine and that's it. I thought that that would as a successful way of getting into the soccer team. Now did that word. Disaster a total disaster. That school didn't react well. My parents certainly did not react. Well i think thought it was probably more than it was. It was just simply may wanting to play soccer. I'm sure schools would deal with this much better these days but they did not deal with it. Well so i remember the next time on the sent me to school with the clip. Some buzzy my hair which julie ripped off the minute. I got around the corner but unfortunately it didn't make it into the soccer team

soccer australian council of trade un Sally iran sally sally shine Assad Hannah fry julie Hannah max
Julia Gillard on the year that was 2020

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

05:32 min | 5 months ago

Julia Gillard on the year that was 2020

"Hello listeners will here. We are at the end of twenty twenty. Finally this is year any of us wanted. And if you feel as though you're limping through to the end of it you're not align wave face challenges individually and collectively as a result of covid nineteen. It's been a big adjustment for all of us to navigate life in this you way. I now familiar. Normally spain. the traveling the world for the different roles zion to take for organizations like the global institute for women's leadership and the global partnership for education. This year. I've been very much at home in adelaide. I've missed face to face. Contact the new places in the energy ideas and excitement that generated in a room full of people but there have been some upsides to not traveling. My bay my life. And i've been to sing more of my family including baby here for the start of my new great nieces life. Baby gwen joined us july. I've come to both the lies and love digital platforms and new ways of communicating and fortunately with global commitments paying online in the middle of the night has been far too common experience this year. Podcast of oncein reflected the new normal chilly while i haven't been to travel my conversations of still traverse the globe back from the safety of my home. Many of my guests reflect on the pandemics impact on gender inequality we have discussed women. The workforce and how we structure working lives leadership. And what. We want a nate from our world. Latest now they seems to be a race thinking of the traditional styles of leadership and a focus on the need to incorporate other traits like kindness empathy and compassion as we approach the end of twenty twenty. I've gone back through the many episodes we've released the and picked up some of my favorite discussions for you to enjoy someone. I've always admired. Is sally mcmanus of non sally. For many years three professional life an always fantas style of ladyship refreshing now is head of the australian council of trade unions. Sally is leading the conversation about the impact of the pandemic on the economy and working life unlike earlier disruptions often major adjustments in the economy iran manufacturing affecting time mile jobs covid nineteen disproportionately bang about women's work. We saying the impact on part-time casual work the hospitality travel and tourism industries. Sickness where the workforce tends to be a feminist one. It's become clear we need more secure jobs and less sick maintained light before the new ways of working we a pioneering now could and should stay with us and give us more flexible and gender responsive workplaces. My conversation with sally took place before curving really made an impact. So we didn't discuss these issues but i conversation went in directions. I hadn't experienced before in podcasting and really experienced in conversations with other women seven said she done things she was white for it. good at. It's so unusual to hear a woman. Say good things issues telling me a bad childhood soccer dreams. Well this is why back in the dice obese. Would've been in the early eighties. And i was really good at soccer. And i had two younger brothers so sort of used to roughing it with my brothers and always the name to stronger than them to until i hit puberty and that was something i was happy about but anyway i was. I used to play soccer at lunchtime with the boys. The boys doing so. I used to play soccer after school and the coach would just let me join in and always the best in the team and really really wanted to play because it go to the way candid that be the match on and i couldn't fly because ridiculous rules saying that goes couldn't play in the boys teams. They ended up taking it to through the hierarchy of the soccer club and they had a meeting in that. Assad no goes cop. Line the team and for me as a ten year old it just same so ridiculous but so deeply unfair like this is something that i love but not only did i love. I was better than all the like. Why couldn't i use that skill at a my simple child mind back then. I thought well it's just because i'm not a boy. Well that's it so. I bought my brother's school uniform and i went to school the next day and are lined up in the boys line and i said i'm no longest sally shine and that's it. I thought that that would as a successful way of getting into the soccer team. Now did that word. Disaster a total disaster. That school didn't react well. My parents certainly did not react. Well i think thought it was probably more than it was. It was just simply may wanting to play soccer. I'm sure schools would deal with this much better these days but they did not deal with it. Well so i remember the next time on the sent me to school with the clip. Some buzzy my hair which julie ripped off the minute. I got around the corner but unfortunately it didn't make it into the soccer team

Global Institute For Women's L Baby Gwen Soccer Sally Mcmanus Australian Council Of Trade Un Adelaide Spain Sally Iran Sally Shine Assad Julie
"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

03:10 min | 5 months ago

"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"This is sarah scenic hosted the serial podcast. I wanna tell you about our new show nice white parents. Reporter hana joffe..

Twenty years of climate extremes

The Science Show

06:35 min | 7 months ago

Twenty years of climate extremes

"The year two thousand and twenty was always going to be a tantalizing horizon for future thinkers even at symmetry conjures the clear-sightedness and precision of twenty twenty vision. Too which policymakers in resist manages. Always aspire twenty years ago. Most of southern australia was still in the group of the millenium drought. The dry conditions broke records around the nation. Perth stems where their lowest. Since the first world war and the southeast of the country was on its way to the dryest shania period since recordkeeping began as the bureau of meteorology. Put it at the time. This was the nation's first climate change drought. That observation came hot. On the heels of the third assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change which made headlines around the world with this conclusion that there is new and stronger evidence that most of the global warming observed over the last fifty years is attributable to human activities if suburban households become complacent about the household woody's than the drought was a wakeup call across the nation. Education campaigns and water saving devices joined water restrictions in an effort to ease pressure on limited urban water supplies in melbourne for instance the voluntary target. One five five campaign aimed more than half the daily water consumption of residents by encouraging shorter showers while imposing strict limits on watering gardens washing the car. Brisbane went even further aiming to reduce residential would consumption to one hundred and forty liters of water per person per day. The rain water tank in grey water. Recycling became suburban. Must haves offering the means to keep gardens green in trying conditions as the damn levels so lower and lower state governments turned desalination with perth leading the way in two thousand six a prospect that was unthinkable just a decade earlier other states took notice and before long desalination plants were on the drawing board for the gold coast sydney melbourne and adelaide. But for the most part by the time those projects were completed. The rains had returned to the east coast and the plants built. There were dismissed as wipe elephants journalist. Chris noticed this change in the weather himself as he reflected in the updated edition of his book on the murray darling basin in two thousand and ten browsing through his local bookshop. He'd realized that he's book. The river somehow migrated from the environment and ecology section where. It's just six months ago to a new place on the history shows even so this record linear rainfall that broke the millenium. Drought did not turn back the clock. A drying trend continued across the south of the continent particularly in the southwest. Where winter rains had been in decline since the nineteen seventies julian part to human induced climate change indeed while eastern australia record high levels of rainfall in late twenty ten and in twenty eleven perth and much of southwestern austrailia experienced record dry weather. This is just some of the challenges of planning for both climate variability and climate change on a continent of extremes. It's been looking ahead into the future. That's being one of the ways in which ustralian have long tried to come to terms with this continent of extreme climate variability in twenty eleven. The climate commission released its first report declaring that australia was facing the critical decade back. Then of course. The climate commission was a federal government body established under the gillard government but it was dissolved under the abbott government. Soon after its election in two thousand thirteen the decade to twenty twenty. The climate commission's report argued was critical in terms of meeting the two degrees celsius guardrail by curbing emissions of carbon dioxide in the decade to twenty twenty global emissions had to be well on track to reaching by twenty fifty to limit the planet's warming taking the temperature on the nation's progress towards this goal in twenty seventeen the climate council the independent body that rose from the ashes of the climate commission declared that australia was now known as global climate lagged already the concentration of carbon dioxide emissions had tipped over four hundred parts per million higher than at any other time for millions of us and the planet's temperature was over one degree higher than temperatures before the industrial revolution of the eighteenth century. The report warned that the window of opportunity to limit worsening climate impacts is closing and already climate events were getting worse pointing not only to bush fires and hate waves but also to drought and drying across the south of the continent. Just as the gun. I report of two thousand. Eight and countless other scientific studies had predicted two thousand and nineteen was the driest year since records began in one thousand nine hundred and it was the country's warmest year in fact all these since two thousand thirteen are among the ten warmest on record australia. The impact of climate changes lead to longer more intense fire seasons and an increase in the average number of elevated fire weather days as measured by the forest fire danger index twenty nine thousand nine so the highest cumulated index on record fires have burned before an australian but never like those we saw over the summer. It's called comfort knowing that this disaster was nice surprise after all the two thousand eight garner report warned that fire seasons will start earlier and the slightly lighter and generally be more intense. This effect increases over time but should be directly observable by twenty twenty in another ten to twenty years time 2019 white. Be so unusual. Although this use emissions might be lower thanks to the covid lockdowns and the air might be cleaner. The concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere like carbon dioxide continues to rise and the period two thousand sixteen to twenty twenty looks set to be the warmest five year period on record. Unfortunately a few months of slowing down can't make up for the decades upon decades of greenhouse gas emissions that have accumulated in the atmosphere. He street is weighing heavily on the planet's climate future.

Bureau Of Meteorology Climate Commission Southern Australia Melbourne Southwestern Austrailia Perth Intergovernmental Panel On Cli Abbott Government Eastern Australia Brisbane Australia Adelaide Gillard Government
Light flare spotted in black hole merger

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:31 min | 9 months ago

Light flare spotted in black hole merger

"Scientists using Celtics Vicky transient facility may have sputtered a light-flare it's associated with a black hole merger. Now, if confirmed, it will be most surprising is black holes and emerges and only dot to the electromagnetic spectrum. So where did the lively come from? One theory is that the system may be orbiting a supermassive black hole nearly form black Oh may have received a cake from the merger shooting off in a new direction and surging through a disc of guests surrounding the CBA massive black hole causing it to light up while it's unlikely that the Gw Nineteen Zero Five, twenty, one detection originated from the same event is the light flay researchers admit the possibility that it might have is intriguing. There are a number of different environments in which the system to black holes could formed and the disc of guests around supermassive black hole is one of them. The discovery of this mammoth black hole merger was only possible. Thanks to the work of gravitational wave laser interferometer observatories. They work by sending lasers into a beam splitter, which they en- shoots the beams along to perpendicular Mati kilometer-long tubes equipped with mirror test messes it the reins, the refracted laser lights the sent back to the detector where eventually they should theoretically recombine however gravitational wave generated by. something. Like a large moving masol to merging black holes for example, it causes the very fabric of space time stretch and compress emphasis slightly by just a fraction that I am a Proton and when the gravitational wave passes the Observatory Look space-time including the to bean lines and the text messages I stretched and compressed ever-so-slightly. So slightly leaving them out of phase the signature of the gravitational wave event. Using multiple gravitational wave detectors around the globe allow scientists to determine the direction of the gravitational wave source. Lago Lazy The from the Gravitational Wave Observatory comprises two identical detectors wanting in Livingston Louisiana and the Second Hanford Washington state. A third detector could virga was also used in this experiment it's located in the Northern Italy a fourth detected Japan's KAMIOKA gravitational wave detector. The first to be built underground is expected to come online. Later, this year and fifth gravitational wave detector originally offered to. Australia. But. Rejected by the Gillard, Labor government is now under construction in India.

Gravitational Wave Observatory Celtics Gillard Australia Northern Italy India Japan Labor Government Livingston Louisiana Hanford Washington
Mat Hancock defends "Homophobe and Misogynist" Tony Abbot

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:15 min | 10 months ago

Mat Hancock defends "Homophobe and Misogynist" Tony Abbot

"There are reports that Tony Abbott who is Australia's prime minister between two, thousand, thirteen and two, thousand and fifteen is being lined up to work alongside the British International Trade Secretary Liz Truss. The appointments not been made official yet, but it is thought he would take a senior role negotiating Britain's exit from the European Union. However, there have been many objections with those opposed to the appointment claiming that Abbott is unfit to represent the UK due to his views on climate change and pass misogynist homophobic comments, his the Health Minister Matt Hancock being grilled on the matter by skies K. barely we need to have the best experts in the world in that working in that field. And as the former prime, Minister Australia. Obviously. Go huge amounts of experience even if it's a homophobic misogynist. Well I I I I think that that is I I don't think that's. True I Dave I haven't seen. It said he I'm sure you'd have to support some of his comments. He's a homophobe a misogynist well. He's also an expert in trade. Well joining me on the line from camera is Karen Middleton the political correspondent for the Saturday paper listening to that Toko cliff. And, of course, Karen knows a thing or two about Abbott. So is he a misogynist homophobic? Well I wouldn't call him both things, but he certainly has been cold those things in the past he's taking controversial positions and. Alpha Prime Minister Julia Gila misogynist effectively when she gave a now famous speech in the parliament suggesting that that she can take lectures on misogyny from men meaning ashish. And he wasn't in favor of the. Vote we had here in Australia on same sex marriage campaigned strongly against it and and was involved with some. Philly. strenuous an unpleasant protests against the Julia Gillard when she was prime minister in general that had fairly success language in it. So you know they certainly have been controversial positions in a number of people here have strong views for and against Mr Abbott, and we are enjoying the debate from afar that's going on in London.

Tony Abbott Prime Minister Prime Minister Julia Gila Australia Karen Middleton Julia Gillard Liz Truss Toko Cliff European Union British International Trade Secretary Matt Hancock Britain Official UK London
UFC featherweight champ defends title in split decision

The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani

07:41 min | 1 year ago

UFC featherweight champ defends title in split decision

"I Will Fight Island was officially christened tonight for the UFC in Abu. Dhabi there was no baptism to be had in the main event of UFC two fifty one. What's going on everybody? Welcome to the official. You have to fifty one post fight. Show here on, May, finding dot com I'm Mike Heck location this week from Boston Massachusetts visiting the parents this weekend. That is Jose Jose. Main Event Kamara, who's been retains a welterweight title against Whore Mazal. Challenger looked pretty darn good in that first round. I'm pretty surprised that judges gave in that first round, but it was the much fresher champion that was able to sort of chip away at the always game, or hey mazda throughout the fire Ab. Fresher champion but Komo. Zeman was basically been in camps since beginning of this year, despite was like Ben Booked and booked in both supposed to fight earlier this by giving burns, and also muzzle steps in, so yes, he's finally fresher because he he's had the full camp and everything but I think Kamara wasn't one hundred percent in that fight, either considering this long extended, Feick at Ala, similar to twenty Ferguson with all these these these fights falling apart, but Kamara who's been one nonetheless, might not have been the most exciting fight. I saw a couple of tweets complaining about the fight and I really take that. I felt it was a lot of fans that were on this very muzzle hype train. He's on the video game cover on this baptism round the resurrection Super Necessary Punches bef tile, and that they were expecting violence, even mice I myself said fight between WHO's minimize well probably has a higher chance of ending in a violent way, but it did not come out who's been one I had them winning all five rounds the first round I guess. Didn't really matter to me. Who won that? I still come who's been what at least four of the rounds comfortably? The people complain about. The foot stopped the wrestling the headbutts. That stuff will come out. Who's been did what he had to do to win. That's exactly why I thought he would. Take, her might as well because all the time Mazal taking this fight on short notice. Kamara also took this fire. On short notice gets an extra a completely different fighter between Gilbert Burns as well. It's completely rechange leftist camp Had his new trevor wittman is corn for the first time fighting the guy all this bad blood is in the air all the pressures on him, and perform a like we ourselves, said all the pressures on who's Madonna not not a whole lot on Mazal, but at the end of the day. Who's been doing what he had to do? I didn't have a problem with the way fought. Might not have been the most exciting, but if I was going to pick up, predict away whose men would pull this off. This is exactly how I thought he would do it. Yeah, when you get a fight like this and you have a guy as hot as MAS. Bat brings in a lot of the casual fan base. Does your watch? As many events as we watch, and some of the hardcore fans watch everything so most people expected this fight to go exactly that way I thought the first row was going to be the most interesting round, obviously, because of Mazda was going to get it done. He's probably going to have to do it in the first five minutes, and this is the fire. We got like Mara. Who's been defends his title. For the second time. It was another classic who's been like performance and he gets a one-sided win and highly anticipated main event so in the end. We like to talk about the overall letter grade, but it felt like just kind of looking at the time slot when we're all said and done. We're getting ready to hit record here. We're just like man this is this is super late like I feel like the card and the whole night in a weird way. Wet Kinda slow did it not. started off really really quickly. Might just. Like I feel like the first few flew by and all of a sudden I had been watching fights for two and a half three hours and I'm like wow, this fight is cars going quickly I like this pace, and then we the main card and Amanda he boss comes in, and just submits patriots immediately i. wish went exactly as I expected, but then there was decision with Rosen on drugs, and then even Yawn Aldo finish, but it was in the fifth round, so there's still basically fought for twenty five minutes, and then we get twenty five minutes, Vulcanology Holloway and then we get twenty five minutes of in Mazda, also of these we've seen. We saw that graphic on the screen like. All the cards are three title fights, and like we used to fourteen had like Woodley Maya in Jones, a cormet and Cyborg Abinger, and then to seventeen to five those had some bangers like like two to seventeen had three epic fights three like violent, like just three of the craziest finishes you'll see. And then, of course to a five, the CONOR McGregor show, and then to seventeen had the DC Jones trilogy, so I think we're a little maybe. We'll. We'll spoiled on these three. These three title fight cars while we're expecting something like that and I loved all all great fights off spectacular fights, but I think a lot of fans are tuning in to see fight island. In the Mazar strain, all these title-fights might have been. A limited. I could see why they might have been little disappointed. I didn't have a problem with it, but probably was the night Dana White wanted in terms of finishes. Yeah, the main event may have disappointed some people but for. The Sake, this is like the best thing that could have happened for the welterweight division like if you're burns. Edwards these guys are pretty happy right now. Especially Gilbert Burns. One hundred percent I mean we. We set it on count after it was on what the heck or or post eyesore produce. All kind of blend together at this point in the summer, but we. We said if Moslem Dole wins. That's going to be a problem for the US's pockets the welterweight division I mean. We were talking about him fighting the bringing the both belts so that the Conor McGregor. The table and all this. Kamara who's been one and it's? It's a no brainer that Gobert burn gets three matches. Suppose he should've been fighting tonight. before covid nineteen October, nineteen. That's applaud the car, so yeah, for all the way division, and the the the martial art fans of the world that don't like quote unquote. Holding divisions I think that's a good thing, but I. Honestly I love chaos at Moscow had one I. Think I, think it would have been fun time in the world of May. And Mazda all. Let's be clear. We all know this. He was the a side heading into this fight. He's the reason. There was a lot of buzz and a lot of fanfare when you had a guy like game bread in the street that he's on. That's what happens, but a lot of people wanNA know where he goes from here. Because despite losing the fight tonight, he still has a ton of options moving forward. Chaos can still rain in some way Jose. Can you say that again? You cut off quick second. Chaos can rain. For horny Mas at all got about it because he's got so many options moving forward despite the loss tonight. Yeah, I mean Hoy Mazdas. All I'm Kamara. WHO's been himself set like he's GonNa. He's like. He's like he's GonNa. Lose all these like excuses. Bill didn't talk the finance days notice flu costs. The country doesn't have was coach in the gym, covert nineteen this and that so like I. Don't think I of course I think Mazda obviously cooled anytime. You lose. You cool a little bit Conor McGregor and Nadir's, and it's such an insane finish that they run it back, and you have another epic fight like that, but for Mazda all you're obviously going to a little bit but he himself said. Let me, get a couple of wins and they'll run back. I'm sure he want. He would love to five full camp but the Colby College. Is there I? Think that is going to drum up a whole lot of interest I. think people might even be more interested in that fight in the dynamic between those two fires, oarsmen and I think that Kobe Covington already Moslems? Fight does not need a title online. That's just two guys. They hate each other I wanNA break brick on each other's faces. WHO'S MCCANN? Fight Gillard. Leeann, Edwards of course out there, wonder boy thompsons, working his way up Santana, positive I think has covered to so he somewhere out there, so the welterweight division will move, but for now Mazda all. Of course cooled, but he's still I think still the hottest commodity hundred seventy pounds.

Mazda Kamara Fight Island Conor Mcgregor Jose Jose Gilbert Burns UFC Massachusetts Mike Heck Edwards Official Komo Trevor Wittman Boston Colby College Mazal United States Dana White Jones Kobe Covington
Saharan Dust Cloud Arrives At The U.S. Gulf Coast, Bringing Haze

Environment: NPR

03:37 min | 1 year ago

Saharan Dust Cloud Arrives At The U.S. Gulf Coast, Bringing Haze

"It's a journey. That's a weeks and spend thousands of miles across an ocean floating on currents of air today, a massive cloud of dust from the Sahara desert arrives in the southeastern United States to walk us through this meteorological phenomenon. We are joined by Professor Marshall Shepherd. The Director of the atmospheric scientists program at the University of Georgia welcome. Thank you for having me okay now. I've seen the satellite images, but. But tell us what it's GonNa. Look like from the ground as this wave of dust from the Sahara arrives in the United States. You know we give these things every year and some are bigger than others. These are this year quite large and so I think that's why it's garnering much attention. Typically you lose the blue sky for more hazy Milky Sky. You tend to see more vivid sunsets and sunrises because. Because of the scattering properties of the dust and interacting with the sunlight, so those are sort of the optical effects, but I think people that suffer from allergy to dust or particular matter, they actually might not find it so amusing. They may have some health issues Why is it so much bigger this year than normal? I think one thing that happened this year are e.. Is that that dust in the? The Hell region in parts of Africa sat there, and just collected because the the wind system this African easterly jet meteorologist talk about it took a bit longer to kind of get itself going, and once it gets going, you can belch and Burp that dust out into the Atlantic, and that's what we're seeing now. Because there was somewhat of a delay, there was a lot more desk sitting there the build up. All right so pros you said good sunrises and sunsets, cons, people who have health problems might find that the respiratory problems are worse. What else is this dust system? GonNa do I mean on the whole is a good thing or a bad thing you know one of the things is an earth scientist. The Earth is so connected, and this is just another example so these dust storms they actually can fertilize the oceans in parts of Amazonia. They're carrying things that really help those ecosystems. Ecosystems but on the flip side of that there's been studies recently say they can actually carry pathogens as well so when you think about Mosquitos as a vector born disease carrier some argued that these dust storms can be vectors, they can carry pathogens another perhaps positive however is that the dust? If there were to be a hurricane forming out over the Atlantic hurricanes don't like the dust. If the dust gets into those forming systems, they can weaken those storms quite a bit. How much? Much bigger. Is this one than what we would see in a typical year? You know it's interesting. I saw a colleague tweet scale. They were using some data from NASA NASA Sir several satellites up monitoring air, quality and air constituents, and literally this event was off the chart. It wasn't even the same type of event. It was just so far off the plot scale, and so four people who study atmospheric science like you is a moment totally nerd out and like remember where you. You were when the Great Sahara Dust of two thousand twenty came across the Atlantic I th I think it is I I've seen some sort of very hyperbolic terms like the Godzillas dust storm. Those types of things I don't i. don't tend to like us such hyperbole when I talk about these things, but it is an anomaly event. My good friend and colleague Tom Gill at the University of Texas El. Paso is an expert on dust storms I know he's geeking out on this. I hosted a podcast call, weather, geeks or the weather channel, and we use the term geeking out. I'm certain it. Scientists like Tom. Gillard geeking out over this dust storm. Marshall Shepherd is the Director of the atmospheric scientists program at the University of and former president of the American meteorological. Society thanks for talking with us about this monster dust storm. Thank you for having me.

Professor Marshall Shepherd United States Atlantic Director Tom Gill Milky Sky Nasa University Of Georgia Gillard Scientist Paso University Of Africa University Of Texas El President Trump
Understanding the border dispute between India and China

Between The Lines

05:48 min | 1 year ago

Understanding the border dispute between India and China

"Together China in India account for more than one third of the entire population of the world, and if you believe the predictions of Keisha Mahbubani, remember him. He's been a skit on this program. He's the distinguished Singaporean intellectual. He says the future is Asian, and it's China's and India's to shame. But as my next guest points out. There, a deep historical tensions between these two budding global superpowers, which might make that impossible. China and India share land border in the Himalayas which has been in dispute since nineteen, sixty two, and it's been a pretty quiet style for decades, however, since May tensions have been rising nuclear powers facing off in a remote corner of the Himalayas, the disputed Kashmir region. This is the first the classroom this border in forty five years Indian government confirmed twenty of its soldiers were killed in the clash. China seems to now be making new claims to territory now. Will this be the event that pushes India away from Chana. Chana for good, and what does it mean for the rest of the World Tom V. Madan is a senior fellow in the foreign policy program at the Brookings Institution. In Washington. She's the author of a new book called Fateful Triangle. How China shut US India relations during the cold. War She's got an article in this month's foreign. Affairs magazine on how China is losing India Tovey. Welcome to between the lines. Thank you for having me Tom now. The border dispute between China and India has probably been the most tasteful. Conflict in the world. No one died and forty five years. What sit this conflict of? It was set off because of some early moves in early May that. had. Brought forward troops and equipped military equipment at different points on the China. India boundary the line of actual control. In the western sector particularly of their border, which is eastern Hlavac and at multiple points, what we saw was attempts to change the status quo whether it was to establish a permanent presence in built in areas, but both sides claim. Or attempts to stop a Indian patrols from moving in those areas which they have traditionally done. That's set the context. It's been going on since at least early May. What we actually saw what was happening to June, sixth meeting between senior military commanders was that they had agreed to a process of de-escalation and disengagement but something went very wrong in the course of this de-escalation. And this is where the incident took place. Now this particular incident has just been a larger in scale and an this whole stat of larger scale, but also regrets aggressiveness and the ones we've seen before, and there are reports that both countries are deploying some serious weapons to the bases close to the border. Is this just posturing, or is there a serious risk of Esscalation I? Think these kind of situation. There's always a risk of escalation. We've seen at least three. faceoffs three major face before this one between the Chinese and Indian military's in two, thousand, thirteen, two, thousand, fourteen in two thousand seventeen This one is could have larger in scale. We've seen as we did. On June fifteenth that even though they have traditionally had a whole series of agreements, standard operating procedures protocols in place between the two countries to avoid the kind of Esscalation we saw injured fifteenth. They clearly are not sufficient anymore, so let's put this in a broader historical context. China and India and went to war in nineteen, sixty two over the border. Now this of course was at the heart of the Cold War. Taibbi take us back to the geopolitical context of the time what was going on? By the time, the nineteen sixty sixty-two war broke out between China and India. You've seen a few years from about nineteen fifty seven about five years already of rising China Idiot tensions you've seen. The Indians relies that The Chinese did not consider. The boundary settled that they were building. A roads through territory India sought was India's. You saw scuffles skirmishes at between. The. Two sides patrols at various points on the boundary. You also saw the escape of the Lama. At a number of Tibetan. Refugees remain to stay in India in one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine, which the Chinese soil with deep suspicion and suspected that the US and you had worked together to engineer about escape. And, so you seem kind of rising tensions between China and India and at the same time you see you saw. The US India actually because in a national park because of their shared concerns about China actually starting to move closer towards each other for the for the the US This saw a in democratic India as both Jew potential, a political counterbalance, but also democratic contrast to soviet-backed Communist China accident, very interested in supporting it. N India welcomed that support, and so that was the. what was? Preceded that sixty to war, but which occurred when the Chinese decided. To move what they call the self defense a counterattack. And in nineteen, sixty two. Move across across the boundary took and defeated India quite badly, which laughed a number of different. It's a it's left a lot of historical baggage. The only major war the Union army has lost

India China N India United States Himalayas Tom V. Madan Esscalation Chana Indian Government Keisha Mahbubani Union Army Brookings Institution Tovey Washington Hlavac Senior Fellow Taibbi
Cate Blanchett reveals 'a bit of a chainsaw accident'

On The Edge With Thayrone

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Cate Blanchett reveals 'a bit of a chainsaw accident'

"In Oscar winner wearing some new hats lately reveals an unusual injury actors Cate Blanchett has accidentally cut her head with a chain saw while in lockdown the Australian actress revealed the injury during a podcast interview with former Australian prime minister Julia Gillard last week Blanchet saying quote I had a bit of a chainsaw accident yesterday which sounds very very exciting but it wasn't adding quote besides a little neck to my head I'm fine planted in our family had been a lockdown in Sussex England faxes my guns woman the mother of four also picking up the role of teacher while everyone's

Cate Blanchett Julia Gillard Blanchet Oscar Prime Minister Sussex England
"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"She's politics before British politics becoming incredibly toxic and it has over the last couple of years really taken a turn. I've had rape and death threats before I did some work. On Women's means representation on our banknotes with Caroline Credit President Amazing campaign and that was cut the first time people saw that. It's now become so common that it's not really talked. The amount is just seen as part of the job. But I think what was happening to me and I think particularly the idea that you could target a pregnant woman in that way was so people quite shocking. I want to close with one of the strongest most resilient and most inspiring women honored to call a friend at a special live event. At King's College London we welcomed Hillary are- Rodham Clinton to talk to us about her experiences and thoughts about the world today and global progress on gender equality. I took it back almost almost twenty five years to her now famous speech delivered as US First Lady in Beijing at a Union meeting in which she declared women's Rights Human Rights Human Rights Women's rights she told me about the huge reaction worldwide that her woods triggered. I remember it very well. Because it was the fourth United Nations Conference on women it was being held in Beijing and we of course in the United States were sending a delegation but the UN invited me to come to speak. And I think it's a bit of an understatement to say that There were many in the administration namely my husband's administration at the time. who were very reluctant to have me go and members very powerful members members of Congress as well because there were several human rights issues that had sprung up at the time between the United States and China with their imprisoning imprisoning of human rights activists so it was a bit of a tug of war back and forth and I very much wanted to go? The delegation allegation was hoping I would go and I finally said I really want to go and my husband said why. I think it's fine if you go and I said okay fine. We're going then and off. We went but I also wanted to go because I thought it was important to you. Push the envelope. As far as we could about a lot of the practices some of them cultural some of them political social. Some of them legal. So that we're holding women back in many many ways and so in the speech I spoke a lot about those actions and the impact that they had on on girls and women and then of course made the comment about human rights being women's rights and women's rights being human rights in front of the official delegation that I was speaking speaking. It was simultaneous translation in about fifty languages and so nobody was responding. And if you've ever given a speech in front of a big audience and people are hunched over there listening hard. They're not looking at you because they're trying to hear what you're saying it. It is so unnerving thought WHOA. They don't like me talking about the one child policy or they don't like me saying that women can't inherit property the whole list of problems. I was discussing but at the end they did turn out to really like the speech and like the message of the speech. It was funny because because I was criticizing practices including those of our hosts China. So it's one point. China turned off the sound in the rest of the Convention Center left it on in the room but turned off so people outside. Couldn't hear it fast forward like I don't know twenty two years I get a call from a friend of mine in Beijing. Who Says I'm shopping? This large department store and they usually play music over the loudspeakers but they're playing your speech from Beijing. Nineteen ninety five and I went. That's progress. Thanks.

Beijing United States China rape Caroline Hillary President Rodham Clinton United Nations Conference UN Congress King's College London Convention Center official
"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

12:37 min | 1 year ago

"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"Modern father's more thoughtful about the impact of their work on their kids than my father's generation interaction around grandparents generation. And you know these. These things vary from family to family and between couples. They might be many people people who wouldn't make the same decision I made. They'd be others. Who Look the point is is as many people as there are there? are that many different ways. Ace of organizing these competing demands and with people saying I'll give up my job. I'll come and look after your kids still want them to turn fighting for the knock on the door and I had the reverse experience because of course I was criticized for not having children and our do remember day in Melbourne's West where they lived. I was walking down the street and a woman scream to a stop in a car. Went down the window to the kids in the back and yelled out the window. If you need to have kids you can take mine almost two very the I want to see policy that benefits women's lives and furthest gender equality. But you don't have to be in politics to change. It's equally important in the corporate world and I got to meet with one of the most respected thought leaders and vocal advocates for diversity and inclusion Pamela Hutchinson. She's now the global head at Bloomberg on diversity and inclusion but when she started out she was one of only five or six individuals in the UK working in this space this since that time things have progressed. But as she tells me here. It's mostly what women who've benefited are. Maybe he told a story when we together about you being at an event where there was sort of applause because at more diverse board. I think it was advisory committee at bank created. And yet when you look at the the picture that was unveiled it was all what women who had been added to the committee. Can you talk to us about your reaction when you saw that. Yeah this was an event I I went to several years ago. It was looking at best practices around gender diversity and I particular company stood up and showed a big picture of the board ten years ago which were all white man and they showed the picture of what they're like now today which was a mix of men and women so it was great gender diversity but what was very obvious to me and perhaps very obvious to me as a black woman was the Paul Board was white and I asked the question question and I said great that you've made progress on gender diversity but where the people like me. I don't see myself in there and the lady said to me. Oh Pamela that was just the reason the board looks like that is because we were just focused on gender diversity so I asked if I wasn't a woman and she sort of said. Oh well we'll get to the black program later and I asked the question again so does not make me a woman and it really kind of drove home to me. At that point that perhaps hops. The gender agenda wasn't full people look like me because organizations Oh some for that particular organization. I should say didn't see me as a woman Um Black Person I you know I feel that it's really important that as we think about gender that we think about. I've said this one hundred times before we think about all of us and some of us to move this agenda forward I also feel that if the gender agenda continues to support one group of women over another group in them we haven't really been successful of also made some amazing women working and leading in their local communities including the courageous Vic Williams who set up the justice for Grain for campaign in the wake of the terrible in Grenfell Tower Block in London. He she talks to me about being on the end end of gender treatment despite being at the head of the campaign to push the UK government to ensure justice is given to the victims of the tragedy. Do you think the gender in the reactions that they were looking at you as a woman as a black woman and putting the the berries up to hearing what you had to say other. It's all what it's always the Shoji before you know scenario where me government many star who you think at the time just thought you know I was small community person just kind of running around. Luckily that Mateen. He had somebody in his office one of his civil servants. He knew that I was the Yvette Williams from the CPS and told him onto no certain terms that he should be listening to me when we left the mates and we got to the left. He said Oh. I feel like giving you a hug why. I'm with the bereaved family member WHO's mile. I think he needs to hug pete more than May. Why haven't you offered him a hug? So kind of it's the those boundaries of your gender. It is the most significant thing they say on sumptious. Oh you know well. She's speaking Graham Foul you know. She's speaking on meeting. Truman Noxitril traumatizes. She's she she needs to honk So yeah you to your front door is your frontal people. I see you know that they. I think my question asks differently to to man. What do you mean by that question US different life? They will ask good questions that are. Aw Gender Lighten as opposed to stick into kind of the big political kind of policy issues. How are you as a mother? Would you feel about the children that kind of thing. Those questions always kind of crop up as she govern. Long and think you'd have interview men like Another woman who's called at Janury justice left right and center is feminist writer and Downright Crusader Caroline Creo per grizz famous for her campaigns to get Jane austen on the British ten paranoid and the first statue of a woman in the political heart of the UK. London's Indi- Parliament Square. She had plenty of insight into what makes a winning campaign and had a stand up to. Your aggressors apparently stubbornness yes and rage and coffee. She also shared with me some fascinating findings from her book invisible women which exposes the Gender Dada Gap Yep inherent in everything from medical care. Health and safety the design of workplaces and the list goes on get ready to laugh and be shocked. You'd better tell us the via story this story. I'll tell you the female one I because it's shorter. So basically they developed what they called female Viagra oversee it's a different print compound and it's intended for female libido and they discovered that it may interact negatively with alcohol. Probably tell us this guy say they decided to test this which is the right thing today but they tested it in twenty three men and two women intended for women is one thing that the layperson knows let alone doctors. It's that women experience alcohol differently. Two men yes so so yeah. That was pretty amazing. How does something like that happened? So the male Viagra story is actually. I think it's sort of encapsulates. The whole issue so for those who don't Viagra was discovered. It was discovered by accident in a trial for heart. Medication and of course it was an all male title trial for medication and didn't work so that's but they discovered this side effect and so they then did very very quickly after that tests on this and biogra- as we know it was put on the market if he is later and that was I think in the late nineteen twenty fifteen a research Figures out that the way that this active ingredient works could be useful for period pain and period pain. Basically the only commonly available is proven and any other drugs that exist often have side effects and just take necessary work that well you know says fezzet reason to try and test this so he put on the small got some funding to put on a small scale trial and the primary hypothesis was is that it could provide four hours of continuous pain relief with no side effects compared to placebo and that was what what they were finding when they started the study but they ran funding so they couldn't confirm the primary objective. But you know they had these promising study and so he went and he tried to get funding twice from the National Institute of Health in America. I'm both times has turned down on the basis that it wasn't a public health priority. Oh so you. Erectile dysfunction is a serious issue. No one's going to deny that but it affects men period. Pain affects women. And and so I pull the disparity in the funding situation to see as a priority. The second will you think if women had been included it in the first trial maybe by this point we would have period pain medication because the question is why don't Pharma companies take on. What's because his economic money out of it anymore because it's a generic drug now raw so back then? There was loads of money to be made because it was this new compound and say they could make money off of it and they made Agra and if therapy women in that trial they might discovered period pain solution and then they will soon be money to made for in that way. If it would've happened they might still have gone for rectal function Johnson East or is now it's just a public health party. The National Institute of Health Waiting Funder CREO diaper raise as received a huge backlash for campaigning for her beliefs at the height of her campaigns getting fifty threats of rape and murder to every hour simile. Still crazy a British politician Aku up with during the UK election had to suffer an abusive targeted Aug. Campaign entitled Stop Stellar for her Stella work to bring women in Northern Ireland the right to an abortion they was correct very personalized campaigning. Against you which seems to have painting formed by some of the campaign techniques used in the United States and that used a slogan of Stop Stellar. What do you think they meant by? Stop Speller when I first go. Electric British campaigning tends to be sometimes quite sedate. You get an angry lesser inspire early handwriting. Maybe greening but that's about it. This is a form of off political engagement that we've seen in America in particular and indeed we know that the groups doing it had connections to American organizations called the Center for bioethical reform. They turned up with twenty foot posters of my head next to pictures of aborted fetuses quite late term kaffee sustain your. MP's working to make this happen in my community. They set up a whole campaign about the fact that. Because I'm I'm pregnant. We said I was a hypocrite. Which I didn't quite on some of those things that you need to have an abortion to be consistent which I thought given that they would like to claim that they're pro life isn't terribly positioned to them? They have unleashed whole tirade. Tirade of people writing to me telling me that I'm a baby killer telling you I must be stopped. That direct action is the only way stop killing babies. They are constantly on my social media. They're Milo community. They are and they're still doing this stuff. They are harassing me by a form of company. This is not free I've had over. He is lots of debates with people about abortion. Feel very strongly about it because is a very nice issue for people. They've never felt the need to intimidate. Those will target on my head and these pictures is and kind of said to people form of radicalization. It's you go out and stop this person however you can. Because she's responsible for the deaths of millions of children it's incredibly incredibly inflammatory and it's completely different from having a debate about what you consider to be human rights or you can just be a right to choose or at what point you might have a time all sorts of things we haven't had in British..

UK Viagra Yvette Williams London National Institute of Health America Melbourne Pamela Hutchinson global head Truman Noxitril traumatizes CPS Paul Board pete United States Graham Jane austen CREO Bloomberg
"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

14:02 min | 1 year ago

"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"You've missed so far. I also want to take this opportunity to thank you for supporting my first ever podcast series and I hope you stick with me as as we continue this journey together in the New Year. Let's start at the very beginning. With the first episode we released we featured British comedian and equality campaigner China. Sandi Toksvig you may know her from BBC quiz. Show Q I or the delicious great British bake off. Sandy spoke about the under representation Cintas of women in comedy as well as sharing how terrifying was to come out as a lesbian while so publicly well known Olo it often feels like progress is slow this clip about what sandy to enjoy you from male colleagues and audiences in the nineteen eighty S. Reminds us us that we have made some headway. You're talking about the eighties the mid eighties. And if you were on a comedy bill as a woman you would be the only woman That was what I don't know what they're worried about it. But it was two of us the cycles would collide and become bad temper during the show. I didn't know what they thought it was going to happen. and and the comedy store which was the first sort of major comedy club here in London didn't have a a relief for the for the turns for the Comedians so it was just a sink in the corner of the Dresser. All the boys used to relieve themselves in the sink as because it never occurred to them that a woman might turn up and need to be relieved and I was expected to go through the crowd and the Q.. and Go and be with the public and use the facilities there so so even the basics of making you feel comfortable as a young woman onstage. We're not there and then pretty much. If there was a scene with the you know say doctrine and US boys would immediately presume that you're going to business and it gets very I would always try and get in I if they use the same. The doctrine a nurse. I tried jump on this day strategic. Save the boys sonars. 'CAUSE YOU'RE GONNA get you know scalpels or something so they established really quickly the the rim not going to play the nurse at this so you fought. You fought even within the scenes that the improvise scenes that you were doing. And how many times have I stood on stage and remember the show sighted show any of you just think. Wow okay Can I have an unusual ocupation. Please always always as a woman. You'd get gynecologist comical adjusts and then a big law from the men in the audience just it was just yes and a lot of women gave up because they side at about midnight when they've been asked to share the cleavage to somebody to be at home. We lost a lot of great early talent. Who just couldn't do that can keep up with the pressure of being shouted at Sandy clearly had a lot of resilience to stay put and stand her ground in the comedy world and thank goodness or we wouldn't have her as the British national treasure? She is he's Today speaking of resilience and staying port. I want to share some heartening. Words from the courageous BBC journalist Carrie Gracie if you don't know her story story. She resigned from her post. As China editor after discovering her male equivalent was being paid almost twice as much as her. What followed followed was a stressful battle against her employer to get them to acknowledge that she was worth as much as a man he she describes the solidarity between women BBC employers which e terms the high heart and hype Monde? It's kind of a high mind hive heart the hive mind and is absolutely crucial because one of the things that makes it hard for women to see the facts on pay. Is the the secrecy that we were talking about a moment ago and many employers God pay data very closely precisely said that employees can't do that compare and contrast thing amongst themselves and I'm not saying I don't understand employs reasons for doing that but obviously it's not helpful to the question of equal pay because it doesn't allow the kind of transparency which gives women an opportunity to see where the gaps are not justified. Because we had this this hive mind. We share information and from sharing our information we could build our own sense of the patents that were in operation. And that meant that when you're Li- manager also grievance hearing managers said well you know we're paying him more because because this skill that he has that experience that he has is worth more than the other skill that you have all the others experience that you have we knew that on the other side of the page they were paying a man more for precisely the skill that the woman had all the experience that the women are so we could start dismantling dismantling the defenses were on equal pay jute that hive mind and the high heart that I mentioned is vital to because I do think coming coming back to the experience of being gasoline belittled is very overwhelming for an individual. But if you have a group of comrades and sisters fighting together you can help to hold up the mirror to each other and you can believe that you yourself a rubbish because if you're told it enough times and you've been told enough times in your career that you're worth less than a man. Then you can Dan in your moments of weakness belief that if you see the management say of someone you know is brilliant. You know you're not emotionally invested in your roane low self esteem. Then you know it's rubbish and you just build indignant on her behalf and you say to her. You're not rubbish. The talking nonsense. Get Out and fight I to fight and if you're doing it for each other than the fight is stronger. One of the reasons which carry talks about in her episode that women often do get undervalued undervalued in the workplace is Judah conscious and unconscious bias which presupposes that. It's the role of women to be the main care in their family. One woman who's refused to be pigeonholed in the heavily male dominated world of finance is top British businesswoman. Helena Morrissey she made it to the top juggling a super high pressure job. We the family of nine. Yes nine children it does help. She has a Steinheim in husband. It sounds so trite really but I learned by taking panic much more about lots of things and overwhelmed and I learned that she faisal taking things one step at a time much easier said than done but really trying to fight the natural tendency that I think we have to sort of try to over think in the next extinct in the next step. And how am I going to cope amuse negative energy. I think on just over things that might go wrong rather than dealing in the here and the now so that has helped and I guess also values that I have a stay at home husband not always case. We had a fourth child before he became a stay at home father and husband and that has made obviously a huge difference in one of my hopes. Is that the world of what would become the world of family life. It will become much more interchangeable for men and women and that it's not so unusual necessarily completely quitting of job but sharing and family as well as work and Fahim deciding to take the stay at home parent row with the stereotypes that he found Hud. That would have been very unusual. I mean it's still unusual today but even more unusual when you first jointly took that decision had to say remember those days well he always evaluate mommy segment. Ignace felt very confident masculinity you know and he was quite happy to in one sense heated being asked you know school gates or dinner parties or just casual conversation mutation of what is it that you do because it would throw people the onset Oh am bringing up children. People sort of shuffled look embarrassed and move away and they didn't know how to pigeonhole which shows us something about human beings. We don't really need to pigeonhole people do and we can have a conversation. Get to know them. And he's also very the intellectual you know. He first calls degree in philosophy and law degree. And so that has been I think a site frustration for him but he. He says he loves what he does and I think he has done something. Really Amazing we have nine mostly happy most of the time children and that is is a very big thing to have done. I think feels genuinely proud and he should do coming on that. We absolutely need to keep smashing these stereotypes which limit women in Lanman from living their lives and being the people they want to be someone who's very good at this is Australian author and a dear friend of Mine Kathy lead WHO's Who's funny feminist literature? Turns many of our culturally accepted norms on their head including the myth of the perfect mother. Here I talked to her about how we can used literature to shave feminist messages as well as support. Women reminding them that they're not alone in the many struggles they face all you want to do. As a writer writer is help other women are than not alone. 'cause I remember when I wrote mad cows I wanted to take the idea that motherhood was the ultimate fulfillment for female that great big sacred cow. How and why could on the Bobby? Because it's really hard yakup. Motherhood I mean people used to send me all the time. Oh isn't the time going so quickly and I think no it's going really really elise slowly some days. I was so bored doing creative things that Plato could see my plants engaging in photosynthesis right one day. I grew yeast infection as a change of pace ace and every day I was to put the kids under the sink and the lethal household substances within my own region. But I get these other mothers who just sort of seeing being so perfect picked so when I wrote mad cows I thought maybe I'm the only mother who doesn't cope all the time. I don't think that now. I think any mother who says she copes all the time either lying or taking a lot of drugs and that book did go on to be the biggest international success of my career so I was right to follow my instincts and I don't think women pretend anymore to be perfect mothers and I think that book did kick ecstatic genre which we now call mommy lit but I do think a lot of women still pretend have perfect marriages. I mean. Just look at instagram. And that's just a whole other pressure on women into sort of live up to this idea of the perfect marriage. I think perfect marriage is like orgasms. A lot of them are faked. And I don't think women should perpetuate that myth when I write about madge which I've also written and a lot of them. I always try and point out too. That marriage suits men much more than it suits women. Married men live longer than single. Men have this heart disease mental prosperous single. Women live longer married. Women have less hot is made from so marriage. CYSTIC very low. In the whizz. This would have lower than Kim Kardashian's bikini line and I think as women getting PMT PRE monogamy tension we've pre monogamy tension haven't you. Yes you have even married. Felt the need to not you not choose new very very wise in my view. I I'm in love. Prepares you for marriage. The Way needlepoint prepares you for round the World Solo. Yachting's just keep the love alive Julia. I think you're on the right track. Cathy's words remind me of the discussion. I had with another great friend of mine the former deputy leader of the Australian Labor Party tenure sick. We talked about the double standards that face women women politicians on family life if you are a woman politician. You really can't win when you were asked the question. Do you have children if you don't have them. Then you get criticized for not understanding everyday family life if you've got them then you criticized for neglecting them here. I asked tenure about her decision Asian not to stand as Labour leader earlier this year because of her family. Well I've been the deputy later for six years so I had a pretty good idea if what the latest sheep entitled and it's a lot of time on the road it's a lot of time away and it just wouldn't have been just wouldn't have been ought perhaps family at that time and it was funny Julia because I had had people writing columns sending emails saying all resigned from my job. Bob Come and look after your kids and kind of which is heart warming gorgeous but kind of misses the point. I I love my job. I love being the member. For Sydney. I have loved being a minister and a shadow minister. I've felt so privileged to be the deputy leader of the party. I have loved every minute of it and I so value the trust and faith that people putting me but you know I do have to. I think about my other responsibilities as well and it's not the case that I didn't have a supportive family. I would very supportive. It was about how now I felt about the distribution of my time across my work and and my family and I think you know nobody likes hearing politicians complain right about how how they live so. I'm not going to do that but it is A. It's a seven diabetic responsibility as it is and seven days a week on the road is. It's just not something that I wanted for my kids and do you think men think about those choices differently face up to those choices differently. Can you imagine facing that choices. A male politician. I think more so today than a couple of generations ago. We obviously had one of my my colleagues from Western Australia. Who pulled the pin on his parliamentary career in his first term because he said it was having a big impact on his family and certainly my husband's a sandy public servant? He has not back job offers to move into state or moved to the federal bureaucracy. You know all sorts of offers because it would have been incompatible with family life so I do think..

Sandy BBC Julia Sandi Toksvig US Cintas London Australian Labor Party writer Carrie Gracie Plato Kim Kardashian Helena Morrissey Western Australia China faisal Dan
November 2019 Astrology Forecast: Last of Jupiter in Sag

The Astrology Podcast

08:45 min | 1 year ago

November 2019 Astrology Forecast: Last of Jupiter in Sag

"Right now into as we're recording this mercury is slowing down and getting ready to station retrograde but it's not quite there yet by the time I released this episode it'll probably be like right on the mercury integrate station it's happening on Halloween in Scorpio read yeah so that kind of opens the month in many ways it seems like right yeah one that's the it's one of the probably the most consistent thing about November is Mercury Retrograde until the twentieth and we'll be in Scorpio the entire month yeah and so you know other than the outer planets that is the most consistent thing about November it's all mercury and Scorpio all the time little bit retrograde little bit direct but in Scorpio the whole time yeah Ah I love that because then when a planet slows down and stations and just one sign you really get a much better feel for what that planet especially at enterprise like mercury is like all about one of the things I was doing a threat on twitter earlier this week was like talking about famous mercury and Scorpio place mints and some people throughout some pretty good ones I was curious if you guys have like a favorite mercury in Scorpio example that comes to mind see we'll see aware of so I believe you and Watson throughout Patrick Watson throughout Eminem and then we L. Yankovic whose parodies of Eminem were brilliant it was both mercury and Scorpio's I can contribute Alister Crowley who had Mercury and Jupiter both in the first second of Scorpio and so I think that I don't know his reputation in probably makes a lot of sense as far as mercury and Scorpio he was obviously obsessed with magic and mysteries and the Colt and also add as not everyone might know like eminem and like we don't Yankovic a a relentless troll right I was thinking about the episode I did on Evangeline Adams and one of the things where he had a falling out with her and he wrote this just like screed about horoscope writers that was like a very thinly veiled attack herb but yeah he also wrote a he wrote an essay on Arthur wait you in people may know weight from the writer Waite Smith Tarot he was one of the designers of that very popular Tarot deck and he called that essay dead eight okay about his uselessness but yet earlier one that you mentioned eminem was my favorite one and obviously the is a lot more going on there because he's like a libra with Sunan Libro with mercury and Scorpio and he has Saturn in Gemini and he was going through sort of Saturn return during the eight of his popularity in the early two thousands so obviously there's a lot more going on there but it's just funny thinking back especially a lot of his earlier music and how Oh so was the word like acerbic was in many ways as part of the reputation in the way that he expressed himself despite being a libra but having that mercury in Scorpion Lavi I think I think all three of our examples are Sunan Lebron okay what about you Kelly on the first came to mind when you mentioned that was at previous Prime Minister of Australia Julia Gillard who was incredibly shop intent agent woman and she's very famous for a speech about misogyny which he gave in parliament of attacking the opposite party and and some of their views I guess and I think she actually gave that speech when Satan in Scorpio was on her mercury in Scorpio so that's a really interesting one just speaking up from her perspective about how women were being traded according to the issues of the day and I think that's actually on youtube if anybody who's in trysted to to check it out but she's the first one she's also a son in libra actually was just having a quick check of that yes so there's that makes if you like and the other one enough is a poet Raynham Maria Rilke who I love his writing and unquote some of his poetry when I'm talking about Mercury and Scorpio about the truth telling but the depth there's a quart of he's that says something back you're not I'm just paraphrasing here but something like you're not dead yet it's not too late to dive into your depths and to find what's of hiding in there and mercury and his shot is like twenty nine school Pr Sorn that's interesting yeah the darkness of Rilke Yeah and he's actually Saj it's yet it's not just darkness it's like there's also you know the the juicy nes- certain of the hidden rivers of blood it's very passionate and very it's you know it's the depths of passion rate it's Jerry Elementary Wall artery but it's like you know yes throbbing lifeforce sort of water not not tepid water data I was thinking of that 'cause I previously on the Zodiac series I had used like ice as a mercury in Scorpio descriptors like an skewed but I was thinking about that earlier today that doesn't actually make as much sense because it's a Comorros ruled sign and Mars tends to be much more hot and much more fiery so it's more like hot water or water that's been rapidly brought to a boil and the funny imagery I thought of actually for Scorpio was a hot Tub Jacuzzi I'm great imagery for Scorpio we all know what happens in hot tubs I I so for for Scorpio for Scorpion water that that fixed but Marshall Water I usually use water which is flowing in a consistent direction such as in a fierce river or through a sewer system or it's it's always it's always moving always always moving but it's still fixed you know it's course where the river is headed and also blood like arteries right arteries veins that like always flowing fixed direction as a Scorpio lemonade ahead and stick with my Jacuzzi analogy and sewer analogy but I appreciate nonetheless the imagery well you know the I mean you know if you think about the rivers the blood within you it's important to have a sewer system right if your blood couldn't clean itself right then you'd be dead okay well I think it is important to keep your mind what you guys are talking about mercury assign ruled by Mas so there is shop nece or a directness or piecing quality two words and communication as mercury goes through Scorpio and as you said Austin it's Mercury Jio all the time this mom sometimes retrograde sometimes not but it is I mean if you've never read Real Kaz poetry this be a good month to Woah to try some of it but it's very piecing there's nothing that is left unexplored or unsaid no matter how shop would direct it might mm-hmm so there it is open with November first mercury is retrograde already conjuncture Venus Venus quickly changed does signs that same day and moves into cemeteries and the mercury basically spends the rest of the month in Scorpio before eventually stationing about three weeks later into November yeah well and it so it's worth noting here that mercury during this retrograde is really not strongly configured too much right it's ruler Mars is in libra for almost the entire time that Mercury's Retrograde Mars does move into Scorpio later in the month but just as the retrograde is leaving off and we literally Elbow Semel Tena Sleepy Mercury stationing direct as when Mars joins the pardon yeah and so and then Venus leaves of Venus Leaves Scorpio for Szeged areas a day after mercury turns

Three Weeks
"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

11:04 min | 1 year ago

"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"I'm Julia Gillard and this is a podcast of one's own. I'm offended by the lack of women in positions positions of leadership and the way those that do make it a traitor die. I helped lead the Global Institute for Women Slave ship at King's College London mm-hmm headquartered in Virginia Woolf Building in Nineteen Twenty Nine Virginia say she aspired for women authors to have the space to write in a room of once on here. I want women leaders too. Have a podcast once Mike Mike is this podcast is Helena Morrissey financier.

Julia Gillard Mike Mike Global Institute for Women Sla Virginia Woolf Building Helena Morrissey King's College London mm-hmm Virginia
"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

13:56 min | 2 years ago

"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"I'm Julia Gillard and this is a podcast of one's own. I'm offended by the lack of women in positions positions of leadership and the way those that do make it a traitor die. I helped lead the Global Institute for Women Slave ship at King's College London mm-hmm headquartered in Virginia Woolf building in nonshedding twenty nine. Virginia said she aspired for women authors to have the space to write in a room of once on here. I want women leaders too have a podcast once Mike yesterday's tenure placebo sick a.

Julia Gillard Global Institute for Women Sla Virginia Woolf building Virginia King's College London mm-hmm Mike nonshedding
"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"gillard" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"Josh I'm Julia Gillard the first and only woman to be Prime Minister of Australia. Join me later this month to my brand new podcast series. I'm offended by the lack of women in leadership so each month I'll be discussing how we get more women leaders with guests from the world of Entertainment Business Sport Activism and lots of other fields besides here's a taste of what you can look forward to doesn't matter to me which bits of politics you you come from whether you come from the left whether you come from the right women's issues have never ever been at the forefront of any of the political parties months lot of progress depends on being unreasonable people. Keep saying to me all you may choose to find. It hasn't even gone far enough. Those top order predators who lying on top of the raw slithered onto the rock with this still absolutely there in publishing in every other industry so this is just the beginning what it means to be a woman has changed what it means to be a man has changed much less and the idea of what successful manners is still very much predicated on the idea of power over women. I think any woman who doesn't cool so for feminist has kept to Wonderbra and burned a brains because we still have a long way to go. She's here. She's treatment. She's join join me Julia Gillard for Podcast Oncein from the Global Institute for Women's leadership at King's College London. It's it's going to be fun and it's going to be enlightening. Subscribe now through your preferred podcast provider to get every episode delivered straight to your device.

Julia Gillard Global Institute for Women Prime Minister Australia Josh King's College London
Australia's Federal Election May Be a Tight Race

Between The Lines

08:45 min | 2 years ago

Australia's Federal Election May Be a Tight Race

"Ever since Malcolm Turnbull nearly lost the twenty sixteen election, the polls, the pundits and the bidding markets that consistently put lie in a winning position pointing to a landslide this weekend. But such is the magic politics that the federal election could be a lot closer than anyone had the raw to expect a week or whatnot agai, remember during the past half-century close vigil elections favor, the incumbent, you think of Gordon's narrow victory over whitland in sixty nine the so-called don's party or Gillard up against Abbott losing her majority in twenty ten but when oppositions wind power from the government, the victories are usually in fatty, you think of phrases massive landslide against whitland, seventy five or how smashing catering in ninety six but in politics, there are no guarantees, and the smart money is still on a lie. Victory. And according to my guest, that may be a good thing for conservatism and the nation. Australia, where told needs a shortened government to help us break out of Al complacency genital Ricksen is a columnist with the Australian. She's a board member on the institute of public affairs, and a former board member here at the get I Janet, welcome to our Tom, now you're leading conservative commentator. So naturally, many of our listeners here on between the lines. We'll be shocked to hear you say that a and prime ministership could be a good thing house on Tom. I think some of my raiders were shelter and I made that argument few weeks ago, but I think it's we've now come to the position where we need the lived experience of a shorten government to return, the labor party to the wisdom of the hawk aiding agenda. We need a short and government to force a liberal party to get through what I think, is an existential crisis identity crisis to rediscover its roots to rebuild a very confused. Brand. And we, we the voters, we need lived experience of short and government to, to deliver, what I call buyer's remorse to realize that whitland, esque mix of big promises without policies that grow the economy is not just nicotinic disaster. But a social disaster, and I really think you have to go back to the days of the Whitlam era, to, to find the level of complacency that we see today, and my colleague at the astray Lian PO Kelly code. It know that nineteen sixties grand delusion, that continued prosperity was a strategy is destiny. And it's true, we've had almost thirty years of, of economic growth, but that is not a given. So you sign in the shorten economic agenda increases the prospects of a recession, and Farley will be mudbound, reality. I think that's absolutely right. Because Bill Schoten is very honest that he's politics, the politics of redistribution not growing economic pie, and it's it's much easier by the white to redistribute rather grow the economic pie. If you think of the big reform. The hard reforms in a strategy during the eighties nineties, and the early two thousands. They were hard reforms, but they were important reforms. It liberalized the economy. We're not seeing those same kind of policies with the short and government. He's Fago economics is a slogan. It's premised on complacency is premise on emotion. Just listen is shooting in some of the might say that, you know, we're, we're experiencing an ideological seachange in the electric, the oldest twenty percent of the electorate si- fifteen years ago in two thousand and four. When you wrote that conservatism was cool on the John Howard, the oldest twenty percent back. Then they largely voted for the coalition. They've been replaced by the youngest twenty percent of voters who lift, you got social media Twitter trolls, all the ride a poll show that socialism has risen in stature, especially among these millennials. And of course you got tried unions. They luckily to be reim- powered. So have haven't times changed time certainly have changed in the environment's changed. But what? What you're saying is very much. You know, not just the liberal party and existential crisis, but the left side of politics is strong because it's buttressed by so many elements in civil society that you do not see, on the centre-right of politics strata. It's almost as if liberalism depends on the liberal party in a stray area. And if you have a liberal party that stepped away from those basic, liberal values, what's left, so it really is up to other organizations, I think, to build the foundations of liberalism in ustralia to make deeper than the liberal party cannot rest on a conviction later such as John Howard. We haven't had one since two thousand and seven and look, what's happened to liberal values in that time you've had get up. You have the unions, you have the light party and other organizations. It's up to the center right of a Strayer to rebuild to make the case for liberal values. And that's what hasn't happened. You've written the Rausing damp of the wits in the liberal party has lift the joint with dodgy foundations. And just might clear, the conservatives now would rather walk away than stand up and fought. And he also criticized the so-called modern liberals. But at these decisions by the senior liberals to shift towards the so called center at they attempts to adjust to what many political analysts, I is an increasingly more progressive political and cultural landscape. I certainly think that way in politicians nervous about, you know, their prospects that they start to put on new labels. And we're saying range of liberals call themselves modern liberals. Now, I've pressed a few of them as to what the what that means, and it really doesn't mean anything, it's just a bit of branding. I call it branding bunkum. What is the most important to be successful in politics, merger of conviction with good retail political skills? We've seen that before the last ten years, though, we've seen we've seen the party and politicians on the center, right suffer a deficit of both conviction, and, and really good retail politics now recently under Scott Morrison, I think the party has started to reimburse, for example, explain the social good of a strong economy, the virtues of lower taxes, allowing people to have more of their own money to make decisions how they spend their money. But imagine if the liberal party had more core values at the center of it story for the past ten years, it would be in a much stronger position. It's not about rebranding as modern liberal. I mean this, this guy's back today, but Cameron calling himself, a compassionate conservative, or which had Nixon, quote himself, a conservative with a heart. What does it mean if liberal parties, make the moral case for classical liberalism, you want convince voters about the purpose of a liberal governor Cosa, just to clarify, you think it's premature to read the last rods two Austrailia conservatism. Your argument, is that conservatives a losing tonight because they not farting. But Janet, we had on this program last week Tim sue pomace on the former rice discrimination Commissioner, and he I use that a short vitual Mark the end of what's derided as neoliberalism hasn't market capitalism, filed given the widespread economic inequality, wick told by because I think the evidence is just not there for, for widespread economic inequality. It's become a slogan. If you look at their three surveys from the can. Census. And I think there was another one by Hilda. They all showed that inequality has pretty much not changed over three decades of productivity commission. More recently is found that claims to growing income inequality. Not true. The economic growth has lifted standards across all income groups. I mean these are the facts, but the slogan of income inequality is being used to justify dismantling capitalism, in the name of some sort of utopian social democratic project, we've been here before now at this stage Paul's point to alive victory. But Malcolm Turnbull mind tines he would won the election, if it weren't for his wing enemies in the media, and the potty room. Let's hear for major Neal's interview with tumble on the BBC two months ago at the time of the coup in August. We were level pegging on the public Paul's or the opposition and we were four points ahead on the polling in the marginal seats. But basically, you could argue that the concern was not that I would lose the election, but rather that I would win it. You telling me your own party didn't want you to win the next. I'm just saying if you analyze credit. Well, Andrew, you've only got to look at the facts because Malcolm Turnbull on the base on why he would have won the election Janet Albertson. Well, I see we've moved into the comedy section of

Liberal Party Malcolm Turnbull Janet Albertson Australia TOM John Howard Institute Of Public Affairs AL Gordon Paul Bill Schoten Scott Morrison Lian Farley Twitter Gillard BBC Strayer
"gillard" Discussed on RobinLynne

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05:38 min | 3 years ago

"gillard" Discussed on RobinLynne

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