25 Burst results for "Gildas"

Medtech Talk Welcomes its New Host

MedTech Talk Podcast

08:42 min | 4 months ago

Medtech Talk Welcomes its New Host

"I'd like to take this opportunity to introduce the new med tech talk host as well as give him an opportunity to share more about his story. I'd like to welcome Jeff Pardo partner at Gilda healthcare. Hi Jeff. Welcome to the MED tech. Talk podcast thanks worry. I'm not sure. I'm totally deserving of that introduction does very nice and I'm really excited to be hosting the show Awesome Jeff. Can you share a little bit about yourself your background and just also how you got into this industry absolutely? You know it's interesting I. It was not a straight LINE GETTING INTO MED tech at Brown University. Where I went I was a history. Major actually. Didn't take a single science class. I took some economics classes but they were a really boring and I really didn't have any interest in it and But I also recognize. That really didn't want to be a history professor and I didn't know exactly where history would take me so I started exploring after graduation. How to get into business in my first job was actually doing oil and gas consulting of all things and other areas. That hadn't really no idea was doing but I actually was born. In Latin America was put on teams that ended up working in Latin American oil and gas and had a terrific experience and that was my entry into business but then my initiation into midtech really began with sympathies and that turned out to be pivotal to my career development. Why is that well? It's funny Cynthia's was at the time. People probably know now that Cynthia was bought by Johnson and Johnson huge acquisition. Like twenty billion dollars. But at the time Cynthia's while it was reasonably large it was still run like a smaller company founder That owned a majority of the company was really able to shape the culture in the way that he wanted to shape it and part of that was in really tight relationships with clinicians In particular he really mandated that everybody spend a lot of time in the operating room working side by side with clinicians. That's actually not so easy anymore to do in the current You kind of regulatory environment. But at the time we were in the operating room all the time and and it may be realized that I wanted to contribute to innovation on a larger platform in effect companies. In many different medical specialties. So is that how you got into? Venture capitalists yeah exactly so I went to Ward and after Wharton I had a chance to work with cardinal partners. A general healthcare venture firm in Princeton New Jersey and then ultimately went to spray venture partners back in my hometown of Boston and Really was lucky in both cases to learn from some amazing mentors and entrepreneurs in their own right brandon hall. John Clark Dan Cole. Kevin Connors all. These people had a tremendous impact on me and it was really an apprenticeship for a business that you can't teach in a classroom. How South at spray was some of the most. I think important experiences for me. In terms of how to get company STAR WE START ABOUT HALF. The companies in our portfolio with the entrepreneurs filed patents in many cases for these companies but one of the more interesting experiences with solutions which we had invested in the CEO. Step down unexpectedly in two thousand seven and actually. I remember Juliet a backer. Who's now longitude? But at the time was with the peak. What approach me and said she was on the board and she said. Do you want to run this company and I was just you know pretty young guy but I said yes and that's an important lesson for me as I got through microbes. Even when you're not sure sometimes just say yes. That thing's usually important learning experiences. Come out of it and that was an amazing experience because we took a product that was still in a prototype stage yet in the clinic in the early clinical trials. We will find it into a very slick procedure. And we brought it into a full-scale pivotal trial and the device itself was working really well But we also endured a lot of funding challenges. Two Thousand Eight to two thousand eleven is listeners to this podcast probably remember was a very difficult time in medical devices in in particular for spying. Pma's and unfortunately we weren't able to complete the project ended up selling Globus in two thousand eleven and it was not a financial success but so many lessons came out of it for me. I'm sure so. What did you do after that I went? I went back to spray for about six months but during that time also was introduced to the folks from Gilda healthcare and I never met anybody from Gilda but got to know them and really appreciated their strategy of jumping into us. Med Tech at a time that a lot of investors had rotated out of the segment. Why is that well in two thousand eight? There was a financial crisis so that was a time. When you saw pullback from a lot of things but also at the time there was a lot of issues with a regulatory frameworks in Med tech. It was pretty onerous or difficult relationship with FDA issues were reimbursement. Were starting to crop up and a lot of Investors were simply hadn't really had the depth of background in Med tech and didn't know how to navigate some of those challenges so they ended up rotating out and guilt a really brought a fresh perspective in they saw the great products had been developed and the ones that were surviving really were worth investing in and so the last nineteen years For me personally has been an amazing journey through all of that you know. Through the ups and downs of medical devices and through seeing now public market emerged for venture back a device companies which really enables some of these companies to stand on their own two feet rather than than sal out to a bigger company in there's also whirlwind of challenges and opportunities the regulatory and reimbursement landscape shifts. Yeah then you're kidding when you said it's not US straight line. That is quite. The journey enjoyed every moment of it. I mean not that there haven't been really difficult times with various companies but really enjoyed every moment. It's incredibly challenging business. But the really what makes the difference or the people in our business and how dynamic people throughout this business are not only the entrepreneurs and investors but the clinicians also that are really on the frontlines implementing what the engineers are companies Do so it's really cool to be around. Inspiring people on a daily basis and that is a great perspective to bring to the MED tech. Talk podcast yeah when I was approached to do this You know it's exciting to think about what you might like to bring out in a podcast like this and for me really is kind of what I been referencing in terms of individuals their stories and my own story knowing that it wasn't a straight line to get here the chance to interview people and hear about their stories the experiences that shaped them as they were growing up as they were getting into med tech And really understand you know what makes them tick the things that they've learned that have made them successful and the really tough experiences. One thing I'd like to do is highlight failures in our business and the ability to come back from failure the ability to turn around situations. That's something that's not celebrated enough in our business. I don't think people sometimes hide from the more difficult experiences or doesn't go on their resume necessarily and I'd like to start to you. Know I have a small role in changing nat in bringing a spotlight to more difficult things because we learn so much from those experiences. So you'll hear me some of the guests that will bring on. The show is really understand. Kind of what? We're situations that they failed in and what came out of that in the hopes that you know people listening to To the show will really be able to grab onto something and maybe it helps them in in the situation that they're in and then we'll also tackle some of the big challenges in the business whether it's reimbursement regulatory commercialization what it means to take a company public but it will really focus on some of the guests that we have lined up

Cynthia Gilda Healthcare Jeff Pardo Brown University Kevin Connors Latin America Johnson United States Partner John Clark Dan Cole Boston Professor Gilda PMA Company Founder CEO Juliet Brandon Hall
Shai Gilgeous-Alexander is officially one of the NBA’s best young players

The NBA Show

02:57 min | 7 months ago

Shai Gilgeous-Alexander is officially one of the NBA’s best young players

"With Gilders Alexander Alexander. I liked him as a prospect. I did not love him. And that's because of the jumper aspect I was like well. How real is this? He shot over eighty percent from the free throw line which is encouraging he had. Good touch on floaters layups which he still does. And that was encouraging he did shoot forty percent from three at Kentucky is just the had this. It's kind of like ugly looking form especially off the dribble and you wondered how much as a guard he could be a shock creator but even today you watch lots Gilders Alexsandr and you think about like the the construct of a guy like him at six foot six lanky with with at the time a questionable shot it it was hard to come up for successful comparisons for him in the NBA for what he could grow into. But a lot of Rondo right like that was a Rondo or even like you could have said even like a Michael Carter Williams. You could have said somebody like that too. And you know. Granted Carter Williams has had some good moments as without the reliable jumper. That's what's limited him as an offensive player. You could have said Shaun Livingston a highly successful player and I thought Gildas Alexander would be a success but this much this soon averaging nearly twenty points per game with efficiency doing what he's done. It's it's incredible to see that rapid development from year to year as a freshman at Kentucky to a rookie with the clippers. I am now a second year with the thunder and for this team moving forward to have this guy to build around with what is already a pretty nice young team in a transition phase with Chris. Paul there Galadari there. They could blow it up. Emplo the pull the plug on these veterans or they keep just trying to win around this youthful star and killed us Alexander but with all those picks you mentioned boy the amount of possibilities. This office is going to have moving forward to build and with Gildas Alexander. Somebody who can he can handle the ball more if you need him to. They don't run a ton of pick and roll with him. Because you have Chris Paul because he had a shrewd her but he can do more of it if necessary or you can continue to use him in this ball. Sharing role or multiple guys are handling the ball. I can't imagine how exciting it must be for Sam Prestige to sit in his office and imagine the possibilities. Moving forward with the draft picks they have in the assets that they could could utilize and trades. It largely comes down to Shay though he was the best asset. The best player they got in that deal and he's a reason why they would even do that. But with all those picks they can have fun. Were bored and if you're the clippers I mean look. This is why they did it. They were taking a run at the TAITO title but want. PG COLLI Warren No. That's what I'm saying right that it was it was almost contingent. You're not you're probably not getting coli. If if you're not getting Paul George. Has the story went but boy did they. Give up king's ransom my God

Gilders Alexander Alexander Clippers Michael Carter Williams Chris Paul Gilders Alexsandr Kentucky Rondo Shaun Livingston Paul George NBA Taito Sam Prestige Shay
Shai Gilgeous-Alexander is officially one of the NBA’s best young players

The NBA Show

02:57 min | 7 months ago

Shai Gilgeous-Alexander is officially one of the NBA’s best young players

"With Gilders Alexander Alexander. I liked him as a prospect. I did not love him. And that's because of the jumper aspect I was like well. How real is this? He shot over eighty percent from the free throw line which is encouraging he had. Good touch on floaters layups which he still does. And that was encouraging he did shoot forty percent from three at Kentucky is just the had this. It's kind of like ugly looking form especially off the dribble and you wondered how much as a guard he could be a shock creator but even today you watch lots Gilders Alexsandr and you think about like the the construct of a guy like him at six foot six lanky with with at the time a questionable shot it it was hard to come up for successful comparisons for him in the NBA for what he could grow into. But a lot of Rondo right like that was a Rondo or even like you could have said even like a Michael Carter Williams. You could have said somebody like that too. And you know. Granted Carter Williams has had some good moments as without the reliable jumper. That's what's limited him as an offensive player. You could have said Shaun Livingston a highly successful player and I thought Gildas Alexander would be a success but this much this soon averaging nearly twenty points per game with efficiency doing what he's done. It's it's incredible to see that rapid development from year to year as a freshman at Kentucky to a rookie with the clippers. I am now a second year with the thunder and for this team moving forward to have this guy to build around with what is already a pretty nice young team in a transition phase with Chris. Paul there Galadari there. They could blow it up. Emplo the pull the plug on these veterans or they keep just trying to win around this youthful star and killed us Alexander but with all those picks you mentioned boy the amount of possibilities. This office is going to have moving forward to build and with Gildas Alexander. Somebody who can he can handle the ball more if you need him to. They don't run a ton of pick and roll with him. Because you have Chris Paul because he had a shrewd her but he can do more of it if necessary or you can continue to use him in this ball. Sharing role or multiple guys are handling the ball. I can't imagine how exciting it must be for Sam Prestige to sit in his office and imagine the possibilities. Moving forward with the draft picks they have in the assets that they could could utilize and trades. It largely comes down to Shay though he was the best asset. The best player they got in that deal and he's a reason why they would even do that. But with all those picks they can have fun. Were bored and if you're the clippers I mean look. This is why they did it. They were taking a run at the TAITO title but want. PG COLLI Warren No. That's what I'm saying right that it was it was almost contingent. You're not you're probably not getting coli. If if you're not getting Paul George. Has the story went but boy did they. Give up king's ransom my God

Love Powered Co., founders Anna Lazano and Lindy Sood  Affirmational thinking, building a business as two moms, and cleansing your mind

The Here for Her Podcast

04:12 min | 1 year ago

Love Powered Co., founders Anna Lazano and Lindy Sood Affirmational thinking, building a business as two moms, and cleansing your mind

"So we know that you're both moms and you're renting really successful business at the same time. Can you give some tips for working. Moms out there and how to juggle. We'll work life balance and just tips on avoiding mom. Gil talk a little bit about the good. I just did the segment on morning. Live with julie coal actually so mom guilt is going to happen. No matter what i feel like the moment we sign up for motherhood mom gildas just with us and forever with us so very true. Oh it's never going to go away but i think becoming aware of it right like once. You know you're feeling guilty right now. How can you get yourself out of that space. As i was talking moby for uh what has worked for us always a scheduling so scheduling in the time to be a hundred percent mom and just being fully present with your kids and and doing whatever it is that you need to do to have fun or learn or grow or just be here and do nothing and let your kids got bored so we talked about as well and then scheduling in that time for business and when you're being in when you're in business mode and you're being an entrepreneur being fully present and just focusing on that and then not off focusing on your kids so scheduling for us is just works because if not then we get stuck in oh well i should be doing more for it for my business or i should be doing more with my my kids and that's where the guilt just takes over yeah. It's true. I feel like there's so much destruction right and you know it's like your when you're with your kids. You're kind of half in half out. You're on social media or you're watching t._v. In the background or then if you're working there's also a ton of distractions. They are so really like you said maybe focusing fully being fully present in in whatever you're doing exactly and for me what works is getting out of the house like i cannot be trying to work and having my toddler run up 'cause that's where feeling guilty for both again right so you know scheduling in my one hour two hours for that day getting outside work being fully present on my business and then coming back and being mom and it's it kind of feels your soul right. You're doing what you're passionate. Action about your feeling fulfilled and then you can give from a full cup to your family <hes> yeah that's great tips and when you say you're scheduling that in what does that look like for the both of you. Do you use like just your phone calendar like. How do you tell us the details. It's so funny we've kind of fallen into this natural synchronicity together other and we've never spoken about it. We just and it will be like we're we're on this podcast of this time on this day and it comes up in the calendar and then we're show right a list. Take a picture of it. I i take a paper. I do paper and you're you're so funny is alex and digital. I'm paper at that like you either to the digital digital somehow we've just it works yeah. I feel like that's the only are setup. Okay so let's talk about the comparison cycle. I feel like in this day and age especially with instagram. Women are feeling that deeply and it's really hard hard. What are your thoughts on comparison mom comparison or just girl comparison in general yes <hes> can you can you talk about that. It is hard girl. It is hard and and you know i think one thing i think we all need to do is just go into our social media like do it right now and start on following everything and everyone that makes you feel just itchy and bad like though you know we always talk about taking social media detox and how very important it is yes for business. You need to be on it. You you need to be on it so you can't necessarily but like i took a month off of my social media personally and it was the best thing that i did. I was refreshed ashton. I was you know it really brought me back to the present moment again mindfulness. I was really living in the moment with my kids and with with everybody else when i went back i realized that okay. What is the purpose of me following. These three thousand people are they my friends or they. You know it's something inspiring know that something lovely now. Is it something that i'm looking at and it gives me a sense of peace or joy note than your off the list like i just can't i love that and actually i'm going to do that when you guys because i feel like it's tile yes time good information and it's so

GIL Alex Hundred Percent Two Hours One Hour
Emmy nominations are out and HBO is back on top for now.

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:56 min | 1 year ago

Emmy nominations are out and HBO is back on top for now.

"I'm Kim Masters and this is the Hollywood breakdown joining me as Matt Bellamy of the Hollywood reporter and Bat obviously the Emmy nominations came out this past week and my first reaction was really to admire the wealth of material that is so oh good and you know the academy. The television academy has been paddled in the past for the sort of reflexive conservative re-nominating modern family teen times not that there's anything a great series it but got to the point where it seemed crazy just keep nominating and over and over again this time there is some really fresh interesting shows and actually some formidable matchups yeah I mean I think a lot of the headlines that came out of the Emmy nominations were based on game of thrones getting a record thirty two nominations but if you look deeper there are a lot of nuance shows like fleabag getting into the comedy race killing Eve in the drama race bowl shows from phoebe waller bridge if you look. Ed Shits Creek which is a word. I don't know if we can say on the radio <hes> but it is spell with a C. H.. In two TS <hes> that's a show that has been on for a number of years and not gotten much attention but the ground swell of love for the stars Eugene Levy and Catherine O'Hara got popped T._v.. Its first emmy nominations and there's a lot of Nice little narratives like that yeah I I was late to the Shits Creek Party. Yes it is going to say that word and <hes> benched it on Netflix like so many people I was like Oh look what I found on Netflix when really pop would probably like to assassinate me for even saying that except be really can binged on Netflix and it's pretty great. I'm also really impressed by the very high impact series that ran. They're not in the same category we have the R Kelly series from lifetime in the in one category up against <hes> Leah Remedies Scientology series and weirdly comedians in cars. I mean very very very different kind of material. Anthony Bourdain also is going to be I think for a lot of people an emotional choice but that r Kelly dock as we know he's imprisoned or Kelly right now and I think a lot of credit goes not only to Jim de regardless the journalists who pursued. Him For so long but Dream Hampton and lifetime for doing that series and if you look at the authorities who arrested r Kelly they specifically cited that Docu series as being the thing that opened there is to what was going on and if I'm lifetime I'm looking at that and saying wow that should be our emmy materials because this is the best advertisement you could get for winning. An award is that there's real world impact. You might think that the H._B._O.. Series leaving nevertheless would be in the same category with the R Kelly but it's not <hes> and it is up against you know things that are so diverse in and you know again. This is golden age in many ways some of the stuff I mean minding the gap and this points to the confusion. What's a T._v.? Show what's a movie mining. The gap was an Oscar contender this now also an emmy contender. That's happened before in the last few years and it's it's confusing and in the same category you have you know Jane Fonda Series and <hes> thing about Gilda radner and the it's it's a very <hes> odd set of. Things to be competing with each other but talking about cultural impact. I think you know I don't even know if we can measure what the impact of that series was but I think it was huge yeah. The breath of the nominees is one of the reasons that H._B._O.. Oh really clobbered Netflix this year. If you remember from last year the big narrative was at after seventeen years netflix finally overtook H._B._O.. As the top nominee at the emmys this year no such luck now obviously game of thrones was a big reason and for that but even if you take out the number one nominee on both of them game of Thrones H._B._O.. And when they see us the central park five miniseries on Netflix H._B._O.. Would still be the winner this year and that might be the Swan Song. I think in the future is going to be really difficult for H._B._O.. To compete with what Netflix is doing now. We're seeing the output of H._B._O.. Increase via this new streaming service called H._B._O.. Max that was announced last week but in the short term Netflix Netflix is really focused on winning awards and they are green-lighting things with an eye on whether they can win Oscars Emmy's so for the foreseeable future. I predict the emmy champion is going to be Netflix but it's going to be a nice party this year.

Emmy Netflix H._B._O R Kelly Ed Shits Creek Phoebe Waller Bridge Shits Creek Party Anthony Bourdain Oscar Hollywood Kim Masters Matt Bellamy Eugene Levy Gilda Radner Reporter Jane Fonda EVE Leah
Israel Folau Debate: Freedom of Speech or Homophobia?

Between The Lines

09:51 min | 1 year ago

Israel Folau Debate: Freedom of Speech or Homophobia?

"Well, you don't have to be a rugby fan to know that Wallaby sti- Israel allow has been a big news story over the past few months, when I pretend he posted these woods on his personal social media accounts, quite warning drunks homosexuals adulterers, lies fornicated his thieves eighth assed, odometers hill. White, you repent. The fallout was a means rugby Australia won't allow that he had breached these plaid code of conduct by posting homophones combs on social media after examination of the event this happened. Well, he's roughly is football career to be TATA's right now, rugby Estrella saying is going to rip up his contract and no long matted that allow was one of the most talented players in the game. Hanes four million dollar contract will no longer together. Now, this story has ignited a discussion across the nation. That is polarized opinion really before. Why love invited to experts to navigate what all this means? Joining me in Sydney is paid a cookie. He's an eye junked associate professor of law at Notre dumb. He's also a senior research fellow at the center for independence studies as off started on this program before CIs. That's the thing tank. I hate it. Well, the guest is professor, Catherine Gilda, Catherine research, is freedom of speech, human rights in public discourse at the university of Queensland school of political science and international studies, and she's in Brisbane studio cath paid, welcome to the program. Thanks to be here. Now, let's stop hearing both of your opinions about what the exact issues are that we need to address a cookie. What's the hot of what's dividing public opinion? Well, I think Israel has done two things that run counter to the culture. The first thing is that he's stalked, very, clearly and openly about his religious beliefs, something that we're not really accustomed to doing in Australia. We just don't tend to. About God publicly, but the other thing that he's done is whereas straightens, generally very accepting of LGBT. I people there is a small, but very powerful group that wants to move the community beyond acceptance to endorsement, where dissent is not tolerated, and Israel allow refuses to go along with that. But it seems to be a difference between how people define freedom of speech religious freedom discrimination cath. What's the release you? He really show in my opinion, is that all human rights are not absolute and all human rights, stop at the point at which your exercise of your own right impairs, somebody else's exercise of their human rights. So what we have here is a difference of opinion of what the implications are for these Ralph last said, so in my view Israel now has engaged in discrimination occurs is not about religious freedom. It's about discrimination, pater, freedom, offense, discrimination, Joel on well agree with Catherine's assessment of human rights, and I think they are not absolute. I think that's very important. I don't think this is an issue really over religious freedom. I think it's gonna be on that. Now, I don't think that Israel has discriminated against in any more of a sense that he's just made a decision to he's chosen one group over another, he and he's not vilified not incited violence against this particular Cody should there, be limits to what freedom of speech allows people decide. Well, I think we have very careful about where we want to draw those limits. What what's wrong with him expressing an opinion? And remember that this opinion is, it's a conditional warning, as it were he saying, essentially, I love these sinners including homosexuals, and I want you to repent because in my religious belief you go to hell. If you don't so he's issued a warning out of love and Israel flowers, post vilifies more than one element of society. Cath gilda. What is it about homosexuality? That is really triggered the greatest response. Well, the answer to this question response directly, what pay to just sit? Absolutely. What is? Flouts said, Philipon homosexuals. And the reason that the issue with sexual was more important than liars or adulterers, or drunks is that there is no entrenched systemic discrimination, or bias in society against lies or against adulterers. There is entrenched systemic discrimination against time a sexual and by saying what he said, what is flour saying was that guy. People have no place on this earth. They must repent I ate Thiam must become not guy in order to be acceptable now. That's what crosses the line that is what is. But what is wrong with expressing that opinion? Again, I think Catherine's analysis is right ex-. I don't think is what have occasion. But if that's what you believe what's wrong with expressing it. Which is why I'm concerned that we've reached the point now in society where we simply cannot descend from certain positions that are laid down calculator. It is not just an expression of opinion to think that is to say that when. In your talking. All you're doing is expressing your thoughts, but we have decades of scholarship that tell us that words can do things worked can do good things and words can do bad things, and there is wise expressing yourself that constitute a form of discrimination, and that is why we recognize that law as height speech or vilification, or the Katherine disagree about whether or not to these this amounts vilification, because it seems to me that in Australia, at the moment that being gay is no bar to holding the highest office, highest officers in the land to holding commanding positions in business and in, in the academic world. So I wonder to what extent this discrimination, which certainly was very real. And I think very toxic early generation is is as prevalent today. Cather some commentators, they say that we're already over instructed by the nanny state governments, institutions. Are we headed towards becoming the nanny state? Many libertarians think we already are. Absolutely not. What we have in this country are very narrowly drone very carefully constructed laws that don't side that you can't talk about particular topic. So Israel Lau would have been free to say as he is in has infect said, don't support same sex relationships and audience put same sex marriage. And if that's all he'd said, we wouldn't be having this discussion go. Fund me has finally closed down. Fillets requests for money to becky's legal challenge, cath, is that fair? Yes. Guy fan me has a policy that is in sync with a and law in sync with international human rights law, and in sync with public opinion in strategy that we should to combat discrimination repeater fails, a millionaire. At least how is it moral to us, the public for money? He's using go fund me to correct what he perceives to be an injustice, and go on me is clearly, a barometer of public opinion because he's got tractor nearly two two million dollars of support even though the has taken over the funding. So whether or not he can afford it. I think is beside the point on Thomas. What's important is that he's attracting a great deal of public support through donations to the site, which suggests that there are many, many people who agree that not necessarily agree with flowers views about the destination of sinners, but they, they believe committed to his the freedom that he should have to express those views cath is Australia angry about censorship. I think there are lots of reasons why people are giving to fund. One of them is, of course, that he's a staff footballer. And so he has a lot of fans. Another one is that he has a particular religious community supporting him. So it's not possible to say that people are against since ship just because they giving him money. This issue has become much bigger than an issue of his religious freedom. And so people are giving money for all kinds of reasons, Catherine you've said that fillet himself is a victim. He why flower caught up in something that's much larger than himself. This is an orchestrated an organized campaign by conservatives who are evidently frustrated at the decades of progress that have been made. Human rights and anti-discrimination, particularly in law. But also in hearts and minds in terms of public opinion. And this movement is now somewhat clearly using the language of human rights at self to try and Hanis public support for Wanding back thighs protections. I don't think this is a push back in a sense. I think it's a reaction to the tyranny of tolerance that Torrence's demanded any dissent from what needs to be tolerated. What is required to be tolerated will not be tolerated. And I think that is what people are reacting to. They would say we've reached a tipping point where now you simply cannot express a dissenting point of view that departs from that, that's a certified by design guy says it were and Kath, how do you see this ending? I'm very, very concerned that paper light paid deny that discrimination still exists simply because there are one or two people in positions of power who may be, for example guy, and that therefore discrimination doesn't exist. Look at the research about what happened during the same sex marriage. So if I look at the research on what happens to young. Gay and lesbian people when role models like fil might comments like this incidence of suicide and self harm increase. It is absolutely the case, both in my research, and in lots of social science research. Discrimination is well, and truly alive and well, and we must not get to the point where we say, oh, discrimination is Ivan. Now. We can stop this fight. I hope that people Tyke from this, the message that we can need to maintain at posture. We need to maintain stance against discrimination, and bigotry, a lovely debate, Catherine Gilda, pita, Cody, thanks so much for being on our end today. Thanks to thanks. Tom Kettering, Gilda is a researcher of freedom of speech, human rights in public discourse at the university of Queensland's school of political science international studies and pay the cookie is a senior research, fellow at the center for independence. Studies also -ffiliated with Notre Dom, and he specializes in religious freedom. And if

Catherine Gilda Israel Australia Catherine Rugby Senior Research Fellow Sydney Cody Associate Professor Odometers Hill White Tata Thiam Israel Lau Football Estrella Brisbane
"gildas" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"gildas" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"With the warriors in the midst of a quick six nothing spurt, they lead thirteen seven seven forty four to go in the quarter wants to get a PJ co listen, here's Adam Amine. Thanks so much Shakeel dis-. Alexander has all seven for the clippers all five starters for the warriors have scored I'll be curious to see if this three point trend continues to put the book Golden State's for two clippers or one. Four coming into this game that post attempted ninety three threes, you expect that from Golden State that from the clippers guest on the bottom you talked to him earlier before the game. And he said that's just a shot that spend their didn't go into the series with the idea of trying to shoot more threes. But they've been doing it for all ready made one they're shooting thirty four percent for the series from three percent the ball court left. And a lot of contact is Durant and Chevy were running with each other to rant. Commits a foul wondering that'll be his first at its second said they're shooting thirty four percent. That's not bad but turn out around forty three percent for the war. The warriors shooed. Yep. That's very good. Inbound nearside front court left Galadari into green overdue Gildas Alexander on the right wing. Watch by dream on Green's cross-court Beverly steps behind the three point line shot. Big on Thompson pitches at back to kill this Alexander history. No good from the lightweight. Durant? Tips into the air over green and grabs the rebound over to Michael. That's a heck of a rebound. Mike agreed had two hands. Kevin just reach back with his long left on and not to free that hour and understatement with the rand here is Kevin Durant left corner. Over, shannon. Fires the fifteen left it short rebound Galadari in her the clippers right to let down by six seven minutes to play first quarter. The Nilo has it at the top runs. It left around Gildas Alexandra screen and fires three crowded out in touched every part of the dance out rebound for Korea. Thompson hands off the dream on right-wing out to curry opened three Tom and a key fight in the Leno good off the rim rebounded by February. There. He comes galloping into the front court or do you get the top tripling left? Handed left. Elaine stops halfway down the pain cross court pass to Michael Green light side for us game. Three four tar both teams just wired threes, and here is the rain outside the ark of the right wing with Gildas Alexander, given the Thompson short mortar baseline vite tribes. Muslims inside at stores often lasts on Landry Shamet. He's got a size and strength advantage. Their way to the smart thing to Shiva some pretty good kind of knocked them toward the right baseline and Klay just waited recaptured. Then bumped him back and made the little batch jump shot fifteen to ten warriors clippers haven't you'll Desalegn into right wing drives on bogut on the fast. Takes it into the side of the late scoops it off the glass with the Latin nine he shouldn't be able to do that on the bigger Andrew Bogan in Kitson property shop locker to surprised he got away with that. Nice food. There's Durant Wang corner against Michael Greene back to the basket bounces to Thompson, circling towards the corner. Not about spy green on the backside over the. Sled. Right. I substitution of the game bogut is out. Kabbah? Moody's had a really good serious for technically on the offensive end surprise when he plays well defensively when he rebounds, but he has really been in offenses factor. Adam fourteen of seventeen from the floor the best bugle percentage of the playoffs. And now all. Here is career right Altos, but a sliver inside and offense. Who is right? The thing that can charge Patrick Beverley and to hurry. Don't have to dash. You know when you drive the ball. He's always going to be ways. And that's good call at both Saturday. He's clearly outside the restricted area. Steph tried to get around got way too much of his body. Here is later sham. If rightwing out to kill this Alexander drives from the top cut off by green backout, Beverly he'll desalination resets top of the key to the foul line. Jumper has blocked but a foul on Draymond green reaching out. Right. The ball for sure. But it looked like it did make some contact PR. And it'll be two shots for the rookie shake you'll to sell exander in the mind. Fifteen twelve more years on top. You'll just tell Zander. Already with nine points at his opening quarter. He's averaging about ten for the series in twenty Scott of this opening frame with the free throw good really funny watching the warriors the way they're defending the clippers would Patrick Beverley has the ball the running out at him. He's become such a good three point shooter shot just under forty percents three thirty nine point seven for.

clippers Gildas Alexander Kevin Durant Thompson Patrick Beverley Michael Greene Adam Amine Galadari Green Gildas Alexandra Draymond green Durant Wang Klay Zander Moody Landry Shamet Leno bogut us Mike
"gildas" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

12:36 min | 1 year ago

"gildas" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Michael Cohen hearing as well as congressman medals rolled in bringing out Lynn patent as an example of Donald Trump that being a racist. As his lawyer has said he is talking about the failure of President Trump to reach any accord in Hanoi on the denuclearization of. North korea. And of course, we are talking about the Chicago mas- race that's going to Gilda in Alabama Gilda, you keeping it real with Jones Austin and shopped. Good afternoon. Evidence sister, Jennifer, how are you? Right. I talk about Chicago. 'cause you know, I lived in Chicago for forty two years. I just wanna say that I like to vote on this last day of black history month, I like to congressman John Conyers for having the heart to bring HR. Forty acres and a menu. That's why use a symbol to the floor. Congress fourteen. Of sessions. Now, it's up to us to carry it. The rest of the way, I am not interested in about it not talking about reparations and embarrassed serious sense. And how be at the convention bringing to people that have never come before. Chicago. We're talking about the token from Alabama and everybody down here is it. Well, we have some tokens in Chicago. I guess it was there for forty two years. And I've never known Lori Lightfoot. Having been appointed by. Daily which plays his game mafia game just like Donald Trump. I never knew how to bring anything from the police board that satisfied the black community. And this was Tony pret- twist concern, I never understood how she became the president of the board. But I know she wasn't a friend to the people because she was trying to take some black guys property avenue. Somebody can't remember who it was. But she called the police on us as we protest that her as an alderman in the fourth ward. So I'm wondering these two tokens and a brother called up a few weeks ago and say the white men don't have a problem dealing with black women. But I'm I don't I've never known either women to be a plan to the black community. So one of two things may have happened either the machines up fixed or they have gentrified Chicago to the point that the north shore. Aw is electing the the politicians in Chicago now, and they need to really look into that. Because I I'm still at baffled by Lori Lightfoot and Toni preckwinkle, and will you tell me what an L P Btk TQ. Plus is and know what an LGBTQ is. But what an LGBTQ plus well, let let me say I I don't know of lemon in answer to your question. Cheese. She's Google and gilding. Thank you for your call. And see I think that guilty hit on a point. I mentioned the other day. There was a front page story of in New York Times. Not even Chicago people about how blacks are moving out of Chicago. And when you see these social constructs and your policy expert, Jennifer, these things don't just happen. No when they take down public housing cabrini-green all that gone. Gentrify implosion people out not push amended. The suburbs. Gilded findings right? That has to impact the electric. Oh, absolutely. And a number of people voting has to absolutely absolutely. Well, what we're seeing all across this country is even if you begin with the north the they called the reverse migration where you got so many of our communities that once we're really entrenched now moving out into the suburbs and into the rural areas, you know, they're being displaced to degenerate vacation, you have mixed development housing. If you will where the median income is based on a middle income based on a low income, and it's all deliberate and intentional. That's what influences and leash shapes and informs voting blocks. I'm just gonna put an A-plus real quickly and say that's why it's so important that we all be counted in the twenty twenty cents because that twenty twenty cents is not only informs representation, like how many elected officials congress persons you have house of representatives. But it also informs how they draw. The lines and how many votes like how blacks and people of color, low income may be able to shift and influence elections. But this is all by design. This is all part of planning this. You know, there are elements of their often elements of gerrymandering in there. It's all by design. Let me just say the LGBTQ so lesbian, gay bisexual transgender and then questioning the plus which is a relatively new. You know, like a added symbol speaks to additional. Categories, intersex, a sexual ally pan sexual and they all have very different sort of plus all the other. So, you know, a sexual you don't identify with one sex or another ally may mean that you are, you know, a supporter of people who fall within the LGBT community or identifies such pan sexual. I'm just, you know, I don't know. Specifically what that means? But I just based on the Latin meaning the pan all, you know, maybe you don't identify with one particular, but you identify with all so these are just ways people are identifying themselves and want to be considered and recognised as such I let's go to daisy in Cleveland, Ohio. Daisy. Keeping it real would Jennifer Jones. Awesome now shopped. Hello, Reverend Sharpton, judge daisy. How you doing? Yes, fine. How are you? I'm good. Yeah. First of all I want to thank you for your appearance on TV today. I saw you on MSNBC, and I'm so thankful that you're there to speak up on issues like this. And I and I really appreciate also having Jennifer Jones Austin and Tiffany cross and Jason Johnson. I'm just so happy because I can remember the days, which weren't all that long ago. But we didn't have anybody else to speak up for us and concerning. You Reverend Sharpton, I hope that on your to weekend television programs and other times when you're on. Will you give the public information on that meeting that you had with Michael Cohen? Remember, he called you before he started cooperating with the government and. Well, you can tell tell us what what what happened. But I think it would give a very good context to help. The public understand Michael Cohen's reason for telling the truth now. So I just would like to ask you, if you please publicize that to the extent that you can and that you feel appropriate and as far as this congress man calling this having this black woman to stand up. There is a trophy to me the saddest part about that said, she this one man, I've can't think of her name right now. She didn't even understand. She's still seems from her appearance on TV. She doesn't even understand what's going on. And to me that's been the saddest part of it and somebody really needs to get her. And and and talked to her and help her to understand what's going on. On you know, we all know about these people talk about my best friend is black, and and we have to keep in mind that even during slavery time, these white enslavers hat black women as Mitch this is so just to say that somebody has one black friend or one black employee. It is really an insult as the other congresswoman pointed out that I think two of the the congresswoman pointed out, and I this this points up the urgency of our need to educate our black people and to to to make sure that they have some social consciousness and understanding. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. Right. And I think I agree with what you're saying. Just daisy. Thank you for your call to California to Tom, Tom, you keeping it real agenda. Jones austin. And our shaft, Reverend Al how are you? I'm well. How are you? Listen, I I have something very important. I want to say. I'm a sixty year old white guy and. You know, I've been living. I called you last week and explain to you about an injustice, I've been living with for going on twenty years running the death of my seven year old son. And I think white America doesn't really realize what it's like to live within Justice. You know being forced to live with this for twenty years has opened my eyes to our nation's history. And you know, I believe that that we do. Oh, black America, a very heartfelt sincere apology for slavery. I can only imagine what it must've been like to be to live under this thing of a whip and forced to work twelve hours a day have your children rape. Your your sons and daughters sold into slavery. You know, and and just living living in a shack with no amenities, and you know, and just be used for Ican economically rich in a white slaveholders. It's horrible. Aren't we our nation is not this rosy colored picture, we have a horrible history? And we do oh black America an apology. And I want to apologize myself for three hundred years of injustice that black Americans who had one door, and it's still going on. I mean a corporate America has their boot in the neck of the poor and the working poor. And they they, you know, it's just a different type of slavery where slaves to these core corporate America, and they wanna keep us down. They wanna keep us working for low wages, so they can so they can enrich themselves economically. So. No doubt about which Tom. Thank you for your call. I think Jenny that a lot of us. Do not understand that the call of their teaching practicing and reiterating white supremacy was an economic. Oh, absolutely. This was not just doing something. Without a reason they built an economic empire off for doing that. And plotted the opposition between the union the north and the south was ov- economic interest. They had in the south cotton, which is why would the first lady of agendas doing it? So, and it was the cotton actually made the slave trade boom breath because they had to figure out how to process, and when in the north they had other commodities and away and they wanted to deal with tariffs and other things globally. So they needed this south to sorta different. And they wouldn't that's gonna clash absolute making. Begrudgingly was taken into become abolitionist. It was only when he couldn't beat the confederate last night. That's.

Chicago Michael Cohen black community Donald Trump Jennifer Alabama Lori Lightfoot North korea congressman John Conyers America Congress Tom Jennifer Jones Hanoi Reverend Sharpton President New York Times Jones Austin Gilda MSNBC
"gildas" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"gildas" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Remembering Gilda Radner in the twentieth. Eighteen Dr love Gilda, and that's new to view streaming edition on iheart. You're listening to Russia's week in review. Hey, we'll try again here on the phones blaming in Charleston, South Carolina. Welcome, sir. Great to have you here. Thanks rush. Just a quick comment about the got three interview the young boy asking him about wearing the red hat calls. All that isn't that a Kintu to like a rape victim getting asked you because the way she was drafted guy. Exactly I made I made I made the point yesterday. When when it was discovered that the mega hat was the trigger. And we had the Catholic priest from the boys school. Say they had no right to be wearing the cap. The Catholic father back something name had no right to be wearing the cap. No right to be wearing the cap from their own diocese. I think so I asked a simple question. Wait a minute. When women are targeted for abuse, sexual abuse rape, and so forth. If you dare say that they were dressed provocatively, and you are shouted down. Your women cannot be blamed. Because of their attire because of their manner. There's no excuse whatsoever. And here we have a situation where they Catholic priest. He's a he's a CNN commentator. We played the sound bite and the guy. Talking about this and have no right to wear a make America great again hat now. Imagine a magin anybody on CNN staying after a one woman who has been raped or molested was on TV at imagine. You've got no right to be wearing short shorts. You have. No right to be wearing dresses with cleavage like that imagine a reaction to it. The here's the thing to make America great again hat. It was a trigger. It was a trigger for these people on our side who had a connection over this all they saw all they saw was a bunch of kids that support Trump. And since they hate Trump. They hated the kids. Let me ask you this, folks. Do you think we would even be talking about this? If that kid Nathan Nick Sandman had not been worrying a mega hat. I've had people tell me that if he hadn't been wearing that hat. This would have never become a story. The video would have been uninteresting, and there may be something to it. But I don't think that does anything but indict further the bigots. What is this? We're supposed to worry about triggering the media. We're supposed to worry about triggering the left. So don't wear the make America great again hat, and that's what's going to be happening. Look, let's not wear the hat. We don't want to become targets. We have to hide what we believe we have to hide what we support. So that we don't become targets. So we don't get it media defaming. That's where this is going to go at their elements of conservatism, it already advocate, this kind of thing for people. Make yourself a target results in a bunch of conservatives going silent and not voicing anything anywhere because they don't want to be targeted like this kid has been targeted like these kids have been targeted. So it's another form of censorship. So another form of politically correct censorship that we cave into and let people get away with what do you mean being triggered by our cap? Even so-called conservative intellectuals on our side. And savannah Guthrie. Let's get to the audio soundbites of the interview we have them here. I've been waiting for the proper transition. It was on the today show today. Now, I. When I first discovered that the Sandeman family had decided. To do their interview with today show. Okay. Who's advising them here? By by the way, you know, what that brings up a whole other can of worms. There are people out there. Now starting to criticize this family for going and getting a PR firm. They have. No, right. They're getting a PR firm. A PR firm is purposely to center this spin and not tell the truth. The other being ripped forgetting a PR firm. Sandra Fluck had a PR firm. Do you know that whole thing was staged orchestrated like everything on the left is? PR firms among the first people democrat campaigns higher. I said why are they doing the today show? But it doesn't matter. I thought I thought mister Sandman held his own was pretty good. Let's go to the sound bites. This was morning, and I get these are somewhat chronological order. Here's savannah Guthrie with the first question feel from this experience. That you owe anybody an apology. Do you see your own fault in any way as far as standing there? I had every right to do. So I don't my position and said I was not disrespectful to Mr. fillets. I respect him. I'd like to talk to him. I mean in hindsight, I wish we could've walked away and avoided the whole thing. But I can't say that I'm sorry. For listening to him in standing there. Did you notice this question? Did you feel from this? Listening Christie ballsy Ford. What's happening in is women and journalists and feel like they're talking to an infant here. Or they want us to think they're talking to somebody with a single brain Celena Niba me better. Do you feel from his experience? The you know, anybody in. Do we not by now know what happened? He doesn't anybody an apology? He is old the apology by you in the media and by Nathan Phillips, and by the black Israelite confederates, or whatever they are. And the drive by media at large. He didn't apologize wearing a cap apologizing for smiling for what does he have to apologize? And by the way. I have to give mister Sandman here a bunch of Atta boys because he did what few would most. I do. I.

America Nathan Nick Sandman Gilda Radner savannah Guthrie rape CNN Russia mister Sandman South Carolina Charleston boys school Nathan Phillips Sandeman Sandra Fluck Atta Christie
"gildas" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

Anderson Cooper 360

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"gildas" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

"Story comedy, great, mid just loved her basically stole all of my characters from Gilda can do almost anything. People are laughing love Gilda CNN film New Year's day at nine pm on CNN. Tomorrow. Investors will get their first look, and whether the markets will improve twenty nineteen after closing out the worst year for stocks in a decade all three indices dropping between four and six percent. And December was particularly dismal with the Dow falling nearly nine percent its worst since nineteen thirty one. But what they continuing government shutdown and other turmoil of Washington couldn't new year bring the same old problems. That is a big question in joining me now to discuss more about this CNN political commentator, Catherine ran pal. She is an opinion columnist for the Washington Post gathered thanks for coming on. Look, you know, we know political uncertainty was a big factor for investors, don't like uncertainty fears of global trae ward, the funding fight over the wall is President Trump responsible for these awful numbers. Look presidents get too much credit when either stock markets or the economy, our good and too much blame when they are bad. So I don't want to leave yours with the. Freshen that presidents control the market. They don't that said certainly there are a number of unforced errors here and Trump is injecting a lot of uncertainty into the market, basically markets are guided by animal spirits, right? They go up they continue going up as they have for the last basically ten years until everybody collectively decide they've probably gone up too much, and they should reverse themselves, and these kinds of shocks things like trade wars things like government, shutdown Whitehouse, chaos and turmoil. Trump threatening to fire the chairman of the fed, which would be disastrous those kinds of shocks can cause investors to reconsider whatever assumptions they have made about the market. So those kinds of forces of uncertainty continued uncertainty about where policy will land what Trump might tweet from day to day. None of that is good for volatility. So just on that note there have been some months on while. Trump has been president where the stock market's done really, well, even though there's so much uncertainty about what he might do next about what he may tweet next. So how do you sort of explain that? I think there are few things going on again, the market has has been growing on net. Anyway, for about the last ten years, so Trump kind of came in with these tailwinds he inherited them from the economy and the markets that were under Obama. Although again, I'm not saying that Obama control them. So some of this is just pre existing trends..

President Trump president Gilda CNN CNN Obama Washington Post Washington trae ward fed Catherine chairman ten years nine percent six percent
How one comedian made 'Saturday Night Live' a cultural phenomenon

Business Beware

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

How one comedian made 'Saturday Night Live' a cultural phenomenon

"CNN has announced it will air a bittersweet nostalgic tribute to Gilda Radner on New Year's day. Here's more on this story from USA's. Rick Vincent, Gilda Radner was an original member of NBC's, Saturday Night, Live and her comedy inspired many. Who came after love guilty is a documentary directed by Lisa deep Alito to be aired on CNN on New Year's day here. She highlights the struggles reading your face struggling with eating disorders. If there was always a sense of humor. You always wonder if people are funny in real life, and from what everyone told me, it was really funny and in her journals and her audio recordings. She was really a unique and different person. She died from ovarian cancer in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine

Gilda Radner Alito CNN Rick Vincent USA Lisa NBC
"gildas" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

Anderson Cooper 360

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"gildas" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

"Story comedy great Mendes loved her. I basically stole all of my characters from Gilda can do almost anything people are laughing. Love killed a CNN film. New Year's day at nine pm on CNN. The news tonight that House Republicans want further investigation of the early Russia pro probably comes as no surprise to Robert Muller. And not that we would know because the special counsel's office doesn't say, much and leaks even less. We only learn about his efforts in court filings. And this one's a doozy is from lawyers for Russian company and one item at the center of it is a selfie a nude selfie. The company accused of taking part in efforts to disrupt the two thousand sixteen presidential election claims the risque photo was confiscated by the mother team along with a lot of other data. But reveal who is in the photo. This is just the latest court drama for Muller who I took control of the Russia probe back in may of two thousand seventeen so far four people have been sentenced to prison. One person was convicted at trial seven pleaded guilty in thirty six people were entities have been charged in one man, Robert Muller is under the microscope himself. Here's C N N's, Gloria borger. Special counsel. Robert Muller is a mystery, and perhaps the most private public figure in Washington. But as the leader of the Russia investigation, he and his team have become a political pin yada after squeezing indictments jail time and plea deals from former Trump advisors, including the president's ex fixer now, singing and facing prison and his ex campaign chair now indicted and accused of lying never been any Muller investigation because it was never anything good room. There was no collusion that has been. It's been a framed job since one of his lawyers. They are a group of thirteen highly partisan Democrats that make up the Muller team excluding him.

Robert Muller Russia special counsel CNN Gloria borger Gilda Mendes Trump Washington president
"gildas" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"gildas" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"NewsRadio ten eighty KRLD Twenty-one KRLD in time for this morning's CEO spotlight. Let's check in with our business analyst, David Johnson. October is breast cancer awareness bond. And I think it was nineteen Eighty-three. They actually ran the first in a race for the cure here. But it's a it's a great space for cancer survivors in general and supporting that is an outfit called the cancer support community of North Texas. It really started out. I think I it started as that Gildas clubhouse that remember Gilda Radner Machel Lewis is the CEO of CSC the cancer support community of North Texas joins us right ads. Good, dave. You're this. Thanks very much. David a pleasure to be. So he's that right. This was killed with this gilders closet or clubhouse or whatever you one hundred percent. Correct. I originally when we fist opened outdoors in two thousand two we opened as a Gildas cab North Texas that organization merged with another organization called the wellness community. And then everybody came under the banner of cancer support community. But so the whole idea is is I mean, I guess the name says everything is cancer support. So what does that involve? Okay. So deeply painted quick picture for you. We know this fantastic medical treatment for everyone in the Metroplex and God forbid, somebody gets a diagnosis you're gonna find a really good on colleges siege. And whatever that may be, but the missing link really is that a cancer diagnosis impacts a person the individual with the diagnosis. But also anyone connected to them far more deeply than the diagnosis and the treatments cancer support. Community comes in on that side and says, okay, we know this is going to be this is going to turn your life upside down these same shitty. And in order to provide the kind of. Environment in the support that's going to help you treat. Well, that's going to put position your family, your co workers and friends in a good place as you move through this diagnosis into survivorship and beyond cancer. Support community comes in with the other what we consider essential compliments of good comprehensive case. And the thing is I guess it's it's because of the progress against the disease, but I know more and more survivors and long term survivors of cancer hundred percent, that's beautiful side of the picture. So people are being treated I being diagnosed earlier that'd being treated they living longer and living. Well, but that doesn't mean to say that he continue to deal with some of the emotional side effects of what the treatment delivers into for you. And for your family for the whole family to shell Lewis is the u of cancer support. Humidity of North Texas CSC good debut with us. Thank you. That's. Honestly. Thanks, David Johnson. News Radio today. Eighty KRLD. She can David's entire interview. Another CEO spotlights, KRLD dot com slash CEO..

cancer CEO David Johnson Gilda Radner Machel Lewis North Texas Gildas Texas business analyst one hundred percent hundred percent
"gildas" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"gildas" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Of the northeast at five at sixty nine for the smart oil and gas show. KRLD news time six twenty one time for David Johnson. And your nightly CEO spotlight October is breast cancer awareness bonds, and I was nineteen Eighty-three. The actually ran the first in a race for the cure here. But it's a it's a great space for cancer survivors in general and supporting that is an outfit called the cancer support community of North Texas. It really started out. I think I it started as that club chloride. This was killed when this Gildas closet clubhouse, or whatever. One hundred percent, correct. I originally when we fist I've been data was in two thousand and two we opened as Gildas capitals, Texas that organization merged with another organization called the wellness community. And then everybody came under the banner of cancer support community. So the whole idea is is well, I mean, I guess the name says everything is cancer support. Boy. So what does that involve? Okay. So painted quick picture for you. We know this fantastic medical treatment for everyone in the matrix. And God forbid somebody gets a diagnosis you're gonna find a really good oncologist siege. And whatever that may be the missing link really is that a cancer diagnosis impacts on the individual with the diagnosis. But also anyone connected to them far more deeply than the diagnosis and the treatments cancer support. Community comes in on that side and says, okay, we know this is going to be this is going to tune your life down the same shitty. And in order to provide the kind of environment in the support that's gonna help you.

cancer Gildas North Texas David Johnson CEO One hundred percent
"gildas" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"gildas" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"And Alexis got off to a really strong start. It was incredible. It was incredible this morning. I was on at seven thirty with them. They're twelve and a half thousand I came back on just before nine o'clock, and they were over twenty two thousand ten grand. Such great charities. I'm going to try not to get choked up. Like, I did earlier choked up is an understatement. I was sobbing we lost her. My it was so our charity is gilda's club twin cities because it was inspired by Gilda Radner of Saturday Night Live who died of ovarian cancer at the age of forty. Yes. This time two years ago. My mom died of ovarian cancer wait before. See? It's happening. That's okay. Right before project down thirty. And I think that that's like all going through my head. Yeah. Yeah. I know generosity. Well listeners overwhelming. In earlier, we heard from someone who donated money and this woman had donated after having lost her daughter. Her daughter had lost a battle with cancer, and she chose to donate. Anyway, she wanted to honor the life of her daughter with positivity and putting money toward a great. 'cause you know, we've heard from multiple people who've whose lives have been touched by gilda's club. Right. And. Day. They've been in it. They have experienced benefit in just love their. They do. Yeah. And so it's really it's really special to see those people stepping up, and yeah, it's very very heart warming. And this whole week has been, you know, just just exhausting. You know, it's been especially for you. Steve you've been going back and forth to the studio in Saint Paul and then back here. And so it's just one of those things where like the anxiety. The nerves are really high the emotions are starting to like..

Gilda Radner Alexis ovarian cancer cancer Saturday Night Live Saint Paul Steve two years
"gildas" Discussed on The Film Vault

The Film Vault

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"gildas" Discussed on The Film Vault

"Adrift by Lisa Dopp Alito Lisa d'appel. Lido is a feature debut her first ever film. Turns out. So I did not. So what do you know about Gilda Radner that she was the lead female comedian on us and on their early seventies from, I think the show's inception there from the beginning. She was in fact the first person ever cast Michael with building the cashier. Remember I used to do that. I produce SNL show for terrestrial radio there for about three or four years. So I I'm familiar with early catalog. I to suffer through that for paychecks, Dow. Okay. Well, then you must Gilda Radner her doing a lot of things. A lot of things that I found unfunny because I didn't really find anything from that era. They're really interesting. So. This might not be up. Your alley certainly was up mine and we were talking about Robin Williams. It's a couple of weeks ago and his early seven seventy I cringe. But then like as we progress, we've got like more contemporary, that's right. Found a funny. I don't know. That must just be a generational thing. I could see that you're not gonna get the same thing out of Gilda Radner 'cause she tragically passed away in nineteen eighty nine of ovarian cancer, which is of course covers she was just forty two years old. I almost no perception of her post SNL and I thought I, which is weird because everyone of big Senate life fan. I claim to be, but I didn't know much about her post SNL life and I was always assuming, oh, she died shortly thereafter. Ono who was a good decade after she left us an Elvis, she passed away. Of course she was battling cancer a lot of that time, but she was also healthy lot time. She Geeta wilder of course, but she really struck. Oh, shrug. A lot of things film covers a lot of her personal demons. She had eating disorder. She's actually goes around, we all know we can all picture her. She played Roseanne Rosanna Danna LIZA loop Nerva all the alva- characters, famous characters speaking Indonesian characters. Then language Rosana, Asian, Indonesian. I don't know if it is. I don't understand what you're saying. I don't character. Let them saying is she's very recognizable personalities, you stand, but as a child turns out, she was really overweight, you'd actually fat kid and she struggled with eating sorter for for for majority of her adult life covered a lot of things. I didn't know about her such as she really struggled with like wrestling with fame. I keep in mind when she was on SNL. It was a phenomenal like she was overnight famous. A lot of people who become famous on TV, for example, work their way up there a little bit famous, a little more famous, sorta what overnight she and the rest of the cast. Were she part of a national Epinal she well, the national limp, you would know this part because she was in the national instant radio hour and we would've seen that portrayed in drunk stupid. What was it called? Drunks to whatever the drunk stoned, stupid, brilliant dead or whatever. Also on the Doug Kenney movie futile stupid gesture. Do we look fest together? So anyway, that's covered stupid gesture. I was bothered by willful taste portrayal. You really his portrayal of Kenny, Kenny, Kenny forte. Just being forte, believe me. I love him, but I don't know if he's really the kind of guy to tackle actual poaching me post post office human humus. I dunno if he'd be playing real people this this film had a couple of things going for one was it actually had access to Gildas like private diaries and writings and things job down to herself. Good. They had a number of recent s an alumni. They had my root off Bill Hader any polar Milton McCarthy is falling over themselves reading..

Gilda Radner SNL Kenny forte Geeta wilder Lisa Dopp Elvis Robin Williams Bill Hader Lisa d'appel Doug Kenney Dow Michael Epinal Gildas Senate Roseanne Rosanna Danna Ono Kenny Milton McCarthy
"gildas" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"gildas" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"Let's talk about where we can find available now on Amazon, Google play YouTube and on demand as well. Amy polars in this Martin shorts. In this Lorne Michaels in this Bill haters in this, had you done docs before this? Well, for the last twenty years I've been producing and directing commercials and long-form branded content. So I've done a lot of things that were docks, but they were never releasing in the public, and but this was the first doc that I had to. Actually I project I ever had a raise my own money. Everything was something I was given a budget to and had the resources. So this was totally totally different thing that I didn't know what I was getting myself into. How'd you do it? I don't know. Did it? Yeah. I mean, I did it. I was very lucky. I had the support. Why did indigo campaign raised a lot of money and had a lot of support from fans. People gave me money like a dollar. They gave me a thousand dollars. I had the support of of Michael Radnor Gildas brother, and their friends and family. So that really, really helped. And they gave you access to diaries and journals that you didn't even have weighed going into this, right? Yeah. About halfway through the project, Michael Ratner gave me access to Gildas boxes that had been in storage since she passed away and he didn't even know what was in there. So when we started going through the boxes Gildas best friend Judy, and I, we've found a video a home movie that Gilda made of her ninth chemotherapy, which was pretty amazing. There's a little piece of it in the film, but she was really struggling with how she was going to handle her her ninth chemotherapy back in the day, it was a whole different and and thing where you would stay overnight in the ninth. Kind of means the end. Like are you cured or not you're getting better. So she decided her and gene wilder decided to make their own home. So it's pretty amazing. 'cause she's in the hospital and she has no hair on and she's cracking jokes, and she designed the whole thing. So when she sleeping, she wrote all these notes out and she put it in there. And this is like, now people have have iphones and they film themselves and it's very common to see people going through their disease. But back in that day in nineteen eighty seven, you know, you have a video camera yet a planet out and and you know, it's it's, that was just really amazing. So that was like one of the first fines from those boxes did I know that gene wilder and Gilda Radner were together for quite some time and then he, he, he passed recently right recently, but he lived on for another twenty years or or whatever it was. Do they have kids? No, no, that's that's. Really sad force them tried they wanted to and and because she had ovarian cancer, she didn't. She lost the ability Shiels had miscarriages and really awful things. But I think if if she had lived, they would have adopted. Oh, that wouldn't work for. Great comedic the powerhouses comedic -ly like if Dane cook, it's together with a model. I don't need offspring, but if these to get you. Gene or kill the get together. We need that. You know what I mean? She was married to before gene wilder. I learned in this movie whom g e Smith. The band, the guy needed the scrunchy. Flash up. Aback. Then all I know is from it's like the the guys of the hair constantly on the hair, the hair. It's like, get a got damned scrunchy at some point or fucking fantastic sands. Would you too cool and the guy that you fro? It bothers me resent that I've gene wilder Gilda Anchin hair kids hair would have been at this. I got a factor that, yeah, he's still around. Right. He's Brian, you're the. I am. I want to say is because I've seen other like documentaries about guitar playing and stuff like that. And he gets interviewed on on those. Yeah, he's sixty six. Wow. We still pretty pretty young. He's sixty six. I didn't say that g g Smith seems to young fifty two healed. It was born in fifty ish now forty six. So she was oh older. Wow. All right. He played rhythm guitar in man eater. This guy. Favorite goddamn. So so you you set out..

gene wilder Gilda Gilda Radner Brian Michael Radnor Gildas Judy Lorne Michaels Amy polars Michael Ratner Gildas Gilda Anchin Dane cook g g Smith YouTube Amazon g e Smith Google Bill twenty years thousand dollars
A Review of This Week's Movies

KCBS Radio Morning News

01:58 min | 2 years ago

A Review of This Week's Movies

"This is the time for movies last night. I saw stars board. But that will have to wait for a couple of weeks. And right now, I'm going to tell you about three of them all of them with seeing Fahrenheit eleven nine. Okay. This is Michael Moore. He makes provocative films often original always in his own voice. This time we get what we expect. He also gets up that we totally don't expect. Of course, trust Trump is cinematic proven to be meglomaniac, oh, greedy and on his way to dictator but more demonstrates that. The Democrats are also at fault. He really shows that more asks the question, how did we get here? And how do we get out? He goes to the Flint water crisis to the young people at parkland to triumph of the will this movie is really never boring. I think it inspires action in this case vote. Anyway, it's definitely worth seeing Fahrenheit eleven nine. Now, see when I was a kid. Do you guys? Remember this TV movie? I know exactly what you're gonna say. Montgomery right fascinated. Yes. As Lizzie Bordon. Well, this time Chloe Sevigny stars as the upper class. Lizzie bordon. It's not terrifying. Movie. I think the one with with Elizabeth becoming was fought scarier, but this time you really get a look at how women were treated in eighteen ninety two a bad time for women, and they weren't allowed to follow their passions at all. But it Lizzie case, her passions were pretty evil, and that she commits a brutal double murder does. She get away with it. What happens one of my favorite actor says Kristen Stewart is it. So anyway, this is with seeing Lizzy scary not for children and finally love Gilda. So many of us hold a soft spot for convicted medium Gilda Radner. We just love her from Saturday Night Live was Amazon, Emily. Let's ella. Lisa Luke ner. I mean, she was just great. And this movie is it's a documentary. It's done in Gildas voice. Love gilda. Do

Lizzie Bordon Gilda Radner Michael Moore Lisa Luke Ner Elizabeth Chloe Sevigny Saturday Night Live Kristen Stewart Flint Donald Trump Gildas Montgomery Lizzy Murder Amazon
"gildas" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

04:59 min | 2 years ago

"gildas" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"If it's the gather, if feels like a Jenga puzzle feels like if you take away one piece, the whole thing would collapse because everything just feels like it's put in place the right way. So what were some of those others cuts? Like? The first cut was before I had a material, so I. Tested that and the person I just that it was a really big filmmaker and they said it was Haley graphic which I didn't even know where the word man, but a means like only good things you're talking about. So I always kinda kept that in mind, then they was version. I said, with the subtitle and then in verse that was more cancer heavy that the canton section longer because kill the go through a lot, even my friends who have like depressing things so devastated at the end of the film. So that was something we kind of worked our way back from trying to figure out how to not to leave the audience really like, oh my God. This is so depressing that she's gone. So that was a real talent. I don't imagine that you ever met her. So how do you feel now knowing her so? Well, I'm a real privilege. I mean, if even spend all this time with somebody goes really good positive person to then time with she was. It's funny. She found the you any, you know, in the darkest of time she was good fire and you know, and there's the saddest that you know thinks learn about about her that she never felt pretty. And to me, some of for while we post the picture of the other filing and people loved her. You know, that's a little sadness that I don't know if they'll ever really knew how much he was loved. So what are the plans with the movie? 'cause I know that it's been touring around in even showed here in Detroit, which people love because she's a native. So now what happens with the film for timber, I in over fifty at the country which is pretty exciting. It's a limited really. So if we have a really good weekend, hopefully it opens and then it goes on demand and then eventually goes on CNN into nineteen. So there shouldn't great opportunities to see the film. I loved them. Showing it in Detroit. Her hometown still seems like the spirit of old Detroit in some sense. So I really enjoyed, you know, I really loved all your friends that I'd from Detroit has family. Hopefully people will like it and you'll thank you. Audience so about for you, what's next for you? I've been working, you know, talking to people in what I would want my next to be, and and I would like to do something similar in the sense of a really inspiring person to behind a lot archives. That's like the thing is I, I can't imagine doing, you know, without having access to something special, I think after the weekend at home, but we can box office. I can really, really start researching the other films that I wanna work on police. Thank you so much for your time today was a real pleasure talking with you. I think it was great talking to you too. Human. You're not thinking right, understand out woman. I am free. I'm respected. I'm not getting out of high understand. I thought I was getting that across. My here and we're trying to engine here. I understand. I was thinking of melody and not meaning. I'm sorry. I was concentrating on the melody and everything. Right. Okay. For you're doing fine. You're doing. Okay. Thanks. All right, Honey, I think what they need is a little more anthem quality. You know. Will you? It's all everything ends up. Singing the song Rico's written the song we need the talent. Okay. I want to go info. All right guys. Little perfect. He, I'm fine. I don't know what happened there. I just went, went a little, hey, where, okay. Let's go again to. Human..

Detroit Haley CNN Rico
"gildas" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"gildas" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Of film, like a rough assembly was with these really bad audios and subtitles, and then filmmaker friends thought that that was okay because they said, well, it's really Gill those voice and she's really telling her story, and then they tested it with my regular friends. And they were like, this is, you know, I can't look at the picture we need and I don't know what she's talking about. So that was the next level is to try to find interviews and supplement the audio. So that killed. It could tell her own story. So some of that is from her audiobook also. And then some are from reporters who had kept their audio cassette tapes when they interview Gill though, like forty years ago, which was pretty amazing. Find those must have been just such a technical hurdle to try to piece all those things together at the beginning editor than friend, producers everyone's that, you know, we're going to have to get somebody in to read, maybe we can mix it, and I was really adamant that I never wanted any. Anyone to read billed as as if it was like that was really hard, and we tried to like, do you places the world goes to be the best? And then we did come across this genius. His name is dominant Bartoli and he was able to rescue some of the stories, all stories, but he was able to rescue some of the that audio. And then we had a big audio team. We went to mix that really spent a lot of time working on the dialogue and working on trying to make it a cohesive voice. So that was a lot of technical work, and also lot of weeding through the materials of what we could use it, what would cutting us and what we wanted to use and what gilded could tell herself and what other people would have to supplement, or you know how we use the journals as another voice. So there was a lot of technical ahead, amazing editors. So I'm very grateful for them. Was your first feature documentary. So what we're. Some of the other hurdles that you really had to overcome. You talked about the financing. You talked about some of the technical stuff. What were some of the other things, the challenges that you managed overcome to bring this project fruition? I, it's really hard the people to take a chance on you, especially when is money at stake. So that was really hard. So I had to build his brother and family friends and donations than finger party is the raising money to get to the the film to shape that people would be willing to was an expensive film in the end expensive to me, especially since as a person who was always hired, I, we've had a budget. So when we finally shot everything, we had a really good trailer and then seeing came in Phoenix film to give us really the money that we were able to get through post production. So that was I was very grateful to them. So that was a hurdle was going through taking a chance on somebody who hasn't done. On before, and then other hurdles where just getting people to the interviewed, even his friends, like one person led to another person who got to another person. So it wasn't like shot everything a month. It was over the periods of that. They interviews led to somebody having good interview. The pulse safer, have a good interview, so it'd be more comfortable for living to happen. Lorraine would do it. And when poets did interview, I think is comfortable enough for maybe for the from art insured and the other modern-day comedian. So I think it was also just been trust, and I think that's that's probably common. There's so much footage pre existing footage. I'm not gonna ask you about, you know, rights usage and all that kind of stuff. I mentioned that was probably a legal mess that had to be sorted through, but just defined some of that footage just some of the the early clips, especially especially her dazed in the theater when she still in..

Gill Bartoli editor Phoenix Lorraine forty years
"gildas" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"gildas" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Think very much and enjoy the interview. How did you decide to get into show business actress as a kid? So I don't know. It just put it happens. I think if you wanna be an actor and you of theater and performing that is sort of happens. I don't know. It's like a you. You wanna do it. It's like this bugs that you. Can't explain. It was kind of the roots of it. And then over the years I, you know, I went into producing and directing, but he's really loved performers and acting and shooting and editing. And I always loved everything like that. Since I was little out. Did you decide to make documentary about Gilda Radner? I've been working in Burundi content for a long period of time, like doing documentaries, but they were basically for corporations or nonprofit groups somehow I fell into doing nonprofit videos for Dylan's club in New York City and eighteen of them throughout the country. But the one on gilded club that I went to return a one that was founded by teen wilder and go with friends after passed away, and her presence is so present there. Even though she passed away twenty something years ago, her murals all around and people read her book and many of the members talk about her and her journey we cancer when I felt like she had such a unique. With a double legacy, this amazing scene comedy, but also this legacy seeing cancer. And I just thought her her story was so important. When was that moment when he said this is going to be a project. This is something I want to do. One moment we interviewing the kids at guild of club at the beginning, the film was I was thinking it was going to be more about gilda's club than Gilda Radner herself. I was just filming them little kids and they have a camper kids call Cam sparkle which is named after Gildas dog sparkle. And this little girl Ruth from Saint Lucia was drawing the Roseanne Roseanne Agana character, which is like logo forgiveness club, and I said, what he trying, I wouldn't Gilda. She had no idea who Gilda one, but she knew build a and I thought, wow, this is really interesting. So we went to movies, funny at the head of field as club, and you think about Gilda and you know you say you wanna do film, but you don't really think you wanna. I don't really know like you're going to do film and she said, well, I'll connect you to Allen's bell Gildas writing partner from SNL and good friend. And she did like that night and Allen responded back. And he said, oh, come Ville. Me and my wife might Mike date because we're going away afterwards. So this kind of just started like that. And I filmed Alan Robin, and it just kind of happened like that once I started little by little getting different interviews with different friends of Gilda that just happen spontaneously. Do you remember? It was about four and a half years ago for the first two years. It was really sort of an on again off again thing like I would work on the film when I wasn't working on commercial and I get back to or would start again when I got another interview so that it was a long process. The first few years was really not a real committed a part time thing. What was it that pushed you into making it?.

gilda Gilda Radner Gilda one teen wilder Allen Roseanne Roseanne Agana Dylan Burundi guild of club New York City Alan Robin Ruth Saint Lucia bell Gildas Ville Mike date partner SNL two years
"gildas" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"gildas" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Finished Sousa, Morgan spurlock, Michael Moore, do you see a new sort of golden era, new genre arising here this summer. I think to Morgan's point, you know, it's a cynical era, and I think some of these movies are are capturing, you know, a feeling that it doesn't have to be that way. So I think I think these movies might not have been so successful in years past, but I think it's sort of a reflection of the culture wherein now I think when it comes to people like Mr. Rogers and Rb g and we have a film coming out called love Gilda, which is about the life and career of Gilda Radner. I think focusing on individuals who are Trail Blazers who have inspired people who have meaning in people's lives. I think just seems to be resonant right now, and I think I would also attributed to to the filmmaking involved. Some of these films are just magnificently made and a really pushing the envelope. So I think as a film experience, they're also finding audiences. Because they're really beautifully made and sort of very, very high level. So I think it's a combination of the art of the film how they're being made, but also picking subjects that in this particular cultural moment, really people need. They want to connect to these people. They feel like it reminds them that they're still good in the world. Here's a clip from that trailer that you made mention of Amy love Gilda about the Saturday Night, Live star Gilda Radner. One of the voices you'll hear in this clip is fellow Saturday Night, Live alumnus, Amy Poehler. There was so much in the world that had yet to be carved out for women. The guys weren't saying, hey, let's think of a way to put guild in the sketch, but he was always funny. Being in the sick of it. I don't even realize what drives we were making another beloved figure. Gilda Radner immune. Tell us tell us about this one. Well, this is another trail-blazing woman who was the first female comedian hired by Lorne Michaels at Saturday night Saturday Night, Live in nineteen seventy five. So she, you know, she was doing something that no one had done before her. And she also had, you know, a tragic ending where she fought cancer, and, but the way she did it, I think inspires a lot of hope and inspiration and people. So her story makes you laugh and it makes you cry. And the way it's done by a very talented new director, Lisa deputy, oh, really creates a film that has guild his voice. All the way through at guild is an in effect telling her own story. There is a treasure trove of home movies and audio tapes that have never been heard before that Gilder recorded and modern day comedians read some of the diaries that she left. Behind. So I think again, it's an, it's an experience that people will feel good about, I think is in spite of of her early death. I think that she left an indelible Mark on our culture and people connect to her Ernst fired by her and this film, I think, allows them to sort of experience that emotion that they had watching her way back when let's go to Brian in Montreal Canada. Hi, Brian, welcome to the program. Very brief. I wanted to throw into the mix Canada's contribution to both documentary filmmaking and its diffusion as a way for communities to cultivate new ideas and to cultivate ideas that others will feel strongly about pretty quickly during World War Two candidates that alone on North America fighting Germans. And so we brought over the documentary expert, John Grierson within making documentaries in Britain to make Canada's documentary all through World War Two, the advantage by tagging shorts feature onto an American Hollywood feature. Both American and Canadian audiences could get a feel for what the war meant ordinary people during the Vietnam war. When I was studying with John thune American students who are getting their draft deferment by studying a Canadian high tension university got to study with John Gerson and learn how documentary film can make a difference in.

Gilda Radner Amy Poehler Morgan spurlock Gilder Trail Blazers Canada Mr. Rogers Lorne Michaels John Grierson John thune John Gerson Sousa Brian North America Michael Moore director Montreal Ernst
"gildas" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"gildas" Discussed on Overdue

"Okay. Beg. Appendice is also a genus of click beetle, and there's a European click beetle named the mega Peres Lougee whose common name is queens, executioner beetle just very sad. Clicking very sad evil beetle. So our two boys head in a mental as his house and their dislike Gildas places pretty cool. There's like bards and acrobatics. And so what happens is, is that pisses Stratus until Emma Casse right up and some guard of mental as goes to him and says, your majesty there, two men outside strangers who seem like sons of Zeus. So again, we see. Worthiness like by comparing them to God's, please tell me, should we take off the harness from their horses or send them off to find another host, flush, mentally, shouted, angrily. You used to have some brains. Now you're talking like silly child. We two were fed by many different host before returning home as we may hope for Zeus to keep us safe in future times, unpack their horses, lead them into dine. Yeah, and then you eighty let these strangers let these beautiful strangers into my house and I'll care of them. And so they like come in and the like the slaves. He has working for them, like bathe bay them and bay them down and olive oil there. So oily they didn't have like banana boat. It was the sun is like SPF thirty olive oil. Yup. And right after that olive oil is is actually, I've been trying to note some of the verse stuff that crops up. Along the way, and there's are the theater person in the theater person. You're the classics person. There is a breach in the the pentameter when the guys after getting all rubbed down of olive oil dress them in there, wolf cloaks and tunics, and then seated them beside the son of a trace king mentally. Now is my saying trace right enter. Yeah. So you can. Yeah, probably you can hear the son of a trace Kingman Elias has like extra. There's no way to run that through in the rhythm. I think it's, it sounds like a dactyl which is like an, it's like bump, bump, bump. It's like a one emphasis and then to low emphasis beets, which is sort of how a lot of Greek versus handled. But I also like that that happening when we first get him referred to as king mentally because throughout the rest of the book he's like, he's flushed Manila's. He's ready mentally, I do. I was just gonna wait a slush and ruddy just makes him sound like he's always had like three or four drinks. Maybe it might be a film that I can't remember a depiction of him, but I just keep thinking of like Kimberly, like I just think John Davies, dislike bearded red faced guy who's just drinking with his olive oil slaves all day. And he's, you know, he's always like mentally as my wife, my axe. So they're hanging out and he's like, eat all my food. Have a great help yourselves. Enjoy the food. When you have shared our meal, we will begin to ask you who you are. Your father's must be sceptre bearing kings, the sons of peasants do not look like you. So with that, he took the dish of rich roast meat cut from the back, which was his special meal offered it to them. So you have some but me eat my special, but me and then I'll ask you are like, okay, and meanwhile, like Pizarro's until advocates are like, yo, this place is super dope. It's really pretty. He's Heather looking around. It's all shiny and full of treasures. And we get this moment where they're like, oh, it's almost like Mount Olympus. And then we get this big long speech for mental Aus where he's like, nah, no, man. I was like God, I learned the hard way and the thing that that struck me. And I think this crops up again later in. The book. If I recall, he says, I wish I had stayed here. What is the line? I wish I'd stayed here with just a third of all the treasures. I have now acquired if those who died at Troy. So far away from our guy pastures were alive, and will I sit here in my palace morning all who died and often weeping, and there's this like Yoko that war wasn't worth it. Like, yeah, this is what I got, then maybe I shouldn't have got it. Yeah, there is. There is a lot of a lot of weeping and sorrow in this chapter..

Manila Heather Peres Lougee Stratus Gildas Emma Casse Appendice Kingman Elias Troy Mount Olympus Yoko Kimberly Pizarro John Davies
"gildas" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"gildas" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"The charlotte hornets select shea he'll just alexander hamilton canada and the university of kentucky alexander has as high upside has any point guard in this draft fits the modern game with his versatility at six foot six seven foot wingspan slithery to the rim has a handful of finesse finishes in the paint but he's not the most dynamic off the dribble shooter so scouts question his ability to score prolifically at the nba level in the half court so the hornets make their pickwick shea gildas alexander from kentucky and when it comes to charlotte hornets michael jordan was recently quoted as saying i'm just kidding jordan has to say about it kidding but but maybe new gm mitch kupchak does he's got some say about this team because maybe the hornets will try to retool their team with a different image three playoff appearances last fourteen years dwight howard resurrection got over like a fart in church in charlotte and so then you have kemba walker of pitcher can be found on the basketball abyss of charlotte so at least now with alexander from kentucky a nice player for i think jordan and the hornets gildas alexander super active off the ball defender he plays with fire and energy which is a plus when you look at all these prospects knowing that he comes in with great energy all the time so there will be a bowl yeah try fiery passion alexander next favorite thai style great quickness with good fundamentals he's got that recently late in the draft process really started to rise on track boards and i think a lot of people were talking in the top ten range he goes eleven to the hornets now you have combination you'll have to see what the hornets what you get out maliki monk a player i really liked last year disappointed this year for the hornets now you have a backward going forward what else can you do you to a couple of other pieces for the charlotte hornets they're really a tough team to kind of judge going forward because ken they signed a free agent can they get a star of the two that they draft in the last two years there were also guys making a coaching change steve clifford out james borrego in this was a team that was supposed to take that proverbial next step last season it didn't happen so can can give this alexander become the guy who helps them into some nextstep we'll see i just don't like the makeup of of that charlotte team in the sense that i don't i don't think they're they're going to ever reach some kind of peak because christie your point i don't think they're ever going to be able to land any kind of major free agent there so your banking on all these picks to work out and play well together that is a major stress so before we go too far with the hornets conversation eastern worship reporting the clippers have acquired gill gis alexander in a trade with the hornets worship ascii saying that the clippers will send the twelfth pick in two second round picks to the hornets forgive alexander okay so coming into the draft the clippers at twelve and thirteen back to back year but you're saying that there has been a switch here of where the clippers and doc rivers will go with alexander yes.

charlotte hornets alexander hamilton canada university of kentucky alexand fourteen years six seven foot two second two years six foot
"gildas" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"gildas" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Providence the temple i vote gird your in the bowl defensively because as you indicated the factory they made a living off of steals they ended up doing it we'll take your word state elected not to foul what did you think of the looks that kentucky got by guilty sally parker look for the wrong person agrees with reformation do about france you've got a chain of the players would have for defense won't be hard to give it to the off as i indicated teams practice with they call three point defense because so many games come down of course of the season two three point shot women but the three was off the mark by gildas alexander and kansas state is able to hold on and they will head to the elite eight to face loyola joining us courtside now do savior snead of the victorious kansas state wildcats what a game that i know that you found out yet to watch those last moments from the bench but what were those last moments like what does this feel like right now save your gas a role you know being a great great program and a great coach perry sabari investment that's the name of the game right now political office for you run for what was it game plan all spread them out and limited easy touches.

france kentucky sally parker gildas alexander kansas snead perry sabari