8 Burst results for "Gil Hovav"

"gil hovav" Discussed on Israel Story

Israel Story

07:40 min | 6 months ago

"gil hovav" Discussed on Israel Story

"Hey guys it's me. She will be back in a couple of weeks with a brand new israel story episode. but today we're excited to introduce you to a new podcast that launch this fall. it's called schmaltzy and it's created by the jewish food. Society schmaltzy explores the intersection of jewish identity and food through live storytelling like the dishes. These tales revolve around the stories. Come with a complex mix of flavors joy disappointment laughter longing and love what i love about schmaltzy. What makes it. Special is how it celebrates the unique power of storytelling to unite us. Even were far apart just in time for hanukkah the episode will be sharing with you. Today is called midnight. Lakas with liz newmark. One night twenty years ago loses kids pleaded with her to abandon bedtime and make lots kisses. Liz couldn't resist today. Lack gaps in the memory of that night old a deep meaning for her. If you enjoy this episode of schmaltzy. I highly recommend you. Check out the rest of their episodes in subscribe to their feed their next episode features israeli tv food personality. Gil hovav a new york-based israeli chef. Not that the money okay. Enough for me. We'll be back soon with new israel story episodes and till then is schmaltzy. Do you think that you're able to reveal your lock goes secret ingredient. When we get to a certain level of subscribers we will post the secret ingredient what level is described. As do we need to get to. The gauntlet has been thrown down. Kane netted lynch the from the jewish food society. I'm amanda dell and this is schmaltzy each schmaltzy podcast episode revisits. A personal story told a jewish food society live event. Pull up a front row seat to hear the original live stories from the stage. Then we'll go behind the tales with the storytellers for more today on schmaltzy liz newmark. Liz is a chef and the founder of great performances in award winning catering and events company that she started as a waitress staffing agency for women in the arts in two thousand six. Liz establish catch ski farm in kinder- hook new york and founded the sylvia center a nonprofit organization dedicated to addressing issues in children's health lose is a third generation manhattanite and was named one of the one hundred most influential women in new york city. Business by crain's new york some stories. You just don't wanna stop in the middle and this is one of those stories so today we are going to break with the schmaltzy podcast tradition and listened to loses entire story before she joins us in the studio. Here's liz from the schmaltzy stage at the new york city wine and food festival where she shared a very personal story about loss living in the moment and resilience so about twenty years ago my catering business was really starting to take off and it was such an exciting time. We had just moved into a great facility in hudson square. And we're getting to expand within that footprint. We had signed the contract with ian schrager and we were operating the hudson hotels so we were really cool. And every day was a combination of meet with customers and clients and internal planning and of course events and all. This was really great. But for the fact that i also had for young children at home under the age of ten and my husband constantly worked laid and when he was working late he was traveling so as you can imagine it was really hard to find balance in my life trying to juggle work and home so i realized really early on that the key to my success both privately personally and professionally was secretive schedule and a routine and stick to it now. I knew about planning. Because i was from the event world where everything has a plan and a timeline and you stick to it no deviation i had waited a really long time to become apparent and i did not want to be an absentee mom. So most days. I took my children to school race downtown. Flew home at the end of the day in order to join them right at dinner time and then we would do baths and story time. And that was the routine heels off sweatpants on and after they went to sleep i would of course get back online and get back to work and try to finish up. Whatever i'd started that day and sometimes they even out to parties so one winter nights started out like most accept this night. I had a really big presentation to finish a deadline for client. So i got home with the baths and the ready for story time. I'm kind of thinking. Let's get this done. So i can get back to work and nelson katie. My nine and eight year old daughters were in their room. They were playing and chatting and wait information. Finish up with the little too and get to them. Sam who was eight and sylvia. San was five and sylvia. The baby three had picked out. One of their favorite books called a story felina in the book. Lena's grandma shares a family fable about apple strudel. So how can i describe what happens next. You know the book if you give a mouse a cookie thing well talking about apple strudel. We started thinking about apples. And talking about apple's of course led directly to apple sauce and the mention of applesauce little sylvia's green eyes lit up and she looks at me and she says why. Don't we make lockers right now and we can eat them with applesauce. Okay so let me tell you about lakas in my family. It's not a special event food. It is not just for. It's kind of like peanut butter and jelly. But it's not because peanut butter and jelly is really quick. Lakas is all the ingredients and it makes a mess and you need a lot of time and then you gotta clean up. And i'm thinking. I gotta get back to work. And she's looking at me like and then sam starts in Grew up to become his high school debating team champion so he tells me they're hungry. Says mom will do it really quickly. And we're going to help clean up and you know what tomorrow night. We will skip stories and we will go a bit early and you know what were starving and sylvia's just egging him on and looking.

liz newmark Liz Lakas Gil hovav amanda dell sylvia center new york israel hudson square new york city ian schrager Kane crain lynch sylvia nelson katie liz apple
"gil hovav" Discussed on The Promised Podcast

The Promised Podcast

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"gil hovav" Discussed on The Promised Podcast

"I five thousand nine hundred eighty four here in Tel Aviv. Looking through the schedule I noticed a lecture called quote. Elliot's our Ben Yehuda in house slippers colon on the fuck ups small and large behind the rebirth of the language be offered by someone named Gil Hovav now. Everyone knows guilt because he is renowned television chef. He's had ten and cooking shows at last count garlic pepper and olive oil was the name of one. Captain Cook Gil Hovav and all the fins the Israeli food parade the flying chef matters of taste meals that made history and more. He's also written sixteen cookbooks. So what makes Gill Hovav an expert on Benue Huda and the revival of the Hebrew language in the event about the only person who had this question and the other morning when I was out running listening to the second network on the radio the host of the morning show Aria Golan phoned up Cova to ask what gives survives mother. It turns out was drawer. Ben Avi who in the early nineteen fifties joined. The Voice of Israel. Radio Station became manager of the Music Archives and was the legendary host most of the top forty show. Her father was lethem are bent on me. who was born in Jerusalem in eighteen? Eighty two his father was Elliot's Ben Yehuda Itomar bet on me was the first child out on the planet in more than a millennium to grow up to the age of three hearing not a word of any language save Hebrew a linguistic purity. That meant that he could be with no other children and also no nanny onto or other caretaker all of which makes gill hoover the great grandson of Eleazar. Ben Yehuda about whom cavs said quote. I'm always careful not to speak for the dead and Elliot's been you who has totally dead. But I think if he were here if he were to get up from his grave he'd be happy what mattered to him was that there would arise here a Hebrew state. This happened as we say. In Hebrew big time Hebrew is alive and dynamic and we're born in Hebrew were idiots and Hebrew were smarten Hebrew. We send rockets to the Moon Hebrew. We do everything in Hebrew and that is an overwhelming accomplishment for Hebrew and for. Elliot's been you who that it would cause him great joy to Z.. End Quote and there was more because KVASS father it turns out was Moshe Hovav a legendary pioneer of Israeli radio. That's where evolves mother and father met in one thousand nine hundred one. The radio held a competition to determine who would read the daily Bible verse that the radio ended each day with and when television came in nineteen sixty eight. It did to Suco Shalom. It was called and Moshe. Hove one who evolves family came from Yemen and he pronounced Hebrew in a way that the Europeans and their kids never could saying the I n en het with what linguists call a Farren Gio frigate of using their throat or ferrings. Oh I can you do any rocky barren NGO forgive. I can try so on and I it I cannot do that for years. Voice was the last voice that most Israelis heard before going to bed and the first one when they woke up when he read the Sh- Ma at five fifty eight each morning. Moshav died young thirty three years ago. He was is fifty seven years old and after he did no one had the heart to take him off the radio so each morning now still at five hundred eighty. Am.

Elliot Ben Yehuda Captain Cook Gil Hovav cavs Tel Aviv Ben Avi Moshe Hovav Ben Yehuda Itomar Moshav Gill Hovav Radio Station Voice Israel gill Eleazar Jerusalem lethem Suco Shalom Farren Gio Aria Golan
"gil hovav" Discussed on Our Friend From Israel

Our Friend From Israel

08:50 min | 2 years ago

"gil hovav" Discussed on Our Friend From Israel

"-solutely. If you're in joying this episode, you might also want to check out our interview with Gil Hovav known worldwide, as Israel's first foodie now is rarely cuisine is having a moment or even an hour or maybe a year, and it's big over the world and actually the food revolution in Israel started round the eighties and now you know, we're on top of things. Israel, cuisine is being admired all over the world and rightly so it's really cool. It's really nice. It's really creative and color fool. It's the right cuisine for the moment because it's colors fit, Instagram. Check out that interview and our entire archive of episodes at our friend from Israel dot com. And now back to today show with chocolate tear dead Brenner. Tell us about blue stripes, had that come about and what is the name? So it's like I said, during those five years, I was. Who's doing few things. I, I thought what will be the concert part of the, I'm a storyteller when Bill the concept and it started from telling Tito which is the nickname of my daughter Nellie by enterpreneurship journey. Like I said before, in this was kind of inspiration for all this creation or the emotional side of blue stripes. One of the stories that I'm telling her is that when I was in Paris, I am really love John Paul good here the designer. One time I saw model the t designed her suit, which was was blue stripes in Brown shawl. And when I came back to Israel and started max Brenner didn't understand anything about design. And so I told my designers the time that I won't all if go chase doing shoot with blue stripes. I all want all my boxes to be with blue stripes and a Brown ribbon. And these were the first boxes of mugs better. To me, it's like a gate. When you go into the concept of blue stripes, this is the beginning of the stories, and that's the part of. So this is one angle of strive. The other was the cooling area angle, which was to create a place that is much more approachable casual, not restaurant, like max Brenner, but something more on the goal you can come in see so. So it was to create a place that is more casual on the goal that you can come in. It's the waiter service. This is one aspect, but the other was also to make it more up to date. And to me more up to date was bringing unknown elements of the kakapo cocoa that people are not familiar with a little bit familiar. Now, knowing that CoCo is very healthy, people know to the cocoa beans are very healthy. They don't know much much much much more about cocoa for example. The flesh or the pulp that is inside the fruit. That is an amazing, amazing SuperFood, amazing tropical fruit. Nothing to do with chocolate in the flavors. It's it's a little bit kind of passion, fruit mixed with a gravel, very delicious where the first one in the world doing with it, energy shea juices bowls similar to a sable, but based on the cacao with granola and fruits. So those are extremely unique and other aspects like taking the cacao beans, grinding on the spot to pure chocolate and then cooking with it, the purest hot chocolate you can think of. So this was part of it, and then obviously not to forget the indulgence part, but in a much lighter way, less forma, less less kind of willy Wonka crazy experience. But more. I think the way we expect today from food that will. Be less drama, more quality. So what kind of what would fall into that category? So we do also in this very, very innovative. Some one of our icon ick drinks today we call it the cloud. It's chocolate mousse on tap drinkable, chocolate mousse. Are we doing different flavors from milk chocolate to new Tele two white chocolate. Strawberries just kind of aerated chocolate beverage, really light and delicious something between chocolate from to a moose. We do think that we call can shake, which is a cake on top of shake individuals, small cake, where you eat the cake, and then you drink the matching shake something. We call cone pizza, which is a breach cone, though sugar crystallize around it. We feel it with melted chocolate salted, caramelized, criminal marshmallow porch on top. All these things together are innovative parts of the indulgence section. In blue stripes, I was reading pancreases peg, which is another is is another kind of cool things, which is a pancake sandwich to pancakes, warm inside a chocolate, petty darla white, a hole in the middle, which we feel either with caramelized. Bananas or with a Cranford strawberries, and then we pack it almost like a sandwich with a little sauce Assira on the side. Getting hungry. Gonna have to eat something after this. So to very hopeless stripes will be in five or ten years, where do you hope you will be in five or ten years? You know, I learned in this enterpreneurship journey that it's okay to look far, but it's much nicer, much more efficient to look the like climbing a mountain who I mean, you can look for, but it's easier and much more effective if you if you look at the next to me, I I, I wanna make the store. Amazing. I, I really want people to love to enjoy the experience to hear the feedback. Yes, I hope that it will eventually be all over the world because I think it's, I think it's a very positive concept. Think it's doing something really beautiful happy. I think it's bringing a lot of good, not only as the one part that, yes, chocolate people happy, but also the healthy part of it, which people are not familiar with. And I hope that I will be still a very creative person. Either in blue stripes or somewhere else. But the most important things for me which I think brings meaning to life. Meaning to us is human beings is to to learn, and then using this learnings to create into make beautiful and bigger and and more interesting and explore and thing that the meaning of life, I'm not looking to the one thing. I'm not looking for his to retire, sit on the beach, not work at the message conveyed your daughter, that hump -solutely. Yeah, I think there is rules. There is some kind of some kind of a rhythm to this. This is the rhythm of this world is we need to work and rest, but in this type of pollens six days of work one day of rest, and it's all about work and and creating this this, this is our, this is our role in this. I dunno unearth as. You being right, create and make this world much more. Beautiful. Interesting. Last question I asked this all the people I interviewed before I end the is there any question I did not ask you that I should've asked you. You can think about that. No. And think you know you because you were talking about much Brenner you talking about Bruce strides with talking about my life. I am. And you asked me what's my message? So that's my message. I am. Good interview. Thank you. Well, thank you so much. If people wanna find out more work, they find out more information, blue stripes comb that's pretty Bush tribes dot com. I, we are in the back room of the shop right now in not in Greenwich Village in union near union square of unions near the lower side of midtown, right, lower Manhattan. And so if you're in the neighborhood, you should stop by and have some chocolate mousse on tap or whatever else. Wet your appetite. Thank you so much for joining us to. All right. Take care. Our

max Brenner Israel Gil Hovav Brown shawl CoCo John Paul willy Wonka Paris Bill darla white Manhattan Greenwich Village Bush Nellie Tito Bruce ten years five years six days one day
"gil hovav" Discussed on Our Friend From Israel

Our Friend From Israel

05:11 min | 3 years ago

"gil hovav" Discussed on Our Friend From Israel

"In Hebrew and hero always in Hebrew, yes. So the seminars going back to what you were saying, going around the world, it gives you a great opportunity to see different cultures and meet different people. Definitely, definitely. And have for next week. I'm going to Panama for the first time in my life to again to lecture about my books. There's a book fair in Panama few months ago. I was in Taiwan, and the book was so. All to Chinese publisher. So this was wonderful and the, yeah, it's always fun. You know, you see different people different cultures and you get to eat strange food. I'm not complaining. I interviewed a Ron, Ron, Ben Israel, the Baker I ran Israel. He's a Baker Isreaeli Baker here in the US he's he's also been on TV shows and he said the same thing to me when I asked, I said, what do you enjoy most than he said, traveling and giving lectures and getting to meet new people? And it's just, I guess it's getting out of the kitchen almost, you know? Yes, but you know what I wanted to get out of is full television because what is a food show? It's actually about faking orgasms, because you really you eat on television and venue. This is the best thing of ever had. This is the best show ever had. This is so good. Oh, I wish television could give the smell. You could smell it. It's wonderful. I've had enough elite. So then I came up with a wonderful idea for for series. I did a series that was called king Gill. About the wars can have all over the world, and we traveled the world, and we looked for the worst dishes. Now I'm not talking about badly cooked food. I'm talking about dishes that would be considered a delicacy in their own countries, but that a tourist would find pulling. And the things I had you really don't want to know like insects and things like that inks insects is for beginners. Come on could roaches are wonderful. No, I had century eggs in China. You know, these eggs that Uber in the well, if you're poor, you bury them in the ground to to let them for men for a few years. But if you really rich, you can bury them in a mixture of limestone and horse urine and then give it an extra extra flavor. And then they turn black, and then you peel them and it smells like this and you hit. It was wonderful. America had Starbucks Coffee. It was really foot. Really bad, really, really bad, but we people drink it. So there I, I agree with you. I think I think Starbucks is way too bitter. I enjoy a Roma. I've had some good like ice ice. Is this, but there is a very, very big scene of, you know, you know, single, like it's not chains. It's just, you know that that that look at coffee as religion and they do it this way that way, and they're always have beards and tatoos and base, and that you always feel guilty when you drink their coffee, but it's really good coffee, Israelis, a good coffee country. Finally, they'll is the last question. I I like to ask all the people. I interview this at the love the two questions. And the second question is there, is there any question I didn't ask you that I should've asked you? First of all? Good question. What should you have asked me? I think that the the thing that I ask myself a lot is so what's really important because you know, we've been talking and in, I hope that in a nice way and I hope that I haven't been to condescending or whatever. I said that food is nice, but it's not that important. So what is important? I think that the only important thing is to do good, and that's something that that that I'm trying to do. Even when I write about food or when I do television, it's just look around you and to say, okay, from from the scope that I see from the people that I see around me who needs help and just to be aware of it that we're so fortunate that we can give and we do not have to take an basis something that the. We should always carry with us. I, that's a great message. An a really nice way to to end the show better than schnitzel right much better than. Well, Gil, thank you so much for joining us as people want to find out more about you. How can they do that? Well, on Instagram. My name is Gill Hoover Israel in one word. My book candy from heaven is on Amazon, and if they come to, we've let them just shout. Gil you'll have on the street and I'm there. Okay. Keep your ears open. You may hear some people. Thank you so much. Wonderful. Our

Starbucks Coffee Isreaeli Baker Panama Gil Taiwan Ron king Gill Gill Hoover Israel publisher US Amazon America China
"gil hovav" Discussed on Our Friend From Israel

Our Friend From Israel

08:25 min | 3 years ago

"gil hovav" Discussed on Our Friend From Israel

"It. You'll notice that every single podcast on the planet ask you to rate and review them on. I tunes, why do they do that? Well, here's the answer. The more reviews ratings that our show guests, the higher the show winds up on the I tunes charts, which in turn, helps more people discover the show. So if you're joining this podcast, please head on over to itunes and leave us a rating and a review. We greatly appreciate it. If you're doing this episode, you'll also want to check out our interview with celebrity chef, Ron, Ben Israel. He told us what it was like being discovered by Martha Stewart, what was it like getting call from Arthur Stewart, actually, I thought it was a joke. I thought somebody's pulling my leg and then when I love rive they will all be laughing at me. You can find that interview and our entire archive of episodes at our friend from Israel dot com. And now back to today's episode, for the conclusion of our conversation with celebrity, chef Gill Hovav. I want to talk a little bit about Israel, cuisine. You mentioned a little bit ago when you were growing up is rally food and Isreaeli restaurants were very, I use your term. You said very basic. And nowadays. I think we're seeing a renaissance in Israel, cuisine. I was recently in bear Chevra whoa, in Israel which which is right. Well, which is I never been there before. It's it's not the usual spot. Most of the time people go to Jerusalem Tel Aviv hi-fi lot, but bear Chev I the only thing I knew about our shovel was it was in the middle of nowhere. So when I got there, I was shocked and surprised to see Olding's city. And they said I was with a group there for a week and they said, and they took us out to a restaurant one night and it was this really fancy restaurant, and the food was unbelievable. And I was like, wow, they took us to the one, the one restaurant and Bishop, and then the next night they took us to another restaurant every night. It was. It was better than the last night. I couldn't believe that here. You know this best chef is like the Cleveland. You know, it's like it's not the, hey, be nice to. It's not the topless city and it has these amazing restaurants. I mean, so I'm sure you've seen since the time you were growing up to now that is rarely cuisine is kind of it's kind of picked up with the times. Yeah, no, no. Now is ready. Cuisine is having a moment or even an hour or maybe a year, and it's big over the world. And actually the food of Lucien in Israel started round the eighties. And now you know, we're on top of things is really cuisine is being admired all over the world and rightly so it's really cool. It's really nice. It's really creative and color full and it's the right cuisine for the moment, it's wonderful. It's it's really a privilege to be a foodie in Israel in b.'s times, even in America we're seeing, you know, James beard award is going to Israel restaurants, Isreaeli chefs the Huw Ryan is have and sell them. And Shaya restaurant, newer last year, I think one best new restaurant. So there's ever I read every day. There's a new one in Portland that just opened up all over. There's Isreaeli. You're right. It is having a moment. I is there also, do you think it may be? It's like a health thing. People look at home and they look at it as as a healthier alternative to fast food. It's a combination of things. First of all, it's it's healthy and it's based on fresh produce and on vegetables and fruits and. And it's lovely. Secondly, it's no nowhere wilder sharper version of either Californian or Mediterranean cuisine. So after we've done these, we want to go to the next age and the next age would be eastern with it's rainy and which Isreaeli which is, you know, with more sunshine, boulder tastes more creative and and I think that it really catches people and also without being too cynical, it's the right cuisine for the moment because it's colors fit Instagram. So it may be. It may sound funny, but look at what happens. You know, Brown food, no longer exists because Brown foods doesn't look good when you take photos of it. So if CHU Lin or chicken soup or stews, etc. They're gone. You need either bright red or bright yellow or bright orange food, and this is Israel food. So for Instagram, so it it rocks. Are there differences between her? What I'm sure there are differences. What are their differences between Israeli food in America and Isreaeli food in Israel? I would say that Israel foot in America is very good, but it's a milder version of what we have in Israel. It is inspired by all the waves of 'immigration that we have had during history and in recent history. So Russian food, if yo- paean food, French, food, etc. Etc, etc. So Israeli food would be very daring and very colorful, and just like Israel lease, it doesn't have rules or doesn't obey any rules. So very in your face and then America you may you, you wrap it in an American glitzy, you know, with stars and gold and whatever. And it's very, very, very good, but it's not as rough and wonderful as it is in Israel. Right, right. Shakshuka in America is not as good as shuck Shchukin and Israel. I remember. Well, I'm sure that it's different right now, but I remember when I was living in San Francisco. I really wanted to have a laugh and they would keep filarial after Friday would keep it in the fridge, which is appalling. So on Israel. So this is the difference? Yes. Do you have a favorite Israeli food or dish? My favorite is a emanate bread called Kabbani eleven first of all because I grew up on it. I'm half Yemenite and also because it's just it's such a wonderful rich and luscious bread. The night Provo goes back when Cabanas on the table. Other breads should kneel down and dry. So it's it's the most wonderful bread. So if there's only one dish that I'm going to take with mater remote, a remote island, it's going to coupon. So you've done a lot of you've had a very busy career. You've restaurant critics, criticism, writing, and TV shows where what's the next stage? Where do you hope to be in five or ten years from now? I really don't know. I know that I don't want to do too much television. I do. I love writing, but usually I write only when I get of low from the world only when I'm depressed. Then I, you know, retired to my den or to my cave, and I do ever is really mine, which is writing. But I must say that in recent years I haven't been depressed. So so I didn't right. As who knows. I love lecturing. I lecture really lecture like three or four times a week in in Israel, and and I travel abroad both for the Israeli foreign office. And for just, you know, universities or promoting my books and and lecture, lecture lecture about Israel in about myself about my books. I really enjoy it. So I'm sort of a lazy bum and I'm happy with it. And if it stays like that, I'm not going to complain when when you write you write in Hebrew or an English in

Israel Isreaeli America Ben Israel Martha Stewart Instagram Arthur Stewart Cleveland Jerusalem Tel Aviv Gill Hovav Ron Portland James beard award Olding Bishop CHU Lin Brown Yemenite
"gil hovav" Discussed on Our Friend From Israel

Our Friend From Israel

09:28 min | 3 years ago

"gil hovav" Discussed on Our Friend From Israel

"Times. When we return Gill talks about Abraham Lincoln's second inaugural dinner. Making food for everybody. And and shortly thereafter it became a huge food fight. And if you read the newspapers of the year, they say that is the biggest biggest biggest shameful event that has ever occurred on earth of the United States. That story and much more after the break. If you're joining this interview with celebrity, chef Gill Hovav you'll also want to check out our recent episode with Sarah Berkowitz. She's a home-cooked who has produced more than four hundred recipes for our website. Now, I had an interest in psychology since I was very little. I love the idea of nurturing people and helping them fix their problems. And I've really discovered the food has a way of doing that. The act of eating in the cooking for someone is very intimate and I find that it creates a strong bond. It's the kind of gift when you give someone homemade food or when you cook them meal for someone really strengthens your bond. It's more than just food check out that previous episode at our friend from Israel dot com. And while you're there, sign up for our Isreaeli kitchen newsletter to receive SARS recipes directly in your Email. And now back to today's interview with the one, the only Gail Hovav. So you're a chef, but, but it's also sounds like you're advocating for for home cooks as well. Actually, I'm not a chef. I never studied cookery. I never worked in a restaurant. People always call me a shift because I was a television shift, but you know, being television Schiff is always about lying because everything is prepared backstage and you just have to toss it together and say, all right, so simply so Saint plan faking orgasm, and then you're good. No, I've been working as a restaurant critic for thirty years now. I've been doing a lot of food television until I shied away from it about. I would say seven or eight years ago because who television is huge in Israel, and I think that there's enough of it without me as well, but they did many series. One was called captain cook and it was about the best restaurants in the world. So for two seasons, I was traveling the world only through three Michelin starred restaurant, and another one was called meals that made history. It was about history, but it also wondered what were people eating when history occurred. So we went to all kinds of countries and you know, we re maids very important meals in the history of of of these countries. So for instance, in the US we ha- we went to Washington and the second inauguration of Lincoln that of course, was. Was held in Washington in what's today's miss? Sonia and museum turned into a huge food fight your enter. You could enter the ceremony. You had to pay ten dollars, and that gave you a ticket for one men and two women base is very politically correct. Isn't it? They making food for everybody. And and shortly thereafter it became a huge food fight. And if you read the newspapers of the year, they say that this is the biggest biggest biggest shameful event that has ever occurred on the earth of the United States. So there and I was dancing the drill with a very lovely lady and they, you know, I was hitting Lincoln food. It's Atra was lovely, and we did it all over the world. And then I decided that I've had enough of foot on television in our doing other stuff until a vision, but not foot anymore. What kind of Snuffy doing? Well, I did shows about history. I did a show that was called food for thought. It was about interviews with a noble prize, laureates all over the world. And now I'm doing shows about a very light show of tours to tourist destinations. You know, just traveling the world and having fun because someone has to do it somebody you're gonna. Yes, and I've tear. So going back, you talked about the show you did where he visited these highly rated restaurants around the world is on particular restaurant that stood out in your memory is something that's, you know, it's really strange because from the I think that it was to season so it must have been twenty four chapters or twenty six episodes. First of all, the tourist rents that I love the most or the only restaurants with lady shifts and not men as shifts both in Italy for some reason. And we have been to elderly at the time l. Belay was the most of warded restaurant in the world it. It was in Spain in rosettes nearby Celona and for ten years in a row, it was chosen as the best restaurant in the world. It belonged to brothers faron and Albert address, and it was a super, super, super impressive restaurant. Unfortunately, they believed in molecular cuisine, which is really a, you know, it was. It's a fad that thank got goodness is is is no longer in the world. But now when we look back at it was so embarrassing. I small amount of food on a plate like a tiny amount of food, his this small amount of food we can live with. But this is where you had smoke coming out from the played. Everything was very chemical and you know, they could do in the procedure that lasted for two weeks. They could produce something that looked like an olive tasted like an olive had the color of an olive and the texture of an olive, but it wasn't an olive, an Icee, what's wrong with olive. I mean, you can have. So it almost looked like a magic trick. It is a magic trick, but who needs it for God's sake. So I must say that they were lovely, the brothers, of course, but the restaurant, I didn't like it at all. So as you said, thirty years, you've been a restaurant critic, yes, you must have what? What's your biggest pet peeve that restaurants have something that you dislike that a lot of time. They. Tons of stuff. I think that the thing that I dislike most is something that you Americans are to blame for. It's the way it towels that that they keep giving you at the end of dinner. Americans have dreadful dreadful, gel that you keep using to rob your hands all the time to clear Hanson is there purell and these wit towels that you really like what's wrong with you guys. Everybody touches the world. It's okay. You don't need to wash after you touch the world about, you know, everybody learns from America. So in Israel as well by the end of the inner lunch, once you're done with foot, the waiter comes to you and serves you this these towels. And one day I was in a very nice restaurant in Tel Aviv, and this waiter comes to with towel, and I look at him and tell him, what do you want from me? I clean. I look at me. I've been using cutlery. I didn't touch my food. What do I need this towel for and being the Israeli that it was looked at me and he said, do you really want to know where cutlery was before? You touched it? And I said, no, no, no. Okay. So this is something that I really remember from from restaurants, but but you know, I've had any kind of adventure. You can dream of in restaurants. I was having lunch restaurant and it caught fire and I was thrown out from restaurants where the shifts didn't like the review that I gave them, although, you know, always, right, politely cetera. And. You name it. I've done everything twice already. And you you were in, you were for a few years. You were a reporter in the US for an Israeli newspaper. Is that right? Yes. For a bunch of Israel and newspapers, I was the west coast correspondent of the Shokhin group in Israel. This is a very long term for a very short job. I was living in Francisco because my partner was doing his post oak in Stanford. So we lived there for three and a half years, and I was based in San Francisco, but I was mostly covering. Fill in Los Angeles. So was there a kind of a culture shock or was it kind of a fish out of water being in Israel reporter in the United States? Not at all. I, the mired, the United States, and I loved San Francisco, and it was so it was such a learning experience. You know, there's, you know, there's a lot to learn from from America and from American politics, and for American culture and food was great, and people were lovely, and we really loved it.

Israel United States Abraham Lincoln Gill Hovav America San Francisco Michelin Washington captain cook Sarah Berkowitz reporter Los Angeles Francisco Tel Aviv Isreaeli Schiff Spain Sonia Belay Albert
"gil hovav" Discussed on Our Friend From Israel

Our Friend From Israel

05:14 min | 3 years ago

"gil hovav" Discussed on Our Friend From Israel

"Later. Every journey of one thousand miles begins with one single step. So there. Gotcha. So growing up was food. You know now now now you're you're known for for your cooking and for your for your expertise and food. Was that something that was important to you growing up? Actually, no. I grew up in a family that was a bit different. So as you know, Israel was established as a socialist country and up until I would say the late seventies, it was almost impolite to to enjoy food. It was, you know it was too as well. But since my family's very capitalistic and both my parents were career people, it's Atra. We did dine out quite loft like twice or three times a week which was unheard of in Israel. And you know, looking back at the restaurants, we had in Jerusalem at the time we went to the best restaurants, you know, we were dining with the prime minister and with the biggest professors, etc. These restaurants were so so. Basing can naive and food at home was the same. We lived with my well, you know, my grandmother lived with us, but as as it was put to us will lived with her. And although we always had two maids, she was in charge of the kitchen. She cooked, but she cooked very, very, very simple food. We used to call it jail for, you know, very simple dishes. We loved it like like okra and rice or a bean soup for, you know, for the whole day, we had chicken once a week divided to five quarters. We were five people. So we had five quarters of chicken and that's it. And we, we were well to do, but this was Israel of the sixties. Everything was very modest and so food on one hand was always, it meant love and it meant fun and it meant home and it meant togetherness. But foot was. Very, very, very basic. So I cannot say that I grew up on, you know, big tables or anything like that, nor did I ever get recipes from my grandmother's because you know, insofar the families, men in the kitchen, bring only two things dirt and bed luck. So she never let me into the kitchen and she never gave away any over recipes and it's all it's all a labor of love that I've started after she passed away when I was twenty years old trying to recreate her flavors. So all my, my cookbooks are of very simple and basic Israeli dishes, and actually they deal with love and with nothing else. Your grandmother plays an important role. You referred to her as Moumouh. Yes, that is the, that's our nickname. So she was a big influence on you? It seems she was a very special lady. Of course, she she, she left the. Super-rich home in which grew up in with nothing. Nothing at all emission gave away our dowry. She refused to get a dowry and she became totally poor. And the only thing she had was empty hands and the full heart and the and wisdom. She was very clever educated woman. She she, she new languages and and she, you know, she was from she was from a different in ration-. She knew what was right and what was wrong. She did not have questions she had answers, and this is something that I really loved as a kid. And this is something that they're really long for as a grownup as as you know, we all are bit mixed up. We'll arbit- wandering or not too sure of ourselves. And now in that generation, they knew they knew what was right and what was wrong, what was cultured with high culture and low culture at cetera. And I really miss. That. So the book is books are about that too, kind of a return to basics? Yes. You mentioned love and food are intricately related and intertwined. I was. I was talking to another chef recently and she was telling me that the act of cooking for others, you know is just like the, it's just such a good way to show your love for for someone by cooking the meal by bringing a meal to a neighbor's house. Once you quote for someone, they really appreciate it. And it's a way to give a piece of your heart to person, and I really strongly believe in it. Yeah. Yeah. It's a piece of you when you serve it to somebody? Yes, yes. It really is. It shows you know that you didn't buy something. You didn't commission someone to do something. You just did it yourself. You're touched it. It has the warmth of your often off your heart attached your hands. And it's important, especially in these times.

Israel prime minister Jerusalem Moumouh five quarters twenty years one hand
"gil hovav" Discussed on Our Friend From Israel

Our Friend From Israel

07:54 min | 3 years ago

"gil hovav" Discussed on Our Friend From Israel

"On this episode of our friend from Israel, we are cooking Isreaeli style. Let me tell you I joining us is Gil Hovav who is pretty much Israel's celebrity chef TV, personality, author of cookbooks, and the list goes on and on. If you've been to Israel in the past few years, you already know Gil Hovav that's his voice over the loudspeaker, welcoming you to Ben Gurion international airport and wishing you a pleasant stay. It's no surprise considering gills great grandfather is credited with reviving the modern Hebrew language writing. One of the first ever Hebrew dictionaries Gill. Hovav is a leading and airy journalists in Israel, a restaurant critic and the author of several bestselling books. His latest book called candies from heaven is a memoir about what food and family recipes meant to him as a boy growing up in Israel, his dark and witty essays about family are likely with David sedaris would sound like if he was from Israel often dubbed Israel's first foodie Gill Hove's outsized personality has made him a staple on TV. He was involved in creating producing and presenting some of Israel's most viewed and. Beloved television food shows. He travels the world giving lectures about Israeli cuisine in the US Europe and Asia. During her only visit to Israel in the fifties. I believe Marilyn Monroe was served chicken soup with motto bows for three times a day at the end of which she asked, isn't there another organ of the motto? That one can. And that made me understand that Israeli food is misunderstood all around the world. On today's episode, we catch up with Gil Hovav from his home in Tel Aviv to discuss his career. Why Isreaeli cuisine is the perfect food to photograph on Instagram. The craziest experience he's had at a restaurant and one of the biggest food fights in American history. Stay tuned. Welcome to our friend from Israel. A podcast brought you by from the grapevine dot com. I'm your host been Yaman Cohen and each week we'll have a conversation with an intriguing Isreaeli. They'll come from all walks of life, actors, artists, athletes, academics, archaeologists and other newsmakers. On today's episode, we chat with chef and author Gill Hovav. Hello, everybody and welcome to today's show. We are joined by the one and only Gill Hovav from Tel-Aviv. How are you? I'm wonderful. How are you? Great. Thank you so much for joining us today. This is a pleasure that's a treat a real treat. Now you are the author of a bunch of books. They're the latest one is called candies from heaven, which if I'm correct, is the third in a trilogy of memoirs about growing up in Israel? Yeah, actually, it's the second in a trilogy cold, the Jerusalem trilogy. It's about my childhood and about growing up in Jerusalem of the sixties and seventies and about all of my family. Even generations before me right now, you have something very special and unique about your your ancestors in Israel. Can you tell us about that? So I'm the great grandson. So that's. Fourth generation of Elliot's, oh, Ben Yehuda the reviver of Hebrew. So as you may or may not know, Hebrew was totally dead for two thousand years. It was just like Latin today and about one hundred years ago a bit a bit more to revive the language so that all the pioneers and immigrants in Israel would have a combine which and it's because of him that we are born in Hebrew in Israel will live in Hebrew, we die in. Hebrew were smart in Hebrew was stupid in Hebrew, and it's a great achievement. Of course, when you say, kind of like reinvented, the language is that it's more than just saying, you know, give put, you know, obviously words like the internet or television obviously was not in Alden. Ancient Hebrew, those words had to be invented later on. But what I'm sure you mean more than just that, right? Yeah, mainly, you know, he was. Not the only one who revived or invented words or modern words, but he was he's greatest Shipman except for riding the big Hebrew dictionary, which is huge is that his family, our family was the first family to speak Hebrew at home. So Hebrew people, some people knew he brew from prayer from books from you know, from the bible, but nobody spoke Hebrew and actually his son. My grandfather is considered as the first Hebrew child, and he was the first child to have been brought in brought up in Hebrew only in Hebrew and the greatest achievement. Of course. And then going going just one generation back your your, your parents were news, announcers, radio announcers, if I thought it was my mom was his his, his boss, both home and the tour. We're both radio people, and later on my father became the the head of the Israel iw radio, and but they were both a, yeah, journalists and very involved in Israeli culture and in Israel, the media etre. Yes. So going back to candy's from having so what? What can a reader expect to discover and learn about you when they read the book? Well, first of all, I hope at least that it's, it's just a bunch of funny stories about a very, very, very disturbed family in Jerusalem of the sixties and seventies now, Jerusalem that I grew. Yup. In no longer exists when I was growing up in Jerusalem, it was totally different. It was secluded. It was, you know, at the edge of Israel, it was on the border with Jordan. It was split. And on the other hand, it had the biggest university in Israel and the parliament and the radio and was very cultured, and very open than very friendly and very naive in a sense. And the book is all about that. It's about growing up and knowing that your family would always take care of you. And this is something that really cherish and the something that I really long for and I wrote three books about it. So this is the second one, and it's been recently translated into English? Yes, it's vailable an Amazon and actually right now it's being translated to Chinese as well. Oh, wow. Yes, big fan base in Asia. Well. Yeah, I hope I would have a big fan base. So far new matrix later.

Israel Gill Hovav Jerusalem Gill Tel Aviv Asia Ben Gurion Gill Hove Marilyn Monroe David sedaris Isreaeli US Ben Yehuda Yaman Cohen Amazon Europe Alden Shipman Elliot parliament