35 Burst results for "Gigi"

Amazon Alexa Gets New Voices, Including Actors Melissa McCarthy and Samuel L. Jackson

Talking Tech

01:56 min | 3 months ago

Amazon Alexa Gets New Voices, Including Actors Melissa McCarthy and Samuel L. Jackson

"This month. Alexa is going to sound a little bit. Different on july fifteenth the tech giant rolled out an update to its digital voice assistant to include a second voice option. As you know amazon's assistant typically has like a feminine sounding voice with this update. You can change that to a more masculine voice setting this all up his quite simple. You just say the assistant's name followed by quote. Change your voice and quote but that's not all there's an additional wake word you can use in place of alexa. That new word is ziggy Basically it works the same way instead of saying the primary name of amazon's digital assistant You can say ziggy instead. If you're a fan of gigi and you've never tried to swap out the wake word and you kind of want to try it out. Anyway you have some other choices to You can use amazon. You can use echo or you can use computer And the way to do this is really simple. Just like with the change. Your voice option. You can make a query to the assistant and say change the wake word to whatever you want Another way to do this too is open up the app for the voice assistant go to the menu. Select your settings than device settings. Then you go to the device that you want to update with this new wake word and then you choose the when you want and that's it now if you don't want either of these options for voices you can actually add a little bit of celebrity flare After introducing an option awhile. Back to add actor. Samuel jackson's voice to queries amazon is much similar offerings featuring actress melissa mccarthy an nba legend shaquille. O'neal so the way it works is you kind of ask them directly as you would amazon's digital assistance. You might say hey shack. Tell me about the weather. Hey samuel Tell me about the news today. And it works exactly the same way and they will read everything in

Amazon Ziggy Alexa Gigi Samuel Jackson Melissa Mccarthy Shaquille Neal NBA Samuel
Tesla Shares Realistic Update on Semi Rollout

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

01:27 min | 3 months ago

Tesla Shares Realistic Update on Semi Rollout

"All right so. Let's take a look at this tesla semi report. This is from electric this morning. Headline reads tesla semi truck is finally about to go into production just for a couple items of context here. The last official communication we got from tesla on the semi was in q. Earnings report back in late. April tesla said that tesla semi deliveries will also begin in twenty twenty one. So that's the last. We've heard from tesla but electric also reported in march that tussle was building a production line for the semi at gigi. Nevada intending to produce about five semis per week by the end of the year. Now tesla hasn't officially disclosed where they are going to produce the semi in volume at on their latest annual capacity update and the earnings report. Also they said that the semi location is still tvd but the prevailing thought seems to be that it will start at giga nevada with this early stage production the learn from that and then eventually make the semi in texas anyway back to the electric report. The new information here is that quote now sources familiar with the matter. Total electric that the drive axle production line is ready and the general assembly line is going through. Its final debugging before starting production and quote so. That's a nice update to here on continued progress for the semi in terms of timeline information. I'm not sure that gives us a whole lot that we didn't already know. I think that probably still just puts them on track for a few deliveries this year. So at expect when we get the cue to shareholder letter on monday. It'll probably just maintain that same line of tesla deliveries expected to begin this year. And that's probably all the information that we're going to get although maybe they'll talk about it on the earnings call.

Tesla Gigi Nevada General Assembly Texas
A New Kind of Tournament Platform with Trey Christensen

Esports Network Podcast

02:58 min | 4 months ago

A New Kind of Tournament Platform with Trey Christensen

"Welcome in trade Christensen, the VP of growth Faith or First Blood. How you doing tray? Very good, appreciate. Appreciate you having me for today. Kevin, I appreciate it. Now, this is your second time on on the show. First time was with the Mitch over a year ago. So yep. Yeah, you know, what's going on. So in case you guys missed that that his previous outing with us, she's a former Halo Pro Gamer. I like I said, currently VPN for a growth that first Blood you were also, if you are still part of the Air Force National Guard CRVs, Gigi your formerly director of Esports and later director of digital Communications for Dallas, the Dallas Mavericks, I guess they're gaming. Then the team itself, which is awesome. And so, I mean, you've been through the ringer on on quite a lot of of things here. So you go from Pro Gamer, to working with the Mavericks to kind of forming their own way through the business of Esports. And I just got to say, Applause all around, not many people can make that that kind of transition know, I appreciate it. I think that it was, I'll say that some of it was an accident, some of it was just need a shipping but overall it's been, you know, a very been very fortunate, very excited to, you know, move on to the next project and see what I can make happen, but it's been an adventure. Definitely wage Uh, to take a career in gaming, essentially After High School. Just instead of going straight to college like everyone else did, I went straight into gaming and I was just all about it and sort of led me here, so that's cool. So I'm glad you bring up something first. I really want to, I want to go over just your former career. I guess, as your past life, as a Halo Pro, I mean, you can pay for about four or five years on the page, the circuit. And then you you I imagined there were some, some important lessons you learned as a player that kind of helped you later on. As you kind of went as more, you know, managerial corporate business. He type of Esports a personality. So, what kind of lessons did you learn? As a player know, I think the biggest lesson is networking. So when I was competing I was, I was off hyper focused on, you know, just rivalries competition in general. And at that point, you know, I'm like eighteen, nineteen, twenty. I'm I came into it a little bit later than everybody else. Then I was competing against, but the networking side was something that I had to pick up gradually. I didn't just have it. So I went into it and I treated every rival as if they were like my Fierce enemy. And I, you know, it was like the only people that I hung out with and talked to were the people that I was teeming with and trying to make a career with. And it took me a while to start to understand that, you know, if she is on my side and the more connections and friendships that I cater to, the more people I had the opportunity to team with the more people that ended up staying in the industry and working in the industry. And so by the end of my career change, you know, just gaming and Halo. I was able to make a lot of friendships that I now, even utilized

Air Force National Guard Christensen Digital Communications Dallas Mavericks Gigi Mitch Mavericks Kevin Dallas
Lucy Hale and 'Riverdale' Actor Skeet Ulrich Fuel Dating Rumors

Kinda Cute Podcast

02:06 min | 8 months ago

Lucy Hale and 'Riverdale' Actor Skeet Ulrich Fuel Dating Rumors

"I up we have to talk about the most unholy not q. Couple of our current time. I had all i have written in my notes is ski and lucy hale. I even have hail spelled. Wrong and kinsey is sitting by me and she sees that top note and she's like ski. All reckon lucy hale are dating. She's like he's not that cute. I mean she starts going off facile and she goes. He's in his fifties. He's she so much younger than him like he just date someone his age i mean and he's not even that cute and then like back in the early nineties when he was on things i mean he played really disgusting characters and i was like you know what can save for the podcast because agreed agreed. Agreed literally you spoke. Exactly what i was gonna say. Ski is fifty one lucius thirty one. We got a nice round twenty year. Difference different yes. That's actually i'm thirty. Two and my mom is fifty two. Which i mean my mom is like bomb like i love my mom. Yeah i mean. It's a little for gigi. I'm i don't like it and i saw this comet being like oh my god katy keene and f p joe which is just a larry's because i don't think anyone actually watched katy keene. Katy keene is in the riverdale universe and lucy hale plays katy keene and then ski. Orrick plays f jones. Which is jug had. Jones head in the riverdale series. Though sorry dad that i was thinking bug head you know so he. I don't know it's very you know. Enter enter cosmic riverdale relationship. And you probably might know. Lucy hill better as being aria and pretty little liars and ski. Alrich was in a lot of lake early nineties. He was in scream. I would say most of. kind of like his most famous role from back. Then and spoiler alert. He plays the serial killer in that. So that's why i do. Like his roles even

Lucy Hale Katy Keene Kinsey Gigi Orrick Lucy Hill Larry JOE Alrich Jones
Saving Sea Level Records: What Historical Records Tell Us About The Rising Ocean

Short Wave

09:56 min | 9 months ago

Saving Sea Level Records: What Historical Records Tell Us About The Rising Ocean

"So lauren you sent me a picture of one of these century old title logbooks and it's so cool. It's really detailed. You can see where it says one. Am someone's written thirteen feet one fifteen. Am fourteen feet one inch in this. Really lovely old penmanship tracking tied. Did people really do this. Twenty four hours a day every day of the year they did. They had technology. That actually made it easier though In the late eighteen hundreds they developed an automatic system which had this float that rested on the surface of the water and then fed information to kind of a pen that recorded the movement so then people just had to read off the values and put them into the ledgers and this was done in other places to lake near hillary island. The port of liverpool also has a really long running title record. That makes sense because this was the era of ships rights. Watercraft was the way that people and things got around. Yeah exactly you had a lot of ships going in and out of port and so they were shipping companies. That had to keep track of the tide so it can be done safely two day. Some of those old records are archived at the permanent service for mean sea level which is an organization in the uk that gathers ocean data worldwide Andy matthews a data scientists. There told me the data are pretty reliable. You know most of the time. Those woman over on point is a little hand square school saying they. They sweet because the Tyja for was sick. You get little insights now with him. Everybody needs a sick day right. Of course andy says they're trying to organize a bigger effort to find these records. Because you know since kind of obscure they're hard to find yet but it can be anywhere these kind of things now in libraries from people that we all kaisei done coin. Doug well they are. Yeah this is quite the quest and an even bigger issue. I imagine is that when they find them. The data is still stuck on those pages. Yeah his colleagues scanned about sixteen thousand pages. But the numbers are on the page and they haven't been digitized so they're really not usable by scientists. They're trying to use computers to do it through character recognition. But i mean you saw that writing right. It's kind of like the script and the formats can be really hard to decipher so india's hoping that the public will help he recently put the images on zoom verse. A website and so volunteers can kind of in and and read the numbers. Type them up. I love this approach. I mean we're all bored at home looking for something to do this pandemic so why. Not some historical data as tree right. Yeah i mean data entry for a greater good seriously but to get into the nitty gritty of it. Why exactly is an important to look at data from the eighteen. Hundreds to understand sea level rise today an into the future right. What does that matter. Yeah right. I mean it has to do with how complex sea-level rise is because it's been caused by a number of different things. I mean i. You got glacier's melting temperatures causes them to shrink and that water runs off into the ocean and the same thing is happening in greenland and antarctica. Where there are these massive ice sheets on the land and there's so much is melting in gigi tons tapping increasingly fast. And i know that oceans are also rising because the water itself is warming up and hotter things expand so the water slick taking up more space. Yep you got it and actually. This is kind of cool. Sea level rise did slow down in the nineteen sixties and seventies because that was the era of dam building around the world. When you know when these big reservoirs were being constructed. They held back so much water. It was actually measurable. Ooh that is so strange and it really shows how we humans do impact the oceans. That's like a tangible detail of how quickly we can do that. It's a huge scale. But it's not really a factor anymore because you know dams aren't really being built at the same rate these days got it. Yeah anyway since one thousand nine hundred there's been about eight inches of sea level rise and by the end of this century. We couldn't be looking at three to six feet of sea level rise or even higher depending on how much carbon humans emits but. that's globally. The water is rising at a different pace depending on where you are. Yeah how exactly does that work. Because wouldn't the phil evenly kind of like when you fill a bathtub. And here's where it gets a little weird. The earth is slowly changing slowly getting a different shape lake. You know when you've been sitting on the couch while and you kind of get up and the cushion rebounds like morphs back into its old shape. Yeah not all couches but sure theoretically Well okay that same thing happens to the earth's crust During the last ice age Kind of started waning. Eleven thousand years ago. There was a lot of ice on canada and greenland super heavy and was pushing down the earth's crust since that melted the crust has been slowly rebounding. And that's actually not good for the east coast especially around the mid atlantic region. Because you know it's on the same tectonic plates as canada and greenland and when one side goes up. The other side goes down So what you're saying is where i live on. The east coast is on the lower end of the see-saw basically your thinking about that slowly. I mean the east coast is seen more sea level rise than other parts of the country. And then there's a whole bunch of other things that can cause that to you. Know ocean currencies big things that span hundreds of miles in the ocean. They cost the water on one side of them to be higher on the other side. You know so. Because of currents and gravity the oceans themselves are just kind of lumpy which is why sea level rises different everywhere. I am learning so much right now. You're basically saying is that sea level rise is local essentially and if cities want a plan for this and figure out what an who is at risk they'll need tailor-made information for their location. Yeah that's where these historical records come in. You know they reveal what these geologic processes and ocean conditions are doing in each place right right and i signed us refine their computer models. Which are those high powered ways that we get forecast about climate change. I spoke to scientists. Tomas friedrich's at nasa's jet propulsion laboratory about this and he said local records really matter. If we don't have that information for these see to be like a few feet off the local records of sea level so especially when we try to projects like high water levels of like extremes sea levels that's how we call them It's very difficult to to get an accurate picture of that but there is a big issue with a historical records. They already have almost all of the ones that have been digitized. Come from europe and north america So what you're saying is we gotta find more places. More hillary islands so to speak with historical sea level data all around the world. Yeah and this is a problem across many kinds of climate data. actually the southern hemisphere hasn't been covered as well with things like whether stations and other kind of data collection historically So there's just this big effort to find these historical records outside of europe and the us in argentina. They're working to digitize records from nineteen o five that were taken at the port of raise But to go back farther in some countries it means looking at the records of former colonial powers that took control because when countries like the uk and germany and france extracted. Huge amount of resources from colonies often through force. They did it largely through shipping colonialism stealing and keeping a record of it yeah pretty much so right now in france the national hydrographic service is digitizing these title records from dozens of their former colonies from madagascar vietnam Some of those records though aren't as long running you know they were gathered. As part of geographic mapping or you know to study an area where they were putting in port project. But i spoke to one person who is working with the french to stitch together a longer running record dating back through his country's colonial history marbella unika for seafood unique is from cameroon and he's a phd student in france right. Now he started in german archives. Because that was the colonial power in the late. Eighteen hundreds until france took control so he's gathered the french records as well and then he the cameroon records after it became independent in nineteen sixty. Yeah that's really interesting. Project and just a clear example of how the legacy of colonialism continues to impact science today. Yeah yeah i mean. It's digging through. His legacy is how he's kind of finding these records And there's really only one other long-term record in africa and that's from the car senegal so he knows cameroon could be crucial for improving global climate models But it could also be really helpful for cameroon itself. Nieto's just told me that. The country's largest city douala right on the atlantic coast and estuary and it's extremely vulnerable to flooding already. I'm just last year. There was a huge flood that displays thousands after really heavy rains. So when you add sea level rise to that it just makes the flooding issue worse. So he's hopeful that the historical records he's finding will lead to more detailed forecasts about just how fast the ocean is rising there because twala like other cities needs to start preparing now communities need to decide whether to move out of the way or build some kind of protection and

Hillary Island Permanent Service For Mean Sea Andy Matthews Greenland East Coast Lauren Liverpool Tomas Friedrich Doug Antarctica Andy UK Mid Atlantic Canada India
Gigi in Wonderland - Vogue's March Issue Cover Story

Vogue Podcast

09:26 min | 9 months ago

Gigi in Wonderland - Vogue's March Issue Cover Story

"She's perfected the art of living in the spotlight. But motherhood has opened digi hadeed up to a new world and a new set of priorities. I'm khloe mao evoked contributing editor. And this is g. G in wonderland knew that i have that animal in me says gee hadeed relaxed. In bright. from december cold the twenty five year old model is astrid colored quarterhorse named dallas. And telling me about the birth of her baby in september here at her home in bucks county pennsylvania following a fourteen and a half hour labor at her side. Were her partner zane. Malik her mother yulong to her sister. Bella and a local midwife and her assistant when you see someone do that you look at them a bit differently. I probably looked crazy actually. She says a giggle tinged with pride. I was an animal woman. Mallet cut the baby. Click that she was out says gee gee gazing forward through dallas alert ears as we plod through the upper fields of harmony hollow. The farm owned by longest boyfriend. Joseph goalie a construction firm ceo. I was so exhausted. And i looked up. He's holding her. It was so cute. She's in a cropped long as puffer stretch. Czar jeans and warned black riding boots and looks like neither a harried mother of a ten week old nor paparazzi ducking supermodel with her hair roped into a smooth bun bear face and tiny gold hoop earrings. She resembles mostly her teenage self. An equestrian who showed jumped competitively while growing up in her hometown of santa barbara. California what i really wanted for my experience was to feel like okay. This is a natural thing that women are meant to do. She planned to deliver it a new york city hospital but then the realities of covert hit particularly sequestering here ninety minutes from manhattan and the limits on numbers in the delivery room which would preclude yolanda and bella from being present. Then she and malik watched the two thousand eight documentary the business of being born which is critical of medical interventions and depicts a successful home birth. We both looked at each other. And we're like. I think that's the call. Gd says they placed a blow up bath in their bedroom and sent their three cats and border collie away when the midwife expressed concern that the sphinx and maine coon felines might puncture the tub with their claws. Malik ask gee-gee what music she wanted to hear and she surprised him by requesting the audio of favourite children's novel the indian in the cupboard. He downloaded the film because it was one of his favorites too and they spent the early hours of labor watching it together. That's something we'd never talked about. But in that moment we discovered we both loved. Gd says bash family. She then tells me that malik. The former one direction star turned solo artist. Who has famously press shy and declined to be interviewed for. This article likened his own experience of her birth to align documentary. he'd seen in which a male lion paces nervously outside the cave. The lion s delivers her cubs z. Was like that's how i felt you feel so helpless to see the person you love in pain. Doom dula malibu high classmate carson. Meyer had prepared her for the moment where the mother feels. She can't go any longer without drugs. I had to dig deep. Jichi says i knew it was going to be the craziest pain in my life. But you have to surrender to it and be like this is what it is. I loved that you'll monda and the midwife coach through the pain there definitely was a point where i was like. I wonder what it would be. Like with an epa darryl how it would be different jichi frankly. My midwife looked at me and was like you're doing it. No one can help you your past the point of the epidermal anyway. So you'd be pushing exactly the same way in a hospital bed so she kept pushing. I know my mom zane. Bella were proud of me but at certain points i saw each of them in terror says she ducking under a leafless branch. Dow also who've sucking in the muddy terrain afterward z and. I looked at each other. And we're like we can have some time before we do that again. The baby girl named kai digi revealed on instagram in january from the arabic for the chosen one was a weekly. She was so bright right away. Gd says adding that. The baby's heart rate stayed consistent throughout the labor. That's what i wanted for her. A peaceful bringing to the world. Kyw's world has so far remained small. Her mother rarely leaves the bucolic corner of horse country where the hadeed put down roots in two thousand seventeen. Malik bought a nearby farm. The shoot for this story. In early december at a studio in manhattan was the first time g g had left her daughter since birth yolanda took over caregiving duties even bringing her granddaughter along to feed the miniature. Ponies mama and mccoo. Gee-gee has no nanny no baby nurse. None of the traditional celebrity crutches of new motherhood during our interview the baby stayed with her father and zan's mother tricia who is visiting from england for a month to help she decided to completely take care of the baby alone says yolanda odd. And i think that bond is so important. The dutch former model turned real housewives of beverly hills. Alum was my welcoming party. When i arrived at the farm booming. Hello her arms wide on the threshold in. Camo print puffer and boots. I'm proud of her face on magazine but seeing her give birth was a whole other level of proud yolanda says you go from looking at her as a daughter to looking at her as a fellow mother. The natural transitions and generational shifts of new motherhood are at play in the household. It is a family happily influx on the sprawling. Thirty two acre property. The handful of cottages are designated for different siblings. But this summer. When g g moved out of her cottage into zan's house bella and brother anwar graduated to larger cottages leaving. The smallest is a guest house. We're still close by says she but we have our space to be our own little family. She hosted thanksgiving dinner for the first time this year with zero mother cooking the turkey g g. A prolific home-cooked herself made banana. Pi and baked yolanda favourite tatham. Bella occurred over stuffing and spiked apple. Cider in the kubota tv g g got her christmas tree early for the occasion dressing it with personal ornaments. That she and malik have exchanged over the years. The most recent being glass nintendo console a reference to a favor quarantine activity. I decorated fully. Without my mom's help. And i think i did her. Gd says they are tribe publicly known for their closeness yolanda the doting den. Mother gee-gee the fresh-faced protective older sister. Bella the edgier veronica deejays betty and aloof baby brother on war joining g g and yolanda in the kitchen for latinos and cinnamon rolls before a horseback ride eyewitness. These rules confirmed. Yolanda has the sink drinking a smoothie and finishing gee-gee sentences when she grasps for word g g threatens to have a connection if anwar eats her cinnamon roll when he ambles out of his cottage. But motherhood is a new phase and it will be up to g g to decide whether it belongs on the silhouettes of social media. I think she wants to be real. Online's as bella twenty four by phone from new york city but until her child wants to be in the spotlight and can make the decision herself. She doesn't want to put her in that position. Bela who splits her. Time between her. Soho loft and the farm and facetime with her niece and sister every morning says she already enjoys reading books. Aloud that jeeves to read to her including the rainbow fish and the very hungry caterpillar. It's pretty nostalgic. Bella says it could be argued that we are all hungry caterpillars this year cocooning and comforting with hope of emerging bright winged vaccinated g. G wants split her time between her condo and no-ho and the first class cabin of airplanes when lockdowns began she had just returned from walking fashion shows in four countries and discovering. She was pregnant on the other end of covid. She will emerge as a mother. Happily headquartered in rural pennsylvania. Still a supermodel. But one determined to lead more secluded less peripatetic life. I always want to be here fulltime. She tells me. I love the city but this is where i'm happiest furious. Speculation and countless think pieces have attended the question of what this time will mean. Will we slow down flee cities for less frenzied. More mindful life in many ways. Gee-gee the bodyman of such ideas. The sheiks glamorous version yes but also a person drawn to reassessment. It feels like now. I'm in a different place in my life. She says and she does seem genuinely at home

Yolanda Malik Khloe Mao Gee Hadeed Yulong Bella Joseph Goalie Zane Dallas Dula Malibu Jichi Monda Kai Digi Astrid Bucks County KYW Manhattan Mallet
Sabrina Carpenter Addresses Speculation That ‘Skin’ Is About Olivia Rodrigo

Comments By Celebs

02:32 min | 9 months ago

Sabrina Carpenter Addresses Speculation That ‘Skin’ Is About Olivia Rodrigo

"Last week. We had discussed the whole. Olivia rodrigue driver's license situation with sabrina. And joshua bassett excetera and since then. Sabrina actor released her own song called skin. Before i get into it. Let me just read you. The caption of her instagram. She posted tonight. Sabrina says thank you to everyone who has listened to skin especially those who have opened their minds to lyrically is trying to get across. I wasn't bothered by a few lines in a magnificent song and wrote a distraction. It i was at a tipping point in my life for countless reasons. So i was inspired to do what i usually do to cope right something that i wish i could have told myself in the past people can only get you if you give them the power to and a lot of people were trying to get to me. The song is in calling out one single person some addresses specific situation while other lines address. Plenty of other experiences. I've had this past year. It also shows that many things have actually gotten under my skin. And i'm still learning to knock have other people so much power over my feelings. I know a lot of you struggle with the same thing. I don't want this to become an endless cycle so please don't take this as an opportunity to send more hate anyone's loss of loved you all. Thanks for letting me grow anybody who listened to the song the main courses basically you can try to get under my skin while he's on mine so i mean listen if she's going to say that it wasn't a direct response fine but like. I really liked sabrina carpenter. I think they're both really talented. I just it was so clearly response. In my opinion the only reason it wasn't a response is because the original song had nothing to do with her. That right so confused. Yeah that's what i think. People were so confused about because of your song was really about her relationship with joshua and what went down there with the one line that mentioned sabrina. Basically saying like you're probably with that blonde girl who always made me doubt she so much older than me. she's everything i'm insecure about. That was it. Whereas sabrina song i think at least when you listen to it the first time felt like was directly about her directly addressing. Olivia song so. I don't know i. I really like them both. I was so confused when i first heard it because it felt so misplaced to me. It was like wait a second. Like if i'm being honest nothing as women you ever want other women to be insecure. But let's just cut the bullshit for a second is the guy you're dating has ex girlfriend and that ex-girlfriend publicly says that you make her insecure not that you want that prefers second that's kind of the best compliment you could ever get like. It was so confusing me. There were all these names of like olivia. Rigo call sabrina. Carpenter gorgeous says rita carpenter releases a distract. You

Olivia Rodrigue Joshua Bassett Excetera Sabrina Sabrina Carpenter Olivia Song Joshua Rigo Carpenter Gorgeous Olivia Rita Carpenter
Gigi Hadid Reveals New Daughter's Name on Instagram Bio

Valentine In The Morning

01:02 min | 9 months ago

Gigi Hadid Reveals New Daughter's Name on Instagram Bio

"And and singers singers and and Malik Malik are are very very private private about about their their relationship. relationship. They're They're also also very very private private about about their their new new daughter, daughter, who's four months old and G finally revealed. The name of the baby girl shouldn't make it announcement. She just changed her bio on Instagram and it now, says Kai's mom, It's spelled K H a. I For your daughter is named Kai. Weren't they correct me if I'm wrong? They broke up for a little bit right? They did, And then they got back to this. When I met them. I met up at the airport, right? Right. DD dd and saying they're together time Really nice. She was really, really nice. He was very nice, but she was like, overtly nice. I love hearing. You know where she was going out of her way to be nice to colonize something. He was very polite. I couldn't say anything bad about him. But you know when somebody goes out of their way to be nice to a kid and Colin, get a picture of them is really cool. And I was happy. I remember that I have the picture in my head of Zane and Colin and Jane is making like a goofy face. Yes, It's very nice to me. He exudes, like, almost like too cool all the time. But the fact that he got goofy with your son that made me like him even more. Yeah, I didn't get a picture of that

Malik Malik KAI Colin Zane Jane
Is Jimmy Garoppolo Proving To Be a Disappointing Player?

Patriots Beat

01:10 min | 10 months ago

Is Jimmy Garoppolo Proving To Be a Disappointing Player?

"The next quarterback. I wanted to ask you about is one that I it pains me to ask you about them because there's so many reasons why Jimmy Garoppolo has not turned off to be aware that any of us want. He was going to be or wanted him to be if you're a fan of his yeah same time. You know, how much Bill loves him the night or said? Well, we know almost he'd loved loved loved. That's we know what we don't know. He loves him loves his past tense. We don't know she loves them now. That's fair. That's the thing people keep on saying that bill loves Gigi that's based on his actions from several years ago. We don't know he loves Jimmy Dean now. I am of the opinion that I don't know how built who's who keeps on saying availability is an ability can love Jimmy G. It's a great point and I think that the the other point that I wanted to ask you about obviously capitalised was home. At twenty-five million this until we won in twenty-five million in 2022. And I think that it gets confusing for people when you're acquiring the contract via trade how exactly that carries over on Thursday. Next teams

Patriots Jimmy G. Jimmy Niners Jimmy Garoppolo Jimmy Dean Gigi Bill
It's a Wonderful Life With Gigi

Recovery Happy Hour

06:36 min | 10 months ago

It's a Wonderful Life With Gigi

"All right. Today's interview is released. Special gee-gee langer has been sober for thirty. Four years used a twelve step program but what is so wonderful about. Her story is all of the other resources that she's used to do. Even deeper healing. We talk about energy work. Inner child healing topping Rural linguistic reprogramming. Meditation cranial sacred healing and outta jillian really incredible books to read all of which are linked in the show notes. This is proof that healing goes on forever and that your recovery won't look the same forever. Either she is the author of the book fifty ways to worry less now and is retired in florida with her husband. It was an absolute joy to get to know her. Here's digi langer hygiene. How are you. I am great. I'm so glad to be here. And yeah i'm so excited to be having recovery. Happy hour with you today. Thank you for taking the time to to share your story of recovery. I'm going to start this interview. The same way i start every interview and that is what is your name and your sobriety date and would you have described yourself as a high or low functioning drinker when you were drinking langer smy name and my sobriety date is february. Eleventh nineteen eighty six. And i was still a high functioning. I except in the area of romance in the area romance. I was extremely low functioning. I mean are we ever high functioning their love and logic those two things. Just don't mix well well. Why don't we just say that to other people. It looked like i was high functioning dairy cow. Mary go. I think i'll i think all of the above is super relatable before we get into your story. Tell me real quick just about what you're doing right now where you live. How old you are what you do for a living family hobbies anything like that. I'm retired. And i'm a little over seventy and i live in southwest florida. I grew up outside of chicago area and then travelled all over in my rambunctious years twenties and thirties. And most of my time. I've lived in michigan for the last several years just this summer. My husband and i moved down to florida. We have a little condo here. We have our kitty with us. And i don't have any children. Because i couldn't stay married long enough and snow grandchildren. So yeah life is good. I don't know what else you asked me. I think that hobbies. What do you like to do for fun right now. In south florida. Play a little golf You know. I have a blog and a lot of service work and a a nonprofit. I'm on that helps. Connect women in sobriety and i do a newsletter and i'm working on another a workbook for how to worry less and my husband and i play we. We just have a good time yeah. I'm very grateful that is fantastic. We'll let's get into your story and in five ten minutes or less. Tell us how long you drink. Tell us how long it was a problem and why you decided to stop you know. It really wasn't a problem for a long time in high school. I got drunk really drunk once and got deathly ill and had a blackout and everybody said how fun. I was a couple of times in college. I got drunk and did not stupid things. And and then i got married and started a teaching career and and he didn't really drink so i drank very little toward the end of that that it. It's kind of a long story about that marriage. But anyway i was very desperate at the end and i discovered marijuana so in my you know. Twenty three or so. I discovered that marijuana killed the emotional pain that i was going through. I really preferred marijuana. I could drink about six. Or seven beers. You know and i got through grad school by getting high and at night to ease the stress and it was really when i was around thirty four years. Old let's see. I had already been divorced twice. I was finishing my doctorate. I had gotten through that with the aid of drugs and alcohol just to calm anxiety and And i lived with two other guys long term. And so i met this guy who was different from all the other guys and i thought. Oh this is. The john and i moved to michigan and we got married very fast and within nine months of marrying him. I went to a bar picked up a stranger and he had marijuana and i started having this affair. You know with this guy. And and i went out to bars a couple of more times when my husband was traveling. My third house but my new you know went home with strangers. Finally i went running to a psychologist. I said what is wrong. With this problem. I have a brand new phd from stanford. And i have this private cd life and my professional life is looking better and better in my private life was worse and worse and he said well you're in the early stages of alcoholism you know. He got my family history and He said just try for a month or two. Try having one or two drinks but stopping and see what happens. Well sure enough. I tried to do his experiment. And sometimes i have two drinks and stop just like a normal drinker. Other times i would have the two drinks and then it was third drink and fourth rank and pick up the stranger and do crazy things that no one could get me to leave and eventually it. I could see the pattern very clearly. That if i had even one drink i could not trust myself to do really dangerous things for myself and other people

Gee Langer Florida Jillian Michigan South Florida Mary Chicago Golf John Stanford
It's a Wonderful Life With Gigi

Recovery Happy Hour

05:46 min | 10 months ago

It's a Wonderful Life With Gigi

"All right. Today's interview is released. Special gee-gee langer has been sober for thirty. Four years used a twelve step program but what is so wonderful about. Her story is all of the other resources that she's used to do. Even deeper healing. We talk about energy work. Inner child healing topping Rural linguistic reprogramming. Meditation cranial sacred healing and outta jillian really incredible books to read all of which are linked in the show notes. This is proof that healing goes on forever and that your recovery won't look the same forever. Either she is the author of the book fifty ways to worry less now and is retired in florida with her husband. It was an absolute joy to get to know her. Here's digi langer hygiene. How are you. I am great. I'm so glad to be here. And yeah i'm so excited to be having recovery. Happy hour with you today. Thank you for taking the time to to share your story of recovery. I'm going to start this interview. The same way i start every interview and that is what is your name and your sobriety date and would you have described yourself as a high or low functioning drinker when you were drinking langer smy name and my sobriety date is february. Eleventh nineteen eighty six. And i was still a high functioning. I except in the area of romance in the area romance. I was extremely low functioning. I mean are we ever high functioning their love and logic those two things. Just don't mix well well. Why don't we just say that to other people. It looked like i was high functioning dairy cow. Mary go. I think i'll i think all of the above is super relatable before we get into your story. Tell me real quick just about what you're doing right now where you live. How old you are what you do for a living family hobbies anything like that. I'm retired. And i'm a little over seventy and i live in southwest florida. I grew up outside of chicago area and then travelled all over in my rambunctious years twenties and thirties. And most of my time. I've lived in michigan for the last several years just this summer. My husband and i moved down to florida. We have a little condo here. We have our kitty with us. And i don't have any children. Because i couldn't stay married long enough and snow grandchildren. So yeah life is good. I don't know what else you asked me. I think that hobbies. What do you like to do for fun right now. In south florida. Play a little golf You know. I have a blog and a lot of service work and a a nonprofit. I'm on that helps. Connect women in sobriety and i do a newsletter and i'm working on another a workbook for how to worry less and my husband and i play we. We just have a good time yeah. I'm very grateful that is fantastic. We'll let's get into your story and in five ten minutes or less. Tell us how long you drink. Tell us how long it was a problem and why you decided to stop you know. It really wasn't a problem for a long time in high school. I got drunk really drunk once and got deathly ill and had a blackout and everybody said how fun. I was a couple of times in college. I got drunk and did not stupid things. And and then i got married and started a teaching career and and he didn't really drink so i drank very little toward the end of that that it. It's kind of a long story about that marriage. But anyway i was very desperate at the end and i discovered marijuana so in my you know. Twenty three or so. I discovered that marijuana killed the emotional pain that i was going through. I really preferred marijuana. I could drink about six. Or seven beers. You know and i got through grad school by getting high and at night to ease the stress and it was really when i was around thirty four years. Old let's see. I had already been divorced twice. I was finishing my doctorate. I had gotten through that with the aid of drugs and alcohol just to calm anxiety and And i lived with two other guys long term. And so i met this guy who was different from all the other guys and i thought. Oh this is. The john and i moved to michigan and we got married very fast and within nine months of marrying him. I went to a bar picked up a stranger and he had marijuana and i started having this affair. You know with this guy. And and i went out to bars a couple of more times when my husband was traveling. My third house but my new you know went home with strangers. Finally i went running to a psychologist. I said what is wrong. With this problem. I have a brand new phd from stanford. And i have this private cd life and my professional life is looking better and better in my private life was worse and worse

Gee Langer Florida Jillian Michigan South Florida Mary Chicago Golf John Stanford
It's A Wonderful Life With Gigi

Recovery Happy Hour

05:00 min | 10 months ago

It's A Wonderful Life With Gigi

"Hygiene. How are you. I am great. I'm so glad to be here. And yeah i'm so excited to be having recovery. Happy hour with you today. Thank you for taking the time to to share your story of recovery. I'm going to start this interview. The same way i start every interview and that is what is your name and your sobriety date and would you have described yourself as a high or low functioning drinker when you were drinking langer smy name and my sobriety date is february. Eleventh nineteen eighty six. And i was still a high functioning. I except in the area of romance in the area romance. I was extremely low functioning. I mean are we ever high functioning their love and logic those two things. Just don't mix well well. Why don't we just say that to other people. It looked like i was high functioning dairy cow. Mary go. I think i'll i think all of the above is super relatable before we get into your story. Tell me real quick just about what you're doing right now where you live. How old you are what you do for a living family hobbies anything like that. I'm retired. And i'm a little over seventy and i live in southwest florida. I grew up outside of chicago area and then travelled all over in my rambunctious years twenties and thirties. And most of my time. I've lived in michigan for the last several years just this summer. My husband and i moved down to florida. We have a little condo here. We have our kitty with us. And i don't have any children. Because i couldn't stay married long enough and snow grandchildren. So yeah life is good. I don't know what else you asked me. I think that hobbies. What do you like to do for fun right now. In south florida. Play a little golf You know. I have a blog and a lot of service work and a a nonprofit. I'm on that helps. Connect women in sobriety and i do a newsletter and i'm working on another a workbook for how to worry less and my husband and i play we. We just have a good time yeah. I'm very grateful that is fantastic. We'll let's get into your story and in five ten minutes or less. Tell us how long you drink. Tell us how long it was a problem and why you decided to stop you know. It really wasn't a problem for a long time in high school. I got drunk really drunk once and got deathly ill and had a blackout and everybody said how fun. I was a couple of times in college. I got drunk and did not stupid things. And and then i got married and started a teaching career and and he didn't really drink so i drank very little toward the end of that that it. It's kind of a long story about that marriage. But anyway i was very desperate at the end and i discovered marijuana so in my you know. Twenty three or so. I discovered that marijuana killed the emotional pain that i was going through. I really preferred marijuana. I could drink about six. Or seven beers. You know and i got through grad school by getting high and at night to ease the stress and it was really when i was around thirty four years. Old let's see. I had already been divorced twice. I was finishing my doctorate. I had gotten through that with the aid of drugs and alcohol just to calm anxiety and And i lived with two other guys long term. And so i met this guy who was different from all the other guys and i thought. Oh this is. The john and i moved to michigan and we got married very fast and within nine months of marrying him. I went to a bar picked up a stranger and he had marijuana and i started having this affair. You know with this guy. And and i went out to bars a couple of more times when my husband was traveling. My third house but my new you know went home with strangers. Finally i went running to a psychologist. I said what is wrong. With this problem. I have a brand new phd from stanford. And i have this private cd life and my professional life is looking better and better in my private life was worse and

Florida Michigan South Florida Mary Chicago Golf John Stanford
It's A Wonderful Life With Gigi

Recovery Happy Hour

04:43 min | 10 months ago

It's A Wonderful Life With Gigi

"Hygiene. How are you. I am great. I'm so glad to be here. And yeah i'm so excited to be having recovery. Happy hour with you today. Thank you for taking the time to to share your story of recovery. I'm going to start this interview. The same way i start every interview and that is what is your name and your sobriety date and would you have described yourself as a high or low functioning drinker when you were drinking langer smy name and my sobriety date is february. Eleventh nineteen eighty six. And i was still a high functioning. I except in the area of romance in the area romance. I was extremely low functioning. I mean are we ever high functioning their love and logic those two things. Just don't mix well well. Why don't we just say that to other people. It looked like i was high functioning dairy cow. Mary go. I think i'll i think all of the above is super relatable before we get into your story. Tell me real quick just about what you're doing right now where you live. How old you are what you do for a living family hobbies anything like that. I'm retired. And i'm a little over seventy and i live in southwest florida. I grew up outside of chicago area and then travelled all over in my rambunctious years twenties and thirties. And most of my time. I've lived in michigan for the last several years just this summer. My husband and i moved down to florida. We have a little condo here. We have our kitty with us. And i don't have any children. Because i couldn't stay married long enough and snow grandchildren. So yeah life is good. I don't know what else you asked me. I think that hobbies. What do you like to do for fun right now. In south florida. Play a little golf You know. I have a blog and a lot of service work and a a nonprofit. I'm on that helps. Connect women in sobriety and i do a newsletter and i'm working on another a workbook for how to worry less and my husband and i play we. We just have a good time yeah. I'm very grateful that is fantastic. We'll let's get into your story and in five ten minutes or less. Tell us how long you drink. Tell us how long it was a problem and why you decided to stop you know. It really wasn't a problem for a long time in high school. I got drunk really drunk once and got deathly ill and had a blackout and everybody said how fun. I was a couple of times in college. I got drunk and did not stupid things. And and then i got married and started a teaching career and and he didn't really drink so i drank very little toward the end of that that it. It's kind of a long story about that marriage. But anyway i was very desperate at the end and i discovered marijuana so in my you know. Twenty three or so. I discovered that marijuana killed the emotional pain that i was going through. I really preferred marijuana. I could drink about six. Or seven beers. You know and i got through grad school by getting high and at night to ease the stress and it was really when i was around thirty four years. Old let's see. I had already been divorced twice. I was finishing my doctorate. I had gotten through that with the aid of drugs and alcohol just to calm anxiety and And i lived with two other guys long term. And so i met this guy who was different from all the other guys and i thought. Oh this is. The john and i moved to michigan and we got married very fast and within nine months of marrying him. I went to a bar picked up a stranger and he had marijuana and i started having this affair. You know with this guy. And and i went out to bars a couple of more times when my husband was traveling. My third house but my new you know went home with strangers.

Florida Michigan Mary South Florida Chicago Golf John
A Chat With Juliette Burton

Mentally Yours

05:47 min | 10 months ago

A Chat With Juliette Burton

"I think the the idea that end of the calendar year might be mean the end of all of this is uncertainty and it would be lovely to think it were as it. Were going to adhere to End of the calendar year. But who knows what's going to happen. Yeah i guess. I was in the middle of my second. Uk national toll of that was funded by the council. When looked down on hits us nationally. I'd done three showers of Was my my fifth surly shire. I've told Toured new zealand twitter on the k. Before but i mean everyone. Everyone who i know in the comedy world. They think that their latest show is bess. Joe because he constantly try to strive to make it to be better investment besser. That's possible. I love comedy because you're constantly learning and growing and often every gigi kind of sit down and reassess right what went well. What kind prove on which was which is funny. Which bits do i need to work. Open caught with to flow a. I'm working on stage with audience. Making it really come alive and engage with them in the moment with that kind of vicious community compensation committee radios. And i already felt like this was my favorite show that i've ever done. It was certainly the funniest. The i feel like i've ever done We'd done three shows of it onto and then suddenly lockdown happened and another. Gosh i can't remember how many shows we had see cancel. But i will say do comedy select corporate events as well and if those sub me become sold for about the first month i i think i had asked of rights going straight backs of my therapy sessions from therapy for over twenty years. Now go straight back to all of the the inpatient treatments of like mealtimes eat well sleep well have good routine. Stay motivated have project. Stay stay creative. And the first month. I think i managed fairly well. But then as uncertainty continued and as the knock on effects of all of these different rearranged plans like the tool was originally rearranged awesome twenty twenty and then gradually some of those became virtual shows and then and the rest of them have just had to become sold in las vegas venues now facing the prospect of will ob and going to survive and then seeing all of my wonderful comedy powell's and insists powell's old venues that have meant so much to me over the years working in comedy. We have to invest not only our time our money and in getting better at it and guessing good enough to make it an actual viable career at the same time. Been sort of saying. Oh my friends. Chaves marriage and babies and make league no careers. My thing. my career is my thing. This year's been really hard. I've missed that community. I'm kind of the connection that you get with people when roller roomful of strangers and you're laughing at the same thing it. It's amazing feeling that is unlike any other And i don't feel alone when i'm laughing in a room full of people whether that's me on stage whether that i'm in the audience watching other people none of us have had this yesterday. I think some heart for moving forward but it some. It's it's trying. I've been trying to get creative in ways to find in ways to support myself and others around me in trying to look ahead with a bit more bit more I'm gonna stay rather than anything else. Because i think certainty is not something any of us going to have for a while. You should have been able to rework things from the show on new comex do some online stuff or have you decided to maybe postpone. It'll i'm i am afraid. I don't have it within me to postpone it. My i think for me comedies. A survival technique. Because for me my my mental illnesses is something that i really struggle with on a day-to-day basis. So if if i'm able to find a funny way of expressing whatever is going through whether that's a mental health thing or just a life thing or family single friend thing or criticizing. If i can find a funny way of making into a a joke or something. I can use in comedy routines. It's a way of me surviving. That that dog darkness in my mind and and being able to curate. My thoughts in a positive comedic way is survival technique and so this year i i did have a couple of moments thinking. I'm i going to do my friends. Were i wanted to say the phrase jumping ship but then notes that they are postponing as you say like that. They're not giving up comedy. But that just in order to survive that that changing to a completely different career for a while i have managed to get some virtual of had quite few lovely virtual gigs and in fact quite few of them have been a because of the mental health angle. Because we've had lots of things like the world mental health awareness week and a mental health day and They've been great. We'll sit on lots of virtual gigs on twitch and next up comedy and mixed bill nights a and they've been different if they've been. I've actually really enjoyed them. I've wanted to get more inventive. Like how to make it more of an active experience for the audience because comedy is an active experience for the audience. It's is. I said it was a conversation so every show that you do. When you're on stage it can go completely differently depending on the mood of the audience. All the way you all. What medication

Powell Bess Gigi New Zealand JOE Twitter UK Las Vegas
"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

05:49 min | 11 months ago

"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"First of all because thereby tbe academics. I am not an academic. These are the opposite of academic classes unless of their taught by g g or my wife. Angela is a professor. Yeah so i had to adapt really quickly right. You know covert hits and then it's like all my revenue from public speaking and some coaching consulting slowdown for second. Because people need to catch their breath and figure out what happens next ritual speaking starting comeback. But in the meantime i couldn't wait. I started creating online classes and memberships so one class that have right now is called creative. Trespassing the map. And it's all about transforming limiting beliefs and mindsets into on limited creative authorities and solutions so that you create your own map towards your own version of success and the videos downloadable worksheets for people to do it at their own pace. I have to say we went through the first cycle of it. And what i learned was people needed this right now because the big the big question i ask everyone the first video in creative trespassing the map. I turn to the camera and i quote from mary. Oliver's paulhamus ever stay. What is it that you want to do with your one wild and precious life because this is the moment that we ask that all of us who are listening. Who are doers thinkers dreamers. We're like i want to write my book. I wanna watch podcast. I wanna watch visit. But i'm waiting. What are you waiting for. A pandemic yrant is so you know. That's what i learned is a lot of people had been waiting for something and so providing them with this online course. Diy and the videos are really fun because they were fun to make a special guests in the videos in the worksheets are really playful. loving it and they love to things in particular one is the idea behind it which is do one thing instead of things or nothing Because a lot of high achievers are taking the course and giving me feedback. I'm a high achiever as well and it's like we have a tendency to to have all these lofty ideas like. I'm gonna write a book going to do this. And then we get overwhelmed and do nothing so the principal foundations to just do one a day. And that accumulates those small articulated.

Diy Angela Oliver principal professor mary
"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

08:31 min | 11 months ago

"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"And i'm just going to start out to say i'm a fan girl and i am so excited i usually don't cold reach out to people to say i don't know you. Will you be on the show. But i was so thrilled to have listened to your main stage presentation at the world domination summit which also always sounds like the wrong name. It's like no. That's not what it's about it's about people trying to rethink community and service but people go you go where serb regard for like ten years but you are one of my very favorite main stage speakers and i loved your book and pecos just rereading it and actually rebranding all my notes. I wrote for the book because you are not just inspirational speaker. But you're massively inspirational and you have such a great way of looking at things. Can you maybe start us off in the conversation. With what the heck you actually are doing now. And they will back up with that as well. what is creative trespassing. And what are you doing with that. Well first of all. Thank you for acknowledging my talk. It world domination summit and in fact within the context of that talk on to have a difficult time with the domination part within the context of my talk at wd s. I changed a domination determination. I don't believe in hierarchy and that's part of creative trespassing is how do we disrupt these systems and mindsets that are keeping us stuck in sinking and feeling that we have to be a certain way in order to succeed in the world and in work and in fact the opposite is totally true. And i know this. Because i have used myself as a test case and also were with lots of people in my long career And how valuable. It's been to bring in notions from the outside or outside nece. Our laws are fears are scars into you. Know buttoned up up tight. Rigid workspaces were cultures in life. And and disrupt the system so that we can invite everyone into participate with more creativity innovation and imagination. And that's kind of been my jam. I come from hitter as it more formal way of learning and looking at the world and play writing more specifically. And so what. I've done with that. Is i actually go into major and minor corporations like in a fortune. Five hundred companies as well as arts organizations and universities around the globe and i've preached the good word of bringing more creativity to solving problems and challenges and obstacles in everyday life and the workspace. So that's been up to have been keynoting a ton around the globe. I was reading an ira as the kids say before. Kobe hit and now. I'm delighting in learning how to disrupt virtual speaking and it's so much fun for me. It's unfair really i. I really like when once you're able to see and and celebrate a innovative process. That doesn't change if even if you change forms so just because i'm not on stages i can't play with the frame of the camera of a computer which i do all the time so this makes me so happy because i have been pushing in challenging people on this for months now is that people seem to think that they're supposed to sit in the center of this little static box ignore the mizzen seen of it and somehow have the perfect home behind them and And and not that. This is a window we can play with and that you can play on your side. I complain on my side and people seem so stack yes well. And that's it you know. I learned about creativity and studied it from the the nineties onward. And there's a seminal study that you probably know your listeners. probably know it's patricia. stokes talking about the. How constraints are actually fuel for creativity patricia. Stokes i hadn't heard a patricia talks by had heard about the constraint opportunities in creativity yes what she proved early on. Look it up. Is that out there are we are sort of born with this. Innate ability to solve problems like everyday problems with creativity and by creativity. I mean imagination if you can't figure out one way of doing it you're out another and we're all born with that. The problem is is over. Time these systems that are keeping a stuck have taught us not to trust her instincts not to follow her machination. But in fact stay so Trespassing is all about what i'm doing is bringing it saying. Hey constraints are great. Let's embrace them and allow them to fuel us to figure things out so for example. I'll start talk in a look into the frame of the camera. And i'll say hey everyone let's le- constraints are awesome. Let me prove it to you. See that frame. See how little it is. Let's leave it and enter the frame in an entire new way and you'll have people leave the frame and then come do like the imaginary steps downward where they're like stepping on an escalator or the pop up or they'll dance into the frame and so now they see a constraint as a wonderful opportunity to play in to use your imagination and one of my friends did that with having a cooking class where everyone drag their cameras into the kitchen and we're cooking and drinking from different angles and making ravioli from scratch and seeing how different you could be cooking but still all cooking ravioli and getting fairly drunk thinking about ways to do things differently. it's interesting because we're such storytelling people at the same time that we think there's a story and then we get stuck in that story instead of breaking the story to your story creator. This is really kinda where you came from. And i'm gonna backtrack a while here. Because you tell a a lot of your good origin story which i adore but you you from a creative family did were you limited by things with your family or did they really help you see this as a broader space there were no limits in my family and actually had the opposite you know instead of constraints. I had sort of like wild parents who were just figuring it out how to be parents as we were figuring out how to be children as we were figuring out how to be family in the world so my mom was an immigrant and English as a second language for her so she was kind of like fumbling through getting jobs and odd jobs in. My dad was in new york. City taxi cab driver and didn't necessarily have a formal education but street. Smart all the way so we were kind of scrappy wild family. Things were great. They were great sometimes when we ran out of money. But whenever we'd have money we celebrate and get a steak dinner in that we'd have no money again so you know my parents the one thing that they really gave me. Foundationally was That anything i did which is good was like fantastic. You know if. I drew something or i shared with them. An idea came up with as a little kid. They're like that's fantastic. And so i sense that support in being able to explore. Be curious early age and i trusted that. Support the unfortunate part which lead to something fortunate was. I didn't have a map for how to be successful. Because here's you people. Who are like. I don't know how to be parents. Let's just figure this out so a lot of my friends. I learned later in. Life had like a formal map. Like you go to school and then you get a degree and then you get a job and the new. Do that job for the rest of your life and you become an adult. I didn't have that. So i had to forge my own unique way of being in the world and understanding my value and i majored in theater. I got a degree in play writing and if the ground running getting jobs doing not play writing. But i mean i was. I was a professional play right. It didn't didn't pay the bills. So then i started to to figure out my own map towards success.

patricia. stokes ira nece Kobe Foundationally new york
"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"But it's that led to cross media lab which was all about malaysians. Getting malaysian content on screens with are not it. Was there a big silver screen or their mobile phone screen but but having a self reflected back at you and i still think that's really important and it still police. What lights my When i get up in lincoln nebraska to run the center for emerging meteorologists. So let's finish talking about x. media labs so you were connecting disparate people in talent. What was that adventure like while it was. It's actually really extraordinary. And i sometimes wonder how brendan and i did it. How we had the the she resilience and guts to do it because we weren't backed by anyone We did it as two people and we we went to singapore. We set up. I am in a single room and we. We built this business that we took to foreign countries in twenty two cities around the world. Let we kind of got in a plane and went to beijing in started knocking on doors Specifically the beijing film academy To talk about how we were helping people to create their own. I pay and to bring economic development at that point in time. China wasn't so interested in that are interested in becoming bitter at work for hire but then then within the euro to our really interested in that. So i actually started the china animation marketing jaw which is a city. Just outside of shanghai back then. It was a half drive now. It's twenty minutes on the fast train and we kept doing that. And i think what was so unique about us. Was that for us for example on stage at the sydney opera house or Or or in switzerland for us. It was just situation normal to have a chinese person next indian posted next year swiss person next to somebody from hollywood somebody from the uk speaking as equals and introducing introducing the west to the east many times. And i can remember way back when you know when also proud to have nacchio sponsor and we had the chief game designer.

beijing film academy sydney opera house beijing lincoln nebraska brendan China singapore shanghai hollywood switzerland uk
"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"Welcome to creative. Innovators g she johnson. I was so pleased to have megan elliott on the show. She is out in lincoln nebraska. But she's working with people globally to help build next-generation pirates magicians and wizards in the johnny carson center for emerging media. She's built a program from scratch but with the support of many organizations companies and folks at university of nebraska lincoln but. She has an amazing history in australia. Working with indigenous culture in contemporary art traveling throughout asia and europe putting together ex media lab. She has an amazing. I guess that word used to be called rolodex list of fabulous people in collaborators. But she's taken that magic and built a whole new program that she'll enjoy And.

megan elliott lincoln nebraska johnny carson center university of nebraska australia asia europe
Harry Styles becomes Vogue's first-ever solo male cover star

Colleen and Bradley

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Harry Styles becomes Vogue's first-ever solo male cover star

"History today, becoming the first man ever to cover American Vogue all by himself and on the cover sounds is wearing a custom Gucci ball gown with a tuxedo jacket. The other guys who have appeared on American vote include styles. Former one direction ban a big Zane Malik as well. It's Justin Bieber, who appeared alongside his Hailey Baldwin. Zane was with Gigi Hadid. So there goes Harry.

Zane Malik Hailey Baldwin Justin Bieber Gigi Hadid Zane Harry
"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"Got MC Ren DJ yella and put this group together and you know, the rest was kind of History. And then the history came apart at a point in time and you then went out on your own. Yes, but but you already were out on your own so so you kind of returned to be a creative solar preneur. I mean you were creating music. What was the journey after NWA so it's kind of weird because when I made my first record even before NWA, I was just messing around with technology and I was using a little royalty money. I was getting to buy computers at sixteen Seventeen. I had you know, every computer that came out a trash which in layman's term a TRS eighty. I had the Commodore vic-20 the Commodore sixty-four, you know, I had the Commodore Colt computer. I had everything out there or just to learn how to do that. And the reason I got into it was because when we used to tour everybody with party and drink and you know smoke or do whatever they did but wage Video games came out people stopped partying and wanted to go to arcades and wanted to play with the little hand-held coleco visions and stuff like that. So I started looking at that like wait a minute. This is like the new crack here and I walk in like I need to figure this video game thing out. So talk myself out of code taught myself how to do sprite animation those kind of things and literally while I was touring with NWA I was going to siggraph conventions and I think it was comdex, you know back then and learning and learning about technology and and got approached by companies who saw me playing with their demo hardware and stuff and like who are you like? Why are you so good at this and tell them I have a lot of time on my hands, you know because of being in this group NWA we can't go outside much, you know, and I got invited to do. The first series of the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers do visual effects on that. I did Casper Addams Family Silver Surfer a bunch of other shows and movies and then Thursdays are hopped over to Fox in Iraq that will start working on video games and vivendi Universal and I just was doing to parallel universes at the same time and making a lot of money doing that and that's kind of how I ended up getting out of nwa's because I had this other career going on. We were getting ripped off by my manager and NWA. I had a hit record with a song called supersonic off my girl group. JJ fad that I produced that I brought over to our label and manager was taking that money too. So I finally got fed up and was like, I'm out. I don't care if we got a hit record with Straight Out of Compton wage doesn't matter if the police are after me and I'm not making any money. So I got me an attorney and went up to my manager and got it straightened out got a contract left and off. A happy camper. So on all of these things where you would an individual independent contractor. Did you create a team around yourself? Did you create a different team around each project? Did you work for the companies as an employee? What was kind of the the people structure that let you be who you were trying to be with so many different directions? Yeah. So when I asked first got invited to do the Power Rangers thing for Saban, they didn't know what to do with me. They were like, you're good. We want you to work on this and we know who you are. I don't care. I'll sit in the office. You know, I mean, I'll sit in the office and do whatever so I just literally sat in the office and I worked on stuff, you know, I worked on the projects just like everybody.

NWA Mighty Morphin Power Rangers coleco Saban Compton Iraq Casper Addams Power Rangers attorney Fox
"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"So for <Speech_Female> your next big birthday, <Speech_Female> what do <SpeakerChange> you want to <Silence> have done by then? <Speech_Male> So the next <Speech_Male> big birthday is <Speech_Male> the 500 <Speech_Male> and I want <Silence> to <Speech_Male> I want <Speech_Male> to grow this <Speech_Male> very successfully. <Speech_Male> I want the <Speech_Male> I want the VR piece to <Speech_Male> be done. <Speech_Male> I want us to <Speech_Male> see you with <Speech_Male> the other thing that I didn't <Speech_Male> tell you is that we are actually <Speech_Male> expanding <Speech_Male> into World music <Speech_Male> because we decided <Speech_Male> to move our <Speech_Male> end date of this program <Speech_Male> from <Speech_Male> the end of January <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> May so <Speech_Male> they have hopefully <Speech_Male> we can get back live, <Speech_Male> but that will <Speech_Male> also mean that we have more <Speech_Male> time to bring in more <Speech_Male> mentors and do World <Speech_Male> music as well. <Speech_Male> I want this <Speech_Male> to really <SpeakerChange> I want us <Speech_Male> to really work on the expansion. <Speech_Male> Nationally. <Speech_Male> I know you and I have talked <Speech_Male> about before <Speech_Male> to get it out virtually <Speech_Male> to other cities. <Speech_Male> How do we <Speech_Male> do that to <Speech_Male> activate more kids? That's <Speech_Male> always a <Speech_Male> it's always a thing <Speech_Male> on my <Speech_Male> every time I pitch is <Speech_Male> that how do we expand <Speech_Male> our cohort <Speech_Male> expand our diversity <Speech_Male> expand <Speech_Male> our reach and <Speech_Male> I think we're doing a <Speech_Male> good job of <Speech_Male> that. We've definitely <Speech_Male> grown from last <Speech_Male> year, but I'd <SpeakerChange> love to expand <Speech_Female> more like, <Speech_Female> you know, what have <Speech_Female> we not mentioned? We <Speech_Female> are at the end of our journey <Speech_Female> home. Gather <Speech_Female> anything that you want to <Speech_Female> comment <SpeakerChange> on Before <Silence> We Say Goodbye. <Speech_Male> Well, I just <Speech_Male> want to thank you <Speech_Male> and all the <Speech_Male> other creative <Speech_Male> innovators that you <Speech_Male> have on your podcast. <Speech_Male> I think especially <Speech_Male> in a time <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> you know of covet <Speech_Male> and locked down. I <Speech_Male> think everybody <Speech_Telephony_Male> amazing <Speech_Male> people who <Speech_Male> are pushing through <Speech_Male> especially <Speech_Male> the ones <Speech_Male> who are inspiring <Speech_Male> kids to do something <Speech_Male> creative and to hath <Speech_Male> hope <Speech_Male> I think that is so <Speech_Male> amazing. And so I just <Speech_Male> want to say thank you for highlighting <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Male> highlighting us and <Speech_Male> including the <Speech_Male> Inception <SpeakerChange> Orchestra <Speech_Female> on this journey. <Speech_Female> So <Speech_Female> I asked people <Silence> at the end <Speech_Female> boss. Who would <Speech_Female> you like to reach <Speech_Female> out to you? <Speech_Female> What do you need? What would <Speech_Female> you like? Who would you <Speech_Female> like to reach out? <Speech_Female> And then how would you like <Silence> them to reach you? <Speech_Male> We're <Speech_Male> having a cool event <Speech_Male> on November <Speech_Female> 7th of November <Speech_Female> 7th. <Speech_Female> How would <SpeakerChange> they how <Silence> would they reach out? <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> we're doing a really <Speech_Male> amazing event. We're we're <Speech_Male> having master <Speech_Male> class <Speech_Male> is all <Speech_Male> day. It's a virtual event. <Speech_Male> It's free. <Speech_Male> It's just showing <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> type of work we <Speech_Male> do there's some panels <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> we'd love for you to <Speech_Male>

"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"So for your next big birthday, what do you want to have done by them? So the next big birthday is the 500 and I want to I want to grow this very successfully. I want the I want the VR piece to be done. I want us to see you with the other thing that I didn't tell you is that we are actually expanding into World music because we decided to move our end date of this program from the end of January to May so I have hopefully we can get back live, but that will also mean that we have more time to bring in more mentors and do World music as well. I want this to really I want us to really work on the expansion. Nationally. I know you and I have talked about that before to get it out virtually to other cities. How do we do that to activate more kids? That's always a it's always a thing on my every time I pitch is that how do we expand our cohort expand our diversity expand our reach and I think we're doing a good job of that. We've definitely grown from last year, but I'd love to expand more like, you know, what have we not mentioned? We are at the end of our journey. Together anything that you want to comment on Before We Say Goodbye. Well, I just want to thank you and all the other creative innovators that you have on your podcast. I think especially in a time of you know of covet and locked down. I think everybody amazing people who are pushing through especially the ones who are inspiring kids to do something creative and to hath hope I think that is so amazing. And so I just want to say thank you for highlighting for highlighting us and including the Inception Orchestra on this journey. So I asked people at the end off, who would you like to reach out to you? What do you need? What would you like? Who would you like to reach out? And then how would you like them to reach you? We're having a cool event on November 7th of November 7th. How would they how would they reach out? So we're doing a really amazing event. We're we're having master class is all day. It's a virtual event. It's free. It's just showing the type of work we do there's some panels so we'd love for you to go to our site. They'll be information on how to RSVP their wage, which is inception Orchestra..

Inception Orchestra
"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"I got a job right out of high school. My dad worked at a company called TRW which is a space and electronics firm not the credit bureau and we made marketing videos about space and space and defense which was fascinating and that went right along with my film school. I would go down and do my film projects in the edit Bay at two o w, but it was after college and we had a director named Justin Lyn in my film class who did things properly and you know got an internship and went on to direct many great features. I stayed at my job doing commercial marketing videos and I developed this love of space. It was really awful really fantastic. I was able to be promoted and worked my way up. I started directing Live Events, you know, so I got this great great experience there and i r e e Feel like I was born too late because I you know, I wish I'd been around during like the Apollo missions. It's almost time again, right as we have new missions coming from new companies. And for those of you who are listening to the podcast you'll hear some resonating elements, right? So we've had stories of people who started out with music in commercial trade videos and getting started that way part of college is story and Sasha's story actually is coming from the different direction and ending up in space and working on vrna are for space and Mars. So we've got some interesting thought I was coming back again. Then you were at TRW and a lot of people a lot of people from my film school class ended up doing a trade videos commercial videos as a big chunk of their young lives and we tend to forget that's part of the journey at times. It absolutely is. Yeah and you learn a lot know you get a lot of volume of work under your belt. Well, it was so amazing because you you get I mean who who really gets a job and it's high paying I ended up, you know, once I graduated from UCLA home..

TRW Justin Lyn edit Bay UCLA Sasha director
"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"Yes, but when I went down there when I went there, it was actually by USC and so my mom drove me we lived in several Lake and my mom drove up and down Hoover, which is a pretty one on the street in LA and she hates it so much. She said that if she dies and Goes to Hell she's going to be driving up and down Hoover for her. Stay there long. Now, where are your parents musicians? Why did they suddenly think our son is going to be a fabulous pianist at age five. My parents are not musicians. I I think it's just a thing to do to put your kid in music. They were very supportive of a wage if of a strict classical piano career and I mean, they put me through everything at Colburn which is an amazing, you know music theory ensembles. I was into a dork extras on Saturdays. And of course my mom drove me everywhere and was very I'm very grateful now as an adult that she did that is your mom still around home. My mom is still around she is lovely a little bit of a tiger mom back as a as a kid. So I mom and but I think that was found in this weird way. I think that was important since you how I became just you know, the work ethic kind of came from my mom. The one thing that I think happens. I said there was no creativity or composition in that point. I mean, I wrote songs. I actually was the winner of the first annual Herbert zipper award and composition but there was there was really no need creativity at that point. And I think that's how I latched onto this going forward. So you were a youth in a youth program doing music in out sideways Through Blood through your bones and you then became a Pianist Yeah, so I was a really successful classical pianist. I got into UCLA on a full-ride piano performance scholarship and I did leave the major after six weeks. But it leaving I won the piano concerto competition there and in the price was to play with the orchestra in June. And so of course by the time I went back there for rehearsals, nobody knew who I was who is this kid here showing up to play what UCLA offered so my mom was very supportive my parents were supportive and they gave me through the UCLA extension while I was going to while I was chasing.

UCLA Hoover USC LA Colburn Herbert
"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"Welcome to creative innovators with G Johnson. I'm excited today to share a kid in the condos interesting Journeys path with you said he has built from scratch the Los Angeles Inception Orchestra, which is not quite what it sounds like maybe it totally is he has a background in any thing from professional musicianship and longtime training to working for TRW and from a lot of this he brought together a unique new platform for young people to learn from professional composers how to become professional composers and the adds a little bit of tech magic in the top of it. So enjoy this conversation with a camera and he's going to be having some interesting events coming up or listening to this during twenty-twenty in the fall. So we'll have that in the show notes, but enjoy this conversation with Akira. Can.

Los Angeles Inception Orchestr TRW G Johnson Akira
Battery Rollout Plan Plus Elon Musk Production Email

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

06:10 min | 1 year ago

Battery Rollout Plan Plus Elon Musk Production Email

"We're here today we are talking about a potential roadmap for tests roll out of their new forty, six eighty battery cells, and then we have a few other news stories to go through on Tesla's well, we'll start off with batteries where we have quite a bit of new information coming from a very active Ilan on twitter today and the first tweet I want to highlight here is on the forty-six, eighty sal and gigabyte lint yuan in response to whole Mars on twitter says quote Berlin will. Use Forty eighty sell with structural battery pack and front and rear single piece castings. Also new paint system. A lot of new technology will happen in Berlin, which means significant production risk Fremont and Shanghai will transition in about two years when new tack is proven and quote this whole situation with the ramp up of Gigabit, Lan has caused quite a bit of confusion because we do expect that to happen sometime pretty early in twenty twenty one probably sometime in q two would be the start production. But Tesla on the other hand side a lot of the technology during Battery Day was still in sort of a pilot phase and I think there were a lot of sumptious that initially this new Salle would be used in the Plaid Model S, which we know isn't expected until late twenty, twenty one. So that's where the confusion comes in of. Okay. What cells are going to be used in that initial motto why Production Pretty early next year from Giga Berlin with this tweet from Ilana it. Appears that we now have a pretty conclusive answer that from the beginning, it seems like tussle will be trying to use those forty six eighty tablets, battery cells, as well as these of of sell to pack or released sell to vehicles structure battery format as for the chemistry used in those cells. Tesla during the Battery Day presentation split up into three groups, iron based Nicholas, manganese, and high nickel in terms of cathodes and the model why image did appear in the nickel plus manganese section of that. Approach. So presumably, that's what we would see in the model. Why though did add in another tweet that quote we do expect to make heavy use of LLP for medium range cars and stationary storage and quote with L. B.. Being with the modern phosphate I think one of the key questions around the ramp up of the model y from Berlin is how Tesla handles that and the potential osborne effect that that could have on Mata y from let's say Shanghai or from Fremont this could be one of those ways if actually starts off with a lithium iron phosphate model Y in Berlin that would be. Obviously, a lower end vehicle that may have specs more comparable to what Tesla's producing today and Fremont, and presumably soon in Shanghai on the other hand, it would be a little bit unusual for Tesla to start production with some of that lower and vehicle usually they start on the higher end that work their way down. So I think whichever way Tesla approaches it is going to have its own set of issues and that's going to be one of the most interesting things to see how it gets handled. Next year we'll set that aside for now I wanNA talk more about the production and the timelines. Year homers reaction to this on twitter I'm not GonNa read all of it here but basically, he said that you had sandbagged the presentation during battery died in terms of of the timelines and he replied to those tweets by saying quote prototypes or a piece of cake. A high volume production of a new technology is extremely hard takes much longer than people think to climb the production s curve I can't emphasize enough that production is by far the hard part and quote this was something that Yulon emphasized consistently throughout the day presentation saying that not all the stuff is fully functional yet in a full. High speed production type of way just working really right now in a pilot line and with somewhat low yields or not yields up to what they would like quite yet. So that's what Tesla is working on figuring out right now at that pilot line, and once they do that hopefully, they can expand the concepts used in that pilot line pretty quickly in Gigabyte Lynn but I think that is the uncertainty that remains if the main issue is yield, Tesla knows how to settle this stuff up and they can get some production out of it. They may just not be able to produce at a higher. Rate for some period of time until those yields improve, obviously it's going to be more capital efficient if Tesla can figure that out on the pilot line before expanding dramatically in. Giga. Burlington but it's not like it's a binary thing. There's a lot of new technology here a lot of different steps in this process that Tesla's working on making more efficient and I'm sure some of those advancements those new technologies are ready to go right now with high yields while others such as the dry battery electrode process will probably take tesla a little bit more time to perfect. But just because a part of that. Process is imperfect yet doesn't mean that there's not going to be any production. It just means that production is going to be constrained until TUSLA can improve that the other element here that we haven't talked about yet is what about Giga Texas it seems pretty clear that if did you, Berlin is going to be using the new cell right off the bat. Then Gig a Texas probably also doing the same as we've talked about the targeted date for first substantial completion forget Texas is may first twenty twenty one. So we put all that together. It seems like by Q. Three next year Tesla is aiming. To have these new cells being produced at three locations, the pilot line and Fremont Gigabyte Lynn and access. So let's breakdown how this all might fit together and how it might spread across various product lines and will start with a couple of points. Tesla. Made at Battery Day. So the first is the plan Tesla said that in twenty twenty two, they hope to produce one hundred gigawatt hours of battery cells in house. We also know that the pilot line in Fremont, they hope to get that to output of ten gigawatt hours per year. But over time they hope to have each assembly line be capable. Of An output of twenty gigawatt hours per year. So piecing all these things together, I've put together a hypothetical forty-six eighty battery roadmap emphasis on hypothetical because a lot of this is just guesswork at this point in time but hopefully, we can kind of use this as a starting point and have a discussion about it and slowly gain more confidence in this roadmap as time goes by. So to orientate those of you that are watching on video on the left hand side, I have the products and then a hypothetical average capacity for each battery pack inside of those products then I have a table with. The number of units from each location the Fremont Pilot Line Giga Berlin and Gigi Texas, and then a second table showing the amount of batteries that would be required in gigawatt hours for that level of production each year

Tesla Fremont Pilot Line Giga Berlin Berlin Twitter Fremont Giga Berlin Shanghai Giga Giga Texas Salle Ilan LLP Yulon Texas Gigi Texas Mata Y Nicholas Burlington
"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"And roll in that time in Saint Petersburg, which is very cool. But by trade, my dad's a civil engineer and my mom is a chemist, my brother who is six years older than me is very kind of interested in technology and did end up majoring in computer science in College. So there. was kind of this more or less technical side of things. But I would say art sort of ruled the roost in terms of my interest at a very young age and I drew actually before I even spoke. So I I started speaking quite late so I learned how to draw before I could speak which I I knew I could speak just was kind of maybe doing a social experiment on my parents because it was really fun to see them I remember seeing them react to things that I got right and I learned that I could sort of make this happiness happens very early memory but I do recall that that existed in my brain I guess I had a pretty good balance of both the arts and kind of more technical side of things while growing up I was really encouraged to express myself through visual art and music. I started playing piano when I was about six years old and was classically trained throughout my life. My parents sat me down at five and we're like piano or violin and I was like, Haha I guess piano because you don't have to tune it because my brother played cello and that was quite Painful beginning to my childhood of hearing him I thought it was beautiful. But my parents like. Stringed instruments it is a different world though they're much easier to carry. Our yes. I moved out of Russia when I was four we immigrated right before like during the fall of the Soviet Union basically. So my dad got us out of Russia to sort of give us ability to have a life that we could. Thrive in and I guess. I. Always kind of felt like the world was my sister in that way where I had the ability to be in a place where I could make kind of choices and create this. Sort of ECLECTIC and interesting future for myself. So that sort of where the basis of that mindset came from is I was told at a young age that you have possibilities here. So go and sees what want so that that left me with a lot of great work kind of how do you call it Why can't they think of this work ethic? Yes. That's what I'm looking for very good work ethic. That left me with kind of a really good. Forward, thinking attitude about what future with the future could hold and kind of made me a serial optimist, which is Great. So we talked before, we started on the recording about jobs and job titles and stereotypes around jobs. What did the young think she wanted to do and she grew up? To be honest. There were kind of two worlds that I was really interested in one was really wanted to be a librarian I thought it was very cool that they got to be surrounded by books all day long and The Libertarians that helped me in the library would always kind of dive deep into my interests and they knew so much knows very inspired by that. I also just liked I just liked the idea of hanging out in the library all the time, and the second path was always to be a teacher I remember recalling that I wanted to I don't know if this is a real award or not. I. Don't think it has I was like I'm going to win the best teacher in the world award what year so I don't think there might be something like that. But I really use that wash should play a national one in most countries I'm not sure if there's a worldwide one. Well..

engineer Russia Saint Petersburg Soviet Union
Gigi Hadid And Zayn Malik Welcome Baby Girl: 'She's Already Changed Our World'

Colleen and Bradley

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

Gigi Hadid And Zayn Malik Welcome Baby Girl: 'She's Already Changed Our World'

"Insane. Malik have welcomed a baby girl G shared a message alongside of a photograph of Zane holding the baby daughter's hand on Instagram saying Our girl joined US Earth side this weekend. She's already changed our world. Indeed, caption the picture so in love, and Zane was the first to confirm last night that he and Hadeed had welcomed their baby girl, so congrats to them.

Zane Us Earth Insane. Malik Hadeed
'Grateful': Gigi Hadid welcomes baby girl with Zayn Malik

Jason and Alexis

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

'Grateful': Gigi Hadid welcomes baby girl with Zayn Malik

"Gi Hadid had her baby again. Zane Malik confirmed it. You know, this is the celebrity thing right now is to post a photo of your baby's hand. Around your hands, which I think is sweet because it gives people a glimpse of the baby and proves that the baby actually exists. But you don't have to show the baby space and a lot of super celebrities don't really want to do that. And that's fair. But Zane Malik, who is Gigi Hadid's Boyfriend posted. Our baby girl is here healthy and beautiful to try to put into words. How I'm feeling right now would be an impossible task and just went on and said, thankful for the life we will have together. It was a very cute New dad post,

Zane Malik Gi Hadid Gigi Hadid
"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"That night the night before or that morning from booking agents around the country who were basically offering up a ban. And it was basically a sheet that described what the band was, who they were, what label they were on what kind of pre buys you would expect from the record label and then they would basically be like, okay what's your bid? What's your deal send us over a bid? and. All the bookers in town would probably be like All right. I'm going to take a shot at this or now not really going to take a shot at this and you'd write a dollar figure on the top, and then you'd write what you were going to charge for like I'm going to recruit my security costs and some of the door costs and some of the bartender costs, and then I'm going to keep all the liquor but you're gonNA have eighty percent of all the door after I recall expenses and you'd facts that back. And then if they bit, they'd send you contract. You'd sign the contract and then you'd have to market right make your deal with the radio station you try and get the record label to buy as many tickets upfront as you possibly could. Put ads in the local paper and acting all kinds of things L. A. Weekly and anywhere else you could print up flyers and you'd hire people to go stick them in car windows and do anything that you possibly could just hit the ground that was not really scientific and the reality is that in a place like Los Angeles, what I realized was people did not go out just to see live music. They went out to see band specific ban. So if you bet wrong and you bought the wrong band, you could lose a lot of money and you are betting on that band sometime in advance to well in advance. Because you're trying to fill out your calendar as early can't we had seven days a week. To fill out four bands a day right. So that's twenty to thirty bands that you're trying to book every single week and you need to it as far advances. You can't because that gives you the opportunity aged feel comfortable you.

Los Angeles L. A. Weekly
"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"And I. Believe me I'm not making fun of it or lessening the impact of it, but I had gone to New York these the Mariah Carey album came out that morning the glitter album. And over the next few months, EMI cut three thousand people from the staff around the world. Can Nancy Berry the chairman and the Vice Chairman were dismissed and Alon Levy and David Munns came into run the company. And all of a sudden I found myself in a role where I had to write long. Winded. Proposals of why we wanted to do a deal with rhapsody we did the deal with rhapsody in December of two thousand one. and. Why would we want to have subscription and aren't we giving away everything if people can listen to anything, they want for ten dollars a month. Why would we want to do it and I had to explain you're GONNA get a consistent amount of revenue. It's not gonNA peaks and valleys based on is there a hit album or do we have three bad albums this quarter and so the combination of looking ninety days out to meet the quarter. To basically what are your revenues for the next three months? Are we going to meet targets? There was this. Pressure to come up with revenue opportunities. My argument was that subscription would be a long term revenue opportunity at the time. I was looked at as the guy who was going to kill the music business. I really believe that if I could hear anything I wanted whenever I want I'd pay ten bucks every month and we also had to get out of this. Ignorance that most people only by two or three CDs a year. If you can get ten dollars a month from everybody every month you've actually increased the revenue base for the industry but I had to do and I've said this year class and I've said, don't take what I don't I don't want your parents calling me telling me you got fired because you did what I did. I would be asked for substantiating data Mark Mulligan. Now would be somebody that you might go to for research at media research to get substantiating data on a particular idea at the time there was no data, but I would be asked..

David Munns Mariah Carey EMI Vice Chairman Alon Levy Mark Mulligan Nancy Berry chairman New York
"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"This ten Watt College Station in University Heights Ohio. And I met some of the Promo guys and I met some DJ's from other stations and I met this Guy Billy Bass Billy adopted me. He liked me and we ended up hanging out a lot heaters, guys at Columbia records and organic. Frankly Oh, who went on to manage Michael Jackson and Steve Popovich. Iran Colombia, again, he Martin looney became like my stepparents and they got a job at Columbia records. I ended up living in Boston, eventually for Warner Brothers, I'm skipping a bunch of stuff but I ended up going into artist development moving to Boston and Boston, was a real little tech community I started going to the Boston commuting store and I met the people that advent speakers and the people that DB X., which was the competitor to Dolby. Star. Vice Reduction. and. It was culminated in then moving to Los Angeles and ending up in nineteen eighty two. On a workgroup between Atari Warner, music group and Hewlett Packard. Looking at what the future of digital would be. At Eighty two, there was no internet There was Internet web that was not until ninety four a motive at that point was three hundred Baud, which is like three hundred bits as opposed to five million megabits are whatever I mean. Basically, it was literally took his long descendant emails it does to send the movie now. Sixteen K Computer whenever but we sat in meetings over a year talking about. Streaming, downloading, burning CD's at a time when a CD burner cost twenty, thousand dollars and a blank disk cost one hundred bucks. But we knew it eventually would come down the pricing. This would all be manageable. But we started talking about. And it's always sounds like it's a boast but it isn't it was under guiding Stan Cornyn on review if you're familiar with them at all, but he led this group. We talked about I'd say ninety percent about what's happening now yeah we talked about creating playlist. We talked about creating mix. The CD was coming out in eighty three about a year later, and we're talking about wants to CDs adopted as the music listening platform and LASERDISC had already come out and seventy nine when video and audio or all digital what will people? WanNa do? We're talking the time where there's no high speed Internet, a computer is a four megahertz computer four point seven, seven Megahertz Not Gigahertz there is sixteen K of memory and you're storing things on cassettes. But we knew the bandwidth would come the storage would come when the platforms would eventually arrive. So in a typical long winded answer for me. I've been waiting for the mainstreaming of all this stuff since literally eighty, two, eighty, three, eighty, four are then ended up at Phillips producing music CD ROMs and Phillips perfected the not perfected the platform but a perfected the implementation of 'em beg. So, in ninety three, we were doing 'em one movies. We'd licensed every title from paramount pictures. And so instead of a DVD which is a movie on a disk blueberry were would five movies on a disk 'em beg one was a a larger size encoding format, but you could get a half a movie on a disk. So you had two discs per movie..

Boston Billy Bass Billy Columbia records Steve Popovich Stan Cornyn Watt College Station Hewlett Packard Warner Brothers Atari Warner Phillips DJ Dolby University Heights Ohio Los Angeles Michael Jackson Martin looney Iran Colombia
"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"Have them serenade your your your partner for their birthday anniversary or you can set up a chat for somebody's birthday where you say, Hey, would you like to talk about guitars with my partner because they're really into the same kind of guitar that you play and so there are those kind of VIP things as well. And then there's companies like stage which has been around since two thousand nine pretty much had decided to bring the oars in for quite a while and and all of a sudden they had gross something like five, hundred, thousand dollars in two thousand nineteen. But in the first three weeks of covid lockdown, they had already seen eight hundred and fifty thousand dollars rolling Grosso. All sorts of different different platforms than each of them is a little little different. A company that we work at this bands in town, which is not a live streaming platform it's a concert discovery platform, but they quickly adapted to help all the artists who are having to pit to livestream to help them discover livestream. They did that by starting their own twitch channel and using that as a way to focus on. Up, and coming artists and help them get audience but then they also added a watch live. So now you can get notifications either via their APP or email when a band that you like is planning to do a live stream concert, you can find out about it but just with a notification. So there's a wide variety of stuff happening there when thing been interesting is. That people now have flexible time to be able to speak to each other and connect and it. It seems like that's been an accidental benefit for what's been going on as you've been able to bring voices together that may have been tangled up in travel or Mer projects, and now they've got time to actually that I, think that's a really good point I think that people. Are Frequently too busy. There's too much going on it. All of us feel pretty busy during this at least those of us who are in the in the working world as opposed to maybe the education world I don't know how it is. In terms of students. They may feel like they're going crazy because they have so much free time, but in work. Don't have so much free time. I just got what's happening. It's almost the opposite. Yes I think everyone's having that right? It's like you get this your schedule changes and there's no excuses not to do more and you end up doing more as a result and so that's definitely what I've seen. But you know I used to use this kind of hack for business networking in the music industry, which is show up in a city and say I'm here for two days. Can you meet with me that works so much better than just being in the same city as somebody all the time because it's like, yes, sure..

partner
"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"That's come You know T to turn into a lot of opportunity for. Innovation so. Some interesting things have come out as a variety I mean as a as a as a result of that in one of them is the variety of ways in which to monetize that which we could get into one of them is. The reemergence of kind of a conversation that was existing in digital music five and ten years ago about ubiquity versus obscurity, and how you approach live streaming is results and that to me that conversation came up when win social media's I started getting big digital streaming services started getting back and we talked about that, and then the other thing is just habits. Will these habits stay I? Think there are new habits being formed right now I don't think once it's safe to go out I. Don't think concerts are over I don't think people are like Oh. Yeah. Live streaming is so much better than going to a festival or a bar or club or theatre but I do think people might say. Now. In the future well, I was going to go to this show, but it's really too far away. So I think a livestream or well there's no shows that I want to go to this weekend. But there is this cool thing happening on fortnight and I think I'll just dive into it that way now engage music that way too. So I think there are habits that are being formed right now that will change what happens. They won't be a hundred percent shift from real concerts to live streaming, but it will be a shift that stays with people pass this. Well, it also opens an opportunity for a different type of doing so that you know. It's almost like we assumed that we've got scarcity of a live concert and then we have a stream that of course, you can't really hold back and it's GonNa, be coming at you no matter what and if not, it'll be pirated, and now there's the opportunity to kind of provide other VIP delivery create artificial scarcity through livestream..

livestream
"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"gigi" Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"Places for people to discuss what's happening in creative industries for innovators overall. But you can start out and find us at creative innovators podcast dot com from there over time, we're going to bring all sorts of opportunities to you as well as ask you who you would like to see on this podcast. What creative innovators would you like to hear their life journey stories and who do you already know that you're massively excited about? Think of this like a informal version of the MacArthur Genius Grant. You can help us find people which by the way, how that works that there's people that nominate people for those grants. You can nominate people to be on this podcast. So again, we hang out at creative innovators podcast dot com were also going to be hanging out in all the usual social media spaces. Plus having a space for people who'd like to be in the conversation to hang out outside of social media we're just getting started. So we're going to be sharing three final podcast of innovating music to be also our first three podcasts or I should say are second third and fourth podcast in we're going to be then expanding into all sorts of other dimensions and directions. Thanks again for listening to this pilot conversation and we'll be seeing you next on creative innovators. Thanks..