36 Burst results for "Gibbons"

Fresh "Gibbons" from Terry Meiners

Terry Meiners

00:56 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh "Gibbons" from Terry Meiners

"And Mck Jagger. It has 16 teenage girlfriends. I don't know what's going on. It was one of those things where they needed somebody that could drive the van. So they got to give. He was the mom of the Charlie's old and he doesn't drink. What's it doing? Banging away this songs from Only 50 years ago. Keith Richards on guitar for being so try. Okay, So how's an 80 year old going to sit out there and just hammer away at these? So he's not going? That's his heart. He's recovering. I wonder how old this guy as he's taken his place. It doesn't say in here. What's his name Steve Jordan. Never heard of the guy. Otherwise ZZ top. I see they're they're continuing with her tour, and now they're putting Dusty Hills hat on the microphone That man would have used that gave me chills when I first saw that photo. On article with Dusty's wife and she talked about the last few minutes with him. It was really powerful. And then, of course, you know they were talking to Billy Gibbons and he said he told us Got to keep doing it. Shows got to go on. So it's that that had to be hard that first time we're Billy and Frank there when he died know they were out. No. They were out on the road. Oh, my God. They were out on the road, so I guess they might have talked to him. Maybe his wife said, just ain't gonna go well, so Steve Jordan, he's a musical director. We know him because he's on the band for SNL. He was on the band for SNL and late night with Larry David. Larry David Letterman. I'll be done So for him. What a boy. Steve Jordan, filling in for the Rolling Stones until Charlie Watts decides he wants to working. I think that says 64. Okay, he's still there. But yeah, he's going to his wrists are 16 years younger than Charlie Watts Back in a few is hailing the knobs on NewsRadio, 8 40. W H A F. It's off, please. Heading out tonight Watch for delays still on 64 westbound over the Sherman Minton Bridge and up in New Albany because of lane closures on the bridge. It's also causing delays for drivers heading westbound on the Georgia powers leading up to the 64 split there in the west end, also clearing up an accident. New cutting road in Scottsdale Boulevard 65 cm looking good through hospital curve. No problems at the water center out to the Snyder Freeway. 71 we found an easy trip past the Waterson the Snyder Not towards Crestwood. Our next report in 15 minutes I'm Bobby Ellis. NewsRadio 8 40. W H A s. As we look ahead through tonight we'll see Partly cloudy skies building in the good news is staying on the dry side and pleasant, with temperatures dropping off into the upper sixties. We look ahead for your Friday Partly sunny skies.

Steve Jordan Frank Bobby Ellis Billy Keith Richards Charlie Watts New Albany Larry David Letterman Snyder Freeway SNL Dusty Crestwood Larry David Tonight Billy Gibbons 15 Minutes Sherman Minton Bridge 16 Years Scottsdale Boulevard Georgia
Dusty Hill, Bassist for Iconic Rock Group ZZ Top, Dies at 72

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:17 sec | Last week

Dusty Hill, Bassist for Iconic Rock Group ZZ Top, Dies at 72

"Loss in the world of rock and roll. He was the bassist for One of the most popular rock acts of the seventies and eighties. ZZ Tops Dusty Hill has Died. Guitarist Billy Gibbons and drummer Frank Beard made the announcement today on Facebook and said Hill had died in his sleep at his Houston

Frank Beard Billy Gibbons Facebook Hill Houston
Nicole Gibbons: How Her Company, Clare, Upended the Paint Industry

Made By Women

02:41 min | 2 months ago

Nicole Gibbons: How Her Company, Clare, Upended the Paint Industry

"I kept exploring different mark opportunities and i came across the pain. Or you know as a designer. I was super passionate about color. And i realized this industry was archaic. The shopping experience was broken. And that's how. I knew. I had a good opportunity might lands. It's amazing actually talk about that because a lot of people think there's like an idea in the middle of the night and someone jumps out of bed and starts their company but what you just described was so thoughtful such a thoughtful process of what you wanted to do and establish your as you say your credentials in your credibility and then then you saw an opening in the market. I mean ask a very simple question. How did you come up with the name. Yeah so. I saw that. All the brands paint. Were hyper masculine. So you know. Benjamin moore darren williams dutch boy. You know they all sound like dudes and plaid shirts and i know from my experience in home that the people who really making the caller decisions in household women and i felt like brands were failing to appeal. The women So i intentionally wanted a name. That was feminine approachable. Easier member friendly sounding Annan name that could be personified so you really build the personality around the brown. And then lastly. I wanted a name that tied back to some deeper meaning unrelated related to color so clear comes from a latin root word laris. That means bright and brilliant And so the word play their felt really appropriate because both brilliant in terms of being innovative in for thinking but also in terms of dollar in. Was you know it kind of checked. All those boxes and it was originally just a working title. Because i wasn't sure what to call the brand but after while it just felt right and sort of stock to the first steps. You took to get this vision off the ground. Yeah so i. I really thought about it for about a year You know super busy in mike company kept thinking like this is such a good idea. How do i make this happened. What do i do to focus my attention. So i thought of this is an idea being twenty six sixteen and then really kind of thought about it off and on the entire year In in the meeting twenty seventeen january you know he wake up on the first of the year and it's kind of like new year new me. What am i gonna do with my life this year. i came back to the idea for clarendon. Like if i don't do this now i probably will never do it. So what are the steps. You take to need to take to make this happen. So i decided to take a quarter off. Vermeille designed firm. I was in a lucky position. That was wrapping up a couple of projects from but two thousand sixteen and so i finished up those products. But i didn't take on any new clients. And i spent i said to myself one quarter shoe explore the opportunity to talk to people in the paint industry figure out. You know how. I might go about doing this. And also get the company

Benjamin Moore Darren Williams Annan Vermeille Clarendon
A Prayer for All Graduates Facing an Uncertain Future

Your Daily Prayer

01:57 min | 2 months ago

A Prayer for All Graduates Facing an Uncertain Future

"Facing an uncertain future written by debbie mcdaniel and read by kelly. Gibbons for i know the plans. I have for you declares the lord plans to prosper you and not to harm you plans to give you a hope and a future jeremiah. Twenty nine eleven. The season of graduation and new beginnings can bring a mixed bag of emotions. Too many of us though. It's a time of celebration and fresh starts. The letting go process can bring some pain to yet. Parenting is often just about that. The letting go and whether it's letting go as they head to kindergarten or letting go as they head to college or straight off into their first job it can be difficult no more so in these uncertain fearful times. We are currently facing as a nation as a world. But there's hope to remember. Our children are his no matter where they go or how old they are. They are in his care. They are in his hands and he has a great purpose for them in this life. And that's the very best place we can let them go. We're entrusting them again straight into the safe care a powerful and loving god and that's the safest place they can be. His hands are big to carry to hold to protect to cover to lead and he loves each one of them more than we could ever imagine. This world is more uncertain than ever. But god is always faithful and true. Here is a special prayer of blessing for our graduates this year. Let's

Debbie Mcdaniel Gibbons Jeremiah Kelly
Data-Driven Journalism Enabled by the Africa Data Hub

Future Cities Africa

02:02 min | 3 months ago

Data-Driven Journalism Enabled by the Africa Data Hub

"Finley is africa. Data up project lead at open cities lab. We'll be discussing. The newly launched african data before we get into that welcomes. Sarah give us a brief inch zero at open cities lab and the project needed africa data hem and which is a project run by open cities lab as civic organization that's based in gibbon but has now branched out to joe bag capetown and they run projects that support data and take solutions for government and civil society to hold people accountable and to offer a better service delivery where it's needed so that africa data how is a project that was started october. Twenty twenty and it is a data platform that seeks to make complex inaccessible data about covid and related issues more accessible to journalists and the public and researchers and it seeks to stimulate data driven journalism and decision making across the continent. Because at the moment there are a lot of data challenges around covid for africa. We see that in europe and america. There's a lot of data available on the continent. It's far more difficult to come by. How do we get individuals to trust the the data that they receive from from the media and from journalists in environment that currently living in trust both in the media and in government is at an all time low but one of the ways that we can overcome that is providing accuracy and credibility and by unpacking the sources in the make a dodgy around how that data is collected if we are clear that this is the reason data's being collected. We are clear that this is how it was done. Why who it was funded by that offers. A level of trust that audiences can then buy into

Africa Joe Bag Government And Civil Society Finley Gibbon Sarah Europe America
A Prayer of Love from 1 Corinthians 13

Your Daily Prayer

01:30 min | 4 months ago

A Prayer of Love from 1 Corinthians 13

"Prayer of love from. I corinthians thirteen written by debbie mcdaniel and read by kelly. Gibbons love never fails. I corinthians thirteen eight known as the love chapter. I corinthians thirteen is one of the greatest reminders to us. Today of what real love looks like and what. It doesn't look like widely read at weddings or written all over. Love notes eastwards may become so familiar over time. It can almost lose some of their important message as we read this portion of scripture. Today let us ask god for help in soaking in every truth as we pray his powerful words back to him let us ask for the freshness of his spirit to bring his message of love alive within our hearts and flowing through our lives. We can't do it on our own. We never be able to muster enough strength within us. It's only possible through him and more than ever before our world needs to see what true love looks like. We can do a lot of good things in this life. We can give gifts. And we can even make notable sacrifices for others but if we do not have christ within us compelling us filling us every moment of every day it prophets us nothing

Debbie Mcdaniel Gibbons Kelly
A Prayer for When it Feels Like Winter Will Never End

Your Daily Prayer

03:33 min | 5 months ago

A Prayer for When it Feels Like Winter Will Never End

"Prayer for when it feels like winter will never end. Written by gregory calls and read by kelly. Gibbons there is a time for everything an a season for every activity under the heavens ecclesiastes three one dear god. Why is it so hard for me to believe that spring is coming. It's silly to doubt it. I know in all my years watching the season's pass. Spring has never once failed me. No matter how tardy it may seem the sun always comes home from a long vacation to melt. The forlorn snow the grass emerges a little brown at first inverted and full of life. The birds return making nests whistling solos into a warm blue sky. No matter how long it takes winter always to an end. But even though i know it's true even though i've witnessed it year after year i'm struggling to believe in spring right now. The world has been gray for so long that i barely remember what it looks like in color. My memories of brighter days have frozen over in the cold dangling like icicles just out of reach. Hope is hard to hold onto with frostbitten fingers. Why is it so hard for me to trust that. You'll keep your promises my wintertime. Despair is about far more than winter itself. It's the same doubt that overtakes me. Every season of difficulty every setback in sorrow. No matter how many times i've seen your faithfulness in the past each new dark day pushes me back to the edge of my seat. I hold my breath. Poised in suspense wondering. If grace could possibly come through this time my memory is so short today god. I'm not asking spring to come before. It's time i'm just asking that you teach me to cling to a hope that feels far away. Give me the grace of memory. Remind me of the countless ways. Both big and small that you've already proven yourself to me. Kim remind me that although hopeless times have come and gone like passing seasons they have never been the end of my story. Remind me of breakthrough and laughter and light. Remind me what springfields like. The cold has sunk so deep into my bones. Said it threatens to define me give me warmth enough to endure if me crackling fireplaces and hot apple cider and blankets shared with friends if me encouraging words and embraces just the right moment give me fresh reminders of your love and grace small mercies to sustain me until bigger mercy's arrive and then when the time comes please give me spring again give me a heart rejoices in the delights and sorrows of each passing year a heart grows warmer with every winter. It endures. teach me to believe in spring again. Jesus's name a

Gibbons Gregory Kelly Grace KIM Apple Jesus
Are pro-Trump extremists messages more dangerous if theyre encrypted?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:39 min | 7 months ago

Are pro-Trump extremists messages more dangerous if theyre encrypted?

"Parlor is offline. Facebook and twitter are camping down on extremist speech on their platforms. So more people are migrating to absolute signal which encrypt messages between parties and telegram. Which can that blunts the power extremist messages but also makes it harder for law enforcement to see what they might be up to reigniting a year's long debate about encryption itself. Alexander gibbons is the president and ceo of the center for democracy and technology. I asked her about the trade offs. So in a way the relocation of these conversations to smaller private group settings is actually exactly what the major platforms were hoping for it removes the conversation from the public square where new people can be recruited radicalized of course on the other hand moving to smaller private settings makes it much harder for disinformation researchers and law enforcement to understand what's going on to respond to it and that's a really challenging part of the problem here and this has been a complaint of law enforcement for a long time right that these platforms reduce visibility. And of course the counterpoint is. Yes but they increase privacy. Yeah so it's a really active debate when we look at this. We really do see it. As a dangerous you know. Journalists human rights activists around the world members of congress doctors engaging in telemedicine they all rely on encryption to protect their communications. And it's a tool that's used around the world and really important ways and so one of the trade offs are the balancing that we have to think about is the impact potentially on law enforcement being able to go after the worst of the worst of these activities versus the huge benefits of that technology to so many other forms of expression and communication around the world. One could argue that we have just lived through an are still living through sort of a five year rolling experiment in disinformation and amplify and i wonder. Do we have a sense now of what happens. When for example these conversations have to go small and go private. is there an impact. When lies are amplified when conversations are these small private messaging apps. It does help in terms of reducing the reach for this type of content You know those those platforms are more private. They're quieter it doesn't participating kind of the general traffic in a way that lets people be recruited. So that's one point. The other is that there are ways that even with encrypted messaging that law enforcement and others including the platforms themselves can help respond to the worst abuses so first of all groups and users can still be reported if information is discovered. You know whether through an individual reporting or journalists or law enforcement or researchers go undercover in these groups platforms can respond and take them down for violating their terms of service. Right you still have to police work. Yeah right exactly so. The police work can get a has to continue and can continue. The second is that some tools. And what's up it's done. This recently can restrict things like message forwarding within these private apps to help reduce for -ality what stopped announced this thus fall is one of their efforts to respond to misinformation. They said that any message that had been forwarded five or more times now has a new limit so that could only be forwarded to a single person at a time as opposed to large groups so there's interventions that the platforms can do while still respecting the privacy and security of the messages to still make sure that the platforms are being used or mitigating. The potential worst abuses. Are you aware of any kind of ongoing efforts or existing legislation to try to require companies to provide access to encrypted messaging. Yes there is an increasing amount of pressure for example a bill that was introduced last year. That will likely be reintroduced in the new congress called the earn. It act which is trying to target child sexual abuse material online. Obviously just a horrendous problem. One of the challenges though is that that legislation in its original formulation tried to get it this by holding platforms potentially liable if they should have known about child sexual abuse material on their platforms and they didn't because they offer encrypted messaging that's really problematic because that's gonna disincentivize communications platforms from offering that type of secure and private messaging. So one of the things that we focused on is saying yes. Child sexual abuse material is a horrible problem. Let's focus on resources for law enforcement as opposed to having again these really tough tradeoffs that end up jeopardizing free speech in communication in such important ways.

Alexander Gibbons Center For Democracy And Techn Twitter Facebook Congress
Florida voters lift minimum wage to $15 an hour

Glenn Beck

00:31 sec | 9 months ago

Florida voters lift minimum wage to $15 an hour

"Are giving mixed reviews to Florida voters decision to raise the state's minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2026. Carl Gibbons runs third Eye Management of business consulting firm in Naples. He thinks brick and mortar retailers may abandon stores for online shopping rather than put whatever resource is that I've got left into reopening, rehiring retraining on all of those things on adding to the wide costs, they'll just diverted and go. Elektronik supporters say minimum wage hikes immediately go back. To the community through spending posting

Carl Gibbons Naples Florida Elektronik
The earliest human footprints in Arabia

Science Magazine Podcast

07:54 min | 11 months ago

The earliest human footprints in Arabia

"Now, we have contributing correspondent and gibbons. She wrote this week about the likely earliest human footprints on the Arabian Peninsula high an hi Sarah how old or how early are these footprints but that's a good question. They threw a whole package of dating methods at them and came up with in the Ballpark of twenty, one, thousand, two, hundred, and ten, thousand years old. Now the dates are not absolute. There's some questions about them, but that's a pretty good ballpark. How does this age compare to previous hints or clues that humans modern humans early modern humans were on the Arabian Peninsula. Here's the. We know that early hominids members of human family have been migrating out of Africa for two million years because we find fossils of our ancestors in the public of Georgia we find them in. Asia. We find them in Eurasia place, but we don't know how they got out and the most logical route is they had to walk through Rabia because they couldn't fly. They couldn't paddleboats a at that point the one landmass in the way between Africa where humans arose originally, our ancestors arose and Eurasia is through Arabia. So we know they had to go through there, but there's a huge gap there are. No tools older than three hundred to five, hundred, thousand years, and what is there is not definitive. The only fossil have a member of the human family from Arabia is a finger bone that is about eighty eight, thousand years old. So the mystery is, where's the evidence of members of the human family marching through Arabia, and then the second part of that is modern humans specifically, our ancestors Homo sapiens arose probably in Africa, because we see fossils in the ballpark of one, hundred, eight, thousand, three, hundred, thousand years of Proto early Homo, sapiens arising and Africa, and then we find more of these sort. Of Early Homo Sapiens in Greece dating possibly back to as early as two hundred and ten thousand. So we know that they got out right now we're just trying to find evidence. Is there something that going on in the Arabian Peninsula that either people didn't want to hang out there for very long or that erased a lot of evidence. Reagan. Peninsula, has covered with desert's it's very dry today the food desert where they found these fossils is parched arid but there were periods in the past where the planet was cooler and wetter, and during those times hundred, twenty, five, thousand years ago it was. One of them, it was green radio was covered with tens of thousands of lakes. They were grasslands between them. If you think about these early human ancestors, it's not a separate continent or a separate place for them to go to its Afro Arabia, right? Yeah. So it's an extension of Africa if the client is good and they're following large game, how were they able to find these footprints? This is a very large area and it's a few remnants of human passing through. Yes. So this team will have by Michael, Leah and it's an international team of Saudi Arabians in a number of people on. Has Been doing a search of scouring the deserts of. Arabia. For the last decade, they start with satellite imagery which helps them see parched ancient lake beds which have sort of characteristic white halio souls often these ancient sediments that stand out in the satellites and then go down to ground truth what they see on the satellites, an airplane shots they go in on foot in jeeps, and in this case they saw this ancient. Lake better rolling out as white sediment. It had just been recently exposed by Rosen and they found the footprints of the animals which was amazing and as I looked closer to one hundreds of footprints, it was four hundred mostly animals but they did identify a small number. It was seven that seemed to be human footprints. So they knew right away they were very excited about that that this was something that was important how Can you tell that they're human footprints and not some other upright walking relative? There's not a whole science of studying human footprints ever since the first ones are found in la totally in Tanzania and Kenya there've been a number of footprints that have been studied people use three D morphometric dimensional analysis with computational imaging or can really look at the depth and they could model how much weight would have been needed to make. That footprint, the length of the foot, the stride between the steps, and then they've done studies living people in their footprints in Africa to sort of test out those ideas and Lo, and behold when they do that to these footprints, they seem to come up with somebody kind of humor that was taller and maybe a little lighter weight more like a modern human of Homo sapiens and say an Andrew Tall so based on that. They say, Oh, these probably were made by Homo sapiens although we cannot rule out that nanotubes might have been there to is there anything else can tell about these people by looking at these marks I think if they get more, they can start to tell about their social structure footprint studies in Africa. I've got quite complicated where you could see the direction that they're going in the payson different members of social groups you can. To see what they are the packs of humans look like you know, what size are they how many are in these groups? What are they doing a lot of the way in this case, they're not spending a lotta time. They're just sort of walking through. This is a bantering group. What is really really cool. Though is that footprint site these are a snapshot of a single moment in time a single day most of the. Time when you have an archaeological site in a layer soil that you get the fossils of the tools and the dates, all that took place. This fan is usually hundreds of thousands, tens of thousands of years. So if you find an animal bone near a prominent human early Human Boehner tool, you don't necessarily know fear there at the same time as parch with footprints like these these were lay down in the same day maybe. A couple of days and they dried out and then got caught up in preserved. So we know they were all there at the same time. So you get this really cool day in the life look at the and of the animals they were with, which is really cool in this case and lots of animals. Yes. Almost four hundred footprints of animals including very interesting. A wild asses which I don't think we're carrying burdens but. That's kind of neat and they were elephants and the thing that's interesting about the elephants as their popular disappeared for the Middle East, just in Africa. Thanks for three hundred years ago and here they are in hundred twenty, thousand in Arabia and the camps they also Campbell's it's kind of interesting that such large animals with Aaron. It begs the question were these humans following them where they attracted them. Going back to the, we talked about it being about one, hundred, twenty, thousand years old. There's some question about the date but if that were cracked, is there anything particularly Gordon about this time human history about what we know about migrations that we could link these prince two? Yes. So what is really interesting is that genetic evidence says that everybody outside of Africa. Came from migrations that happened in the last fifty to eighty thousand years. So this state predates that we happen to know that early Homo Sapiens were in the Middle East pretty quickly after this or at the same time they're fossils in caves. At school and cough so that our early sort of product Homo sapiens. So we know humans are at sorta suggests that because we don't have DNA that dates back this early these were failed migrations. These were members of the human family that went out they weren't shelled migrations for them they lived, but they did not contribute to the gene pool of letting people today that's one hypothesis but it also shows that there's more complex story of groups of humans migrating out of Africa constantly whenever the weather excitement is right that it's three to nothing that they can get water follow animals to meet and trek. Africa. They can cross the desert. It looks like humans were doing that whenever they could and so how do they contribute tour ancestry today a really interesting question and how many different kinds of hominids out there. Thank you so much an thank you. Sir,

Africa Arabian Peninsula Arabia Middle East Afro Arabia Gibbons Asia Cough Rabia Sarah Eurasia Saudi Arabians Reagan Georgia Tanzania
"gibbons" Discussed on The Payroll Podcast

The Payroll Podcast

03:46 min | 11 months ago

"gibbons" Discussed on The Payroll Podcast

"The testing had been completed are just get too excited. I i think. Sometimes the editors they just wanted locker room really. Because i come. Let's get shit. let's get it all. you know. We need to do this now and actually is a process that we need case is surprised says these to happen to to to make sure things correctly on the lossing bit. One is for dave When they need to appear right background does set with me. I'm afraid needs to be done in these right now. Show like i'm sure people listening can Can can feel the same way and can sympathize with as well. But if we're gonna find yourself pool at number one first question which individual has influenced your career. The most so when i studied my degree much christine johnson and i just i remember attention that much of review days and she was just normal. You know that is difficult to explain. She put it on the level that you could just relate to and she inspired me to savante cheater. This and united way i teach and review is very similar. Be related to the process. People will learn a lot better so she was my inspiration professionally. I know christine johnson. So have great. Great chumps to give shout out here on the poco ostlund tastic. Second one of the main resources. That really helped you on your career journey. High-pitched say that it's been colleagues really and in the company's offer full and the pp visit voss amount of information available online. And i think a lot of us experience the the grayness as the hmo things not always black and white and sometimes you need to serve rely on colleagues cheats groups to be able to find your way forwards in some situations so i think results wise is really been colleagues have didn't support safe all the way through accent definitely getting a collaborative field from this year's world something equally passionate hours that collaboration piece which is great which is great so if you can invite three people to didn't party they can be dead or alive. Who would they be and why. Oh gosh so definitely do. I think should be funny.

christine johnson this year three people dave Second one first question One poco ostlund number one
"gibbons" Discussed on The Payroll Podcast

The Payroll Podcast

03:47 min | 11 months ago

"gibbons" Discussed on The Payroll Podcast

"They should be pushing their employees to play a bigger paul in the financial wellness. Their employees do you think they can do that through pay. What do you think it's a a payroll manager responsibility to trot improve the financial wellness of their employees through this experience. This needs to come from the power manager. Should this come from above. I think it's a combination of both to be fair. I think that impair all we know is a very emotive subject. We knew that you know you can get someone's pay incorrectly calculated and the knock on effects that quite severe so you want to actually change that to positive incentive every time they get paid their experienced a really good experience in sense of information fully about financial who have open whether it's about switching your old in atrocities plaza would every may be. It's just taking that step it server. You have to for the captive audience at that time. He likens live in that pace when people really thinking about what today. How much money like less this to be able to take holiday to the shops. Or whatever and bud cindy things for the house and at that point and i think pero people we see a lot of what happens and we. We really get live from people that we pay in terms of struggles. You can tend to that when you get here is back. And things of that that i think the payroll professional to be. Today's guys is how much pressure his gonna be. Required on me and say it with my background's nelson suffer ivoire Eleven years so i completely understand the struggles that tyrod festivals render boever's House or or over a beer. I'm how that time is stretched. So i think if you can put something around atolls you already do which is delivering the payslip. The allows employees to be able to to be engaged by their employer. Then why would you not really want certain to champion that. And i think the paraprofessional properly sometimes banff can voice across has loud as as they should good opportunity then using this as an example. Get people to find that voice because this seems to be a a win win. Solution around really improves employee. Experience than you. You achieve your strategic objectives at board level in terms of that retention pace but also allows you to see as a professional have a real impact on on a on a broader organization objective as well around my experience piece of financial. Wellness is quite interesting dynamic. Because you know it's not often the payroll people have not even seen it. Sounds like this. The the modern payslip is one of the few things that comes to the fore now another opportunity propel professionals kind of raise their hands for the top and said actually. We should be doing something here because you can make a difference. I think so. I think we get our primary fake Data we refer to us over engagement to and i think that pyro professional is probably the pass on the in any organization. People will just naturally migrate to say whether they've got clear about look into the benefits About pay or query tends to feedback three Payroll if it's anything even by a small margin to to payroll. That user has to deal with that situation. And i think that with the interactive side is what we try to do is give time back to payroll professional so wherever that is providing financial. Open all.

both today Today Eleven years one festivals ivoire
Mark Toft  How to Build an Authentic Brand in an Insincere Age

The $100 MBA Show

09:59 min | 1 year ago

Mark Toft How to Build an Authentic Brand in an Insincere Age

"Guests. Teacher is mark. Toft and marked off is going to be teaching you how to build an authentic brand in an insincere age. Everybody is trying to project their brand on social media on Youtube with Webinars, beating their chests with bravado, and it's just falling on deaf ears how you stand out when everybody's trying to brand themselves and. Look like they're winning will that's why we brought on Mark Toft to teach you how to build a branding strategy. The actually works that's real and Authentic Marta is a chief strategy officer and Co founder of the narrator group and he's an absolute branding expert. He was the lead digital writer on the staples easy and project. He has over twenty five years of experience in business and branding, and he wants to give you a gift today a great lesson on how to focus and craft a brand that matters into these noisy world. We got a lot to cover in today's guest lessons. So let's get into it. Let's get down to business. This message is brought to you by windows and HP everyone has a different way to work whether it's typing on a computer sketching out notes with a pen or accessing all your stuff on your phone with windows HP. You'll have all the tools you need to work the way you want. So whatever you do, make it you with windows and HP see how windows dot com slash HP. We brought on Mark Toft today to teach you a great lesson on building an authentic brand a brand that stands out brand people talk about a brand that really has a message and resonates with people they say brand or your brand is what other people say about you when you're not around, let's make sure they say, well, we want them to say it's your job to craft that narrative. So GonNA, hinder over a mark to t shoe his guests lesson on doing just that. Back, to rally the lesson, give my takeaways but for now, take it away mark. Hello everyone. This is mark talked I'm grateful join me today I'll be teaching you about why brand authenticity is critical to success and three things that all authentic brands do. So let's get down to business. Before we dive in. Let's pause on that word branding a lot of businesses get knotted up by especially start-ups. Here's a helpful and pragmatic way to think about it. If you pulled five people aside at your company and ask them what you do and why you. Would you get five different answers? This. Is the kind of challenge branding solve. But the truth is at a lot of what passes for branding materials and consultation are thickening agents meant to make businesses feel they've paid for something substantial complex defying an order to profit Tim Ferriss has called it. But branding is in fact, very simple. You don't need pages of charts and graphs to define it just a few words or a sentence. Branding. Is what you stand for and what people experience from your products and services. It's not what you claim to be. It's what you are. Your brand is your purpose advertising takes that purpose and assembles it into compelling story. That's twenty five years of frontline branding and advertising experience packed into a few words. But why is authenticity important to branding? Because the temptation to tweet or share things on social media in order to be accepted has never been greater. In a sense, we're all performing for each other like never before. Judging by our music or movies social media, not to mention her branding and advertising being true to ourselves. As novel we're after we want to seem to be true to ourselves want the appearance of authenticity. Than the fact. The wise words of Simon Sinek provide good corrective branding is an exercise and trust building. He says when we fake our way to trust that trust will eventually collapse. One level of brand authenticity relates facts. Is that cookie made with natural ingredients is that watch rolex a knockoff? Now this kind of authenticity isn't unimportant. But it's only a starting point. It's like telling people your height or your eye color. These details don't penetrate to who you are were to who your brand really is. It's easy for companies to get hung up and telling the history of their founding. In exacting detail they feel they have to recite information about their origins founded in this year by these two people humble beginnings in a garage or basement. I'm not saying these things should be hidden, but they frequently don't matter. When you think of authenticity branding, think of it, this way brand authenticity is believing in and delivering on what you claim about yourself and your products and services. It's your brand's essence not it's facts or its features. And this gets us to the first thing that all authentic brands do they're built on a clear purpose. In the movie office space and Unhappy Employees named Peter Gibbons, guts, sufficient his cubicle and fights the desire to throttle the CO worker who tells him must be having a case of the Mondays. It's funny because many of us have had jobs like peters bad jobs jobs that seem to have no function other than to make us move paper around in dream of the day will quit. Meaninglessness is deadly for brands because humans are wired for purpose, employees leave jobs when they don't find sufficient meaning pay and benefits are rarely the cause. You can't capture your purpose with long mission statement and pages of brand strategy employees and customers need something clear simple and true. They can go back to again and again. My partners and I call it the hill you defend it's the first and the final ground on which you stake the life your business. Their other popular ways to describe the same basic idea. Jim Collins argues that all successful companies adhere to a hedgehog concept. They succeed by finding and focusing on one thing that they do really well. Simon Sinek talks about the golden circle and starting with why The center of the Golden Circle is a brands reason for being it's why. Don't be afraid to embrace a seemingly humble purpose that you can actually live out rather than a high falutin purpose that has little relation to the products or services you provide. One Young Entrepreneur I met was launching a firm dedicated to sustainable architecture, her passion and her intelligence. Clear. Although. Her purpose was staring right in the face building better buildings that is buildings that are more affordable and more beautiful and friendlier to the environment. She was clinging to a phrase that she had fallen in love with. We're going to change the vernacular architecture. She told me do you know what that means? Neither do I. Should be more likely to find her company's authentic purpose by thinking of it this way. Could someone call her office and say? Hello I'd like to buy a change in architectural vernacular please. nope. But they could call and say I like to commission a building that's better and more efficiently designed. A strong purpose answers a lot of questions and even help inform business decisions. Why should we design packages this way? Why are we expanding into these markets or reaching out to these customers? Why are we aging our cheese like this? Or for employees, why do they perform their work this way or not another way? Because that's what a company dedicated to. This purpose would do. Think of Fedex with their purpose of guaranteed on time delivery. United. Airlines being the friendlier line. Now they've lost their way it seems in recent years but that purpose at one time catapulted them to being the number one carrier in the world. The second thing that all authentic brands do is they seek conflict. As. Social creatures most of us try to avoid or minimise conflict that's perfectly rational but conflict is at the heart of good stories and it's also at the heart of effective branding and advertising. Most products and companies are created out of conflict. To take a prosaic example, a busy parent is confronted by an unhappy teenager whose favourite redshirt is fading in the wash. It's a problem that needs to be solved. Tied Color Guard offers a solution, a detergent that doesn't fade reds and other bright colors even after multiple loads of laundry. The importance of conflict and branding and advertising is often overlooked. Ultimately, address in resolving conflict is why people will pay for your products or services. Conflict interestingly can help you locate and focus your brand purpose if you're struggling to pinpoint. If you're not sure how to express your brands purpose think of the conflict or the problem solve for customers. Finally the third thing that authentic brands do is they cause with caution. Not long ago people greeted with this news KFC announces buckets for. The Cure. You don't really need to learn more details to sense the approaching doom. Kentucky Fried Chicken Partner with Susan G Komen to donate fifty cents to cancer research for every bucket of chicken ordered. Funding, breast cancer research is, of course a noble cause. KFC simply wasn't the brand to do it at least not in this way. Maybe they could have donated money directly without making it depends on the consumption of fried chicken. The campaign was met with House of disapproval and was quickly withdrawn. The public is onto brands looking for cheap grace. Your customers. Dishonesty sensors are set to high. They're quick to see self interest masquerading as selflessness, and they're ready to pounce on publicize instances of inauthentic.

Mark Toft HP Simon Sinek KFC Toft Youtube Chief Strategy Officer Writer Tim Ferriss Jim Collins Fedex Co Founder Peter Gibbons Kentucky Peters House Susan G Komen
Phenom-nom-nom -- Redux

Your Brain on Facts

04:33 min | 1 year ago

Phenom-nom-nom -- Redux

"Lumpy dirty potato spread slowly through Europe being brought back from South America to Spain in fifteen seventy. The Swiss believed that potato consumption would lead to infection of the lymph nodes. The Burgundy. Region of France outlawed their cultivation altogether. Some thought that spuds would cause sterility while others thought that they caused rampant sexuality. We Have Antoine Augustin Parmentier to thank for our fries, Mash and hashbrowns. Forced to subsist on potatoes on exclusively as a prisoner of the PRUSSIANS during the seven years' war poverty are not only survived, but found that he thrived. Changing public opinion was an uphill battle, however, even serving potatoes to the KINK who suffered no ill effects wasn't enough. Permit years genius stroke was to make. People think they weren't allowed to have potatoes. He had his land filled with potato plots and hired guards to protect it. Guards who were instructed to turn a blind eye to all theft and accept any and all bribes so that the public would steal the potatoes and grow them on their own land. After a time Parmentier dismissed the. And as he expected, the locals raided the land and stole almost every potato plant growing there. By the following year, nearly every farmer in the region was growing their own potatoes. The potatoes, geographical and botanical cousin. The tomato fared better initially. Spain Portugal and Italy welcomed it with open mouths, the rest of Europe not as much. Tomatoes were blamed for health problems in in the upper-class people who were willing to eat them. The wealthy eight from pewter plates, a metal, high and let. The acid from the tomatoes would lead the lead from the plates, resulting in sometimes fatal lead poisoning. Even the American colonies of the seventeen hundreds view tomatoes as a curious ornamental plant. Making matters worse the Tomato Horn. Warm a conspicuously ugly three or four inch, long green worm with a Red Horn on its rear that can ruin tomato crops was considered to be independently business, and as dangerous as a rattlesnake. It reality. You've probably seen them in your own garden. You can just pick them off by hand to dispatch them in whatever manner see fit. Lee Apocryphal champion of the Wolf Peach as tomatoes were sometimes known was New Jersey Gentleman farmer. Robert Gibbon Johnson. According to the Salem. Society in eighteen twenty around two thousand people. We're jammed into the town square. Johnson emerged from his mansion and headed up market street toward the courthouse, dressed in his usual black suit with white ruffles, black shoes and gloves try corn, hat and cane. At the courthouse steps, he spoke to the crowd. To help dispel the toll tales and fantastic fables that you've been hearing and to prove to you that it is not poisonous I am going to eat one right now. There was not a sound as he dramatically brought the tomato to his lips and took a bite. A woman in the crowd screamed and fainted, but no one paid her any attention. They were all watching Johnson as he took one bite. After another, he raised both arms. The crowd cheered, and the firemen's band blared song. He's done it. They shouted. He's alive. We, know the tomatoes and potatoes come from central and South America but lots of foods don't come from where we've been led to believe. Let's go to a lightning round real quick. Croissants art from France they were created in Vienna Austria in sixteen, Eighty, three to commemorate the defeat of Turkish forces who were attempting to tunnel under the city and were heard by bakers who were up in the early hours of morning, beginning their trade. The Anna also gave Danish pastry. Sorry Denmark. French fries are Belgian and pulp. Fiction was telling us the truth about the manny's. Though it comes in many flavors, so give it more as ALII. Philadelphia cream cheese was invented in New York and don't bother ordering London Broil. In Britain, it's an American monitor for cheap top round steak to make them sound fancier.

Robert Gibbon Johnson Tomatoes Antoine Augustin Parmentier Europe France South America Spain Denmark Theft Salem Johnson Alii Manny Anna New York Spain Portugal Britain Philadelphia Vienna Austria Italy
US Podcast Ad Revenues grew 48% in 2019

podnews

03:05 min | 1 year ago

US Podcast Ad Revenues grew 48% in 2019

"The US podcast at markets grew forty eight percent in two, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, two, seven, hundred and eight million dollars, according to the AP's annual podcast revenue study that's nearly thirty million dollars higher than they predicted host read ads were responsible for two thirds of the revenue. Now will not hate a billion in two thousand, nine twenty, though, but we are still growing the IB predict slow growth of fourteen point seven percent this year to eight hundred and twelve million dollars. Thanks to the Pan Dome thanks pandemic. It's official scripts has agreed to sell stitcher to Sirius Xm. The agreed price is three hundred twenty five million dollars. Would expect the announcement of new CEO FOR POCKET CAST shortly. It's likely to be John W. Gibbons based in La. He's a strategic advisor to Pod chaser and worked at MD and Amazon for fourteen years. SPOTIFY's Gimblett media is being sued for failing to make its podcasts accessible to the deaf and hard of hearing. The New York lawsuit argues that GIMBLETT VIOLATES THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT for failing to provide closed captioning on various podcasts. Americans are starting their audio day a little later, according to new research from Edison Research. We hope you're enjoying your lion. Shift the kickoff event for the podcast movement. University happens later today it's free to take part and free to be a member. Australia Triton digital have published their podcast report for June total downloads virtually unchanged. The report only mentions participating publishers, not including the country's largest podcast publisher the AP. Even? Though they said that they were joining in the next few months back in October, we've got a pressing corean again. Hey, are insi- our podcast network. Australia, still number one according to Triton claims podcast listening in the news and entertainment categories are record highs. Pontiac has released the US top twenty podcast rank earthy Ben Shapiro show climbs to number five that also only measures participating publishers podcast podcasters unlimited is a new podcast network and consultantcy Paul chaser ratings, reviews and replies and are available on pod Kite Zeno. Is To district NPR podcast on their diaspora focused service and Brad Schwartz. ooh became the new podcasting boss of audible. Last month has left the company after employees discovered an old sexual harassment lawsuit in which Schwartz was named. And KOSS news once upon a time in the valley from enter cadence thirteen launched today, before the was Paris or Kim. There was Traci Lords, but this adult star wasn't Demi. Moore is starring and producing in a brand new podcast. Dirty Diana, the story of a dying marriage. How to partners find their way back to each other. And returning for a second series story bound is a radio this a program designed for the podcast age collaboration between the POD, glamorous and lit hub radio

United States Strategic Advisor AP Pan Dome Australia Triton Digital New York Australia Spotify Triton CEO Edison Research Traci Lords Amazon LA NPR Ben Shapiro Diana
Wairau Incident - June 17, 1843

This Day in History Class

03:49 min | 1 year ago

Wairau Incident - June 17, 1843

"This Day in history class is production of iheartradio. Hey all I'm eve and welcome to this day in history, Class A podcast that flips through the book of history and tears out a single page every day. Today is June seventeenth twenty twenty. The Day was June seventeenth. Eighteenth forty-three. A clash between British emigrants and Mary known as the wire incident took place on the South Island in New Zealand. It was the first major armed conflict between Maori and British immigrants after the signing of the Treaty of Tonky. The new. Zealand company was a British. Joint Stock Company responsible for the colonization of New Zealand in the eighteen hundreds. It's and director Edward Gibbon. Wakefield believed that a successful colony needed to attract a balance of capitalist laborers. The company claimed to have purchased land in the Cook Strait, read and established settlements at Wellington and Nelson. While the Europeans were purchasing land in New Zealand representatives of the British Crown and Mary, Chiefs signed the Treaty of White Tonky. In May of Eighteen, Forty Lieutenant Governor William Hobson declared British authority over New Zealand. Since the Treaty of Weitang, he was signed. There has been debate over its terms, interpretations and differences between the Mary text and the text. The treaty was meant to recognize Mary ownership of their lands and give Mary people, the rights of British subjects that said many Maori were later dispossessed of their lands. Anyway the New Zealand Company promoted the country as a Briton of the south, and it began to organize large scale migration to New Zealand. But the fertile land required for all the Europeans migrating to New Zealand, did not actually exist. The company was failing. Because arable land was limited land titles were uncertain. There were two mini absentee landowners, and there was no real way to generate income through exports. By eighteen forty three, the immigrants were struggling with food supply, and the company was basically bankrupt. Throughout the early eighteen s more European, emigrants Nelson despite conflict between Mary chiefs over claims to the land being sold. But when it became clear that there was not enough arable land around Nelson for the immigrants, the company began moving forward with plans to survey the wire planes. MARY TEVES NOT TOWA TEI row per ah-ha and others were adamant that the company had not purchased this land. Despite this opposition, the company ordered survey parties to begin work in the UAE Ravelli. So, some of the chiefs. Era and victim the surveyors they burned some of the shelters that have been made from local materials and destroyed some of the surveyors equipment. Police Magistrate Augustus. Thompson issued a warrant for the arrest of involved teeth on charges of arson. A group of about fifty special constables were sent to wire it to execute the warrant. They were armed but inexperienced. On, June seventeenth eighteen, forty three, the company party arrived on the eastern side of the to a marina stream. Mari gathered on the other side of the Stream. It's unclear exactly what triggered the fighting? Though some are accounts, say that a wife may have died I from a stray shot, regardless of fight ensued and twenty two Europeans, and somewhere between four and nine Mary died. Many European immigrants feared that this was the beginning of a larger Mary Insurrection When the new governor Robert Fitzroy arrived in New Zealand that December. He was tasked with

New Zealand Joint Stock Company Mary Mary Chiefs Zealand Company Governor William Hobson Mary Teves Treaty Of White Tonky Robert Fitzroy Edward Gibbon Nelson Tonky Chiefs Cook Strait South Island Magistrate Augustus Director Wakefield
Human Speech Evolution Gets Lip Smacking Evidence

60-Second Science

02:56 min | 1 year ago

Human Speech Evolution Gets Lip Smacking Evidence

"Imagine it jetting to a chimp in chimpanzee whether portray by REX. Harrison Eddie Murphy or Robert Downey Junior Dr. doolittle learn to talk to animals, but in reality signs has remains some distance from solving the long standing question of how we humans learn to talk during our evaluation, his one new clue, a team for searches in Great Britain have demonstrated how the rapid succession of opening and closing mouth rhythms by chimpanzees. Lip smacking mimics the natural pace, acumen mouths talking. The. Findings are in the journal Biology Letters. This phenomenon has been observed before in other ape species who performed lip smacking movements at around five hurts, which falls within a range of mouth, opens, and closes characteristic of all spoken languages namely between two and seven huts, but this lip smacking timing connection had not been made in our closest. Relatives until now mouth and vocal signals with speech like rhythm, Hetero been observed in some monkeys in gibbons and Orangutans, one of our closest great relatives, so the last years had seen accumulating evidence that these rhythm other than something that only talking humans do. This was the rhythm from deeper within our prime ancestry recycled so to speak as a cornerstone for speech pollution. The Mirror of University of Warwick. Who led the study, but the sense of evolutionary continue towards speech steelhead, a big gap to cross the African Apes. There was no evidence for speech like rhythm, neither in Gorillas Bonobos nor chimpanzees, the study followed two captive populations of chimpanzees one in the UK. I'm wanting Germany as well is to wild populations in Uganda. Researchers observed lip smacking at an average of four point one five hurts the made all the observations whenever a chimpanzee was grooming another think of a hairdresser engaging an idle chatter with a customer at the Beauty Salon, the coffee mation of speech like rhythm of the mouth into Pansies, not revealed per se how language came about in our own lineage, but he offers the final confirmation to scientists that we are looking at the right place that. That, we are on the right track to solve this mystery. In that great apes in captivity in the wild steel have to reveal all their secrets about human nature in human origins, Numero also notes the variation in Lips. Mac Times both between and within the chimp groups do not appear to be hardwired rather the lip smacking variability likely reflected how individual differences and environmental factors and even social conventions affect how chimpanzees communicate with each other. Even Dr Doolittle will be amazed.

Lips Harrison Eddie Murphy Dr Doolittle Biology Letters Dr. Doolittle University Of Warwick Robert Downey Numero Britain Uganda UK MAC Beauty Salon Germany
"gibbons" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

08:54 min | 1 year ago

"gibbons" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"We always thought that was inspirational. So so you named your I I record so you know there's going to be more. There's a great scene in the documentary. Where the engineer you worked with on your second record is describing trying to find a way to make your sound big while your manager is insisting that it only be single tracked so we only just hear the band as it plays alive and there's only three of us so there's a limited number of ways to enlarge the sound of three people playing three instruments. Right correct somebody sends the manager out for Barbecue and double tracks your guitars. Yes while the cats away the mice were playing. We didn't tell the manager that the barbecue joint was thirty five miles away so we had a good two hours to Kind of beef it up and ironically or coincidentally when When the barbecue arrived with the manager who has a little bit befuddled? We took a break and then he said roll tape and here was this Enlarged effect and fortunately he liked it. He didn't quite know how it happened. So we we just kept show. We kept We kept quiet about it. And we insisted for the rest of the sessions the remainder of the week that Oh we got. We got to have barbecue again. We can go get that barbecue again. So these little to our windows were kind of it was it was growing pains but It it really enlarge the sound and not just. It was two tracks of guitar on top of each other but that a detracts had to be simple enough that you could double them which is say like you. Couldn't you couldn't get too crazy 'cause you had to be able to play it over again. The same and also that the second time around the engineer went in and Fultz with your guitar to just make it. Sound a little out of tune. Like he's like I literally. He describes just pulling on the strings. Oh d tune them just a just a tiny bit where you get that width. If you play exactly on top of it it disappears and it is difficult to forget that strident this long before any any Software Program would would lined up. But then you also got the bonus of that slight de-tune and brother who talked about it's bigger than a buick had gets wide. But but that's the beauty of the the the engineering prowess that that was Robin Hood. Brian's and he he had so much experience and he was not shy he brought he brought all he pulled out all the stops. He's he knew that he liked what we were doing. And he pitched in and said Yell at the art play again and let's make it bigger by the time. The band was a hit. Its first peak in the late nineteen seventies. You went on this. You went on this national tour called the worldwide Texas tour that in the documentary about the band. Billy Bob Thornton describes as being like a cross between a rock and roll Rodeo Circus because you had not insignificant numbers of live animals on stage. Like there's footage of you in this in the documentary. You're wearing like flared pants. Nudie suits or something is a truly extraordinary spectacle. And it's the first time we it seems like you have this idea of that. Like oh the story like the thing that we can get people to understand. What we're doing is this is Texas for the world right like this is something about Texas that we can share with anybody and everybody yes It's also ridiculous like I WANNA be clear. It is goofy attack. It was so crazy. Yeah ridiculous while the byline was taken Texas to the people and you know the the idea started. I think we were sitting around the rehearsal sessions and one thing led to the next and the next thing. We're we've got ten semi trucks being painted as this giant mural from the the beaches through the central plains over to the mountains. And and then the the menagerie entered the picture there's a buffalo there's some buzzards there's a longhorn cow. Yeah Have Lena pig. We had a little Plexiglas pyramid at the end of the stage which was shaped like this bottom part of the state of Texas and inside this Glass Pyramid. Were to live rattlesnakes. So it was it was so. I said Oh we went up north and it got colt and the snakes went into hibernation. Well that wasn't gonNA beef anything interesting. So the question is where do you go to get? Fresh rattlesnakes still awake. We had to go back Texas. You know it was hot and it was. It was ridiculous. Have you ever thought about throwing it all away by which I mean just shaving off your beer for a while wearing a wig if you if you need to do a spot show? Yeah I don't know what is called. Well we're wearing want. Yeah Oh man I don't think we could get away with number one. We're not sure what's in behind. These whiskers here so I think we're pretty much stuck with it. Yeah we're lazy. You know the the big question is do you sleep with the beard under the covers over the covers. It's Kinda like well. I don't know I'm asleep. I tell you what billy gibbons. I'm so grateful that you came to be on. Bullseye was really nice to. It was really nice to meet you. Learn about your amazing career. What you've hit the Bullseye on on many levels to spend the most enjoyable Let's let's keep it going Billy Gibbons Z. Tops immensely charming documentary Z. Z. Top that little all banned from Texas streaming now on net flex check their website for tour dates. Coming up once you know. Once Panzer touring again. That's the end of another episode of Bullseye. Bullseye is currently being produced out of the homes of me and the Sheriff of maximum fun in and around Los Angeles California where unlike Billy Gibbons of Z. Z. Top I had what I can only describe as a mental break and shaved my beard off. It was unsuccessful. Looks Awful. So despite the health benefits just GONNA grow it right back. Our show is British. By speaking into microphones. Our producer is Kevin Ferguson. Shoes Ambrosio is our associate producer. We get help from Casey O'Brien in our production fellow is Jordan. Cowling are interstitial. Music is by Dan. Wally also known as DJ. W Dan has made a collection of music used on bull's eye available. Pay What you will on. Band camp Search for DJ W Bullseye their great great tunes to you know. Read a book by or whatever. Our theme song is by the go team. Thanks TO THEM AND THEIR LABEL MEMPHIS industries for letting US use it. If you're hosting any parties with your immediate family members at home you should get one of their records and you have some time on your hands. We have tons of interviews in our back catalogue if you're maybe into hearing more from rock and roll legends. Maybe check out John cale from the velvet underground or Elvis Costello two pretty good ones we interview all of those Available on our website at maximum fun dot org and almost all of them available in your favorite podcast APP. We're also on facebook twitter and Youtube. Just search for Bullseye. With Jesse Thorn. You keep up with the show there and I think that's about it just remember. Great radio hosts have a signature sign.

Texas Billy Gibbons Bullseye engineer Billy Bob Thornton Robin Hood Jesse Thorn John cale roll Rodeo Circus MEMPHIS industries US Elvis Costello Dan Brian facebook Fultz producer Kevin Ferguson Casey O'Brien
"gibbons" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

08:11 min | 1 year ago

"gibbons" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"That band. Got You on the bill with some pretty amazing artists not least of whom was Jimi Hendrix. How did you get on the road with Hendrix with that band? Well Going back to your point of inspiration was genuine. When the elevators hit I think nineteen sixty six was there. breakout track. You're GonNa miss me and They were living in Houston at the time and there was a big house. They call it the Louisiana House it was on Louisiana and it had been cut off and had been interrupted by the construction of Highway. Fifty nine highway fifty nine which came to a close at the edge of downtown. Houston and They didn't take the house down and yet it was nearly It had been destroyed by this looming overpass of this freeway. So the family moved out and It's sad for a long time. And then some developer got a hold of it and turned it into these cubicles so the sidewalks we the four of US moved in The elevators were occupants. They were living there and that was really a turning point. You know we had this band of billy. Gee in the ten blue flames. And then the PSYCHEDELIC. Things started to kick in and The elevators were so instrumental and and from Texas. These these guys making this kind of music was nearly unheard of it had been unheard of. They invented it so your band was called the moving sidewalks. Because you've felt all bands shouldn't be named after modes of pedestrian convey. Well the elevators go up the sidewalks go forward. We thought that was. You know instep and The ninety ninth floor came around and then that led up to Jimi Hendrix. How did the moving sidewalks land a spot with Japan's will I had some friends that the Jimi Hendrix experience? The first record came out in England and we had gotten a copy Sent over and we were just mesmerized. With what was in those grooves the Hendrix thing was exploding and somehow shortly thereafter. The phone rang and We had an agent down there in Texas and and he said You've got an invitation to play with this Fella's name Jimi Hendrix. We dislike wide. Eyed jumped at the chance. I said sure let's do it and That kinda started off in order for the sidewalks to fulfill the contract. We expected to play for forty five minutes. And we were just starting to develop our own catalog. We followed the elevators. And we started Branching out to this psychedelic thing but we learned how to play a couple of Jimi hendrix songs foxy lady and Purple Haze. And I just like to fill out your set in and meet the do your to be able to do your time. Yeah we had so. I'll never forget the first night. Oh we're going to close the show and and we decided that some of the the stronger material was I'm a man followed with Foxy lady in Purple Haze and over in the shadows. I saw this guy with his arms folded it was Jimi Hendrix was go. Well okay. We'RE GONNA A. We plowed through it. We took a bow and was walking past. He grabbed me and he said I got to get to know you. You got a lot of nerve. Well he wasn't wrong he's like. Hey I gotta go on next. That's my encore. You just did. We came fast friends but yeah yeah even more with Z Z tops. Billy Gibbons in just a minute when we come back from the break we'll ask him a question. You've probably wondered aloud for a very very long time. We'll he ever shave off his beard. It's Bullseye for maximum fund DOT ORG and NPR support for this podcast and the following message. Come from colour attaching directly to your toilet using basic household tools a colour day Su offers adjustable features ranging warm water cleansing and warm air drying to a heated seat. You'll also enjoy automatic air freshening and ambient nighttime light colour invites you to visit colour dot com slash day entered colour thirty at checkout to save thirty percent on in stock but day seats in the United States. Black people as a whole have less access to good healthcare to education and job opportunities and other groups but who do we even mean what we say black people who counts as black. It's a question this country has been trying to answer in the very beginning. Listen on. Npr's codes which podcast welcome. Thank you how these are real. Podcast listeners not actors what you look for in podcast. Reliability is big for me power. I'd say comfort. What do you think of this? Oh that's Jordan Jesse. Go Jordan Jesse go. They came out of the floor and down from the ceiling. That can't be safe. I'm upset. Can we go to soon Jordan? Jesse go a real podcast. Welcome back to bulls. I'm Jesse Thorn. My guest is billy gibbons singer and guitarist in the legendary rock band Z. Z. Top the ban story is recounted in documentary called Z. Top that Little Oban from Texas. It's streaming now on Netflix. Just as the you know the British invasion artists who or post British invasion artists who were mimicking the blues. And coming up with something pretty different you know had their own thing going all those aircraft and so forth when you guys started playing the kind of structures and basic elements of Blues Music. You came up with a whole other thing like it's it's a different aesthetic. Yes yes Early on we discovered that we were not going to be the next Bob Dylan. That was something that everybody can aspire to and yet at the same time it was. It was a pretty lofty notion and at the juncture when we were trying to get our feet on the ground the idea of embracing that secret language at the Blues. So much of it was based on double entendre in it was a lot of a lot of entertaining secret messaging and we decided to take it in that that direction. And you know when you're eighteen you're still prone to cutting up and you know having having a good time with it and I think that's what that's what separated Z. Z. Top it wasn't really To be taken so seriously and although the the dedication in you know the the hours of of practicing was heavily serious and yet at the same time you know we were just having a good time. Let's hear a little bit from Z. Tops first album from nineteen seventy-one which by the way was called Z Z tops. First Album. This is somebody else. Been shaking your trade..

Jimi Hendrix Billy Gibbons Jordan Jesse Texas Houston US Louisiana NPR Purple Haze Jesse Thorn Blues Bob Dylan Japan developer Eyed Netflix England Su DOT ORG
"gibbons" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"gibbons" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Seal the deal. Okay that I WANNA do Now the the irony of that piece to the puzzle when bb King was turning eighty. There was a project That had been dreamed up to celebrate. Bb's eightieth birthday and they had invited different Group of ten different guest artists and they invited me to participate and I was so flattered us up gee whiz to play with BB. I mean this to actually make a record with bb King and a house with my buddy. Tom Vickers and and Bob Merciless. They had kind of spearheaded this arrangement and on the way our said by the way have they selected a song. Is there something that we should know? And they said well as a matter of fact. Yeah it's a solid call. I'm tired of your jive. I said Yeah I know that one I heard it when I was seven years old. I saw bb king play it and We finally got to the studio and was really interesting To walk into the Control Room. There was bobby bland and bb King telling stories from the Memphis days way back and we sat there for the better part of an hour and finally be noticed. I entered the room. Okay you said. Oh I've been just been listening to the wonderful stories. Son Be Metro Memphis and club paradise all the spots you know so he said well. You tuned up. He said let's go make some noise. Is it all right? Got Up there strapped up and he said well let let's go in there and he pointed across the room and I said well. Bbs That's the singing room. He said Yeah. You even play the guitar and you're GonNa sing with me and I said well. Okay but I got I gotTa Tell. Ya BB. I'm white so he got a big kick out but off we went and it was. It was quite fun of getting down with it. I think that because these top sound is so distinctive. It's easy to imagine that like you started making records. That sounded that way when you started playing like you know. Saul cops. That's with a band that sounded that way and one thousand nine hundred sixty but by the time you were a teenager in the mid sixties it was like full British invasion time. And by the time you were in a band that was having real success. It was a PSYCHEDELIC. Rock band in very inspired by the thirteenth floor elevators. And I want to hear a little bit of your. Your band was actually like named almost in tribute to the thirteenth floor elevators. That's how much of a How inspired you were by them. Let's take a listen to a little bit of Your first big bands. One big head and by big hit. I mean small regional hit.

bb King Control Room Memphis bobby bland Tom Vickers Saul Bob Merciless
"gibbons" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

09:53 min | 1 year ago

"gibbons" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Bill Gates welcome to Bullseye. It's great heavy on the show that is it is rare. I have to say this really is rare that somebody comes on this program so significantly more fitted than I am so. Let's talk about for at home listener. I see a pocket square with what looks like a crocheted edge correct. What else is going on here? Whatever you got on your around your neck I gotta rattle the chain I to let you know it's it's It's a collection actually at the very bottom and this is what gets everybody. They said Gee was that. Isn't that a belt buckle and I said Yeah I said well is there a significance to it and I said well I collect the mail down on Sunset Boulevard next to boot star. Which is a famous western Haberdashery Cowboy boots and Pearl? Snap shirts but under glass. They had this belt buckle and had been there and started to kind of get curious it had been there for two years and it was Clint arm famous Silversmith. Who does kind of known for his Western Belt? Buckles and I said well. I'd like to make a move on that belt. No you can't have it. I said well It's really a no no. It's it's incomplete said and what fat and what manner. Well it's missing the keeper and the tip. We only have the buckle and we just would feel better about not not letting it go back incomplete. Fortunately that sales agent took a lunch break and the girl stepped forward and she goes G was. It's been here for two years. What what are you give me? I said well. It's marked at two hundred dollars. She goes boy. You Got Twenty s said. Okay so you know I was right down. The street from Koontz Hardware on Santa. Monica went in there for a dollar ninety nine. I got the Motorcycle lobster class key. Fob and asked came back directly in by this time I'm next door picking up Mayo. And the sales agent happened to glance out the window and saw me stroll buying. He said wait a minute. I I you only two hundred dollars. I said No. It's one hundred and eighty. Let's talk a little bit about a Texas where you are from. Did you grow up listening to the radio stations that were not in Texas but outside of Texas just over the border That were you know that there were there because there were no regulations on how powerful your signal could be These like famous stations that broadcast all the way to Wisconsin or whatever. Oh yeah the lion of X. Stations The the delineation in Mexico Well let's go back to the twenties when when commercial radio just starting to become popular it was the US and Canada that divided the entire am bandwidth between them leaving nothing for Mexico or Cuba and shortly thereafter the FCC was formed and immediately they decided that fifty thousand watts was the ceiling that was his his bold as they would allow and to give you some idea. What fifty thousand watts would be wls? Fifty thousand out of out of Chicago. WWL Seattle Nashville. You could hear you could hear. Wls Out of Chicago all the way to South Texas. What could you hear on those stations that you wouldn't have heard on stations based on the state of the well? They started broadcasting. They turn the transmitter on the morning and they didn't start broadcasting until six in the evening and it took that long for the place to warm up. I mean pretty insane but you'd hear Advertisement and the shows were all fifteen minutes in length. So you had Evangelist preachers Jay Charles JESSOP. You had Zeke manners selling piano lessons One hundred baby chicks for a dollar Things that were really interesting and it lasted up till I guess the late seventies. But it was the hailing preachers. That really got to you. They were they were something else. Jay Charles Jessica. I'm going to the island chandelier. I know some brothers and sisters have been doing things like smoking cigarettes. Cigars you ladies has been wear nylons. What I'm going to the island chandelier and I'm GonNa pray for you. Brothers and sisters Aung Plant my unease in that beat let that salty seawater tickled my toes and when the worm turns to moon and the moon turns to butter. I'll be praying for us now. I know that you must understand an undertaking. This magnitude requires a great deal of money. So Sin Your love offering to me care of cash. Check money order. We'll send you a pair of thought provoking soul slippers with your favorite song on the soul and every step you take will fly to craziness. Your Dad was a musician. What kind of musician was he? Well he did everything. He started off Who's from England? And he came over with his five brothers and his dad. My granddad was a glove maker and During the great migration end of the eighteen hundreds into the early nineteen hundreds fine. Leather goods came from England Italy and Russia and of course back through Europe and they didn't like each other very much until they decided to come to the United States. They laid their arms down and they ganged together and they went upstate. New York and the town of Glover's Ville where they made gloves still there and That's kind of what started my dad off on the entertainment side of things. I one day I asked him. I said well. How did you get in the entertainment game? He said well my five brothers and I went to the glove factory to have lunch with our dad and when we left we were walking home and and we looked at each other so we need to think of something quick. 'cause we ain't doing that so they all they all picked up a musical instrument and my Dad. Wa- had A had a ragtime group called the jazzy five that started off and later they got so good started landing the contracts that Saratoga Springs like George all the joints up around the catskills. You know so. My Dad From from ragtime jazz band to playing the piano silent movies and then it just kind of developed into a thing that that's kind of background did you expect to go into entertainment because he had been in entertainment. I think so I I can. I think it was. It was there and I can remember being like three or four and But in nineteen fifty five. My Mom took my sister. And I to see Elvis. He was playing a big show in Houston Texas at the at the Coliseum the Sam Houston Coliseum and I've got a vivid memory at the recollection of that impact was not to be denied. It was there like I want to do that and you were really young. I mean we're not talking about when you're fourteen no I was I was five and then A couple of years went by and we started collecting records the portable record player. I was lucky enough to my sister and I had one one was in her room. I had one and we had a housekeeper that was it just a music fanatic. And if my mom would go out shopping we'd we'd We'd hurry over to the housekeeper. And we'd ask her to give us the names of the records that we could. We could give the list are mom you know to come back with the records that she you know she would buy this stuff not knowing what it was. Where'd you where'd you get that? Let's stuff turn that down but in then a nineteen fifty seven The next piece to the puzzle fell in line. My Dad said get in the car. We're going to go said I've got some business to do. You can come with me. He was going to Bill Holford outfit. Aca The recording studio. They're the two big recording studios in Houston was was Bill Quinn's outfit Goldstar and Bill Horford's outfit was ACA. So I remember getting out of the car and we walked in and my dad led me into the studio. And he's he said I you to sit here he said. I'll be in the office. If you need anything you can come get me but I said I think you'll like it. He said there's an orchestra coming in. You can watch them. Make a record and that was pretty exciting. It turned out that it was. Bb King and man they marched and set up and they're all sitting in the corner and that pretty when bb struck it at pretty much..

Texas Chicago Bill Gates Houston United States Jay Charles JESSOP Clint arm Mexico Bill Holford Gee Pearl Bb King Bill Quinn Mayo Sam Houston Coliseum Jay Charles Jessica Koontz Hardware South Texas New York Monica
Keri Roberts - Takeaways from 100+ Voice Technology Podcast Interviews

Future Ear Radio

09:31 min | 1 year ago

Keri Roberts - Takeaways from 100+ Voice Technology Podcast Interviews

"So we're joined here today by Kerrie Roberts Caritas a little bit about who you are and what you do thank you dave. I'm so excited to be here so I like to say that I am a brand. I'm a marketer and I'm a community builder So I work for myself and a company called Brandon connection and one of my main clients is voice summit so I help them with their podcasting strategy as well as lead their marketing for their big event. That'll be in October. That's awesome so I've gotten to know Carey. She actually brought me on the inside voice. Podcast that's Sort of like where. Our relationship started and I just think that it's so cool. Because outside of this podcast that she does she has her own podcast. And then I know that she's the host of another podcast. So podcasting is sort of in her life blood and I think that I've learned a lot personally from her. Just the way that she goes about it in post production in the way. That she disseminates podcast. She doesn't really like thoughtful in a meaningful way. And I think that it's incredibly It's a it's a really good way. I think to to build a network and help to connect that network. I know that's kind of a big theme for you and so I'm curious like You know I wanted to bring you on to talk about your experience on the inside voice. Podcast go through some of the different episodes that you've done in the different guests that you've had but like as you've gotten immersed into this world with like so many of us kind of have In you've done it as like being this conduit of Understanding like who people are different. Facets you've actually probably gotten a really wide education you know into the whole voice landscapes on curious like from this first year or so that you've really started to get involved into the space would have been some of your like macro takeaways You know in in things that you've learned since doing this. Yeah well again. Thank you for the kind words I appreciate it. I've been personally podcasting for a little over five years. And I took over the inside voice podcast and leading their strategy and hosting and kind of running it as their form of content marketing and one of the things that Pete Erickson the owner of waste summit that he and I share. Is this love for connection and community and to really showcase the diverse community that we have in voice technology and when I say diverse that means not only male female Or whatever gender you identify as Lgbtq Q Different races different backgrounds but also different elements within voice. So you know it's not just developers or CEO's it's linguists. It's audio engineers. It's voice artists It's startups it's conversational designers. And so my job is to really make sure that we're hitting the gamut as best as possible And I think we're doing that. I think we're doing that. Not only in the podcast that the events that we host And so for me. I personally love hearing what people are passionate about. What makes them great for every episode? I really tried to highlight them as a person first and foremost And then the work that they do within voice and so. I think you know one of the things that I've noticed kind of overdoing that podcast for the last year or so Is that you know first of all. There's so many people involved in voice and that it's important for us to learn the different things that they're doing And so within that also comes the importance of inclusivity with invoice. You know talking to people and saying okay election. Google tend to be a female voice when not everybody wants to hear that or identifies with that or feels comfortable with that You know when you're creating conversations are you including people in how they speak within their culture within their language translation is not always direct word for word. It's also the vernacular and how do we interact with people Are you including people who have disabilities? Who HAVE SPEECH IMPEDIMENTS? You know that I think really thinking about voice in a broader term And really the big question is how do we include the whole world and make them feel leg? They matter and that they can interact with voice. on a global scale. And that's that's not an easy answer but it's great to see that people are doing their due diligence to work on that and I think that's probably the biggest takeaway from the voice standpoint When we're looking at the other side from the consumer standpoint The challenge there is security and this is something I think people have heard about for a long time Of course people talk about well You know your mobile phones already have enough information on you. Are you worrying about Voice But you know there is concern when you're asking people to use their voice for passwords You know how easy is it for somebody to hack into something to take your important information? Your data your privacy and there is a very high level of concern from a consumer standpoint of. How are the big companies doing this? How are Amazon Google and Samsung Keeping the data protected but also every single person. That's doing voice if you are a startup or you own an agency or you're doing it on your own you know how are you proving to your clients and consumers that you're keeping their data and their information safe and it won't get hacked into. Yeah you've touched on a lot of different things there. I think first and foremost it's it's really cool that Because that is something that I've noticed about your podcast is. It's really really diverse and it's just like you said it's not necessarily like just the people but it's also their backgrounds in their interest. Because I think that one of the biggest takeaways that I had when I went to these different shows like I went to the Alexa conference which is now project voice and then I went to voice. Summit Was just a wide variety of different people. Like kind of coming into the space for different things just like you said like people with a linguist background developers designers. So I think it's so cool that it is like this melting pot and I think that the most insightful I think findings that people have come across. Have been when you have like this. Crossover like you have. People that are applying everything that they know in the linguistics world. And then you have the conversational designers that are coming in and when they're all starting to fuse their knowledge together. I think that's where some of the most interesting thing has come about. And you know going off of the point that you made around security and privacy. I think it's really important that this is something. That is a really centric to the whole conversation. Right now I think it's top of mind that a lot of people are realizing that like I think a lot of the people that are attending. These kind of conferences are They share the same sentiments. You know they are concerned about Where's the state of going? What is this data going to be used for? Are we comfortable with sharing the level of this data like I still go back to a the first Alexa conference that I went to where Brian Rahmani was speaking? And my big thing that I kept coming back to like. He kept saying that will need to have these like really deep relationships with voice assistance in order for them to be more impactful So therefore they're going to need a like a deeper level contextual understanding about the user but I feel like that's that runs counter to trust and security so like I'm only going to be able to. I'm only going to be comfortable with sharing the sensitive information that would make my voice assistant In even better assistant if I if I trust all of that so I totally agree with you that I think those are really critical pieces like as the formative period of time while technologies being built so I wanted to Because you've done so many podcasts. In you've brought on so many awesome guests. I thought that what would be kind of fun to do. While you're on here is to go through some of the different episodes that you've done In just go guest by guest in just have you share like either a key takeaway something you learned from that person or just something that you really enjoyed about that person in the conversation are you. Of course I would love to do that. Okay so I know that you shared today on on linked in or twitter. I saw it somewhere about the media people and so. I've had a chance to meet Claire Mitchell and Patrick. So let's start with Patrick. I know that you've done an episode with him. Patrick Gibbons GimMe something from that episode. Yeah I think you know I just WANNA say Intermedia. A lot of people got into voice because of Gary Chalk myself included the sub. Where I I heard about it. And there's so much hype about Gary and he's an amazing person but I think we really want to that. The people on his team are equally as amazing an equally as passionate And Patrick Really he's excited about stuff on the go here bowls a lot of the space that your in specifically And he also Kinda came from an artistic background and I love that he is willing to kind of reach out and say. Hey if you guys have questions like let's collaborate. Let's interact and so it's not just about okay. We're Bainer media and we're going to do our own thing it's like. We WANNA work with everybody and so I love that he kind of mixes his artistic background his ability to connect with others and then his personal passion within boys about how. It's going to be so much more on the go how we're going to be using curable and what that's going to look like

Patrick Gibbons Alexa Google Kerrie Roberts Gary Chalk Brandon Connection Carey CEO Pete Erickson Bainer Twitter Samsung Brian Rahmani Amazon Claire Mitchell
Fashion at the Oscars, an Interview with Author Bronwyn Cosgrave

Dressed: The History of Fashion

08:21 min | 1 year ago

Fashion at the Oscars, an Interview with Author Bronwyn Cosgrave

"Here to talk about the Academy Awards wisher just this past. Sunday right casts. Yes now I get to talk about all things red carpet I mean. This is arguably the Oscars arguably the most highly anticipated of all red carpets throughout the year. So you know we're here to talk about the Academy Awards and the Academy. Awards is the annual event of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences which is an organization established by among others American Phil Magnet Louis. B. Mayer who was co founder of the Metro Goldwyn Mayer Studios and it was founded in nineteen twenty seven and the academy originally had about thirty six members and that included quote unquote. Hollywood royalty like Douglas Fairbanks and his wife at the time. Mary Pickford and the Academy was really focused on promoting the Hollywood film industry at a time when it was not yet. The nationally internationally celebrated epicenter film production that it is today so the Academy Awards. Ceremony was instrumental in helping establish. The Hollywood film industry's reputation by celebrating. Its achievements across five branches so giving awards to producers actors directors writers and technicians and the First Academy Awards was held in Nineteen Twenty nine and unlike today it was not a broadcast event but was rather a ticketed private dinner that was attended by two hundred and seventy invited guests and this was held at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel in L. A. Dismay will mark ninety one years since the Academy Awards debuted on May Sixteenth. Nineteen twenty nine and things. Well you could say that they've changed just a tad today. The Academy's membership has blossomed from thirty six members to somewhere close to a thousand and from its original five branches. It now has seventeen. Over twenty million people across the US tune into the Oscars each year and has really become one of the most highly anticipated televised award shows of the season and millions of us tune in just for the pre show. I would argue and we do that because we WanNa see our beloved movie. Stars walk the red carpet and why can only be described as high style? I mean so. Central is celebrity dress to the Oscars that the pre show is televised live so that viewers like April and I am Oliver Address. Listeners can get up close views of their favorite celebrities attires before they even take their seats so talk show hosts interviews stars about what they wear while others give a play by play in studio and you know on various platforms across the Internet. I know I shared all of my favorites on instagram. And the revelry all things Oscars fashion does not end here of course in the days and weeks that follow as in every year a ceremony and special edition magazines will be printed that are dedicated to this red carpet fashion and of course the Internet will be aflame with talk of the best and worst dressed. Cast we've come a long way from that very first private dinner in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine and this has sparked our curiosity about just winded. The Oscars become as much about fashion as film and I started to research this topic and kind of dive right in but it was not long after. I began Researching that I came across. Bronwyn Cost Grace Fabulous book made for each other fashion the Academy Awards and of course I reached out to her and I am pleased to say she is joining us here. Today Bronwyn welcomed addressed Bronwyn. It is such a pleasure to have you here today. Welcome dressed thank you cassidy. I'm a huge fan of dressed. So it's lovely to be with you. Thank you so much and I have to say that we're here today. Because you wrote this fabulous book and I'm sure you've done a lot of interviews about red carpet fashion because of it your made for each other fashion and the Academy Awards. It's such an incredible book. You have this Great Inc. A primary source materials quotes newspaper clippings. And then there use these vivid descriptions to bring these nights and events to light and I just want to read a little bit from what you wrote about for the First Academy Awards which not aired because this is pre television but may thirtieth nineteen twenty nine for instance you write. A corruption erupted on the stretch of Hollywood Boulevard. Outside the Roosevelt Hotel just before eight PM at two hundred and seventy film industry. Silent screen notable slipped from a convoy of luxury automobiles and into its cavernous event. Space the blossom room. The Academy's prominent guests included Mary. Pickford NORMA SHEARER engine starlets Marion Davies and Joan Crawford. Lean and tanned. These actress lovely looked as delicious as their sugars. Spun Party Vapor a Waxed Candy Replica a Cedric Gibbons Golden Academy Award Trophy. So it's really these details that transport the reader back in time to that moment. So thank you. You must have had a wonderful time researching and writing. This book will thank you. I actually did not have a wonderful because I understand that because you know it's really it's really kind of you to notice the intricacy that actually went in to the writing of this book. The book took me three years and every single day of that was almost every single. Damn it was really one solid year of writing to the homestretch but for about two years. I scoured honestly. The world for information about what women wore the Oscars and my book really is about women and what they went through to get dressed and the great thing is that I did discover you. Know the bulk of that material in Los Angeles at the Margaret Herrick Library which is an academy library and a lot of it had never really been looked at and I'm also went to visit the great designers I went to the Dior Archive and John. Galliano actually called the archive and said you know. Help Bronwyn with what she what. She needs whatever she needs. Giorgio Armani also took it really seriously and help me. His team really helped me. I was very very fortunate. There's a great trust. One of my favorite dresses in the book is what we shall. Yo War when she was nominated for Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon and that dress was created from millions of Swarovski Crystal in Hong Kong by a very gifted designer named Barney. Chang and I what I actually noticed in the process of researching this book and why it took so long was that I kind of discovered a paper trail of identifying dresses and actually looking at the designer a designer attached to address in a caption say and looking at that dress in thinking that does not look like the work of say Howard greer who was one of the early costume designers and not all of the names turned up in in indexes for example addresses. So I really had to look hard and not believe what I saw imprint and that is something that I really noticed with fashion. History is that there will be a sort of myth associated with something. Say A design. Then it's not always the case and you really need to read between the lines and and go back to the primary source material and then to contextualized that all you know and put it in right into this story. This really captivating story. Yeah it's not an easy feat but you did it beautifully. Thank you but oh the one thing I will say about. That is that the book does also revolve around a celebration every year. So that really anchored the book the actual ceremony. Where you know. That was Super Fun. I watched every Oscar ceremony. That had been telecast. That was the first thing that I did so every Oscar ceremony that had been televised. Say I think it was like Nineteen Fifty. Four certainly the mid fifties onwards and really got to work with that material. Which was the fun stuff? Actually

Academy Awards Academy Academy Of Motion Picture Arts First Academy Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel Bronwyn Hollywood Cedric Gibbons Golden Academy Mary Pickford Douglas Fairbanks Metro Goldwyn Mayer Studios B. Mayer United States Phil Magnet Louis Co Founder Giorgio Armani Great Inc Norma Shearer Oscar Hong Kong
What weighs down GDP?

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:24 min | 1 year ago

What weighs down GDP?

"Not for the first time I am on this program. We take our lead from our early rising colleagues on the marketplace morning report. The News News there. The News context here and this morning early with the markets bouncing back. After the agenda of yesterday it went like this well the problem is the market's been doing an awful lot better than the fundamentals. That's David David Kelly a morning report regular also the chief global strategist at J.P. Morgan funds talking to David Brancaccio. This morning say more. Though would you Mitch Kelly about those fundamentals. It's going to get a GDP number tomorrow over two percent. And why is that. Just two percent you know between the federal government of the Federal Reserve. Got All the stimulus being poured into the economy. And it's not actually helping economy grow that's tossed so we got tears in Clare on the phone. She's a professor of economics at George Washington University to break things down a little before us one of the big things that we were watching was the role of the tax cuts and jobs act. Also the Fed of course keeping interest rates low. So that means that we're looking at savers. Trying to find a place to put their money to earn some income and that pushes more more money towards the stock market which gets us to it does look like a stock market and the real economy are potentially out of line. Aw but there is more to the fundamentals than just GDP at the same time if we look at other figures such as what's been going on in the labor market there is that fifty year low unemployment. Of course things are still remarkably good particularly when we think about how long this expansion has lasted. Don't zone on eleven years now which helps explain why people are getting jittery. When unforeseen stuff happens that corona virus really being the the driver of of that tumble and that people are worried that that might affect the Chinese economy that was yesterday? The Corona virus in the markets today traders apparently decided the corona virus. Isn't that big a deal but look fundamentally this whole thing is all about confidence right. How much consumers? which as we've been telling you for years now are the single biggest driver of this economy? How much they think things are going to be okay so to that end a little compare and contrast now we learned today from the Commerce Department that orders for durable goods big expensive things postal last couple of years? We learned those orders were up in December so far so good but there is a certain line-item in that report that we pay attention to capital capital goods equipment that businesses by to produce more stuff orders for those dropped which is not a good look for business investment consumer confidence though how we all feel about the economy. We learned that today improved more than expected so the essay question goes like this. Why do you businesses seem to be skeptical about the economy while consumers think things are maybe not so bad? Marketplace's Kimberly Adams got the assignment. Consumers are feeling better about the economy because after a long recovery since the recession Josh Gibbons at the Economic Policy Institute says most people they have really beaten beaten down expectations in. So if you look over the past year unemployment's pretty low. Wages are doing not great but okay. Maybe they're like this is as good as it's been for a while but business investment has been slowing for months now and economists like to pay close attention to those numbers because weak business investment. Eventually the ripples through the rest of the economy in so if you're trying to predict whether or not say a recession is coming. Durable goods will sometimes sort of go down more quickly than other parts and be a better forecasting instrument because business investments in durable goods are a reflection of companies own forecasts. Alison Schrager is a senior. A fellow at the Manhattan institute she says businesses are looking at the economy. Five ten twenty years from now as opposed to consumers are really experiencing Very strong economy and their outlook is appreciably shorter also when businesses invest are also often now more more thinking about global markets not just domestic markets markets and with the trade war far from over and risks from climate change. The outlook for the global economy is a bit uncertain just now in in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for Marketplace

Kimberly Adams Alison Schrager Clare David David Kelly David Brancaccio Federal Reserve Mitch Kelly Manhattan Institute Commerce Department George Washington University Professor Of Economics Economic Policy Institute J.P. Morgan Josh Gibbons Washington
Areas to watch in 2020

Science Magazine Podcast

08:49 min | 1 year ago

Areas to watch in 2020

"In this segment will turn to the areas to watch for twenty twenty here writers from Science Forecast Areas of policy and research likely to make the news this year? They've called the chaos and identified some of the top stories. I'm Joel Goldberg now. Now we have an gibbons contributing correspondent at Science for twenty twenty. She's calling attention to a new method of examining the lives of people. Who Live far? Aren't past say a million years ago. The technique focuses on ancient proteins remnants of prehistoric life which could fill in some some of the blanks leftover from DNA analysis of archaeological finds. I N hi- Joel. It sounds like we're talking about something like fossil. CSI only by that thinking when expect DNA to be the most valuable molecules rather than proteins. So why is it that proteins so important this kind of analysis being done on these million-year-old specimens so for fossil detective work. Were you looking back in time. DNA is the best I molecule but it is more fragile than proteins degrades more easily and the oldest ancient DNA. We have from early. Human fossils is about four four hundred forty thousand years and from an ancient polar bear about six hundred thousand founding conditions that were perfect cold. Glacial conditions in the Arctic doc or in a cave. So now what's really exciting is researchers or being able to get ancient proteins. That are much older from a wide range of the bones and teeth and other materials that can shed light on early human evolution and evolution of other animals so the first step is to search fossils of human remains what can scientists gleaned from the proteins in those remains so the first thing that they often want to do is determine whether a fragment kind of bone or a bit of truth is actually from an early human ancestor. They might have a fragment that they can identify just by looking at it and so what they can do is look at the makeup jakup. The building blocks of the proteins such as Collagen the different amino acids varies between modern humans neanderthals for example. So this method was already used used to identify neander tall bone from one site and then another kind of human from another place and differentiate them for modern human bones so it's great for classification nation. But the other things that people can do with ancient proteins is they can use them to determine the sex of a fossil they can also use them to date the fossils if you have say early human ancestor bones and aside along with animal bones you can look at the decay of the protein actual molecular makeup and that can tell you how old which fossils older than the other folds who can help you do relative dating at a site which is great and then also we're using proteins to learn about say a the types of milk people might have been drinking when you're looking at era early use of daring getting those diets of the ancient humans. You got it. And with the Neolithic Revolution the revolution to agriculture. The questions about whether the first milk that people drank in the step of Russia and other places was a camel. Milk was a goat milk. So you can begin to get it. Diet and the types of food and drink people are consuming and get a quality of life issues as well which is really interesting. So it's really about finding the way of life of those ancient humans I think ultimately. Yes I identifying who. You've got an archaeological site. But then what does it reveal you about who these people were or the animals animals that were there and scientists aren't merely looking at proteins for these ancient humans and the remains they're also looking at AH artifacts more recent artifacts such as ceramic pots parchment from manuscripts even beeswax. What can scientists learn especially in regard to humans humans by casting this wide net over archaeological specimens so with the books? You're learning often about who I was making them. You can get the sex of the person if with the proteins who's making the books and working on the manuscript so you can learn about what kind of animals were used to make the parchment. You can also learn about the kinds of the economy kind of animals. They were trying to. They had abundant supplies of with the beeswax tax. It would tell you about the sources for the wax. What bee colonies? How far away do they go to get their wax and to make it so you start to get information about the lifestyles lifestyles of ancient people and you can do that for any any time? Period that the protein survived from okay. And thank you so much for coming on thank you and givens is a contributing correspondent at science. Now we have Kelly servic staff writer at science. Her area to watch for twenty twenty is a somewhat somewhat eerie subject the transplantation of pig organs into humans these cross species transplants known as Zeno transplants are already Being performed on non human primates and may soon be primed for human trials. I Kelly Hi. Why is it that scientists are hoping to put pig organs into people so really simply? We don't have enough organs There are more than one hundred thousand people in the US alone. Who need some kind of organ transplant and are waiting waiting for a suitable organ So researchers have been thinking for a while about possibly using pig organs which are pretty similar size and structure If we could raise pigs to provide hearts or kidneys or pancreases or maybe livers That could could make up the shortage. So what's keeping these types of transplants aliens from being implemented. The big hurdle has always been that our bodies thankfully no how to recognize foreign material And our immune in system is designed to attack anything that it sees as an invader and so pick cells and tissues are making molecules that human cells don't so unless scientists can sort of convinced the human body that a pig organ is not an invader that organised probably not going to integrate harmoniously into into into its new host. And maybe that's not so unexpected that the human body is rejecting some aspects of these pig organs so immune rejection rejection is even a problem for human organs transplanted into a different human right but the but the problem gets a lot more extreme when you have a different species and speaking of different species. ABC's there are these non human primates who are involved. Can you talk more about that. Yes Oh the testing in in monkeys is sort of a stepping stone to to figure out about whether a pig organ can survive in primate and Can Be Safe So that's sort of a requirement for these research groups before they we're GONNA have permission to test these things humans. Okay so the non human primates step is a very important part of where this research is going. What developments can we expect to see in the next year round the issue? I think there's a lot of excitement in this field right now. and a lot of momentum Partially because because of of crisper genome editing. That's making it possible to Make really precise insertions into the pig genome And to make a whole lot of changes changes at once so what we're seeing now is several companies sort of designing their ideal engineered pig putting a whole bunch of genetic changes into into pigs and There are a couple of US companies that already have those pigs sort of thriving and so. Yeah what we're going to see in the coming year or so I think is more Non Human primate testing as groups are preparing to get permission for human trials. What are some of those groups and countries or speaking about so a couple of the front front runners? There's a Virginia based company called River core. That's making pigs that I have. I believe nine modified genes that are sort of designed to provoke less of an immune reaction even in human body and there's a company called E. Genesis which was founded by Harvard geneticists. That is collaborating with a company in China to produce Some of the most extensively edited pigs. That have ever been created for the purpose of transplant. What type of testing do you think will see and people I so? The first trials trials are not likely to be like whole hearts or whole kidneys. They're more likely to be for example. Cornea transplants from pig to treat blindness or pancreatic excels for diabetes. So I think researchers are sort of thinking about ramping their way up in complexity from there Kelly. Thanks so much for coming on. Thanks for having me. Now we have Jeff Murderer's senior correspondent. Science

Joel Goldberg Kelly United States Gibbons Milk Russia Harvard Virginia Twenty Twenty Jeff Murderer Diabetes Zeno Givens Blindness Staff Writer ABC China
"gibbons" Discussed on Sports? with Katie Nolan

Sports? with Katie Nolan

04:30 min | 3 years ago

"gibbons" Discussed on Sports? with Katie Nolan

"So I just figured the best way to time was well, listen to all of those force five cats. And while I was listening to the third ons name brackets yesterday evening, I got a good question of with if you guys were Suzy Christopher incest. One animal which is not. Have to have an animal. So I. And yes, after I've asset now I understand why everyone else struggles ending. Bye. Love you seen it. I love it. Can I just say that when you call us and leave a voicemail and you get nervous and you start of blabbing or you say the wrong word and I can hear the moment where you get your own head. I love it. I think it is so relatable and and I love it. Some people freak out and hang up. Yes, Volvos I do. There's sometimes people will call three times in a row and they really nail it by the third time and I'm like, good for you. But I, I think it's really sweet. No one's asking you to call in and be the best this. We get to do it for living. We're not that good at it. So it's fine. I thought that was a great question me to what was his name. He didn't say, oh, now you. Got see your name guys. Don't I say that in the I haven't listened in awhile to what my actual what I say. Leave us your name in short. Yeah. Well, that's fine. We're not good at following instructions. I'm delegating a task and no one's doing it story my land. But the question was, if you were Disney Princess, what would your animal side kick be? It's very hard for me. Not to be like a Guscott. I just want Gus. Gus home. My interpreted that as like which Disney care? No, Get I'm just saying. saying. Such? No, he's such a good one that I just want it to be hit share my cheese though, and he feeling he'd want all the cheese and I'd won all the good point. So what I'm going to let you go first because you have strong opinions on this. Yeah, I do rigidly tried to think of like if I was an animal, what animal would I be? But then I realized like the sidekicks are kind of foils to the main characters like oil. They have to bring literary device. Do. They have to bring something else to the table that you're not getting from the character. That is right. You know, if you have a very calm, composed character like the sidekicks usually like wacky all over the. Yeah, so me being very mature contained human adult. It's going to be me. So you're gonna pick. Katie Nolan is. I wouldn't go with the Gibbons monkey specificity. They are. You even have the the gene genus, the Honey, the families, the what's the delineate species? Do you science? Do you know anything about Gibbons? Of course you've obviously, if for those of don't wanna talk over their heads, they're the ones with really long arms. Okay. She's doing it. I wish you you gotta stay close to the mic. Ash like, oh, sorry, Ariel. Like swing from knew. It's audio medium, but it is beautiful in the studio. She's broke aerial to set. Sorry about that. That's right. And they like they make the really live like. Like that they're, they're the ones who like they got wasn't a monkey was it was not national, give into the studio. They're the ones who will like mess with like Tigers like, you'll, I think there's a video online. Go look it up of the Gibbons studio where to swing down and pull the tail and then like swing swing over and moving on. I've never seen you so excited about something so much there so crazy. There's, there's a section in microphone. Get closer to ascension, price it on a podcasts. There's a place in animal kingdom and DisneyWorld where they have like a Gibbons like sanctuary wherever I would just stand there for hours watching them. They're so amazing. I used to have a crush on. I let the last name Gibbons then I learned he was a total not worth my. You know, when you're younger and you look back doing, oh yeah, he was just on the hockey team. He's like skaters, like Apollo one Ono and Antoine..

Gibbons Gus Disney Suzy Christopher Guscott hockey Katie Nolan Ono
"gibbons" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"gibbons" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

"The word there is gibbons moon which means you go you see this this is again this is the educational i do feel like did you know this anywhere it means hunchbacked did you know this anyway i had i had i remember talking about this before and looking it up before but obviously you get a certain point lively even though you've looked something up you've forgotten and it means a moon that is more than half lit but less than full wow this one has a who has an app for ages has been using which every day gives you a new word word to learn that you might not know it it will will i thought i cannot imagine that that's a great thing playing scrabble with child one it's it's just it's a complete i mean they also they also apparently allowed to use that little cheat card which has to two letter words which you've never heard of but apparently except like szeto a exit there was a y a is a word and it means a what is going wrong with no that's not a word it's annoying children at scrabble if only they were slightly sick it would be better come back when you go to temperature then tell me the shanghai i'm a music dj in his early thirties i recently watched the magnificent cocoa in a flight from shanghai tongue look a few weeks but you had a list in writing about the accuracy of the guitar playing depicted in cocoa in regards to the hand positions whilst playing the songs therefore i was not surprised when the details of the dj in the big party we're also spot on his hand movements and headphone positioning whilst performing we're realistic and in particular the way he fades the music outs on the mixer when our young hero starts to sing i love the way they got all these little details on point as usually dj's depicted in a club and party scene just look silly an amateur i mean who would have thought as opposed to been real life whether we like rocket scientists anyway the movie was great can stop crying by the end of it is a great films here we had a dj's corner to the church deejay booth these are two types of dj this property as like radio dj mean like you in this club chase you you put on records in fields for people to dance to queue this amount of complaining letters saying that is not what they do i don't know i mean i you know all the all the mix each mix he stuff i don't know i don't understand why don't just done is how you do it with cd's at least when you had discs i understood he did it with an can do it but you could see people all that stuff which looked very this was a long time ago probably just telling me something what you said.

gibbons moon
"gibbons" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

04:55 min | 3 years ago

"gibbons" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"He told his children to run away to the boat while he put himself between the bear and the children the children were unharmed to me that's the story of the day you know you always wonder you always wonder don't you what would you do aaron gibbons knew he was given his life so his kids can live what would you do anyway you can go google his name and read the read the whole story but nobody's gonna talk about him i know it was found the article in the daily mail i didn't see it anywhere here manno ma'am so you have one yacht gone from washington dc a real yachts and compl on his resignation complaining about unrelenting attack let me tell mr pruitt that the unrelenting attacks happened to aaron gibbons bi polar bear you complain doofus ladies and gentlemen it is thursday this is investor's edge as we said this is a show about things that matter logically we don't care who's running the show we don't care about popularity we don't care about party we care about policy and how it affects things and there's a heck of a lot of things going on in case you did not know there's going to be some big tariffs on china who probably will retaliate tally eight there's been tariffs on soybeans hogs harley davidson hogs amongst others i don't know where this leads does not matter in that we're just the audience i just hope smarter in cooler heads prevail because if this escalates it will be bad news soybean farmers if you travel those states field after field of soybeans one third of those soybeans designated for china and they're gonna slap another big tariff on it what do you think that means china will find cheaper places to buy hurt the farmers here and of course china's doing that on purpose because those red states and what is all this tariffs do to them do you know what the most important part of farming is ladies and gentlemen that you can control because you really can't control weather it's planning and when you can't plan that means you don't know how much equipment to buy or rent when you can't plan you don't know how much the plants when you can't plan forward contracts on price hedging you can't do anything you're stuck and match what we got going right now we'll keep you up to date on it as it moves forward if it ends up into way pissing match on the ordos that's going to be real trouble because there is one heck of a food chain in autos auto lending parts service warranty and there's a heck of a lot of parts again we'll keep you up to date but we have nothing to report good just yet we heard rumors today but no facts am i gather those rumors were planted for the markets sake.

aaron gibbons washington mr pruitt china google
"gibbons" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"gibbons" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

"It will actually work out as well you know i spoke to john gibbons i saw him at the winter meetings i walked up and i said you know i i've been staying on a podcast i think you'd be the perfect manager for boston any laugh because why do you say that because you don't give enough like you know the words you don't care what the reaction is from people dopes like me when recruit assize you and he just burst out eleven john's a great guys you know he's very easy going and but he knew what i was talking about an alex cora i think is he's a different personality than john he's i think he's probably more polite he doesn't poke fun at writers maybe as much as john does i think there's a part of that of alex to i gotta be honest with you because i was thinking this morning about the criticism that he's going to get i think alex rugged shoulder and say you know what that's the call i was the right call and didn't work out in soviet what do you think i hope so i hope so i worked with a couple years in toronto and i do you're totally right about his two he does not care made the right decision that's the end of it and he'll reevaluate if you'd think he made the right decision and then it doesn't work you can take a look back and say well what the right decision this is not giving puts on an air of the sort of country i was used to needle him too because he got the texas accent the boots he's gonna your beverly massachusetts right i know an act and he's brighter than he lets on but i think some of this whatever personality can sort of presents to the world that's fine but he's more of a thinker than i believe people would give him credit for if you stereotype them off of off of the appearance of the accent he's thinking a lot for alex we know we worked with him he is i think very intellectual always had that reputation as a player as well and we'll certainly be thinking through his process and did i make the right move by bringing kimbrel in i don't think he'll be overly sensitive to the public criticism but i do always worry and this is.

boston alex cora john beverly john gibbons toronto texas
"gibbons" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"gibbons" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

"And dusty just the tears it up um i guarantee you when you hear that and thank you for the compliment yeah uh so i didn't dusty singore o where he does he does a franken i have made it a policy uh we we've made it up part of the the band ethos the night is not complete until we hear dusty say essay say a bit of a reluctance singer now oh no no he smile of ilya ikea now narached sometimes it's when you can go okay dust car handed hour listen man i can't thank you know for the time it's a it's great have any on i hope we can do it again soon and against see billy and all the other great artist tomorrow wall street rocks a great a charity event happening a terminal five you're new york and on down there and look for it on tv coming soon as well that you man i'll see you tomorrow night at a truck thank you man this been a great great pleasure memo we'll you tomorrow night i greatly appreciate it we'll see you soon all right well my thanks to billy gibbons of zz top for joining me on this week said he trump podcast remember we are new every thursday via podcast onecom and i tunes katie era's ari as usual is the producer of the trunk podcast and remember interviews are courtesy of my show on siriusxm volume channel 106 please check out truncation nothing but rock talk in interviews each and every day monday through friday hope you join me on the show on volume hope you guys had a great week remember social media at eddie trunk twitter instagram face.

ilya ikea new york billy gibbons katie era producer social media dusty siriusxm
"gibbons" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"gibbons" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

"Johny winner our our play with them or you know interact with them are ah y'all if you've got any a quick story you can tell about johnny winner oh yes up a list of johnny was uh he was an inspiration from wave way back uh there's a couple of records from the early sixties that uh you can still find it's on the radar but that's how far back johnny goes you've got a when you speak of johnny winner you speak of uh a good texas blues man that that did it right from the beginning and yet we still uh we still we still listen to his records johnny's always there with are there any guys today young guys newer guys that you hear too you can keep up with each you you you're a fan of heard that you think are are doing something special there's a there's some emerging guys you know whether be gary clark junior it be joe bonte masa guys like that younger guys do you keep up with that stuff you like what you hear him from the scene now oh yeah and i'm i'm grateful for that call or to mention jimmy baen another great friend to y'all he goes back into that texas blows thing way deep a gary clark junior coming on strong uh attempt montana another guy that he knows which end of the guitars up uh in fact uh his new song hillbilly rich which uh uh he he worked a bit with kid rock on on some of that stuff but yeah at right now uh keep your dial tuned in siriusxm because there is more music than ever ever before in a few it whatever you like it's after yeah that's what i see all the time there's tons of great stuff it's just that it we're not we're not in the day in each like when eliminator came out where it goes on mtv and boom it's right in front he he got to look a little bit you there's a lot more out to choose from she got to put a little more work in a find the good stuff but it's definitely out there yeah let's talk to john is in south carolina hey john yarmuth billy gibbons bent you ready go get at ease.

johnny montana siriusxm mtv john south carolina texas gary clark joe bonte jimmy billy gibbons
"gibbons" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"gibbons" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

"Any thanks so much for tunisia um dog so man nervous faster rubber i gotta i gotta ask you a question 'cause you're tones in boston throughout your career over the years on the album semi it's still stands up today cartel and i noticed you're playing through the uh uh slight or gates streams yep and i was i was wondering how that works because in the chain somewhere you're gonna lose you know that tony you make it up and the amplifier or uh uh you know what kind of an sorry used in its first transformers two danny secret again it's a guitar safi early says elie tubes in gauge strings and using you being from st louis are are good buddy ted kornblum from st louis uh he picked up the trademark and started remanufacturing magna tone amplifiers at a los angeles and that's a big part of it uh if you really want to beef up the sound don't uh they'll pass up the opportunity to plug into a magna tone than you it for you to talk to you there's a there's an endorsement right there jason in mississippi go ahead jason you're on with billy gibbons thank you for the opportunity mr trump if you're given a true honour uh i didn't want to say before my question i think it's a cool that you're playing a an don't with jimmy vaughn and i'm sure you already know but that's where event at brother got their start at uh but my question beauty was um i being uh as a fellow decadent uh from the bulb on area i was just curious if you ever got a chance to be.

boston st louis los angeles mississippi jason billy gibbons mr trump jimmy vaughn tony ted kornblum
"gibbons" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"gibbons" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

"This is the steady drunk podcast hey if you guys checked out the new history scripted drama series nightfall every wednesday you can check out episodes ten pm eastern pacific nightfall is set in medieval france tangled in politics and conflict one headstrong and courageous templer night landry will lead his order of warrior monks on a life or death mission to find the lost holy grail control the grail eucontrolled though world you gotta check out nightfall hopefully you guys are watching this because it really is a cool show and again new episodes on wednesdays at ten pm eastern pacific nightfall is an amy studios original production and association with jeremy renters the combine and midnight radio there's ten episodes total and there's a lot of cool stuff going on this season takes viewers inside the medieval politics and warfare of the nights templer the most powerful wealthy and the steriods military order in the middle ages who are entrusted with protecting christianity's most precious relics check it out nightfall everybody wednesday's ten pm eastern and pacific on history trump gas the last thing for me before we go to the calls while we been going into break she ed has been playing some of you know zz top music and i'm watching you listen to it in your headphones and kind of it you know gribbon on it and listen to a little bit do you listened to your old you're on recordings very often or do you only here amon settings like this well i will be again here in a moment uh once view and our wrap up i'm going to go back and listen to our version of the great salmon dave track called i thank you um said just just this morning in rehearsals sam came in and he said can we do i thank you and i said okay lemme lemme refresh the arrangement goes no i wanted to these these ta okay so you go you'll go back when you need to kind of refresh yourself on something that you did oh yeah yeah yeah all right let's get people on farrah billy gibbons i promise you guys chance to talk to them so here we go this is dan at st louis daniel first stop welcome.

france landry amy studios farrah billy gibbons holy grail jeremy st louis daniel
"gibbons" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"gibbons" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

"Show that you've you've got to put on down in austin i said it's day after christmas twenty december twenty six and twenty seven and i said wanted to join us so he's gonna were you doing it out uh we'll antones the famous both cla all k yeah that sounds really special that's very cool and then we'll just kinda hang around uh new year's eve i'll get to take the stage with willie nelson which will be the sixth new year's eve that we've done together really yeah comes at midnight you smoke weed uh well if you're a if you're in the building yes you hathaway clearly unhappy with mandatory with willie nelson his of course i think that's like a a great moment to be able to say you smoke i mean for a fan to be able to see i don't even smoke weed but i would do it if willing also was there just because it's willie yeah well this event happens at the moody centered the big venue and austin here and willie statues right up right out uh well but yeah you walk into that building an 10000 willie found are and if you know contact high aw hey one other quick thing here from you i wanted to ask you yesterday jimi hendrix would have been seventy five while they knew of course outta history with jimmy or your early ban toward with jimmy you you do i said this vernon reid was here the other day and asked him course he didn't know jimmy but you did do you think at seventy five hendricks would have still been active and playing qatar all these years what would you you ever think about what he would have done more than likely he was he yes i would say so because of his his inherent dedication to taking the instrument to places that had never been taken before and taking music word had not been taken before he was he was a dedicated guy yeah so he would have been a life for for for music you thank yeah definitely absolutely all right so billy is here with us we're going to have fifteen more minutes with him on the other side of this break you guys on hold don't kill me promise you were going to let you guys talked to billy gibbons right after we get to this on this week's eddie trump podcast.

austin christmas willie nelson jimmy vernon reid hendricks qatar billy gibbons hathaway jimi hendrix eddie trump
"gibbons" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"gibbons" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

"Just been a crazy whirlwind man been running around you a lot of different things in lucky to have all this work in lucky to have all your support remember trunk nation is live on siriusxm every day monday through friday on channel 106 that his volume its a one hundred percent talking interview about rock show that i do and now have fun with doing every day we have some great guests on there and here on the podcast you get a little sampling very little sampling of what we do on a daily basis on that radio show so i hope you join me on volume each and every day the show is heard live two to four pm eastern time the replays every night nine to eleven pm eastern on demand on the siriusxm app as well got a lot of good stuff would you came off the great week shows miles kennedy was on with me just did a big debate with arrowsmith tom morelloand mike mccreevy chimed in on that so so much good stuff we do on a daily basis on volume it here on the podcast a you get be one fifth if that of what we do every day but i try to bring in interview and may become to you courtesy of the show on volume the interview for you this week was with billy gibbons and is with billy gibbons of course zz top i had billion the studio because last week last wednesday i hosted an event which trace adkins in new york called wall street rocks to raise money for wounded veterans and we had a great time at that event it's going to be a tv show that's going to premier on december 23rd i'll let you know where very soon but it's going to be a great hour of tv with some great performances trason i hosted it offer a great cause for wounded veterans so i did that just before flying here to tulsa and.

siriusxm mike mccreevy billy gibbons new york tulsa kennedy one hundred percent one fifth
"gibbons" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

02:20 min | 4 years ago

"gibbons" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"To be taken out of sports net five naughty the fan he's a 26yearold righthander rally a two thousand thirteen a graduate of the us military cata me he bypassed was bypassed in the amateur draft but ended up signing with toronto went undefeated in the gulf coast league back in two thousand thirteen but first lieutenant rally had to miss two thousand fourteen and two thousand fifteen while he was on active service included a stint overseas in bulgaria today able to work into the six bidding for the jays allowing just one run in the process to get the ball to john gibbons hey for the cap the aleve leading korda why we talked about pitching with military precision what a job for the west point graduate i spent thirty months in the us army got an exception to the remainder of his service that came in january of this year but he still on individual ready reserve in three season last year in classy dunedin started this year three in do with one point seven three era at double a new hampshire was promoted aaa buffalo in the middle of june at a two point eight two era in five starts to twelve relief appearances there before getting the big call up to the major leagues he allows five hits against the pie rich just one run strikes out three in walks wanted all comes as part of a seven to two blue jays win i felt pretty calm i was pretty nervous last night anticipation but once i got out there sort of a fell com for the most part what i came off a little emotional those a triple tires two fortyfive thousand people center on the first time ever seen that one guy there was impressed by rallies burst start maybe the guy's opinion matters the most blue jays manager john gibbons loan live gold legs to the golden globes awesome rarely air we've been looking for that first look look very confident out there it good life on his fastball good seekers stressed both those good breaking balls you know he's athletic debuts never easy but i thought he did a tremendous job you and feel proud himself you know excited and definitely help the team that's for sure win for the blue jays keep some three and a half out of that second wild card in a.

us toronto gulf coast league bulgaria jays dunedin john gibbons fortyfive thirty months