26 Burst results for "Ghazi"

Italian Grand Prix: Max Verstappen on Pole After Valtteri Bottas Wins Sprint

The Autosport Podcast

01:22 min | 8 months ago

Italian Grand Prix: Max Verstappen on Pole After Valtteri Bottas Wins Sprint

"Vouch. we bought one one seconds qualifying at the twenty two nd. Two italian gregory beating max staffan with lewis hamilton fifth after making a poor start from among side us down robotic finished third mclaren ahead of his teammate landowners who kept hamilton at bay for the duration of the race which was disrupted by a fast lap crash for twenty months of winter. Pa ouseley ghazi. Briefy fit the mccaren of down. Your ricardo damaged his front wing as a result which went underneath his front wheels causing him to shoot off into the gravel. The crash about the safety car and ask as these call was recovered a clash between iki snow to number but cubits so usa came about the race restarted on that four of eighteen with batas romping to one point six second lead over verstappen with hamilton chasing. The two mclarens both tie as fast as the mediums of the cheerleaders. On the second mercedes recorded came home fourteen point five seconds behind the winner with norris keeping hamilton behind him who at times was even sliding around dramatically shall lead time. His ferrari teammate call assigned in sixth and seventh the former recovering from feeding on while at the end of f. b. two scientists ferrari had been rebuilt off his heavy f. b. to crash came highway started ahead of antonucci of nazi. The affirmation drive ahead of the charging such a paris to finish with the red bull. Dr having to make a couple of attempts to pause after martin's launch drove for that position.

Max Staffan Pa Ouseley Ghazi Hamilton Lewis Hamilton Batas Verstappen Mclaren Ricardo USA Norris Ferrari Paris DR Martin
The Straw That Broke The Bucatini Supply Chain

The Indicator from Planet Money

03:38 min | 1 year ago

The Straw That Broke The Bucatini Supply Chain

"Today on the show. I am joined by planet money producer. Alexi horowitz ghazi and alexi. Hello first of all parody cardiff alexi. You've brought us a kind of pasta mystery. Not just any pasta. Cardiff dismissed all about a very particular. Pasta shape called bucatini. It's basically just spaghetti with a hole in it in. The story comes to us. By way of a self avowed bucatini fanatic new york magazine writer. rachel handler. When did you know that you were bucatini. Hat or bucatini bopper. Look what do we call ourselves. Ivan bucatini had because. I just think it's cute but i definitely didn't grow up in a bucatini household by any means we are definitely spaghetti. Family the mystery part of all of this began. When rachel started to notice last spring that her beloved bucatini seemed to be getting harder and harder to find at our local grocery stores in new york until eventually it seemed to be totally gone and then one day in the fall rachel was on the phone with her also pasta obsessed mother who lives in chicago and her mom kind of mentioned off hand that she was having the exact same problem. Racial literally haven't been able to find bucatini anywhere and she was talking specifically about to check out. The check is a one hundred and forty year old italian pasta company so when she said that i was like slow mo i was like because i thought it was like a new york problem like a very classic. Sort of like you know history. I can't find my bucatini. Whatever like who cares. But then i was a coli though. Sorry can i swear. Oh yeah okay okay. Great it's like holy if you can't find it that means that this is a real issue. And then she told me that she had actually reached out to the customer service department to check. Oh i just sent them an email. it's a classic move. It was like full of typos. Which is like a way. That mom's ready meals. But her email said i am a huge fan of bucatini pasta huge in all caps. I have not been able to find it for many weeks at any store. It is my favorite pasta cook than the sentences in all caps with four questionnaires. Are you still making it. Please tell me how to get some not too long afterwards. Rachel's mom gets a voicemail from a regional dicicco sales representative named brian. And then when. She played me voicemail from brian. I was like holy like this goes deep. There is a cover up like something weird is going on. Brian told rachel mom that she was likely having trouble. finding check. Oh bucatini. Because of an fda hiccup the hecker exactly for some reason the fda which is the food and drug administration seemed to have put a hold on the import of check. Obu katini and now. Brian was telling rachel's mom to sit tight and check the shelves a few months down the road and the fact that this little pasta mystery seemed to reach all the way to the federal government. That was something that had dogged. Journalists like rachel could not in good conscience. Look away from. This is the turning point for me. Yeah the next day. Rachel pitched the story to her editor but in the back of her mind. She wasn't sure it would go anywhere. And i'll just felt so big. And i think all of us figured nothing would really come event. At least i did. I was like i'm never going to figure out what's going on but began calling to check. Oh i reached out to like five or six different people. Email and phone call and voicemail and no one got back to me and then i was like something in santa's happening and i don't know and at that point i was like there's there's a story hammond

Alexi Horowitz Ghazi Cardiff Alexi Rachel Rachel Handler Ivan Bucatini Alexi New York Magazine Cardiff New York Food And Drug Administration Obu Katini Brian Chicago Hecker Federal Government Santa
"ghazi" Discussed on When I'm High

When I'm High

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"ghazi" Discussed on When I'm High

"Up and and so it it helps me sink. More deeply into the landscaper experience. It also helps me. You're asking what is it about being in nature. That feels so good. When i'm high. I think it it makes the feelings of awe and wonder more accessible or getting at that when i was beauty but that like swelling of like. Oh my god this the way the my coffee cup looks on the plate with the crumbs from the cookie. Just look so beautiful. In a way that no that i would appreciate If i was perfectly sober so so yeah i think it has a positive impact in his for my writing similar to the creative like mental process. It yet helps me. we've together. Ideas articulate things in ways the might even surprise myself which may be my more sober solve needs to edit or refine but that the raw material that comes out. I feel like is really generative Robust that's cool. We got off on these tangents earlier than i normally do so. I don't think i even got to ask you this one question which we sort of already touched on a little bit which is Just in a general sense what to you. What does it feel like to be high When it's the kind of high that i like if feels Kind of floaty light. In my body it feels a little bit. Ghazi like A weird combination of on the one hand feeling like noticing details more clearly and being more integrated in my environment at the same time. It in my head feels to be a little bit more like gauze somehow and. I think that's you know what my friend is seeing an feeling in experiencing in her reflection of Feel like there's something between us when you're high that makes it hard to like really focus so yeah so. That's funny that you brought up your friend twice now actually. Who told you what you were like while high. Because there's one question that i have asked that i don't think ever once somebody had an answer to you actually answered it before. I even asked the question. Which is has anybody ever told you what you were like when you were high Have there been any other people who have who have said that as funny. No i not. That i can think of your. That's i just think it's funny that you answered it before. I even got a chance to ask it. Because i was like. Nobody's gonna know. This has never happened to anybody. But i think it's funny that she actually called you out on that. Like your godsey not that you use those words but you mentioned focus. What how does your level of focus change when you get high. Yeah i feel like it gets more dispersed focus. I mean because another thing. I like to do high is like like to clean the house or clean. The backs might my chore here. I live in a community of people. Like a commune and we have shared bath house in. By what my chores is to clean it every week. Until i'm like we're gonna get high in clean the bath house. I end up being getting really Ping pong bollywood like like. Oh i have to go focus on this thing..

Ghazi
"ghazi" Discussed on Soundrise Podcast

Soundrise Podcast

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"ghazi" Discussed on Soundrise Podcast

"Monday you mean by that like it Kinda. Reminds you of the early grunge bands like the sounds the exactly. Yes. I never really thought about it. That way to me, this sounds like Ghazi record. It I think it has some traces of grunge. You know maybe it's maybe not the album as whole. Certain strikes. Now I want to highlight fifth and sixth track life and limb and the kill I life limb is such a good drunk. You know I just love it and the singing and chorus is so catchy. Then it's followed by the kill which has a mistake and a very dark introduction I. Love that effect I don't know what it's called and I would I could honestly listen to it forever. It's such a good introduction of the song also ex spectator, another great Shrek and the. Final track argument let's say the title track is a very good ending to record of whether you think well, I absolutely agree with you that the band went out with a bang. Well, if this is the end for now it's the end, but we don't know they might come back but this this is the end it's a spectacular and I think that Another amazing effort very consistent throughout not a single week track here I'd say, I like this one even better than read medicine even though it's hard to compare such great records especially when you listen to them back to back it all blends into one very long sequence of greatness I love the topics that they have here the themes that they cover especially for example, the first track cash-out is about gentrification in how the neighborhoods lose their soul, how people are left without their homes because of this very greedy expansion that's going on. So great track. The kill as you said, another amazing one and that's the track that really speaks a lot to me as somebody from the Balkans where unfortunately we had horrible conflicts back in the nineties and where people who used to live together in harmony turned against each other overnight despite the fact that they speak the same language and are very culturally similar..

Ghazi
The Curse of Winthrop Falls

The Strange and Unusual

05:20 min | 1 year ago

The Curse of Winthrop Falls

"November eighteen sixty six winter falls Massachusetts. As a door slowly creak open. Drawn. grief-stricken face of Alice McClure was revealed from within the homes, dark? Interior. Shame swelled into a solid lump and Henry ups chest, which then rose to his throat as he tried to speak. Finally. Managing to stammer a few words of condolences to Rebecca's mother. Alice quietly expressed her thanks. And opened the door wide to make room for Henry. To enter stepping over the threshold Henry was enveloped into the dense shadows of the sambre room. Bringing his is until they adjusted to the darkness Henry's attention was instantly drawn to Amir of the fireplace which I've been covered in a heavy black velvet. The mere sight of the mirror started his heart racing and sweat to beat along his hairline. Henry followed Alice to the kitchen table where she offered him refreshments. And then poured him a generous glass of whisky. Drink it down lad. It's what we do at a Scottish like Wake Alice explained. Needing little persuasion Henry gulped the whiskey down and just a couple of swigs. The welcome liquid heat felt his body like a naming south. Giving him a pat on the arm. Alice asked Henry to follow her upstairs. Honor the McClure's Scottish traditions as new immigrants to the United States town of winter evolves arranged for a few youths to take turns watching over a Becca body every night until her burial. And tonight it was. Henry's turn. Alice solemnly lead Henry, upstairs to a dimly lit bedroom. Seated around the perimeter of the room or Matilda Hutton Joshua Derby and Sarah. Courier Henry Spell watchers for the night. He and seeing them since that night since Halloween. Greet each other with a nod of their heads Henry's attention was then drawn to the bed at the head of the room. Illuminated by the soft golden glow of candlelight. Lay Rebecca. Dressed in a Ghazi white shroud. Her arms crossed over her chest her eyes closed as if any peaceful sleep. Made a stark contrast to the last time Henry saw her. Crumpled, broken on his family's cellar floor. Alice Motion Henry over to Rebecca's corpse. Upon closer inspection, his first impression of her dissipated. Her Skin blotchy and discolored with a Pale blue cast appear dry and Steph. Her once big expressive is now sunk deep in her skull were scarcely covered by the malted paper thin skin ever eyelids. At the corner of her mouth was a dried cracking drop of blood. Unsure. What was expected of him Henry Finally commented She looks so peaceful. I allies responded. Taking notice of the dried blood. She left her thumb and rubbed the stain vigorously. That is until Rebecca's mouth popped open into a wide silence scream. Henry's friends seated in the room. All audibly startled in their chairs the frightful image. Henry looked at them and with one simple expression they knew. He was telling them to be quiet. Be Still. Without visibly acknowledging the horror of the site before them Alice gently pushed Rebecca Shaw closed and tied at length of cloth a cloth that had been draped on Rebecca's shoulder up around her jaw to the top of her head keeping her mouth forcibly shut once and for all. Sensing that she was waiting for him to do something Henry could only to say, I'll keep good watch over her tonight. I have no doubt. Then Alice looked at Henry and said you must touch her you know. Pardon Henry asked. It's customary is tradition from the old country. Keeps nightmares, illness away they say. PA- mainly, it's a sign of respect. Erin who visits the dead must touch them. She shrugged. Oh. All right. Where shall I touch her? The choice is yours lad. Though in general, most just touch the forehead or shoulder. Wherever, you feel most comfortable. Reaching out Henry's hand begin to tremble slightly as he moved slowly in his uncertainty. As the last moment, he found himself drawn to touch the tight shiny skin of her cheek, but he immediately regretted it and upon feeling her cold rigid flesh, he quickly pulled away.

Alice Motion Henry Rebecca Shaw Alice Alice Mcclure Henry Spell Henry Finally Sambre Room Massachusetts Skin Blotchy United States Matilda Hutton Erin Amir PA Joshua Derby
"ghazi" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"ghazi" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Health director Dr new Ghazi Izzy cases we should not get too excited about the one day drop there's a lot of data that we're looking at you can't look at data data day you really like you said you have to look over trans meanwhile governor Pritzker in mayor Lightfoot are announcing the transformation of part of a Cormack place into a temporary hospital to make space for Colbert nineteen patients the eventual plan is to is to have three thousand beds there in the event the Chicago hospitals run out of space the army corps of engineers and the National Guard are working on that this week they should have five hundred beds ready to go by the end of the week big news from Abbott labs of north Chicago the company now says it has a test that can detect the corona virus in as little as five minutes here's governor prince came very the very excited about the development of this rapid happened Abbott test that's coming out to this is but test that will take no more than fifteen minutes to determine a few minutes to determine if it's positive fifteen minutes to determine if it's negative this is I mean if we can produce enough of those we can make a real difference habit got approval from the food and drug administration has commissioner Steven Hahn says this is just another example of private industry stepping up to help the nation battle the virus had a substantial addition to testing with the authorization of point of care tests especially the added point of care test which the president has pulled out of the box the point of care testing.

Lightfoot National Guard Abbott labs Chicago Steven Hahn president director Ghazi Izzy governor Pritzker Colbert Abbott commissioner
The Case of Palmer v. Kleargear.com

Planet Money

09:49 min | 2 years ago

The Case of Palmer v. Kleargear.com

"John and Jen Palmer love to buy each other little presence figurines desk toys. Chomsky's are their love language but a while ago this got them into trouble. What is the inciting charge? What is the charge gave? That gets this whole story going. It was basically looking for something for Gen for her desk at work. John goes online finds. This website called clear gear dot com clear with a K. Of course it's just a website that tells like little toy for grownups and John Decides to order not one but two little Chomsky's for Ya. I think one of them was a one of the ones where it's the sand art and then I think another one was one of the little perpetual motion toys that little silver ball things or something. Yeah exactly they were meant to be stocking stuffers. The total cost around twenty bucks. John pays with pay pal. Then a week goes by two weeks. The sand art thing and the little click. Click Silver Ball. Never show up so jin gets involved. She tries to call the company but she can't get anybody on the phone. She's getting the runaround on e mail. Eventually John and Jen do get their money back from pay pal and then Jen decides to leave an online review at a site called ripoff report. Just to warn other people about clear my husband ordered items from clear your dot com for Christmas presents. After several weeks went by with no delivery he attempted to contact 'em pastes in this sort of absurd email exchange had with the company into the review. Then she hits publish it goes up online and that's the end of it. Our response was okay. We've we've put our experience out there for the world to see we're good we're done. We went on with our lives. We want a house to house. Had A kid and it was three and a half years later John was working from home and I was upstairs taking care of our our toddler and all of a sudden I hear John Screaming bloody murder. Knee swearing up a storm. Yeah Jan get down here. What what what's going on gen gets downstairs and John is looking at an e mail on his computer. It basically is says it's from clear gears legal departments and it is saying that because You posted this in. It's in violation of our non disparagement clause. We are going to find you thirty five hundred dollars because you disparaged US online. So it's a letter from a lawyer saying you owe clear gear. How much thirty five hundred dollars for? What for posting the Truth About Them Online? And what is your response panic? Hello and welcome to planet. Money Jacob Goldstein. And I'm Alexi Horowitz Ghazi everyday as we make our way across the Internet. We are swimming through a sea of Legalese. Terms conditions warnings. Most of us just click accept and move on without so much as a glance today on the show what happened when Gen and John got caught in a fine print nightmare and fought it all the way to Washington support for this podcast and the following message. Come from each raid investing. Your money shouldn't require moving mountains. No matter how much or how little experience you have each raid makes investing simpler and for a limited time. Get One hundred dollars when you a new account with just five thousand dollars. It's all about helping your money work hard for you. For more information visit each ray dot com slash learn more each rate securities. Llc member SIPC. Hey Greg result ski here. I write the planet money newsletter. We'll keep you up to date with stories behind fed decisions the housing market and big scooter subscribe at NPR Dot Org Slash Planet money newsletter. Just the right amount of economics set weekly so John. Has this email. Remember from clear it saying that. He had violated the terms of service. The fine print that we all agree to all the time whenever we do anything online specifically it saying there was a clause in the terms that said you cannot leave a nasty review about US online but remember. It's been three years since they posted that review. They don't remember seeing any non-disparagement clause when they bought the Chomsky's so the US this Internet archive site to look at the old terms and conditions from three years earlier and that clause was not there when they tried to buy those Chomsky's but there is still that email from clear gear threatening to find John. Three thousand five hundred dollars. Which of course is a scary warning so John and Jen? Sorta calling lawyers and all the lawyers said basically the same thing. Oh sure you give us a five thousand dollar retainer and we'll see what we can do and I'm like dude if I don't have thirty five hundred dollars to give them. I don't five grand to give you the couldn't pay any of these lawyers so they just went on with their lives. A while later they went to buy a car and we were sitting in the in the dealership and finance manager comes over to US and Kinda loudly says okay. Well we're trying to find you financing but who is clear gear? And why do you owe them thirty five hundred dollars and both of us just face palm? Yeah because of this whole thing with clear gear. John now had this like black mark on his credit report. We fast forward to October of that next year. Our hot water heater died on us. We use our savings to get that repaired. Three days later our furnace goes out. It's going to cost them thousands of dollars to get a new furnace and they just don't have it on hint. We tried get emergency financing every company. I tried to go through turned us down so finally I am at my wit's end it's October in Utah. My House has no furnace. I have a three year old and thinking to myself. Oh my God we're going to end up with a frozen house and CPS is GonNa come and take my child away. Because I can't keep the heat on because of this stupid mark on John Credit and there's nothing we can do so finally I mean I I am almost crying. I'm a I'm at work and have no idea what to do. Their case was too small for the FBI too strange for the local police but luckily there's a certain kind of person who is perfect for helping people just like Gen. My boss comes up to me and says well why don't you give KTV's Matt Gephardt a call. There's one in Utah. Who Arms You with the information? You need to protect yourself. Get help get inches. Get Gephardt five nights a week on two news at ten so I called up get Gephardt and I left them of really long message and explained to them the entire story and the more. I'm speaking the the more I'm just realizing how utterly ridiculous all of this sounds. I mean you cannot make this up. You're leaving a voice mail. Yeah I think I had caught them like off hours or something I think it was the next day I get a call from from Matt. Gephardt of Gephardt. Yes he calls me back and says I believe you and I WANNA help. And all of a sudden I saw the light at the end of the tunnel. It you get horrible. Customer Service MMA company. You will likely tell people about that. I get this company is ordering Elaine coupled obey thousands all because they don't like the review they posted up here on a Tuesday three days later the story has gone viral and by viral. I mean England and France and Australia and China and Canada and in the middle of all this John and Jen get a call from a lawyer named Scott Michelman at a nonprofit called public citizen. He said he wanted to take their case and agreed to do it. Pro Bono. The lawyer Got John's credit report fixed. And he sued clear gear in federal court. We show up to court. And he's got his fancy lawyer formulas that they do to to calculate things like real damages versus pain and suffering and all of that basically how much is he gonNA ask for three hundred seven thousand dollars so we got to court and of course clear doesn't show up and so it's just you guys in the judge hanging out pretty much it's I mean the judge still sat and heard our story. We still gave our testimony laid out. You know all the damages and as the judges hearing all of this he decides. He's like you know what I've heard enough. I don't need to take under advisement. I'm GonNa give you everything you're asking for. And the lawyer's fees on top of it and I remember sitting at the table and kind of like whispering. Did he do what I think he just did? The lawyers just shut up. Shut up shut up and you know. And he went ahead and gave us the judgment right then and there But even with this huge number that neither of US could of ever dreamed of. We knew we were never going to see a dime of it. You couldn't even get him on the phone. How you'RE GONNA get three hundred seven thousand dollars plus lawyer that exact ex exactly but this was a significant enough number to at least deter anybody else from attempting the same thing on somebody

John Jen Palmer United States GEN Chomsky Matt Gephardt Utah John Credit John Screaming Alexi Horowitz Ghazi FBI JIN Washington Jacob Goldstein Finance Manager Greg Murder
"ghazi" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"ghazi" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"A throwback Thursday consumption level Ghazi stadium the place I'd rather be on a Thursday lots going on here get to a lot of our sponsors a little bit later on Christian school gaming and bartending great show in store for you Antaeus go normally in studio with me on Thursdays and he will join me our number two going to get into all the college basketball lots of big games tonight NHL going strong as well Vegas golden knights now up by four points in the Pacific playing great and of course get later from the Blackhawks that'll help out as far as back up and then we've got to be a action Lakers back in action tonight no lebron lebron coming off the forty point effort will not play tonight so a D. N. company trying to lead them against the lowly Golden State Warriors but it's been a night a night of upsets at least at the college level already a couple big upsets cal blowing out Colorado at home and a couple other ones as well with Wisconsin winning at the crisis center against Michigan and the Wolverines have been playing good ball right now Lakers with a twenty two twenty one first quarter action about fifty five seconds to go so real low scoring game as far as the NBA goes we'll get to all that just a sec if you haven't been to a Ghazi stadium you know it is a criminal crime doesn't get any better than this this place is a sports fan's paradise to say the least make it down here to Vegas even if you're not staying at the Venetian or the palazzo in the suites then what you want to do is at least come by and check this place out coming out of the kitchen and really got his recipes doesn't get any better than that of course shoot I've tried just about everything on these menus so I'll let you know first hand that everything is outstanding we are rolling out your Monday through Friday eight to ten PM right here the A. inside seven twenty F. inside one one point five and college basketball man my favorite sport next to college football college football college basketball the NFL those three right there kind of like if you give me those three on okay look I love my hockey I love my MBA and I love you know the U. S. C. I. like Major League Baseball seasons long but you know I enjoy it a lot of strategy what not I enjoy the majors as far as golf even the Daytona five hundred watch the other day like the tennis you can be the Wimbledon the French Open the Australian Open for the U. S. open I'll take it all day twice on Sundays but right now it is college basketball at the forefront because why we're running down to the end of March in a lot of the end of February by the end of March will have a national championship going on that first Monday in April I believe is when it's going to conclude so you start seeing teams jockeying for position right now inside the conferences and a lot of teams right now on the bubble teams on the outside looking in and we saw Minnesota lose a big home game last night at the end of Maryland and so teams like that Purdue right now struggling as well they were five hundred they get a win tonight at home against Indiana but they still have to do a lot of damage as far as in the big ten tournament if they're gonna make it to the big dance otherwise are gonna be in that and I. T. C. B. I or the C. I. T. so we'll get to all of that in just a little bit let's go check out the rich Belgian Findlay Toyota out of town scoreboard let you know India's go our number two but I've got a special guest in studio you always know so many great things going on here as far as charity events different things the best in entertainment not only are we the sports gaming capital of the world we're soon going to be the sports capital of the world readers moving here at the Las Vegas aces they moved here golden knights of course hitting it up big time there in the third season already and just a matter of time before you have the NBA right here you in LV playing great basketball right now hats off to TJ otzelberger coach first year doing a nice job there this team's really turned it around and a nice win avenging a loss up in Boise is a beat up on the Broncos last night and of course a big win the monumental win on Saturday beating the undefeated San Diego state Aztecs remember that turn it will be right here at the.

Ghazi stadium
"ghazi" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"ghazi" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Thompson lives Ghazi stadium inside the beautiful Venetian palazzo and a very busy weekend as you all know wall to wall I mean you know when you pull in the parking lot as big as the Venetian and the palazzo you know you you're gonna have your that are going to valet but then you've got the underground parking structures I'm telling you when this thing is like ninety five percent full and I've got a walk I know this place is packed with my nephews up steers losing on the blackjack tables and having trouble to just get a table I know this place is packed man it is top of the line right now this is one of the best weekends got of course fury Wilder to coming up tomorrow night eight action going all weekend long college basketball NBA NHL everything going full fledged got the XFL back tomorrow Brad powers to join me in about about four five minutes from now we're gonna go over a bunch of games I get caught up on the ridge project in the toilet out of town scoreboard some Friday night basketball watching NBA of course back in action and of course college basketball not as many college teams as we had last week a couple good ones in fact one of the mac it was a dynamite game and I'm a little coin there lost on an Ivy League game and hopefully I'll get it back on that same team tomorrow India's collects Harvard tomorrow harbor came up short tonight they won the game but only be Princeton by point never really in there as far as covering nice effort by the Tigers if you have not been to a Ghazi stadium is a true sports fans paradise doesn't get any better than this folks I will tell you the first three days of March madness or sold out about ten percent occupancy left for that four day that Sunday that first four days is absolutely Bedlam here there's no place to be but right here in the Ghazi stadium doors open up at eight o'clock AM first games tip that I didn't think the very first games like at nine OO five AM and it goes wall to wall all the way to the the final game tipping off around nine PM so goes you know whatever it is all the way almost eleven o'clock eleven thirty one first Thursday Friday and Saturday Sunday gets going we end up with the Sweet Sixteen by the end of the weekend but lots of great stuff over your legacy stadium if you not being here even if you're not St you know you're not staying at the Venetian palazzo come by and just check it out the ambiance is incredible I mean TV's high definition everything big screens like none other have the action that you can get cantor gaming runs the book right now William Hill will take over about the middle of April from what I hear you have set ups as far as private boxes operandi stadium seating clubhouse seating you can buy out the place but a true sports fans paradise seventy.

Thompson Ghazi stadium
Kindness From Our ... Exes?

Kind World

06:37 min | 2 years ago

Kindness From Our ... Exes?

"Wanted to talk about breakups today. Right I mean right. What else should we talk about on Valentine's Day but we do have a little twist because after all this is kind world and we see compassionate and the unlikeliest of situations including terrible breakups. So one of our colleagues here at WBZ. You ARE LISA. Creamer suggested we ask this question. What's the nicest thing an ex? That is an ex boyfriend girlfriend. Significant other has done for you. I love that idea so much. I decided to post it on social media and I got some responses. Do you want to hear them? Yes absolutely okay. Cool so one woman said picking me up. When I was walking somewhere in the rain it would've been a two mile long. Walk any changed. My car's oil that same evening. That's pretty impressive. That is really nice. That's very nice number. Two apologized and own their mistakes k. Maturity shows growth absolutely and then this one. When I moved about ten years ago my ex was the only person who showed up to help true friend. Status Moving for life for sure is a pain and of course one of my favorites. This is kind of obvious. One disappeared like he never existed. But I I get it. It'd be like that sometimes. Do be like that sometimes. But Further Record Yasmeen. I have not come up with a good answer to this question. I'm not really sure what that says about me. You know what I think is. You're completely normal. I mean I respect my ex's but you know time to move on but a few friends and colleagues around us do have these really great stories and we decided to ask a handful of them starting with our intern if Ryan Hernandez what is the nicest thing your ex has done for you so a couple of summers ago. We broke up around April ish but had already applied to this summer camp as a counselor and I needed a reference so I listed her as a reference and. She told me later that they call her back way. This was supposed break-up post break up. I just still had her listed as a reference because we had worked previously in a tutoring GIG and they called her up and to give me a reference. Did you get the job? I did not get the job. What if this was a bad reference it really I mean led by Ghazi Bygones? I think she might have given me a good reference so these guys with me and the camp but you know. I don't think it's her. I don't blame her high Taylor. Hi Okay I have a question for you. What's the nicest thing your ex has ever done for you? I think the nicest thing man did was break up with me and the first thing that was that was a good call. We let me keep his sweatshirts. Wait did you just keep sweatshirts without telling him? Yeah but he didn't come get him. I'm Jack Lepe ours and I am the mid day host. Wr Okay. What is the nicest thing an ex has ever done for you? Hus- break-up I think the nicest thing that has ever not done for me but I think offered to do for me was to my cat while I went away for a week and I'm talking to my girlfriend at the time and I said well my ex offered to watch our cat while we're gone for a week and she goes. Are you OK leaving our beloved baby boy cat in the hands of your ex and I was like no no no no? It's fine. The sex loves cats even more than I love cats as so it'll be fine and it was very sweet? Hi My name is mark. He's nil and I am an engineer. One of my ex girlfriends. We was on the way to be broken up and she helped me graduate high school. The only consider that Nice. It was just really just kind of like whatever that's not whatever not finishing high school. I mean if you if you ask me you know what I'm saying. I mean. She helped because she felt because she helped me be in the position. Not Finish. Who so it's like but it was a while situation so I was in high. School was a wild boy. Wasn't doing really well my senior year and my girlfriend at the time we was on our way to break it up or whatever but because she was going to go to college in North Carolina and we kind of knew that that was kind of but she helped me like get my papers done lake turning all my papers and pass my test and stuff and we broke up. The rest is history. My Name's Maria Garcia and I'm the senior editor of the artery which is debut arts and culture team so Maria we want to know what is the nicest thing your ex has done for you This person who I dated took care of my childhood barbies in my childhood Barbie furniture for over a year in his storage the free of charge and every month would send me like the nicest gentle reminders. It wasn't actually about the barbies itself. It was about all of the handmade furniture that went with the barbies so growing up. We were working class. I love barbies but my parents couldn't afford the cool Barbie accessories so my mom would like get Styrofoam or like leftover cardboard and she would shape them into like couches and it's it sounds really makeshift describing them. But they were really beautiful and then she would go to the fabric store and like buy fabric and make Barbie furniture. You know the barbies represented the lengths that my mother would go to to lake. Provide me with a beautiful childhood. Even though we didn't have a whole lot of money so I logged these homemade toys from apartment to apartment until I moved with my ex and then we store them in his garage even when I had like nothing to give and return to him right that it wasn't like a exchange like he was just like he cared about me as a human being he saw he was like okay. She once was a child who really cared for these things and even though I'm not with her I am going to be a good steward of this thing that I know to. Her core is really meaningful to her. So it's nice to have that memory with an

Maria Garcia Creamer Ghazi Bygones Jack Lepe North Carolina Intern Ryan Hernandez HUS Taylor Engineer Senior Editor
"ghazi" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:31 min | 2 years ago

"ghazi" Discussed on KCRW

"That was dinosaur junior track hold budged from a dinosaur collection of BBC recordings called in session before dinosaur junior the and Ghazi family a track called night of fear for re issue an original of the forty five thousand volts record you don't want to know how much that costs I bought my Rick re issue with everyone else anyway that's what you heard night of fear from forty five thousand volts by the end Ghazi family before them joy division from the unknown pleasures record a track called wilderness in right now another track from that brand new record on upset the rhythm Locris if you're listening from the in threes record this is the band handle a track called life's work and phonetic.

BBC Ghazi
"ghazi" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"ghazi" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"Ghazi like attack any orders Somali be killed as quickly as possible because the president says he did not have time to call it Nancy Pelosi and wait a couple days to discuss it saying so money was on the move and planning other attacks fox's mouth fell on the house focusing on the president's actions towards Iran as it passed a war powers resolution to limit those actions Republicans Matt gates and mark metals coming down off the side of the votes this war powers resolution was worthy of support because it did not criticize the president did not say he was wrong and killing stole money with a non binding resolution that is nothing more than a press release madam speaker it has no effect it doesn't do anything and we're getting reports of unidentified planes striking targets in Syria near Israel this morning possibly by pro Iranian malicia Erica's listening to fox news Lara Logan he is back the award winning journalist returns with an unflinching look at the border crisis what I care about is one thing the truth and she's taking on the mainstream media tackling the issues that matter to America one story at a time we see this but we don't have to see where they go we don't know what they've been through this together you could see on their faces this is my call these guys are runners they're not going to give themselves up it's all happening yeah yes this is what you're used to okay yes the villains that's not the case and we all have families we're here to protect our borders a third country having the freedom to take on tough subjects and tell it like it is that what we have a fox nation that's what sets us apart no bias no nonsense Lara Logan has no agenda the must see docu series is available now only on fox nation start your free trial at fox nation dot com this car is Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein loses his bid to get a new judge for his trial the judge in the Harvey Weinstein sexual assault trial denied defense lawyers request for refusal because of comments he made on the former mobile cell phone use as jury selection in his rape trial continued winds dean's lawyers called the judge's comments about one scene cellphone use prejudicial and inflammatory Burke said let me first just state the obvious there's nothing prejudicial or inflammatory for scolding a recalcitrant defended for violating a court order multiple times adding one scene had been using a cell phone in court and was defiant and challenging the court officers when asked to put away his phone Michelle Felino fox news cell phones getting attention in Vermont but for a different reason democratic state senator John Rogers has introduced a new bill that would ban the use of cell phones by anyone under the age of twenty one get this penalties include up to a year in prison a one thousand dollar fine or both Rogers contends young people are too immature to use cellphones citing the role devices plane fatal car crashes not to mention cyber bullying but after all that Roger says you may not even vote for his own bill admitting he has no delusions that it's going to pass he says he just wanted to make a point timer gaudy fox news Tiger Woods announces is returned to the links for a shot at a record setting win he will make his twenty twenty debut later this month of the farmers insurance open the tournament begins January twenty third at Torrey pines of venue or what's is one eight times in his storied career including the two thousand eight U. S. open the last came with a Taurus at the San Diego venue in twenty thirteen this event would be what's his second of this PGA tour season winning the zozo championship in October for his record tying eighty second career victory man apartado fox news and stocks rise to a record the dial up two.

Ghazi president
Planet Money Investigates The Origins Of The Sperm Bank

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:29 min | 2 years ago

Planet Money Investigates The Origins Of The Sperm Bank

"Friends at planet money spent a lot of time reporting on banking. Just not always this kind. This is a story about human reproduction. Alexi Alexi Horowitz Ghazi from our planet. Money podcast has covered every bank from the Federal Reserve to the Bank of America and now has gone looking for the origins of the Sperm Bank. One of the biggest sperm banks in the world is based in a little city in Denmark. Called our who's just past the reception desk. There's a ro of donor cabins outfitted with touchscreen computers and erotic magazines. A Little Red light comes on when each donor cabin is occupied. And that's where I meet. Donor Nicholas Funeral. Have you spent a lot of time in this room. Then no no. They don't like it when you stay too long. Time hasn't have never even dark. Are you donating today already. Did funeral is a recent college graduate donates a few times a week for up to seventy five dollars a deposit each each time. His donation goes from a little cup in the donor cabin to a lab in the back where it gets tested and divvied up into straws it's like sperm assembly-line lab technicians Sion's than freeze the stras and liquid nitrogen and it's off to storage. It looks totally frozen. And it's making all these things until eventually. Somebody picks corrupts profile from crisis online catalogue which includes things like is hobbies academic interests. It's mostly pictures of babies. They're presented as these his prized stallions. They have enough donations in storage for tens of thousands of potential babies waiting to be packed in coolers and shipped around the world but sperm in banking hasn't always been such a high tech far-ranging Enterprise Rene almo- ling is a sociologist. At Yale who has written extensively on the fertility industry for most of the twentieth century sperm donation was a fresh donation meaning. Basically from the donor in one room at a doctor's clinic to the patient in another almo- links has the first first generation of frozen sperm banks started in the early seventies when they were marketed as a kind of insurance for men undergoing a sect amies or cancer treatment. Who might want to have children later later on but it remained a niche industry? There really wasn't a great market for their services until HIV after several women contracted HIV from fresh sperm. Donations pins in the eighties fertility. Doctors recommended against its use from then on anyone seeking donor sperm on the medical market would need frozen sperm. which was quarantined and retested? Later on to make sure it was `virus-free they had to turn to these Burbank's who had all the infrastructure for freezing sperm and testing donors shipping shipping the sperm out and his laws and social norms around same sex parenting and single motherhood have shifted so too has spurned. Banking's customer base craft says that seventy five percent its customers are now single women and same sex couples almost says the. US sperm industry has grown dramatically in part because it remains vastly underregulated which which has raised a host of ethical concerns. Sometimes sperm donors will have fifty offspring or a hundred and fifty and in part that's because these sperm firm banks are businesses and they are collecting sperm from people they spend a lot of money screening at the same time. Mulling points out. Countless families might not have otherwise gotten and started if it weren't for these sperm banks and the broader market for sex cells. That sells with a C.. Alexi Horowitz Ghazi N._p._R.

Sperm Bank Donor Nicholas Funeral Alexi Alexi Horowitz Ghazi Alexi Horowitz Ghazi Rene Almo- Ling United States Bank Of America Federal Reserve Yale Denmark Sion Burbank Seventy Five Dollars Seventy Five Percent
"ghazi" Discussed on Noble Warrior with CK Lin

Noble Warrior with CK Lin

05:54 min | 2 years ago

"ghazi" Discussed on Noble Warrior with CK Lin

"Why she was born raised and then the next city over his the quad cities in Iowa so wait what were the middle of the golden grains Husky corn and all the rest of it and so like my friends from Undergrad. There's like a group of us that we we've been friends got decades decades. We we grew up from being kids. We've been together through life. Death marriage broken hearts job loss. You name it. We have really come together and mystery just lost weekend. We had our annual or quarterly. meet up we do a friendsgiving every year together so these are people who are still in Chicago a lot times. My life feels so far into a a lot of folks but why love and I get to meet up with my my crew from An. Iu is that I get to just be myself. And it's safe space where we just speak about everything and we are still eighteen. And nineteen and just the energy low of and the support and the bubble the confidentiality of it. Like I know I could trust these folks so I'd say that's definitely a group of folks who are just a right here for me Of course My best friend in the UK. And I've got very close friends in the UK as well who. I grew up with I I've realized is that people tend to be close with all the people who knew me before I ultimately canton. You'll feels was like because I think it's because they they knew my true assets and I think in New York. I've made some good friends as well. But it's fewer and far between as you get older that that generally happens but I would say it's my Undergrad. Mine what is You know my My true essence. I think it's obsolete dream row heart like I still want to write a book and so every time I meet with my house the book. It's it's you know being around my family I just I like being very laid back and chilling now and I love riding horses horse right I am. I've been writing for years years' I had my own horse for most people would have I and most people wouldn't even it's funny. I'd either yellow wrangler. At what point which was a stick shift. Most people people like you do not seem like a guy who knows how to drive stick shift. I'm all about state so yeah rode horses. I wrote Western. It people trail riding the door. But yeah so I think my essence is ultimately experienced all of it But I'm very guarded around the people closest to me and and I think that's it things sharing nor is I also have a loving challenge for you. What if you share more all of my essence or choices so that you don't you can fully be yourself so you know I? It's interesting right so I came into advertising advertising. Because I'm a firm believer that you you need to do what you and who you are as a person so when I was in financial services I did feel a big dichotomy I was. I'm this creative dude. Naturally I mean it's very technical field. It's very and also I need to be in field. I get to be one with Hawaiian and or Reggie coming into. Advertising has allowed and now focusing on writing articles and all that sort of stuff so it's set continual journey of just being in tune with myself completely like in writing I would say is a quarter who I am like. I love writing at one point. Is Hamas really good at it and if I have a regret it would be the. I didn't write more because I was thought it'd be a skill salad. Always have but like anything. You don't use it you lose it so that's getting back into that Writing love to write a novel one day working on it and you commercial novel fiction. Yeah fictional novel. I've been working on it for loss. Go twelve years now but yeah yeah wow I love it I mean you certainly only do half the the experience that you write that right. He came from a creative background. You've got into data and then yeah very terminal aware and yeah thank you. It's more. Is there anything else that you'd like to share with our audience in terms of you intention of inspiring them shoe live a more purposeful. I I would say at the end of the day in life. We all and I'm still learning as I go so definitely not a foremost authority. I think to that Nature Buckingham and just speak from my experience Edwards from my experience of the best so for my experience in life is is tough it is hard that gets better. I think it's about the mindsets and you know it's always just no matter what show up show up on the good days shop chopin too bad days even if it's difficult even if that means just getting out of bed but just show up and put misstep and put one foot in front dealer to to live your best life. You said that you're not going to be on the show. Thanks Ivan one thing. I forgot to do that right now. And really acknowledge you for being vulnerable being open about your previous experiences. Because I know that this is atypical. Normal interviews where most people just want the sound by one the tactics except on an answer whereas you actually were able to You went there you talked about your pain or going out of some personal things with your sister with mom and everything. I really really push deeply. That's an extraordinary thing that you did right. Ah Typical interviews acknowledging going there. Acknowledge you for just being being right does lying to come instead of filtering things right. Aw thank you for being here. I'm out of infinite number of other things that you could be doing your here spending time with me now. The Garden of Love Love Love Nora. It's different this is did you know. I think it's it's all about experience. So guys listen.

"ghazi" Discussed on Noble Warrior with CK Lin

Noble Warrior with CK Lin

11:42 min | 2 years ago

"ghazi" Discussed on Noble Warrior with CK Lin

"That during so knowing the best heat where did my undergrad on what's called the program so they were given a chance to give to hi afford the l. t. r. e. program missy and education and it was a super change also wisdom poetic devices analyze song and it was just bringing making things ear off and i was acting full time when out to LA for pilots seasonal the rest of it so i ended up at transient which is the credit bureau and the one of the first name coding it's as cold war it's a JCL job control three hundred million people and also like even though i had coded that wasn't natural taught myself coded so was it transient six years and i initially four and then i moved more into a client facing role where i was leading a team of technologists pieces for capital markets and you know looking at loan appraisals on what types of portfolios transient for about six years and then i got picked up to go to american express where you know what types of decisions should american express mate and then within a few they could ultimately increase their cardmember portfolio to get more of a younger demographic financial services at that point in time about eight years and NFS the way it works between this is good i mean american express it was like it is the golden standard and the financial services adleman go figure and it was specifically the episode with jon hamm or eight new and as khalil gibran would say what you seek is seeking university yeah my attention do the universe all's like someone else and then spoke with this gentleman in december twenty they haven't spoke with WPP they're looking for director and for the first time in my life i picked my boss rather than the role which has paid dividends to have that opportunity so pick my boss and then that's how i got to advertising the idea that is it's not so much the content that your teachers teaching you around your boss yeah absolutely absolutely and i think you know from the i mean it said martin sorrell as we met you know all these people across the industry who industry leaders to as we saw it to happen so what you know what with partners such as facebook global director managing director to CTO but it felt like fun the entire than just data and i wanted to really like i love working with clients i love telling the story to how do we position ourselves in the market do we connect with a meaningful initiatives that council should be swad offers we have the partnerships that power those offers it's been the full and do the job as yeah like i i caught and a half to feel it all about what hasn't been thought about today at how do we take the business in that direction and we've so if i'm let me recap a little bit of your trajectory and you found mentors slash bosses who resonance the big pieces i love tell yeah you know so like i got to WPP have resonance with anyone outside of my boss my boss at the time he exp- did expended his political the school very thoughtful i moved on things quickly and i was able to show results so that is what connect with some of them have gone on two different firms and so forth but i created that residents by being quick folding up a plane ultimately because he was willing to have the conversation that you create resumes by providing value i wanna speaking just to speak there isn't anything new to add and you're like great how can i help you know even today from my first calls with our took a spreadsheet and just making it very specific this data partnership is going to help this product up providing value twenty four seven so actually let's let's concretize the intention go to your partners who everyone the tax to people on the streets orange juice i want to amplify the brand by these metrics i want a you know business growth all right so what's your plan.

"ghazi" Discussed on Noble Warrior with CK Lin

Noble Warrior with CK Lin

08:42 min | 2 years ago

"ghazi" Discussed on Noble Warrior with CK Lin

"Me. That's how I lent it. The best way was modeled for me as I was going through different pieces and I mean I started off my professional career in financial services and then after eight years and financial services transitioned over into the world of advertising and I was very fortunate especially in the world of advertising for my first boss The tree soon as I saw it within six months of being at W. P. my oldest really sick nick and my my first boss was like take all the time off that you need. Don't even question it. Come and go as you want. So I was very fortunate to see it modeled Ed from day. It was almost like by seen it model. It was almost like saying it's allowed because up until that point in time Like I also come from like a very like an Asian culture. It's very very tech. Drew a very logical driven. Almost everyone I know that think to be was an engineer at Like the four word. No one in my family ever says love so you so I come from that type of background as well and even though empathetic in the workplace I was always taught in university. They'll give you a close on Youtube. This giving management finance all the rest of it so it wasn't until I saw it being modeled and being a recipient of it and what it did for me in terms of made me more loyal will like I literally was doing partnerships out of hospital waiting rooms now because I felt the pressure to do it because but because I wanted to and loyalty to my boss and to the firm as a the result of it so I've realized more empathetic. You are and really understand what people are going through. People were the pretend that to you. Dividends diffidence because loyalty. Such a key thing when you get people I have to believe. And I've seen it that people were tended to by being good to you by working halted by wanting to do what's best for the firm and so forth also want to emphasize that we're talking about it. It's not so much where gamification trying to nyc manipulate someone to do something to me. Actually yes the outcome is greater in. That's the juice we are in a human human oriented organization and the interconnectivity. The how you share how you provide space for people that you serve with. That's the juice right because otherwise I would easily be. You know programming something tools. And that's that it's not interesting interesting to me right. Yeah absolutely. Yes shouldn't be so the minute you have the attention that it's going to give you an outcome of a pestle be more loyal. It needs to be more authentic than its basic principle of treat others the way you want to be treated And that's it. You know just trying to be a good person be a good human being and even so for my career at the firm has been around developing collaborations and partnerships. And I've prided myself on being a fit fair business partner just from the human perspective. You could hear all the lawyers not where I'm like. Hey also disavowed partner. We need to give it back to them as well. It has to be fair And there are times you know. I'll be honest I've been burnt. Where fairness isn't reciprocated from a partner? You know you can't win all of them and I'm okay with that. I need to know that I can go to sleep at night knowing that. I've been a fair practitioner because ought to be known as a fair practitioner of partnerships and collaborations then being known known as someone who is unfair. Yeah totally and ultimately I love the way you articulated because you did it for you right so you can go to sleep sleep at night. There is a cost of trying to maximize profit or trying to get the most out of someone gets what to me. Life is a long game right and you have a reputation. If you're repetition is yeah working with C K is an example you know I feel shitty. Yeah Shit no one wants to win. Maybe this time you get some you know some short term gains by long-term wise almost be around you right so thank you so much better assurance generously so talk a little bit about. How do you actually imploring that? Because you're uh-huh speaking from it individual person's point of view you have given you have received. How do you actually still that? Because I would say that. That's pretty tricky. So it's interesting as I came to council transitioning WPP within A few weeks we had a product launch. I had to lead and this product to the team had been working on it for months it was such a large opportunity not and they were so big that no-one tackle it and so came in and literally. We had six six weeks to launch this product and the product name bows attribution And we had to launch at can and there were so many stakeholders involved with partner we had of a forty people internally and love it was just listening to what everyone had to say. Hi and in listen to what they had to say then also understanding what what is the communication saw so like why this one member on the team Super Smart Guy and and his emails on a different level because they were the luminous offer academic and I there was so long I was just like no one's GonNa be able to read all these e mail so I realized very quickly that the way you scale something like that as you call them so so then I realized that that communication jollity was you. This is a person who needs to. We spoke to on the phone to get the message and distill it. Here's a person who needs to WHO's cool speaking in public environments varmints. It's understanding your team. And just it's that emotional. The e q alternate of knowing how and when people want to be spoken to the so. I think it's just understanding feeling out where your team is and understanding how they want to engage what's the most effective way to join outcome for business us but a lot of industry is just listening so that you can figure out. I think a lot of folks that jump headfirst and do this do that. We are economy. A of dictatorship is over. We are in a collaboration economy and the only way a collaboration can happen is if people felt like they are hers and that you are taking them seriously and you are really making them feel valued and that their contribution plays a role in the final outcome. We're trying to bring forward. How do you teach to your managers or someone who is not you? Who who has daily prayer faith. Strong family background in. Because I mean actually share. Share this with you Companies that I previously where at we tend to want to find people who are like US similar values and practices the depth of was them Deeper winners Eq. All of that right. If you look for someone who's exactly like you gonna find it because there's only one in us there's one okay. Well how do you scale that level of depth and awareness. So this is where. Here's a funny truth right so so this is where being a minority has been helpful. Because there's when I start my career as a grownup resorting to look like me in the professional force and ed I never had a manager who was my background either anything to that nature so I used to dealing with people who want like me right so that almost has now become a. It's an asset because I look for is a skill set and also look for chemistry. Do we as people got along with people from very backgrounds at differences. Because like I said I've I've always been different and to now we're lucky we are in a place in time with being different is considered good. But it's just bringing people who are right for the job but people that you have chemistry with who you understand they understand you and I think that's really important to like and trust the people that you work with regards to what backgrounds who've come come from like I said like I've led global teams. Where even though there are commonalities is also differences and I think we as people will like then diagrams this pieces of a star like in those pieces? This is a different. It's just how'd you bring that right permutation together to get the best business outcome. Because I don't want people the same and I think that's why especially in advertising. That's where we run into big issues with campaigns and so forth where we have all the same people.

"ghazi" Discussed on Noble Warrior with CK Lin

Noble Warrior with CK Lin

12:00 min | 2 years ago

"ghazi" Discussed on Noble Warrior with CK Lin

"Optics right and no one really shows one has a story to be told that everyone's going through something and i think a lot of it now is for me putting myself there are things to overcome i will work on overcoming them through a different better leader it does i think had a an entire global team folks from japan india indonesia and having the benefits now of being from a global culture rowing WPP's data alliance into the company that it became because i was able to to what your parents expect an understanding that to you know having a colleagues translate that into business growth i'll share my personal journey emotions as it occurred supress them avoid then i'll pretend they're not empathy or the compassionate or how people react to certain things because he immune why why don't people want to work with me even though rationally so what compassion feels like like wow this is what having compassion i wanna impact people more deeply not just the rational side but also deeply like whole internal salvage operation to do in medicine work to i think it's important to also have it modeled right i think for me that's how i lent services transitioned over into the world of advertising and i was very fortunate nick and my my first boss was like take all the time off that you need it up until that point in time like i also come from like a very like an asian culture where it's oh you do so i come from that type of background as well and even though empathetic and being the recipient of it and what it did for me in terms of made me more loyal the result of it so i've realized more empathetic you are and really even i've seen it that people were tended to by being good to you by working halted by nyc manipulate someone to do something to me actually yes interconnectivity the how you share how you provide space interesting to me right yeah absolutely yes shouldn't be so the minute you have the attention treated and that's it you know just trying to be a good person be a good human being fair business partner just from a human perspective you could hear all the lawyers not fairness isn't reciprocated from a partner you know you can't win all of them and i'm okay with that but i need known as someone who is unfair yeah totally and ultimately i'm trying to get the most out of someone guess what to me life yeah shit no one wants to win maybe this time you get some you know some talk a little bit about how do you actually bring that because you're because i would say that that's pretty tricky so it's look the team had been working on it for months it was such a large opportunity six weeks to launch this product and the product name bows attribution and we had say hi and listen to what they had to say than also understanding what offer academic and i there was so long i was just like no one's gonna be able to read all these up to on the phone to get the message and distill it here's a person who needs to who's cool speaking in public environments the so i think it's just understanding feeling out where your team is a lot of folks that jump headfirst and do this do that we are that economy and that you are taking them seriously and you are really making them ars or someone who's not you who who has daily the previous week where we tend to want to find people who are or someone who's exactly like you gonna find it because there's only one in us there's one okay so this is where being a minority has been helpful because there's when i start unused to dealing with people who want like me right so that almost has now become a i've i've always been different and to now we're you and i think that's really important to like and trust the people.

"ghazi" Discussed on Noble Warrior with CK Lin

Noble Warrior with CK Lin

12:32 min | 2 years ago

"ghazi" Discussed on Noble Warrior with CK Lin

"Morning after a whole spiritual prayed ause which is pray for muslims got a i write three things i'm happy about that i of what is the theme of today going to be and then at the end of the day i go through before gratitude into my daily life and having intention of what my day's gonna be about ed like for me i've got i've got to own my narrative i just recently saw a commercial with she said that's it for me i'm like i'm gonna ask anyone's permission i'm just gonna go do i have to do this and strengthen and i think the new that is has got me through the stinging failures for those of you that listening nacional or here to share something so there's a five minute journal essentially now so we if we can maintain that that's not three simple things as you can be you don't need ten thousand different rituals and other things eight the intention we have the option to choose how we the one thing i will do on the line a little bit is that in my and one thing that i would do is to the ideas i'm theme there was to suppress my emotions the listeners is that our emotions is the emotion of injustice anger resentment fully in intergrity meditation retreat of of the whole idea of go tomorrow achieve enlightenment just the mechanics not they really jussie positive motion that we want a touch attachment and also this process of actually integrating both feeling guilty about feeling resentful resentment his back and therefore we're going to pretend that truly actually integrated to let's say i feel anger aw then i now i'm neutralize tore and then at some point it's gonna blow up someone say something that triggers my my you exercise the muscles gives us gratitude muscle resilience so he is reflection so just going back to this situation cbs different circumstances so you're always better off from the learning and to me i looked back happens where you mean by that not personally personalizing tim's saying i'm valued by this moments there's also this this slavic leaf of you know like what should be good what is good too should it's this thing of as humans we only know so much as crucial thing for me and i think ultimately is having trust in a higher power that the high power in to help me and navigate me through life so i think that's where that pieces for muslims which for me that helping the resilience of course speech my family and my family are the folks who i can trust my mom siblings and so forth so ah encourage me to get back to that place of us and i think that's been very the nuggets of wisdom skoda bentley four slash noble warrior review share these nuggets of wisdom to others just like you can't do that right organization and the world so sounds like you have really make the canadian maple asians in the world is that an accurate statement i would say yeah a sister well it was it was just you mess with one of us you've got all of us at back picks a fight with one of us it is the five us that you have to deal with from nine i think i understand myself better now by think always understanding house because we always have all blace or north i cell or tell your own true and be be authentic when you discover reveal your truth yourself before i think from a since i was a young child i've seen my mom worked really come up seeing that so my purpose has always been eights make sure my mom and my sisters and my loved ones else when i think about things that happen outside of that everything else then it puts it into perspective it doesn't okay if it doesn't work out with that because then i feel like now i've gila become more self aware of become more grounded go and there's also a game of.

"ghazi" Discussed on Noble Warrior with CK Lin

Noble Warrior with CK Lin

08:59 min | 2 years ago

"ghazi" Discussed on Noble Warrior with CK Lin

"Could inspire people to not don't give up on what their goals are. What dreams what aspirations are because we all face hardships myself included? It's how do you overcome them with out. Losing focus of what it is that you're trying to achieve so if this could help someone continue down the path that'd be brilliant. I think one of the pieces that I feel connected it to you about is every time I read some of your content and this the great thing about content never know the kind of day. Someone's having a small piece wisdom of any any sort could make someone's day or push them in the right direction of where they're wanting to go even when it feels hard. So I'm hoping this podcast. When people feel that they're experiencing hardship hardship depending on the day that having this helps them get to the next place and just to continue the good fight to become the best person they want to be as beautiful beautiful? So what actually bring you namesake just a little bit as you share with me before we started recording. We name his first name. Your last name being in going to that colluded so my first name is an office and an Arabic. It's means humanity. It's actually based on a prayer. Coal sewer a NAS. And it's about God's creation and humanity as a whole in my lost name is Ghazi which means warrior poet for me so just putting those two together. I was named by my mother Eh. It's a person WHO's trying to be a warrior of thoughts ultimately what a perfect guest then noble warriors. Yes I know I know you call these things it's perfect. It's all perfect I I really appreciate being here. Thank you and no they reach out to me and say hey. Ah Ah story I wanted to share right and I'm so glad that we met right as right away. There's a resonance absolutely just your name your presence. We're being so tell us a little bit about why. Why your desire to help people overcome harsh? Everyone has an origin story. And I'm here. Here's my biggest superpower highest intention comes from in my desire desire to empower people to alleviate suffering to inspire them to really step into purpose mostly came from my my own journey. When I first started I was following the the status quo? Life should go this way in a very rigid. Wait in an throughout the journey of Following the path of science and engineering hiring to entrepreneurship to now where I'm at right now sharing wisdom. It's wanted say while he's been all over the place but I would say no. The core through line of my life has been the pursuit of wisdom. I just didn't have the words for that. So share with us. A little bit of awarding story of Whitest desire to share to alleviate struggle adversity hardship. So there's a couple pieces to that right so I think I have to take it back to my childhood house race and so forth so it was born raised in the UK and my mother is of Indian. Burmese to set my father's of box. Donnie and Turkish descent and raised in the UK. My my parents both let them come from US phenomenal families of extreme fortitude grandfather. What he's called? What School Degi Guitar Landowner? And that's generational racial to being one of the first mattress giants of India to my father and his family being boxed on during the time of the partition. His his his family's journey to my father leaving England box on for England. Eighteen to go to school so we came from this. I come from this lineage of people who are entrepreneurs believes and strives who have done extremely well parents got married moved to the UK and we went from being this family of having halves. CBS having a country house in Norwich England. And all the rest of it to my father passing away when I was three and my mother a widower twenty eight with five children youngest being three I children oldest being nine yeah so foreign woman in a ultimately a new land that she was a native of and so we went from having all these things to to my mother's sewing teddy bears for us and our coats. And you know. We had a renter in our house. Because we we needed money to and my making some Moses for a theme park called Chessington Zoo so we we've we've seen my family and I we've seen the bifurcation of life have have nots and one of my biggest things. I've always been a dreamer. Big Time driven. I could get lost in my even as a as a child so I think having those aspirations expirations of this is what I want my life to be like and one of the core values. My mother isn't still door. VOSS is you're not defined by you are at the moment because monster moments change you will define but you are decide where you come from. So we're very proud family lineage. And you know this idea of bloodline it's also the characteristics that you invite in by US bloodline so my mother like who I remember the first time we went to a home in India. It's practically palatial to seeing that fallacious relations like a palace to seeing how life was an England where you lived in a very modest home and so forth. Mom You came from this. You're living like this and she's at that shouldn't doesn't matter what does mattress who are person character and your work ethic and not to be defined by the failure that you have in life but to come above them so back to your the question of. What's the story to share? It's that it's people have ups and downs all the time and I'm reference my Momma la La. I'm just going to be on this. The people have ups and downs all the time. But my mom has taught me and my four sisters is that everyone force what defines you is. How quickly and how gracefully getup and that's the the story? Because I think a lot of times people see instagram version of Liberia invasion of life. We share on twitter. That's true just the tip of the iceberg of who you are. We all rotated by that submerged iceberg of paying hardship overcoming resilience. And I think more people need to see that because it takes many. I'd like to see many nights to be an overnight success and I think it's to shed light on. Hey what success means different people but what that journey has been bottom of iceberg. uh-huh so beautiful. Mom was quite a master teacher for you. Oh absolutely absolutely still is to this place of safety for all my siblings and yeah well until this day we all speak to my mom every day not every day. We are very very very much on the way here. We're a very very close knit family. And I think fortunate but that also happens and I've read a little of psychology is when a parent pulses away. Siblings families tend to become even closer. So we've always been like this Armata and as my mom would say we're like five fingers on one hand when you wouldn't together your strongest so we've just genetically we who we are as well but not everyone so blessed to have such mother right right. So what a blessing you had mentioned uh resilience mentioned grace so put myself in a position of my listeners. Yeah because it's easy not easy simple to say. Yeah just pick yourself back up with grace. But in that moment when you're being punched life or adversity or challenges it's quite challenging to actually embody that operational operational is that right right so tell us a little bit about. How do you move from challenged grace in that moment and I literally actually just had this happen to me this week? It was something I really worked by deserved. I was very passionate about and full of good step back from it and it was hard. I mean it was stress headache and all the rest of at the moment. I'm like what the heck is happening. Because they're all moments when you get get punched in the face that you lose faith in humanity right and you're like how can this be how people have morals anymore. People don't stick by the words. I'm a good person. Nope but also the environment around when people do the do the ugly. What the heck is going on So when you're in that moment I think the pizzas has worked for me is a now just taking time and realizing that when things don't work out it's in that moment.

"ghazi" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"ghazi" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Mean you've got a a how cool is this is management my man you I will I will take Kerry that is awesome bringing candy for my sister's candy dry that said what's your name what is it Chris grips Chris Chris Chris guys gonna go great to go he's going to be from Chris it is great to meet you my man listen I I will I will take care of you meant and but I like to meet you during the commercial break in the next five six minutes if you come in to be great how about that that's that is awesome now sports six Michelle of course is a teacher here in Vegas valley and she came on and gave a Thursday night pick of the week right which wins against Stanford sports which I feel is a twenty nine and thirteen are you freaking kidding me and I do all the studying and no I actually had a good week this week but she's twenty nine thirty Mike Scalia who's a regular listener because he goes Katie he goes I'm on it Michelle I don't care if she gets it he goes on but the nickel game up in five hundred game one sports X. me shows plays now because this is it like stealing but I'm still jinx because the only time I did the Thursday night show when you were here and she came out as a one while she had read we won't let you do good on Monday night yeah I mean it's going to kind of gangster there all right sports it's Michelle we're gonna get her dad down here as well live at the Ghazi stadium which is having a candy drive for her second grade class in in a lot of kids that you know they they looked at it say it says school downtown so she knows that a lot of the parents are just making ends meet so she's like you know what I'm gonna ask the school permission if I can do a a candy drive will be old she got permission and candy fish fame brought him back to candy no Parker bottom bags of candy Chris just bought two big bags are you kidding me which is good because Katie comes off a nice weekend of giving plays out I was coming out to sunset station yesterday our goal of forget if I was going in or coming out and all is going in well my daughter and my pal Nelson St younger we're going to the buffet and I got a great slaughter house their duties Harris one of the coolest ladies ever and so we're walking in and this guy Ken Thompson on yeah this is a man I just want to thank you man you you let me know that that running back who is banged up there for east Carolina whatever and or or when it when the team you guys and because I got off that he goes I played the other side he goes in that does an easy when you guys thanks a lot man I'm like all right great I'm glad I did my.

"ghazi" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

15:52 min | 2 years ago

"ghazi" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"Enough. American express was my climb and so my client and they asked me to come over to new york from chicago to me at that point felt like a big thing to leave chicago haugen go to like the number one financial in the world was let's do this right and as boy who's born in wembley london in the city was in chicago lived in the suburbs and they went out to school in dekalb illinois so like practically by the border island right so i was craving t- environment so went went to michigan express and i was part of the data analytics capabilities group and for about four weeks my role was to pretty much oversee the relationships with the credit bureau's but also to understand what does data from a variety of sources should be coming into american express's decision for the consumer called services group and risk information management group so that they can make better decisions for the consumer and so actually that was about four weeks and then as a stroke of luck would have it my v._p. At the time she came came up to me and she said you have a facebook account right. I'll say she sake as she was looking at me. Always guiding my question say so you want you get digital right so she's notting ahead for our good. Even i ah i could respond. Also yeah sure facebook where she's at great. She's you can lead the digital transformation for the division and i was like okay and in my head you know i don't know if there's even a brave nece or a little bit of both in my house i couldn't be that difficult so i put together the digital transformation for <hes> risk information management and consumer cards gutman tim's of who should partner with why we should partner with them and ultimately it was solving the problem that american express had at the time and and that was more so how do we increase our called member base so they were looking at reaching out to folks who had nontraditional at that point in time so they wanted to younger consumers of people have divest backgrounds and so forth and it's which platforms can we connect without gal help us reach those audiences right so put together this whole digital roadmap and what's my favorite is because i saw it there. What thing is like september october so i didn't really have any vacation so i worked all through that december it came around january presented it what well and went on to get leadership in action award and so forth and my role to hats now it was lead this digital digital transformation for g in addition to bringing in data deals through some of our net- bureaus and so forth and i mean at american express i really dade at the time it was the c._e._o. And he's a marvel of man in that all the way from him being the this c._e._o. To american express being several thousand people everyone felt a connection to him and why really that from that experience was how he was able to quickly distill information. I think till today what has helped american express ticket is their agility information travels so quickly the very concise i every i mean the town. Oh pulled a every president is burgeoning c. suite of every person that's interesting. That's a a and i haven't interviewed anyone from american express so appreciate the insider insider view to that's pretty interesting and you go from credit bureau who has all the data on everyone to amex who knows at the transaction in level what their members are doing <hes> and and then you you flip the switch if you will to the platform side and digital transformation mation i guess data's the common thread ray. It has a completely right and that's why i tell folks. Data is now like a thing. I came into the industry when data was even a career and it's very like the career a lot people have asked me. It's just a career. You thought you were going to have right and austin college. This didn't even exist and even now now the work that we're doing at cantor and so forth of our products infusing a._i. And so forth the these pieces and exists until a euro backer in some cases a few months back and i i think where american express is doing it right and they've always been doing it right is they've always had the foundation of days help their their experience company so they build stories on that day. Take they build experiences on that data because data is only as good as the data. It's the story that you tell and they've done so many good things all the way from these partnership with fashion fashion week to do things with the u._s. Open i mean it to you. Airport lounges they get their called members and that's why they're called and called members and not card holders because they have members of a larger group who they want to treat with respect and give him experiences that will help give them a better life right. You're so true so true are they. You said it much more eloquently than i can but the fact that they were using the data for the benefit and utility of their members <hes> was was fantastic and everyone's trying to emulate that in some ways now they are investing. I think a lot of this is about speed to market right so i think these brands who have done it i they've they've just made a cachet behind it is this is who we all this is what we stand for all the way to the partnership with the new york taxis where you could use your credit leslie berlin and twitter sink that was like a big that was actually the first big social media relationship that went in place to that was like two thousand team two thousand fourteen they have been innovators and they've done it quickly but they've done it in a way where is improving the life and the experience of their called member base and so your amex then you end up at w. p. Oh gosh yeah so how tells about that transition and leading the data alliance eventual sure so interesting enough. If you're gonna realize the theme of my life i guess fired a lot by television and i literally was watching an episode of madmen and it was the episode assode where'd don draper was a pitching the idea of the carousel for kodak and as the pictures flipping up and they're coming up on screen and i watched that episode now i could do that this. I called my sister safina funeral. I think wanna get to advertising my sisters. You are nutcase but this this is what we've learned to expect with you. Let me see who i know who could try and connect you up. So as khalil gibran would say what you seek is seeking you so my sister connected me with someone. One who i met lesson that was never turn down a meeting so i met this gentleman jim tobacco and met with impove now our and nothing happened the six months later. He reached out to me and i'm with a phone call w._p. And they've got this group called data alliance would could you be open to to coming in so i was like sure why not and he's he sends me this literally six page job description which was is everything and the bathroom sink and a lot in ice or job descriptions. I would say you know sixty percents of else. I could do twenty percent of it. I could figure out twenty percent l. Just fudge vic figure out over the drought but when i saw the job description as i've done all of this so i could do this so a short minogue back and with immunities c._e._o. Wants to meet you all right and went in and i met the c._e._o. Who at the time was nick. Knight the hat who's currently the chief digital off canton and also the chairman of our profiles division so i met him. He spoke about division but what was the hook for me to come to w._p._p. As much as i understood with the group was trying to do it was i felt a connection to nick as a person and it and that is a ruled. I've actually let i have to pick people over job. Titles and descriptions i just felt very connected to nick and his vision and the type of person that he was when i grow on nick that was what was supposed to be a half hour. Forty five minute meeting ends up being like two and a half thousand. I walked him to the train and and i was just at this is it i'll say this is the place i want to be so came to date alliance and what data alliance that the remember days alliance who was very much to bring together data partnerships so that we could bring those those day to assets into w._p._p.'s decision systems so what we what we refer to as house we'll have coined data destinations so how'd you bring data into the d. n. p. over at one time and how do we bring data into <hes> pre and platform than into platform how'd taste into their how to bring day and enter the panels council so that we could understand the three hundred and sixty degree view of an audience so that we could reach them with the the right message at the right time so the first partnership that we place low behold was twitter up and then from there we data surfed and offer that it was facebook book initially the team was based in new york and as the pawnshops began growing the benefit was really apparent. There was a desire for us to branch launch because we had also become at that point in time. A center of excellence of how do you do data partially created oldies frameworks of this how you do and this is. What how are we gonna evaluate partnerships so we were able to do at scale so then after that help support the the landing of or the expansion of data lines indicate in south africa in between johannesburg and cape kicked out right so like it's working and what was beneficial at that time like nick his leadership like has just been brilliant he was like if you've got an idea just make it happen and so came up with this entire structure of how we should do more expansion because we've been getting folks from u._p. India indonesia china all over the world saying we want d._a. We expanded to these regions because we want to. We want to not only leverage data decision systems. We also want to tell stories and we also wanna have relationships across all these sport. Also i mean end to end d._a. We did over twenty two partnerships with spotify horrify facebook twitter. I mean you name it all the big ones and as pure out that supports each one of those so we began so i started off as a director and dan began doing these partnerships and then began doing expansion and then move my web from director to global director managing director than to c._e._o. In about three and a half she is fast but you know i think it was false because it doesn't feel like work right. It was just something so intuitive and so natural to what i wanted to do. I was always the environment that i was in. It was a false failure ebb and they were failures. I mean oh god i mean and and we were supposed to do a music po ship had this big session i can and all this kind of great stuff and <hes> as we're about to go live with it. Just don't work at it died. I gave the analogy of you know you've operated someone stitching them back up and then they just flat on the table and also also my gosh maltin soils involved with this bags and at the time the chief strategy off says scott spirit because i get over it and that was the best advice i've ever received also what he was just go over. It is working on this stuff figure out and through the failure of that was the genesis of our relationship with spotify which like i'm just so proud of the firm as i see them grow and i see them do well like i feel in a small way. I've been able able to contribute to that because the way that relationship even developed was one night in a mobile congress in barcelona myself pete good guide well we can collaborate and a lot of these collisions have come together because of passion right like we. We've got passion for the music. We've got passion for the industry. What can we do that was going to be cool and collective and we ended up being like launch partners in indonesia and asia and have done a variety of work since then interesting so yeah. That's how old game together good all right so you you you're c._e._o. Data alliance and then now you're kantar. Yes what happened so with data alliance. The remits of days alliance grew as well so outside of a data partnerships. We also became a consultancy with clients the supporting our agencies going out there winning pitches. We were we this entire curriculum about data storytelling so eventually this idea of data. It's become commoditised and that's the reality and we're at a point somewhere like we've got like we've got team in indonesia. We've got firm in india south africa u._k. Senor and we were at the mission was that we would up school everyone and be able to have the center of excellence where everyone canal do it and we scaled it so then the next opportunity that came my way. It was like for me professionally as well. I wanted to be closer to the business because through d._a. Had luxury of influencing over two hundred million dollars worth the dayton technology spend and where we can leverage that how we can leverage that by one or two almost go back to my roots being closer to the client right front of house smart house but also.

facebook nick twitter new york chicago indonesia spotify africa partner austin college tim dekalb illinois london michigan president khalil gibran kodak cantor kantar safina
"ghazi" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

11:02 min | 2 years ago

"ghazi" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"Today on marketing today i've got a nas ghazi growth officer at kantar a nas and i talk about his pathway kantar which started at the trans union and his background in actually programming led to data data analysis. They're then going to amex followed by joining w._p._p. In their data science initiative and ultimately becoming c._e._o. Of that initiative before his current role as driving growth and partnerships at kantar. I hope you enjoy this wide ranging conversation with a nas qazi nas welcome to the show. Thank you for happen. We excited. We're here durham's. Thank you for coming no worries. We're in this nice little incubator space with these crazy companies running around but i we're gonna talk a lot about data today with kantar and and the data alliance from w._p._n. Your past listen and even as a data engineer or data plus but before we go there when we last talked you talked about wanting to pursue a a career in acting oh so one. I got that right. I believe she did get that right. Did you get that right. Tell us about that. Ed's my little tip of having apple juice to help was a crisp voice. Yes the things that you load your together from canada. So tell you about wanting to be an actor. I honestly i have to take it back to growing up in london specifically wembley and i watched lots of stallone movies. I'm about to date myself here. I remember watching over the top. It was that that and rocky five and i remember watching those films and even at that age just being really taken by the character and the connection seven and i remember being with wembley high road probably marks and spencer remember this clearly and i told my best friend homes are also i'm. I'm going to be an actor and i'm going to move to american could become rich and famous at his response. At true british fashion was known eveline leaves wembley and that was a year later. We did end up moving to the the u._s. We actually moved to chicago and subsequently i was picked up by a talent agent and it wasn't because i was different looking or handsome tall anything to that nature it was just that i was what they deemed ethnically ambiguous and that man i could play any role i could play them. Do you know i could play iranian. I play indian box thorny mexican sardinian you name it. I've played it right because at that time in the early nineties specifically chicago the era was different. It was either you a black. We will white and those very few folks in between so yes so so that's how my acting aspiration began and told me a lot and you just i remember going to meet my fest agent with my mom at that was a surreal experience and i would walk in and as there's no shorter than i am now and the name was choline. She was five eleven coughed platinum blonde hair in a bun and as we sat down she was awesome questions. I do think you're gonna grow tall. Your face looks fine. Your ears are adjusted out so you're going to have to get them pinned back and as i walked out i was at mom. I'm gonna have to get new ears. Let's do do it at my mom's response. Was you need to get new agents so it was a really interesting time and it actually i love doing it. I loved it for the experience. I wasn't wasn't a very good actor. All this. I think at that point in time was doing it for all the wrong reasons rather than for the enlightenment which acting does provide is more for like the fame and the fortitude that would bring but there's also a big piece that acting allowed. We allowed experience which before that's awesome. That's awesome not everybody i don't i know that i've had any former actors on so you're the first it just did it for almost a decade and a half wow did it through to high school. Undergrad grad school even took a year off in between and continued doing it and then it sort of ran its own course but did it for a while. That's cool. That's cool well. Let's let's talk about your business background. You start oh goodness and actually tails into the acting thing because after grad school the first time round i took a year off and i decided that i was going to act and the big thing i needed was health insurance right so couldn't be able to my my parents anymore onto my mom in particular and so i was like all right. How do i get health insurance so i found a job that was closest to my agent in chicago and closest to david o'connor honor costing and that happened to trans union and i remember the day i wh- for the interview and came back and it was wearing a suit and tie and my mom's like you just don't look well because i walked upstairs with my coat on and i just through my bank of my head and my mom's like oh no. You didn't get it also where i did. She's it while you're upset. Also the ending of my dreams because now we're going to be like this corporate stooge and actor bells i. I'm just doing this part time really going to be an actor so initially when i first began gun working at transient during my launches in between i was going and i was doing well dishes and i would liken it because i got hired as a data engineer and interesting story when h._r. Recruited me the first question. Is there any coding involved and the h._r. Associate was like no not at all day one of the job it was cobo stray batch processing kabul gassing soil and this is code going on mm-hmm so that's actually how i got my four into trans union and a big piece around being data engineers i had to code campaigns and models for all the banks that were doing business snus with a transient right and so so the banks the credit card agencies at the credit card issuers visa moscow american express discover <hes> bank of america so it came down to charlotte quite a bit i was up in delaware because p._n._c. was the blades and my role there was to code campaigns anes where they could either do what we'd call prescreens where they would run acquisition campaigns based off of the credit reporting online network utility system krona's. We're we pull data off of the <hes> at based on specific criteria that was invited and develop an acquisition strategies for them or it was coaching what we call portfolio reviews which is where a client would give us their their consumers and say we want to understand how they're reacting. What types of decisions should we make. Should we increase increase the credit. Spending limit should be decrease based on how the fluctuations network credit profiles so that's why i initially started took off as and and like you said i was did not realize coding even though i had a graduate degree in information systems or did c. plus plus i literally had to reteach myself coding wow because by the time i went back into a into the corporate world and grad school i had a year hiatus because acting acting the whole time i was elated pilots seasons and policies in chicago and so it was i was completely green and i remember calling my college roommate. <hes> shocker say doodles like teach me how to code that he was he would like draw. These buckets of this is how coding works right but it was a lot of weekends. I would actually put in baker's because those this competitive thing in also i cannot fail at this so every we cannot go literally i think for about eight months and i would just no one else of that not just code it would make my mistakes printout will call dumps which were sample credit report where everything is anonymous black to make sure my code was working as it should and and <hes> started off as data engineer and then very quickly progressed into being warned the client consultant side where i mean models are transients. Muscles auto's really complex trying to explain that to clients because we were dealing with marketing to people so then i was reluctant. I got to lead an entire team of client service. This and data engineers to not only can sept- what these marks in campaigns would look like but also how do we explain. It was the strategy behind it. Are we going to get the consumers that we're trying to reach out to all making the right decisions and did that. During the <hes> through i'd say the two thousand eight two thousand nine crash and and at that point in time washington mutual was actually my client and i and i mean it was intense overnight. They evaporated and i remember going out to pleasanton in california. You could scape through their offices because overnight things just disappeared while and it was a great experience in terms of i feel like in this data industry. There are very few folks have actually touched data who have understood data who can actually code and so when i think now it's all a decision trees. I didn't realize how much of an imprint sprint trans union coding domain but it really shaped the way i see things and do things and interestingly enough and i walk into a room very few people realize i come from a very tactical tactical background educational and a career perspective and have the fortitude to do that and lead these client teams servicing being over sixty different clients over. I'd say was portfolio of several million dollars tens of millions. I'd say right and helping these credit issues issue at that point in time especially post two thousand eight two thousand nine really minimize their risk also grow at the same time right right well. I mean credit bureaus. They're known from an outsider never worked inside one but couldn't is known for having all the information about all of us right and you know the famous lately i guess recently the experience hack equifax twenty dollars folks yeah so yeah equifax in all the settlements wants. They're going on around that but you you think about it. That's a great way to cut your teeth right all that much data because it's interesting because now like you hear a lot about data privacy and security at trans union like where the seven it was listed in an oxygen tight room ever a fire broke out they would suck the oxygen out the room to protect the service so transient already had the mindset i mean literally figuratively and literally around data protection actually yes <hes> to the point that while i was working there they were located in west new we import our name on the building because they want to protect the building right so that it wouldn't track like eh or and at that point in time it was a family owned business. It was owned by the pritzker and then it was one of them went to p._d. So anything before as well and at that time it was a billion dollar company company. Today's fourteen billion wow so the has always had those principles now. It's become the buzzword but they've already had an interesting. Well you move from trans union m._s. What was that transition like. What was the appetizer. The prompt maybe <hes> the prompt was strangely enough..

trans union kantar chicago engineer durham wembley high officer canada Ed london pritzker stallone apple spencer charlotte delaware washington pleasanton baker
#139 The Reply All Hotline

Reply All

53:03 min | 3 years ago

#139 The Reply All Hotline

"Restaurant. That's amazing. 'cause I was like I was on yelp. And I did like dollar dollar. And then there was all. That's a pretty savvy move wondering, wouldn't it? I mean, I told him that it was that was what I did. He thought smart. How the day go. Go while he thought it was. But I got a dollar out of it. I like the restaurant that much what you were telling us about congress internet interesting. It's no problem. After the break. We take some more calls. This episode of reply all is brought to you by squarespace squarespace. You can easily create a website that stands out all by yourself. I made this website called gopher grapes dot com, which is a place where you can grape about the world. And maybe I will read it in an ad like this ad right now, here's a great bills. With tips included. I like bills tips included. My crayons aren't sharp enough sharpener friends every time I get a haircut. It just goes back. You just need to make peace of hair. So maybe not everyone agrees with your grapes. But if you have a gripe with your fully, customizable, squarespace website. You can tell it to their award-winning twenty four seven tech support go to squarespace dot com for a free trial. And when you're ready to launch us, the offer code reply to save ten percent on your first purchase of a website, or domain. This episode of pile is brought to you by atlassian. They make collaboration cipher that helps teams open up seeing worked better together. They leave it. Open communication and open wave working in an open mind to better teams and happier. People Alex feel like you're probably one of those people. I know literally point where I had to recreate you from scratch at this point. You know enough about me that you could upload my opinions to computer, and it would be a reasonable ExIm leave me actually humour that most people. That is so messed up. At the robot making plan, they'd be like, well, we don't really know how to program like the robot like reading your emotional cues. That's fine. More accurate. Atlassian their philosophy is openness does more than just produce. Better. Hypothetical co host teams feel safer less. Stifled more ready to do great things. To learn more about atlassian, what openness can do for your teams, go to last Sian dot com. That's AT L A S S. I N dot com. Hello. Who's that? My God I got through again. Do you? Remember your second question. Are you eating right now? I was I'm not anymore figured you guys gonna answer. Anyway, we've the phone twice for you. Now, I feel like the idea that we don't answer the phone is not something you're allowed to believe. Oh, I know. I don't eat more. Now. I'm a firm believer that you guys are not full shit. The phone. Fucking fall. And you're so full of shit. Back again. Do you? Remember your second question. Oh my gosh. Oh, all right. What is different between a proxy server, a whole and VPN and what what is your better choice between the free. Okay. Allison answer. This question doing from. What are you trying to figure out how to browse your net anonymously? Yeah. I yeah. Because like, you know, you go on the dark web and shit, and I have a VPN and all that. But like with this you need to bridge. But like, okay. So what if I have a VPN what's the point of having a proxy or bridge? You know what I'm saying? Like, I I don't understand like why you need all that shit. So I don't totally know the answer to your question. Okay. When I know is VP N is essentially like, basically, it's a virtual private network that that's what stands for it. What it means is like you are now part of a network that is elsewhere on the internet. So it's not technically a server it's more like you are. Connected to a different network and in your your traffic, all when it hits the internet. All looks like it's coming from this network which have somewhere else. I don't know. Exactly what a proxy is. So I don't know the difference between that and the minor saying is it's it's a server that you're that is between you and the place you're connecting like, you're sending your traffic. I try to you you send it to see so. Okay. So I guess that's the difference. Proxy servers like an actual, computer. You're hitting whereas of APN is a network that you're connecting to. What are you doing on the dark web? You know, just off and stuff. Hello. Hey, are you there? Hello. Is there way at can you chat with him? I mean numbers are coming in so fast. I don't know how we would do it. Can't you see which ones like connected with like, no. Because we connect over that phone. Country for jerky is ninety. Well, hey, we're still here. Don't hang up back. What's your what's your question? Okay. So I like ever since like ninth grade or something I've been like working real hard on my English. I don't know if that's parents. Your English is your English is amazing. Oh, thank you so much and ever since like twenty six I've been really working hard and trying to like get into college abroad. And so towards the end of last year December last year, I take the tea and I get a fifteen forty grand. That's really good and like in two thousand sixteen Trump comes into office at obviously, there's a travel ban. And I'm the longer allowed into the USO Cup. I really attack. Oh, that's okay. Just take your time. We're here. And so like the only option I had then was Canadian universities. And I try to register to the best of my ability on the internet. And I just like there was the west sites all of them were so bad and like just like hard to actually use like so many problems like, for example. My name is all cats and English. But because that's how we do it in Syria. I don't know who decided that. And so like on a lot of the like websites, I put my name, and they were all like, oh, your name is case sensitive. So you need to capitalize it as it is in your life passport and. I go in there and put it in all caps because that's the way it isn't my passport. And they're like we can't accept that. And so I literally hit him up. I. I call them. I call the university. And they're like, we don't know that they're just like, we don't know flat out that that's like McGill. Oh, yeah. I went to McGill there. I had very bad experiences. When I needed help with them. You went to got. Okay. Yeah. So like, I kind of missed all of my deadlines now. And it's like these three months have been super depressing roomy. I like, I just don't know. What to do? I've been like searching for counselors on the internet. I put Hurley pointed anyone and like, I don't know if that's even something that like you said anything so. Yeah. I don't know what I'm doing. Let's try to help. So it sounds like you need somebody. You literally need somebody who can help to navigate the college admissions process. I mean, it's not like we know first hand, but we can will help. Yeah. Well, that that's I get so much. I'm really sorry that you're going through this. How long have you been in Turkey? I've been since like twenty thirteen and are you with your family? Yeah. Can't gather. What's your family like like what mom dad siblings? I have three siblings. All females. That's how I grew up younger or older. I'm the youngest kid and what like what's your life like in Turkey right now. Like where are you talking to us from on from Essen like I've been in mesh on this whole time ten and I can't like go to Ghazi and tap. I can't go to temple unless I have a permit. And what does it take it? That. You have to have either family somewhere off, and they don't always accept that. Or you have to have something like a test or something like when I took my say t's I had to fly out on car. And so what do you do your done with school? What are you doing with yourself? I like, I skipped I went to school year earlier like like, I get your and so yeah, I'm done with school now. But like, I'm most old as a senior your student, and are you working? Not really Alex said that like he was your dad, and it's okay. You know, I'm not trying to. Yes, it's fine. Not working. I was just curious to know like the thing is as Syrians were not allowed to our care, regardless. If you have like a college degree or anything, I think we simply instated some sort of process for people to you know, convert their diplomas college diplomas and try to work here. But for now, it's mostly like educational field, and like markets and stuff that get the jobs that can work. But otherwise, no can do anything. How do people just like survive financially? We've just been like borrowing money from my grandpa from my own call for the past like three years four years. And that's what we've been subsisting off for the whole time that sound. Really, really, really hard. Yeah. Tim has a question for you. Go ahead. Hey, how's it going south? Okay. This is a kind of uninformed question. But I'm just really curious. So I live in Berlin, Germany, there's a huge Syrian population there. And I've met a lot of Syrians. And I'm just curious is that I don't know. I'm I'm genuinely cares. I don't know. Is that a thing that you guys think about is Germany so possible to emigrate to or has is that become really difficult. We wanted to go at some point back in like twenty fifteen my dad and sister wanted to go to Sweden or something like one of those countries. And basically what you do that is be get on a boat, and you go all the way there. But right, all it's very dangerous and a lot of the smugglers are, basically criminals. Do you might get still income? I get you're definitely gonna stuff stolen on the way there. You might never get there. You might think whatever. But like my dad and sister, we're going to go the way it works. Is that like once a family member goes there like your parents like your dad, he can reunite and with all of? With all of his children as long as they're under the age of eighteen and so my sister was above eighteen and if you had to go. I feel like it was really scary. You know, the days weighed in to it. And eventually. The day came they were going. I went to school, and I turned and turns out they hadn't gone and. Like right about that time. There was a law that was put in place that would prohibit Syrians from traveling between states between Turkis states or cities without a permit. And so my dad was on his way to like wherever the city was where they were going to get smuggled, and they didn't let him get get through. And so here turn and that was that. Did it did it make you feel? Did they make you feel disappointed or sad that he wasn't able to make it or were you just glad that he was not in harm's way. Obviously, I was come freighted. But. A lot of my friend had gone meant that we're going to reunite with them. And it's really not good here in Turkey, and no jobs. Yeah. I obviously, I I don't enjoy my stay here. And so I would have been happy had he like gotten there safely and reunited with us. They're put this e you know. Yeah. Totally. You don't like anyone hawks pay. picks. So Alex day has been asking people on dude. It's really important to know that reason to me to know he said he wants to with pretty much everybody. Whether they think they're PJ or an Alex foundational thing. Alex. Recklessly? Thank you sow. We're the same height. How tall PJ? Hey eleven. Yeah. You're on six feet. I can't I'll walk around on my knee. All right. We're gonna try VR. We can help you. Okay. Thank you so much. Yeah. I love you so much. I I'm both in Alexander PJ. No on your an ally year. Okay. Everyone has all right. Take care love you. Bye. So we have our conversation last Thursday since then we found too many the McGill admissions department who's looking over sows transcripts and helping him navigate their system. Macgill's student run Syrian student association is also helping out if you are one of our listeners any working college admissions in North America, and you want to help out just in this an Email reply allocate media dot com. Obviously, the problem sows having is way way broader than just him. There's tons of smart Syrian kids who have been displaced who want to go to college, and it's very hard for them to get there. If you're interested in this. We found to organizations that seem to be working on it. There's one called juicer J U S O R. It's a group of Syrian ex-pats trying to help kids. Find opportunities. The other one is the institute of international education. I e they've program called peer where they tried to find scholarships and opportunities in connect them with refugee students said he keep us updated. So if there's more news with him, we'll let you know. And finally, just thank you to everybody who called or who wrote in it was fun to ineptly trying to solve your problems. Thanks.

Alex Day Turkey Squarespace Atlassian Yelp Congress Alexander Pj USO Institute Of International Edu VP North America Germany Mcgill Allison Berlin Syria Macgill Hurley
"ghazi" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"ghazi" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. There's a lawsuit over the net flicks show. Black mirror is episode bender snatches what it's called here. It's interactive and lets viewers make decisions for the main character the format may remind some people of the choose your own adventure books series. In fact, it reminds people of that so much that next left is being sued by the publisher of that series, Al Alexi Horowitz Ghazi of our planet money podcast explains. Choose your own adventure books, are what people often point to when trying to explain the concept of interactive narrative this series sold more than two hundred fifty million copies over its heyday in the nineteen eighties and nineties its popularity waned, but the fanfare around Netflixing Vander snatch has signaled a new hope for the interactive genera, Shannon, Gilligan is the CEO and publisher of choose co the company that currently publishes that shoes you're on adventure books and is suing net flex even. She sees. Bander snatch as a turning point for the interactive narrative market. I think that we are seeing the beginning of what will become a new genre in both streaming end in theatrical release. So why is the small publisher of the choose your own adventure books suing the company that could help jump start the market for interactive content. We simply want to protect our trademark vendors tells the dark and sometimes gruesome story of a teenage programmer as he works to adopt a fictional book called Bander snatch into a video game with multiple branching plotlines, choose because lawsuit evolved out of this scene. Nossa choose your own adventure book. You decide what your character does? Lucky game sounds thrilling. That is the moment. Choose co claims that net. Flicks ran afoul of their trademark..

publisher Al Alexi Horowitz Ghazi Gilligan Steve Inskeep CEO and publisher Rachel Martin Netflixing Vander programmer
Adventure Series Book Publisher Sues Netflix Over Trademark

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:31 min | 3 years ago

Adventure Series Book Publisher Sues Netflix Over Trademark

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from the almond board of California representing California's almond community a collection of family run farms dedicated to making life better through innovation and responsibly producing a healthy food more at almondsustainability dot org. You know, what they say about your favorite movie? No matter. How many times you watch? It always ends the same. That is not true. For one episode of the Netflix show black mirror. An episode called bender snatch lets viewers make decisions for the main character the format reminds some people of the shoes your own adventure book series. And that prompted choose your on adventures publisher to choose this adventure. They chose to sue. Here's a Lexi Horowitz Ghazi of NPR's planet money podcast. Choose your own adventure books, are what people often point to when trying to explain the concept of interactive narrative the series sold more than two hundred fifty million copies over its heyday in the nineteen eighties and nineties, it's popular. Rarity waned, but the fanfare around net. Flicks is banner snatch has signaled new hope for the interactive genera, Shannon, Gilligan is the CEO. And publisher of choose co the company that currently publishes that choosier on adventure books, and is suing Netflix, even she sees banner snatch as a turning point for the interactive narrative market. I think that we are seeing the beginning of a new genre in streaming end in theatrical release. So why is the small publisher of the choose your own adventure books suing the company that could help jump start the market for interactive content. We simply want to protect our trademark bender. Snatch tells the dark and sometimes gruesome story of teenage programmer as he works to adopt a fictional book called Bander snatch into a video game with multiple branching plotlines, choose coz lawsuit evolved out of this scene knows that she's your own eventually book. You decide what your character does? Look a game. That is the moment. Choose co claims that Netflix ran afoul of their trademark. Choose goes suit claims that net Netflix is use of the phrase. Choose your own adventure causes confusion for viewers about whether or not Bander snatch is affiliated with choose coz signature book series. It's not for the record. It also claims that being associated with the dark content in banner snatch turning the family friendly reputation of choosier on adventure books and the company is suing for both in injunction against net. Netflix and damages of at least twenty five million dollars again, choose coz publisher, Shannon, Gilligan trademark law. Requires that you protect your Mark. Because if you don't you lose control of it. So it makes perfect sense. From choose coz perspective to try to ring. Whatever value remains out of this trademark. Chris bregman teaches law at New York University spokesman says that choose coz lawsuit is also about combating one of the great dangers to try. Mark holders. The concept known as genera side, genera side is the idea that trademark law is not supposed to be withdrawing words from the English language if the trademarked name for a particular product manages to become so popular it's used in everyday language to describe a whole category of products. It runs the risk of losing its status as a valid trademark case. In point the words zipper was originally a trademark for a tooth closure. But people started using the words zipper for any tooth closure and that trademark became worthless. It became generic aspirin thermos escalator just a few one time trademarks that have succumbed to genera side. And while companies are obliged to fight to protect their trademark. They also run the risk of losing it in the process because the legal determination that a trademark has become generic often happens through lawsuits like this one Chris sprig mint says that means there's an inherent risk to choose coast strategy. He other playing with fire because it's entire. Airlie possible that choose co files a lawsuit. They end up with a finding that the Marcus become generic Carla Engelbrecht director of product innovation at Netflix wouldn't comment on the lawsuit. But she says that Bander snatch has tested the technology and confirmed the appetite for new interactive programming. What does it mean for romance? What does it mean for documentaries personally? I would love to see a really soapy cheesy telenovela. That's like slap him or cheat on him. What still unclear is whether they'll choose their own descriptions of what they make Alexi Horowitz Ghazi NPR news. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast. Actual speeds. Vary and are not guaranteed.

Netflix Publisher Gilligan Lexi Horowitz Ghazi Alexi Horowitz Ghazi Npr Comcast California Airlie NPR New York University Chris Bregman Aspirin Chris Sprig Programmer CEO Bander Shannon Marcus
How to 'chunk it up' when it comes to tricky questions

All Ears English Podcast | Real English Vocabulary | Conversation | American Culture

04:49 min | 3 years ago

How to 'chunk it up' when it comes to tricky questions

"The true you in twenty nineteen in English. Welcome to the all ears English podcast downloaded more than fifty million times. We believe in connection not perfection with your American hosts Lindsey McMahon the English adventure. And Michelle Kaplan, the New York radio girl coming to you from Boston and New York City U S a and to get your transcripts delivered by Email every week. Go to all ears English dot com forward slash subscribe. The web class is coming up soon. And you don't wanna miss this unique opportunity to grab your spot. So today find out how to sign up. Hey lizzy. What's happening? Hey, Jessica, I am ready for the first web class of twenty nine thousand nine is going at pick. It's going to be awesome. I am so excited about this web Ghazi guys we were working on it just recently. Right. Just getting everything you guys. And honestly, it's been so fun to design this web class. Like, this is such a creative learning opportunity. I mean, this is a huge goal, right? Yeah. How can you express your personality? How can you be you in English? This is cameras so Lindsey, and I have been working really hard to break this down into real actions. You guys could take to do this. Oh, absolutely. Because over the year, you know, you, and I we've both been teaching for more than ten years right for a long time and working with so many students I worked with a lot of students one on one before we started this podcast and back in. Twenty ten and two thousand seven ages ago. Right and students would always tell me, I can't be myself in English. Like, I feel like maybe a pillar version of myself in this language because I don't have the vocabulary. I don't have the attitude. I can't be myself. And that's a pain point. That's a major problem for a lot of our students. A listen our listeners, all it's huge. And you know, I think this is essentially why it is sort of easier for like little kids to learn another language than it is for adults to learn another language because we're an adult. You are you're as you've you know, who you are at this point. You've tried out some other ways of being and you've sort of settled on yourself. You know, who you are? But and you can do that in your first language, you could beat you in your first language, and then when you're trying to speak another language, it's like you revert back to you know, infancy or whatever. And you're like I can't say what I want to say. I can't do what I want to do. And it's really frustrating. And so part of that, of course is vocab. So we're going to help you guys think you're out. Where's the best place for you to get this real vocabulary? Right. Like how where do you go to learn how to express yourself in English? But another part of it is sort of like, this bigger piece first of all like figure out who what what is the best thing about you at how can you do this in English as well as I love it. And once we have this information once we know how to do this the sky's the limit, right? Because at that point, we're empowered with these skills, and we start to envision we start to see that person. Again, that we know we are in our native language, and we can see the path to getting to the point where we can express ourselves. He like ourselves, right? It's a horrible feeling not feeling like yourself right tangible. I mean, everybody has those days, I think that just happens. Sometimes this is the biggest pain point, right? Like, what is holding you back in English? And that always just like, I think that idea is what governs everything we do. Right. We don't want anything to hold you back in English. And that's what I'm so excited about this like this particular web class, I think more than any other. I'm just gonna go out on a limb that I am more excited about this one. This is just what's so fun to think about so like a big part of this right is finding your role models. Right. Like, that's the heart of it. Like, how who are you going to follow an English that goes back to what Lindsey said a minute ago about knowing what your goals are having these clear goals in front of you. So having this idea of who you want to sound like, right? Like, how can you beat us in English you need that example, that model so you have a clear destination? Exactly. So when it caused so maybe we can just. Briefly give our listeners a little sneak peek of how exactly we're going to do that how they're gonna do that on this web class

Lindsey Mcmahon New York Michelle Kaplan Ghazi Lizzy Jessica Boston Ten Years