22 Burst results for "Gessen"

Seager (1B, 2B, 3B), Flexen Lead Mariners Past Red Sox 8-2

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 months ago

Seager (1B, 2B, 3B), Flexen Lead Mariners Past Red Sox 8-2

"Kyle Seager is hot hitting weekend continued as he finished a home run shy of a cycle in the mariners eight to win over the red Sox Seger had an RBI single in the first a two run triple in the second and doubled in the fifth a day after hitting a three run blast in driving in for Chris Flexen struck out seven and limited the red Sox to a Marwin Gonzalez RBI single over his seven innings of work in the mariners seventh win in ten games Boston starter Nathan Eovaldi exited after five allowing five runs four earned the red Sox have dropped five of eight Gessen cooled off Boston

Kyle Seager Red Sox Mariners Chris Flexen Seger Marwin Gonzalez Nathan Eovaldi Boston Gessen
"gessen" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

03:50 min | 5 months ago

"gessen" Discussed on Throughline

"If you're never quite sure how to answer the question why are you. Npr's rough translation might be the podcast for you. Yes fine why someone else. Give us your accents and your origin. Stories your cross cultural misfits yearning to just be and listen to rough translation from npr. During the many years that masha gessen's spent living in russia reporting on among other things. The rise of vladimir putin the spent a lot of time thinking about how a country morphs into an autocracy. How one person the ruler. The autocrat comes to control everything and short. There's no playbook but autocratic regimes throughout history do seem to share a few things in common and tend to develop in three stages autocratic attempts autocratic breakthrough an autocratic consolidation so autocratic attempt is the stage when it is still possible to reverse the autocratic through electoral means. An autocrat comes to an aspiring. Have come so far and has to find ways of carrying out an agenda and creating the preconditions for autocratic power with a set of existing institutions institutions like the courts the media congress or parliament. And so what we see usually is on the one hand. The tax on the credibility of the institutions on the other hand the use of institutional weaknesses to make them pliable and to make them part of the autocratic attempts and then of course we see a lot of public lying right where nothing is true. Were everything is possible where there's a kind of informational hayes. And that's part of. What makes it possible to then us. Institutions every which way and at some point comes to autocratic breakthrough which is when their structural changes that make it impossible to unseat autocrats electorally now. These countries continue to elections is just those elections can have an impact on autocratic power for a variety of reasons. Electoral rules change. The media are taking over. Or you know they come under autocratic domination. There's massive voter disenfranchisement. There's you know the rigging of the counting votes and then the The last out of credit consolidation when the auto patas firmly in power and starts consolidating that power and a mask thing.

masha gessen vladimir putin russia congress one person Npr three stages one parliament
"gessen" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

03:15 min | 5 months ago

"gessen" Discussed on Throughline

"I'm routine at louis. I'm random and on this episode of through line from npr the anatomy of autocracy on You could never predict the particulars you know. I never could have imagined guy in pajama pants and horns walking around the capital. A few weeks after the insurrection at the us capitol and just a week. After the inauguration of a new president there russian-born journalist. Monica gessen writes for the new yorker and focuses on autocratic regimes among other things is still thinking about how the united states ended up here with its democracy under attack. We had a president who was very clearly inciting political violence for years and also president who had the election voice casting doubt consistently on the election. Basically telling people that it was going to be stolen no matter what. So while i'm shocked. I'm not at all surprised. And the words of hannah arendt the writer political theorist and philosopher who lived through world war two and much of the cold war had been swirling around in. Mahesh's mind the person who defined talibanism totalitarian movements in the sense that we understand them. Hana arend bush. What she thought was possible anywhere. The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not convinced. Nazi are the convinced communist. Shouldn't think it was somehow specific to germany and the soviet union but people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction and.

Monica gessen hannah arendt world war two Hana arend Mahesh russian new yorker Nazi soviet union cold war louis germany a week few weeks years united states
"gessen" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

Monocle 24: The Big Interview

04:41 min | 10 months ago

"gessen" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

"Out as a very clear set of of steps beginning with the autocratic attempt and just comparing trump to Putin just comparing the United States to Russia would be intellectually questionable but looking at a number of strong men who have appeared over the last ten fifteen years in really different cultures but have traffics in many of the same tropes and have short up power using many of the same tools is really informative. I use Russia because that's what I spent in twenty five years studying and writing about. But, my -bility Russia is short out by observing so many other places where something similar has happened from India the world's largest democracy to Israel. The only democracy in the Middle East to Brazil to Venezuela to the Philippines to Hungary. Examples abound. And the similarities are really terrifying. We are unfortunately coming towards the end of the time we have I want to attempt optimism as we finish. If we look at the United States which later this year will decide whether or not to continue with the trump experiment the time I've been talking to people about Donald Trump. I. Hear to there are two basic strains of optimism that I detect one is from American conservatives. I mean proper old school Eisenhower Reagan type people who aren't keen on trump but think this is perhaps an overdue stress tests for our country's institutions. Those institutions will meet that challenge and we will survive this. The other optimism I hear is from American liberals who suggests that trump and the midterm elections where perhaps evidence of this that trump will. Destroy everything he attempts to protect and advance by prompting an enormous backlash of liberal activism and a revival of civic society having having demonstrated to them. What can happen if you take your off the ball? Do you think there's anything in either of those analyses? In I'm less familiar with what you across the conservative strand of it but the liberal one. Yeah absolutely. There is that analysis and of course, more recently, and this is the the the greatest ray of hope I have seen in years. You know just a activism around the country which is really fueled by. Not, only anger but you know real serve pent-up demand for reinvention and envisioning a different future. which is something that has been lacking in the Democratic Party, which is why trump's promise of the imaginary past. That has been so incredibly effective the big question for me. Well, there's two questions. Right? Is that energy of these protests and the actors is that sustainable until November? We still have nearly half a year to go and and I'm scared that. That may it may not be sustainment might also get a little bit both tired and overly optimistic. And the other is, does the Democratic Party have the wherewithal? To, use that energy to use that vision to propel US forward so far. It has shown very few signs of doing that right even its response to the midterm elections in two thousand eighteen. was basically to continue backing. Very. Conventional. Center would imagine are sort of candidates who can appeal both sides who in the end appeal to neither right instead of backing. Candidates who actually represent a younger, much more future oriented kind of voting population. So He can finally get its act together. On that score then I think we have a chance in November, and then there's also the question of whether he goes peacefully in November, of course. Masha. Gessen thank you very much for joining us. Thank you for.

Donald Trump United States Democratic Party Russia Middle East Putin Israel India Eisenhower Reagan Brazil Hungary Philippines Venezuela
"gessen" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

Monocle 24: The Big Interview

07:12 min | 10 months ago

"gessen" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

"That he was. He really did want to say the Siberian cranes wasn't just. Hang gliding with them for show and that he sympathized with my publisher for firing for not sending a reporter but he had overreacted and he wanted to set things straight and so my agenda was to draw him out a little bit about this showy gestures of his which was really fun and to tell him that the publisher had not merely overreacted but violated the law. Russia has this great press law and this goes back to the topic of how well-designed institutions can be. Russia is a really great press law that was written in nineteen, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety one that makes it illegal for the publisher to interfere in editorial operations but you know who cares anyway when we got to that topic conversation was very civil up until that point when we got to that topic, he said Okay I know what you're going to say thank you for coming in. Stood up, shook my hand and I was out of there. Let's talk. Then about trump you right early on in two thousand, sixteen, the New York review of books you'll rules for surviving autocracy. How well do you think that is held up when measured against three and a half years now if DONALD TRUMP Well he's has held up unfortunately extremely well. You know that that piece was not a blueprint for politically resisting autocracy. It was very much a piece about psychic an intellectual survival, which is what I felt was in a position to do the the the pieces are very funny history which has that like most people. I know I went to election watching party on November eighth and the party just kind of went sour and and everybody tried to slink away without saying goodbye to the hosts, and as I was biking home, I started getting phone calls and text messages from various acquaintances asking, what do we do now which I thought was really ridiculous because why would you ask me what we do now I was living in exile and clearly it like whatever I did not have not worked out that well for me. But as long bike ride and I kept thinking. Is there anything that actually that I have learnt? Right there's something that goes into this kind of letter from the future that I can send to my friends and I thought well, I have learned something about. Living in this kind of mushy reality and it was very clear I've been from the trump campaign. As you know American presidential campaigns are obscenely long so we had had ample opportunity to observe them. It was very clear that that's the period we're entering. And I also knew what it was like to really tried to resist something that you understand. Logically, you don't want to believe is happening, which is what we experienced in Russia with Putin for especially in the first few years. And I would experience with trump you write about this in the book in particular, how the media have responded to him. This almost desperate attempt to try to find something normal about what he's doing those sort of moments where he managed to get through some mindset peace without committing any great obvious howler indiscretion and all of the subways rewarded with aditorial saying he has become president at last excellent the and look I feel it in my soul I. Like I have there have been times when I watched trump's speech and thought okay okay that that was you know. Like that didn't I didn't have a feeling of bring shame at observing this for every second of that spectacle credit where it's Ju-. So, and I think and I I, want to make very clear right? I think that the. I really take the New York Times and some other media to task in the book but I think that the problem is real. It's not like there's like a great solution that the Times has just refusing to utilize in covering trump I think covering trump is in itself is essential to me. This is another point you make the the idea that as you say trump is is actually kind of a trap for journalists. Absolutely because here we have a president who lies all the time who not only lies but rob's executive speech of meaning, which is an extraordinary thing to think about it. So for example, he says. Let's inject ourselves with disinfectant and within hours poisoned centers around the country are inundated with calls from people who are either considering injecting themselves with disinfectant or have already injected themselves with disinfectant. So his speech because he has the biggest microphone or. Academic Speak Executive Speech Act Has Real life consequences that are immediate and tangible, and then the next morning he always kidding that meant nothing. And so how do you deal was something that on the face of it is nonsensical and he says means nothing when it actually has real life consequences. empirically means something. And that's a trap that we're constantly. Where view got to though on what strikes be one of the eternal questions about trump and there is a chapter in your book where you talk about, why would somebody even lie about the weather which he famously did or had people do for him about his inauguration? Do you get the sense now that trump does this deliberately with malice aforethought or is he just a genuine simpleton who just says things that pop into his head? Well, again I think both can be sort of true I mean, I don't think he is a mastermind of evil I think you know he doesn't have enough brain to mastermind of anything right? But then he is a very intuitive performer and that is that is a genuine talent. He performs the kind of. That he imagines himself having, right. And an integral part of that power is the power to say whatever he wants whenever he wants to. The power to force you to engage with his absurd statements because he has the power, right? It's the powerline it's self enforcing. And it is incredibly effective. Is Is there an element in which then you see the trajectory of Russia over the lost thirty years as a warning to the united. States now that this is what can happen absolutely, and obviously Russia is a has a very different history wrote a book about how it is very much shaped by sister Talibanism that will sort of my argument, but I, think that's one way of telling the story. In other way of telling the story is to hear where people who had a chance to live in a very different society and to invent a society, a new who had this opportunity that arises. From crisis and collapse. And who decided to hand that opportunity over two? Very uninteresting, uneducated curious man who promised Moustache Aclu transport them to an imaginary past. And in the United States, we have something very similar and we have an Talk sees do proceed by what I think module has laid.

trump Russia DONALD TRUMP publisher president executive New York Times United States reporter New York review Putin aditorial Talibanism rob
"gessen" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

Monocle 24: The Big Interview

07:09 min | 10 months ago

"gessen" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

"Extensively what a lot of the central you're in eastern European post-soviet states decided to do. I don't know that that makes a huge difference. In, this century there were all these incredible arguments about whether. Presidential System is better or parliamentary system is better whether a two party system Hana aren't thought that a two party system wasn't brilliant invention because it really imbued whatever party was in power with a sense of responsibility for the fate of the country that she felt was absent in a parliamentary system. I think maybe in the last fifteen, twenty years, we have learned that focus on structures. was somewhat misplaced that it's not unimportant to talk about institutions. But especially in the American context. This faith in the perfectly designed institution is misplaced. Again. To go back to that experience of Russia in the nineteen nineties though, was there a particular moment when you realized that it wasn't going to turn out like that or was the say a sort of a frog in source been kind of process you know I think the answer is usually both I certainly remember feeling really uncomfortable in nineteen, ninety six when President Boris Yeltsin. was reelected and so many of the people I knew felt that his opponent who was a communist was an existential threat to the country. And so they voted for Yeltsin and worked to have Yeltsin elected and you know the Ruutel awful just. An old words are unjustified but but this was just beyond anything I'd seen it. I'd been correspondent nineties. The war in Chechnya has been going on for two years. And and all these people I knew were willing to forgive or The war in Chechnya. Because they felt that the communist candidate who I think would have been freely and fairly elected had the election been allowed to Go on in what we think of as a free and fair way they felt that he was an existential threat. So that was scary and but I think the decisive moment from it was the emergence of Ladder Putin and here I can. Record will show that almost as soon as he appeared. I. Started writing about what a threat was to the fledgling. Russian. Democracy to have this very, very Soviet, very, very KGB I become president in a very, very undemocratic way I mean is there actually a vastly different parallel history of Russia in which Vladimir Putin for whatever reason never rises any higher than mine KGB functionary? I. Guess we'll never know. But. Look I mean this is is very much like the line I tried to walk in the new book about trump. There are two ways to tell the trump story trump came from outer space. He's a total anomaly in American politics. The Russians installed him and he is destroying everything that we hold. Dear, which is all true except for maybe the Russians installed it, and then there's another way which is a minority view. But as held by some people, I respect very much like the political scientists. Corey Robin who basically says, Oh, he's just a Republican president. He is the natural continuation of Republican politics over the. Last however, many generations. He's exactly the same thing that we've seen before and all the wonted norms that she talked about that. He's supposedly destroying. You know are just these norms of your class privilege, which is also true right? Both of those things are true. The conditions for a trump were laid over in some ways over fifty years. I'm counting back to JFK or in some ways over the last one, thousand, nine years I'm counting back to nine eleven and yet trump is a special snowflake and. Someone who shares some of his qualities, but is not a deranged self-obsessed. Malignant narcissist clown could have taken his place and so both of those things are possible. He is completely anomalous unlike anybody else albeit quite recognizable character, he's also using the groundwork was laid for him. So I think of it as taking a quantum leap from a running start. I WANNA. Come back in a bit to the parallels between the two. And the non parallels between the two which you do write about in the new book but. Written as you said extensively, about Vladimir Putin most notably in your book Man Without a face do you know how much interest he has personally taken in your writing about him? I do exactly zero. And I you know there's a very strange reason. I know this. But. This is now ancient history but you know eight years ago I was fired from my job as editor in chief of Russia's big. Popular Science magazine for not sending a reporter to accompany. Putin on his adventure hang gliding Siberian cranes and I tweeted about it imposing apparently saw it and. Called me and offered me my job and it wasn't his style for back. But he doesn't realize that because he thinks if he likes something, he owns it. But as the meeting with Putin was prepared to discuss that whole misadventure of mine. It became clear to me that he was not briefed on how I was and you know the reasons are very clear because he loved the magazine. I was at. And probably at a certain point when he decided that he loved that magazine and this was during my tenure, somebody would have had to say to him, but there's an issue with the editor and someone dropped the ball and actually know who it was and I know. I know how that happened. They didn't notice that I was editor. And then when he wanted to meeting. Then that someone would have had to say to him, but there's a problem and there's a book. and. He would have had to then learn of the existence of the book which also couldn't have been pleasant for the Messenger. So there was actually a lot of jockeying to avoid telling who I was. So they basically told him nothing about that was a very interesting experience like he was told about my preferred name usage, which is particular Russian. But he was not told that I was an American citizen for example, something that I happen to understand because our meeting happened to fall on September. Eleventh. And so I know there's no way he would have emitted mentioned that if he had known that I use it as an and so on inserting he didn't know about the but. What kind of conversation is it possible to have with him but what do you talk about when you meet President? Putin. Well. We talked about sincerity of his nature conservation efforts basically had two topics he wanted to tell me.

Vladimir Putin president trump Russia Chechnya Yeltsin KGB President Boris Yeltsin. Corey Robin Popular Science magazine editor editor in chief reporter
"gessen" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

Monocle 24: The Big Interview

06:40 min | 10 months ago

"gessen" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

"I've thought a lot about how my hopes of my friends hopes and some other people's hopes were crushed after the nineteen nineties and how our assumption that that we're all going the same direction we had just moved through the end of history was so incredibly wrong and so I, think I keep circling around that place and trying to understand how people choose unfreedom. How it actually comes to take hold what to shared reality and shared language. When we enter autocracy, that's what I've tried to focus when I read about. This book is about United States, but the teams are very similar. Masher Gessen's latest book is called surviving or talk crecy. It is a subject know better than most now a columnist for the New Yorker the prize winning journalist and author spent two decades covering the resurgence of totalitarianism in. Russia. Since leaving what was then Soviet Union as a teenager, they've been a persistent and prominent critic what is now Russia or at least of the people who run it? Gessen has always been careful to keep pointing out however that what has happened in Russia is not necessarily uniquely Russian surviving autocracy is pitched depressingly accurately as a memo to their adopted. United. States. Many books have been written about Donald Trump's bazaar presidency mostly essays in shock sneering and satire. GESSEN's latest takes a more practical approach deploying what they've learned as instructions for how a country which has taken at least a few steps down a dark path can turn itself around ideally before. November, third. I'm Andrew and I spoke to Masha Gessen for the big interview. Masha Gessen. Welcome to the beginning of you. Thank you. It's good to be here. I want to start kind of at the start because it strikes me that one of the perspectives that underpins a lot of your work and especially the new book surviving autocracy is that. You're of that generation that got to have a fairly fully formed understanding of two completely different systems of government you were I think about fourteen years old when you left the Soviet Union when you'd left which I think is in nine hundred, eighty one did you have an understanding before you left the Soviet Union of how different it was from where you were going? I don't think you can have an understanding when you have grown up in really effectively forced isolation. I mean there was no place for that kind of imagination to develop. We and by we I mean the sort of the Soviet underground of wish my parents were very much part. You know believed that there was something else out there but my parents had a friend who actually joked, where are you going to go? Do you have any scientific proof that the West actually exists? Have we seen any material evidence of the existence of the West and we hadn't but we western journalists and we Russian intellectuals? Believed that democracy was going to take hold and my last book. The future is history was really very much about why that doesn't happen and also why that misconception. Was So. Stubborn and Sarong and so important at the same time and in a sense, the new book takes off from the same place. It's not about Russia but I actually used the work of a Hungarian incurred named Ball and monitor. WHO has worked lot on developing a system for understanding how the systems have developed in one of the things he says. Is really striking to me, which is that when the Soviets systems collapsed in nineteen eighty nine, we started using the language of liberal democracy to describe them because we saw that that's what was going to happen. But also because that's the language of political science but that's the terminology us we ask. Are there free and fair elections is their freedom of the media is their freedom of assembly? andled macho says, okay. You can describe the absence marked absences by using that language, but you can't describe the thing itself and I love when he says this but you can say that the elephant doesn't fly you can say that elephant can swim but you still have not described elephant. You talk about this in your new book about the perhaps the need to better defined political terms political terminology because a word like democracy kind of course, mean any one of a number of things absolutely. But also that they are interesting understanding. Is biased toward what we think of as democratic institutions and what we think of as liberal democracies, and so we have a much harder time understanding autocracies and so module has developed a language and taxonomy for autocracies where he describes the autocratic attempt to autocratic raked through the autocratic consolidation and in a gesture of both poetic justice and and just I think good research I borrow his language. So I, take the language from what used to Eastern Bloc and apply to the United States, which is, of course, you know how political models develop as we take something see where it fits where it needs to be adjusted and whether it benefits our understanding. So. That's very long winded way of answering your question. You know, I've thought a lot about how my hopes, my friends, hopes, and so many other people's hopes were crushed after the nineteen ninety S, and how are some Shin that that we're all going in the same direction we had just lived through the end of history was so incredibly wrong and so I think I keep circling around that place trying to understand how people choose unfreedom How it actually comes to take hold what happens to shared reality and shirt language. When we enter autocracy, that's what I've tried to focus when I write about Russia in this book is about the United, states but the themes are very similar when you went back to Russia in the nineteen ninety. Then did you have an idea of what kind if Russia was going to become a liberal democracy? What kind of liberal democracy it would become? Did you Majett being say akin to what the Baltic states are now only a lot bigger obviously. Well, it depends on what you mean by what the Baltic states are. Now because you know Russia made some decisions about a very early on about the structure of its government. They settled on a presidential republic road than a parliamentary democracy, which is what a lot of the.

Russia Masher Gessen Soviet Union United States GESSEN Donald Trump Majett Andrew
The rise of Poland's far right has important lessons for Americans

On the Media

10:04 min | 11 months ago

The rise of Poland's far right has important lessons for Americans

"Of Donald J. Trump. We in the United States have become accustomed to a degree of fabulous. Um I've done more for black Americans than anybody. With the possible exception of Abraham Lincoln, the president, self aggrandizement provides the framework for his alternate reality. We have one of the lowest mortality rate way had 900 Deaths in a single day. You have the numbers place because I heard we had the best mortality number one low mortality, right? We are being given something I can't recall in my lifetime, a choice of realities. One that is mostly regarded as evidence based and one that you might call faith based that faith being in Mr Trump In either case, you have a sizable cohort to back you up. Truth has been displaced in many quarters by rage and fear. Over the past four months, we've had many opportunities to observe the impact of paranoia. When deployed by a fantasist in the White House in Arizona Man died after taking Clara Quien, his wife said that they heard about it from Trump's briefings. Are you gonna allow the government to tell you you have to wear a mask? Some believe these mask orders go against their freedoms will protect. All right, I will know asked me and I will not pay for antibiotics. Conspiracies of Sena numbers swell on Facebook and doctors warn, if left unchecked, they could undermine an effective vaccine. The death toll from the Corona virus pandemic has surpassed 150,000 in the United States. That's the highest number of fatalities in any nation by far. And accounts for nearly 1/4 of the recorded global. Told immediately after the 2016 election, I spoke with New York ER writer Masha Gessen, who, after having lived long under Vladimir Putin had some advice for anxious Americans trying to navigate the so called new normal. She explained that for the would be authoritarian, the lying is the point that the ability to create a reality flagrantly staring down conspicuous fact. Is a crucial component of building and sustaining power. And last fall boxes, David Roberts noted bluntly, where such a strategy left unchecked, could lead this sort of cultish, increasingly authoritarian movement takes over the country. In Russia and Turkey and Poland. Right's a disturbingly longer and longer list. We see countries that we thought were democracies devolve into this. In the U. S. So much has happened in the last few years that we thought would never happen. I think we should really loosen up our imaginations as to what can happen when a movement that is convinced that everything it knows and loves is in danger of falling apart movements that's thinking like that unconnected anymore to fax or reality. And got its hands on the power of the federal government is the basic recipe for democracy is falling apart. And so last fall on, the media producer Leia Feder reported on one of those places Poland, a young democracy teetering on unstable ground and where it's far right Nationalist government is intent on rewriting the nation's painful history. For almost a decade, Poland has been in the grip of a conspiracy theory what really happened when a plane crashed in a forest in western Russia, killing Poland's president and dozens of other government officials. The plane had been on route to commemorate another Polish tragedy, a massacre that had occurred in the very same location in 1940. 1973 documentary explored the mystery While the German army is advancing from the West, the Soviets crossed Poland's eastern front court in a method of Polish army collapsed, Um, surrendered. The victors, divided the country down the middle and imprisoned every soldier they captured. Russia took a 215,000 Poland officer Corps were never seen alive again. Many. What die near Smolensk, in a forest called catching after decades of opacity and suspicion on investigation in the early nineties, confirmed finally, that it was not Hitler. But Stalin, who had ordered the massacre. And so when, on April 10th 2010 a delegation of 96 Polish politicians and officials traveled from Warsaw to Smolensk. It was in service of remembrance and reconciliation. But what happened instead compounded the national pain. Poland's prime minister burst into tears when he heard the news today that his country's president was killed in a plane crash pilot tried to land in a thick fog at least twice missing the runway. And ignoring the control tower's direction to divert to another city. Not just losing the president of that country. The first lady, the ahead of the army chief of staff, the National Security Office head deputy Parliament speaker, the deputy foreign minister. It was a devastating national tragedy. What's more, the symbolic layering was undeniable. Ah, longstanding tragedy finally solved and a new one appears in its place. And yet, in the immediate moments and days after the crash, there was a kind of common shock. An Applebaum is a journalist and academic beast in Warsaw At the time of the 2010 crash, her husband was minister of foreign affairs in the Polish government, and there was pretty straightforward reporting. About what had happened. What was immediately clear There were people on the ground who saw the crash. So there was a kind of concensus initially about what had happened that it was a terrible Accident and that you know many people of value to the nation had died. But the story started to shift is the investigation into the crash proceeded. Investigators say pilot error was mostly to blame. It became clear that one of the causes of the crash was the fact that the pilots were under pressure to land. The president's delegation had arrived late for the plane. They were running behind schedule as they got closer to smell lens, which was even really an airport. It was a kind of airstrip in the forest. They began to be worried about the fog and the pilots weren't sure they could make the narrow landing. But according to black box recordings, Polish President Lech Kaczynski, head of the opposition party directed the pilots to do it was meant to be the launch of his reelection campaign. So there were cameras there which he knew, and he was very anxious to go under pressure, the pilots tried to make the landing. Instead, they hit a tree, killing all 96 people on board. The president's twin brother, the head of the nationalist right political party in Poland, same parties, the president He didn't like this story. It made the president look bad, more to the point. This is a terrible crash very near to a place where a Nurlita generation of poles were murdered by the Soviet state. Because of that eeriness. People immediately began to speculate that there was actually a different, deeper story that perhaps the Russians caused the crash. Perhaps there was a bomb on the plane. And conspiracy theories began to proliferate online. The president's brother, Nijinsky began openly alluding to them. Kaczynskis Law and Justice Party made unraveling the Smolensk conspiracy. It's key campaign promise once you had bought into their idea that there is a secret conspiracy, possibly involving the Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk. Possibly involving the Russians, and that lots of people high up in the state were implicated in some great big secret plot to kill the president. If you believe that Then you can believe a lot of other things. The point was to get people to believe in a kind of alternative reality to doubt institutions to doubt that the government was telling them the truth, and that was absolutely an attempt to help win an election, But it did more than carve out a new electorate. It created new divides in Polish society. Where one's Polish politics were split between Communists and anti communists around economic policy. Now it was over a vision of history. It was how you see Poland's place in the world. And whether you think secret dark forces air trying to undermine your country and whether you know you need to elect a government of Patriots in order to make sure that doesn't happen. Where you fell on that dividing line affected how you would vote and how you would understand politics for the next several years, And so when line justice one in 2015 it spawned a new kind of power a power based on the willingness to embrace the myth. They fired large numbers of Polish civil servants. Polish members of the foreign service. All kinds of people who work for the government also leaders and board members of state companies and they replaced all of them with people whom they were sure we're loyal. And one element of the loyalty test was belief in this Molinski myth. Smolinski conspiracy implied that there were dark, mysterious forces continuing to try to manipulate and undermine the Polish nation. It also drawn the larger story of a Poland continually attacked by outsiders and the valiant Polish resistance to threats past and present line Justice Road that narrative electoral victory. And then wrote its electoral victory to further consolidation of that narrative in service of Polish nationalism.

President Trump Poland Russia Polish President Lech Kaczynsk Smolensk United States Donald J. Trump Warsaw Prime Minister Mr Trump Federal Government Poland Officer Corps Abraham Lincoln Facebook David Roberts Arizona Masha Gessen Vladimir Putin Deputy Foreign Minister
The rise of Poland's far right has important lessons for Americans

On the Media

10:04 min | 11 months ago

The rise of Poland's far right has important lessons for Americans

"Election of Donald J. Trump. We in the United States have become accustomed to a degree of fabulous. Um I've done more for black Americans than anybody. With the possible exception of Abraham Lincoln, the president, self aggrandizement provides the framework for his alternate reality. We have one of the lowest mortality rate way had 900 Deaths in a single day. You have the numbers place because I heard we had the best mortality number one low mortality, right? We are being given something I can't recall in my lifetime, a choice of realities. One that is mostly regarded as evidence based and one that you might call faith based that faith being in Mr Trump In either case, you have a sizable cohort to back you up. Truth has been displaced in many quarters by rage and fear. Over the past four months, we've had many opportunities to observe the impact of paranoia. When deployed by a fantasist in the White House in Arizona Man died after taking Clara Quien, his wife said that they heard about it from Trump's briefings. Are you gonna allow the government to tell you you have to wear a mask? Some believe these mask orders go against their freedoms will protect. All right, I will know asked me and I will not pay for antibiotics. Conspiracies of Sena numbers swell on Facebook and doctors warn, if left unchecked, they could undermine an effective vaccine. The death toll from the Corona virus pandemic has surpassed 150,000 in the United States. That's the highest number of fatalities in any nation by far. And accounts for nearly 1/4 of the recorded global. Told immediately after the 2016 election, I spoke with New York ER writer Masha Gessen, who, after having lived long under Vladimir Putin had some advice for anxious Americans trying to navigate the so called new normal. She explained that for the would be authoritarian, the lying is the point that the ability to create a reality flagrantly staring down conspicuous fact. Is a crucial component of building and sustaining power. And last fall boxes, David Roberts noted bluntly, where such a strategy left unchecked, could lead this sort of cultish, increasingly authoritarian movement takes over the country. In Russia and Turkey and Poland. Right's a disturbingly longer and longer list. We see countries that we thought were democracies devolve into this. In the U. S. So much has happened in the last few years that we thought would never happen. I think we should really loosen up our imaginations as to what can happen when a movement that is convinced that everything it knows and loves is in danger of falling apart movements that's thinking like that unconnected anymore to fax or reality. And got its hands on the power of the federal government is the basic recipe for democracy is falling apart. And so last fall on, the media producer Leia Feder reported on one of those places Poland, a young democracy teetering on unstable ground and where it's far right Nationalist government is intent on rewriting the nation's painful history. For almost a decade, Poland has been in the grip of a conspiracy theory what really happened when a plane crashed in a forest in western Russia, killing Poland's president and dozens of other government officials. The plane had been on route to commemorate another Polish tragedy, a massacre that had occurred in the very same location in 1940. 1973 documentary explored the mystery While the German army is advancing from the West, the Soviets crossed Poland's eastern front court in a method of Polish army collapsed, Um, surrendered. The victors, divided the country down the middle and imprisoned every soldier they captured. Russia took a 215,000 Poland officer Corps were never seen alive again. Many. What die near Smolensk, in a forest called catching after decades of opacity and suspicion on investigation in the early nineties, confirmed finally, that it was not Hitler. But Stalin, who had ordered the massacre. And so when, on April 10th 2010 a delegation of 96 Polish politicians and officials traveled from Warsaw to Smolensk. It was in service of remembrance and reconciliation. But what happened instead compounded the national pain. Poland's prime minister burst into tears when he heard the news today that his country's president was killed in a plane crash pilot tried to land in a thick fog at least twice missing the runway. And ignoring the control tower's direction to divert to another city. Not just losing the president of that country. The first lady, the ahead of the army chief of staff, the National Security Office head deputy Parliament speaker, the deputy foreign minister. It was a devastating national tragedy. What's more, the symbolic layering was undeniable. Ah, longstanding tragedy finally solved and a new one appears in its place. And yet, in the immediate moments and days after the crash, there was a kind of common shock. An Applebaum is a journalist and academic beast in Warsaw At the time of the 2010 crash, her husband was minister of foreign affairs in the Polish government, and there was pretty straightforward reporting. About what had happened. What was immediately clear There were people on the ground who saw the crash. So there was a kind of concensus initially about what had happened that it was a terrible Accident and that you know many people of value to the nation had died. But the story started to shift is the investigation into the crash proceeded. Investigators say pilot error was mostly to blame. It became clear that one of the causes of the crash was the fact that the pilots were under pressure to land. The president's delegation had arrived late for the plane. They were running behind schedule as they got closer to smell lens, which was even really an airport. It was a kind of airstrip in the forest. They began to be worried about the fog and the pilots weren't sure they could make the narrow landing. But according to black box recordings, Polish President Lech Kaczynski, head of the opposition party directed the pilots to do it was meant to be the launch of his reelection campaign. So there were cameras there which he knew, and he was very anxious to go under pressure, the pilots tried to make the landing. Instead, they hit a tree, killing all 96 people on board. The president's twin brother, the head of the nationalist right political party in Poland, same parties, the president He didn't like this story. It made the president look bad, more to the point. This is a terrible crash very near to a place where a Nurlita generation of poles were murdered by the Soviet state. Because of that eeriness. People immediately began to speculate that there was actually a different, deeper story that perhaps the Russians caused the crash. Perhaps there was a bomb on the plane. And conspiracy theories began to proliferate online. The president's brother, Nijinsky began openly alluding to them. Kaczynskis Law and Justice Party made unraveling the Smolensk conspiracy. It's key campaign promise once you had bought into their idea that there is a secret conspiracy, possibly involving the Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk. Possibly involving the Russians, and that lots of people high up in the state were implicated in some great big secret plot to kill the president. If you believe that Then you can believe a lot of other things. The point was to get people to believe in a kind of alternative reality to doubt institutions to doubt that the government was telling them the truth, and that was absolutely an attempt to help win an election, But it did more than carve out a new electorate. It created new divides in Polish society. Where one's Polish politics were split between Communists and anti communists around economic policy. Now it was over a vision of history. It was how you see Poland's place in the world. And whether you think secret dark forces air trying to undermine your country and whether you know you need to elect a government of Patriots in order to make sure that doesn't happen. Where you fell on that dividing line affected how you would vote and how you would understand politics for the next several years, And so when line justice one in 2015 it spawned a new kind of power a power based on the willingness to embrace the myth. They fired large numbers of Polish civil servants. Polish members of the foreign service. All kinds of people who work for the government also leaders and board members of state companies and they replaced all of them with people whom they were sure we're loyal. And one element of the loyalty test was belief in this Molinski myth. Smolinski conspiracy implied that there were dark, mysterious forces continuing to try to manipulate and undermine the Polish nation. It also drawn the larger story of a Poland continually attacked by outsiders and the valiant Polish resistance to threats past and present line Justice Road that narrative electoral victory. And then wrote its electoral victory to further consolidation of that narrative in service of Polish nationalism.

President Trump Poland Russia Polish President Lech Kaczynsk Smolensk United States Donald J. Trump Warsaw Prime Minister Mr Trump Federal Government Poland Officer Corps Abraham Lincoln Facebook David Roberts Arizona Masha Gessen Vladimir Putin Deputy Foreign Minister
"gessen" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

Politics and More Podcast

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"gessen" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

"And I remember that you had a very interesting encounter with when you were an editor of a magazine that really. I guess. I could compare in some ways to national geographic in Russia. Yes I while I was fired from my job at at the magazine. For not sending reported to to cover Putin's hang gliding with the Siberian cranes. But. That is because. You gave that in shorthand most autocrats or leaders of any kind do not hang glide with Siberian crane, so what exactly was happening there? Most autocrats like spectacle, and and that was that was a special he was, he was proving that he was not just president of the country, but also king of the jungle and so he was going to. I mean that's the thing people. There's a way to show migratory birds new migratory routes that are safer by kind of pretending to be if flock leader. So pushing actually dressed as a Siberian crane and Hang, gliders. I refuse to send somebody. That didn't go over got fired and Putin called me. And her in a car. You're at a restaurant. You're your tax. Taxi. He called me on my cell phone. And you say Hello Vladimir Vladimirovich. Well I thought I was talking to a Prankster, so I kept trying to come up with something smart to say would say to you. Well you said you know I heard you got fired I heard him unwittingly at fault. Would you like to come in and talk about it and I said Yeah I. But how do I know you are who you say you are? In, he actually started laughing. So after we hang up the deputy administration will call you. Set up an appointment show you'll know. How did the meeting go? It was ridiculous. He offered me my job back. The president of Russia offered you your editorial job back as the head of Russian National Geographic as it were. Yes, because I mean this was back in twenty twelve but by that point. person, really could not tell where he ended and everything else in Russia began. Basically, if he thought if you liked them something if you like something, he thought he owned it. And I think this this is something that is. That is important to keep in mind as we observed trump. I mean I. think that it's not dissimilar to how he conceptualizes power. Power is everything powers control over everything. Masha is this reversible in in an immediate sense. Let's let's say right now. We're looking at polls from CNN. And elsewhere that have Joe Biden. Whatever's limitations far ahead? Of Donald Trump nationally and I believe that he is the running highest in modern polls ever for somebody challenging a sitting president..

president Putin Russia Donald Trump Joe Biden CNN editor Russian National Geographic Vladimir Vladimirovich
"gessen" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

Politics and More Podcast

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"gessen" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

"OUGHTA crecy. Guessing who has lived and worked in Moscow discusses what her time journalist in Putin's Russia has taught her about trump's America. Hot dominated you don't. You wish to. Jerk. Response to the uprising triggered by George Floyd's killing the president tells governors to dominate protesters. Trump is threatened to use the insurrection act of eighteen. Oh seven! He's called military forces to patrol Washington DC and he issued this ominous threat. When the looting starts, shooting starts. His administration used tear gas and rubber bullets to clear protesters for a photo op though they claim otherwise. For Staff Writer Masha Gessen. These actions are just more fodder to reinforce something that has seemed obvious to them for years. Masha new book called surviving autocracy. It's a series of essays making the case that the president thinks and acts not at all a democratic leader, but as an autocrat, a strong man for whom laws and norms are just hindrances to be ignored. The book was informed by the years that Masha spent as a journalist and Vladimir Putin's Russia. We spoke last week. Has Been Bizarre few days for me and my social newsfeed. I see posts from my friends in the states and my friends in Russia about their children getting arrested I, suppose from my friends in the states and my friends in Russia about journalist, getting arrested or beaten up at protests. And Sometimes I. Forget what which language I'm reading in. How do you see what's going on? Are these protests going to set out a kind of civil division that can be exploited by Donald Trump in an election, and in power in such a way that his autocratic a tendencies will deepen and deepen and get even more profound. And then I really try not to make predictions, but what I think we do know. Is that polarization and violence anti-anxiety? Or all things that benefit autocrat. And actually of all of those I think anxiety is perhaps the most important element. My favorite social psychologist Erik from has I think the best theory of how autocracies come to be. His famous book escape from freedom, which was published in nineteen forty eight. When he felt, the world was on the verge of catastrophe. And it seems he was right. But his his theory is that there are times when a critical mass of people is experiencing such extreme anxiety. About how to invent themselves about not knowing who they are or what the future will be like it and that kind of anxieties..

Donald Trump Russia Vladimir Putin Masha Gessen Erik George Floyd Masha president Moscow Washington DC America Staff Writer
"gessen" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"gessen" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

"<Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Decades of <Silence> trumpism. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And that's and <Speech_Male> that's even if he doesn't <Speech_Male> try to delay election, <Speech_Male> which is also <SpeakerChange> something <Speech_Male> that I'm really really <Speech_Male> took my breath away. When <Speech_Male> you said that <Speech_Male> I mean 'cause. I was Gonna <Speech_Male> ask you before <Speech_Male> Slim <Speech_Male> Minmetals <Speech_Male> obviously knew it <Speech_Male> wasn't better than you, but <Speech_Male> I was GONNA ask because this presidency <Speech_Male> been like as <Speech_Male> bad as you thought <Speech_Male> or worse in <Speech_Male> you answer that <Speech_Male> for me so <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Is there anything else <Speech_Male> that like <Speech_Male> I could talk? She's <Speech_Male> literally like seventeen <Speech_Male> hours like you're <Speech_Male> thinking. I just think you <Silence> are so brilliant <Speech_Male> and I <Speech_Male> mean you. Literally <Speech_Male> have chills from <Speech_Male> the belly. <Speech_Male> Button down like I just <Speech_Male> I just <Speech_Male> yet, but. <Speech_Male> Yogi. Racing <Speech_Male> part of the PODCAST. Where <Speech_Male> like is there anything you feel we <Speech_Male> missed. Is there any <Speech_Male> place where you're particularly <Speech_Male> active <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on twitter, or <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is it? Read the book <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> like how can people <Silence> keep up with <SpeakerChange> you? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Definitely read book and read <Speech_Male> my columns in the new. York but <Speech_Male> you know what I won't say <Speech_Male> I actually have hope <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I think that <hes> <Speech_Male> we're in a revolutionary <Silence> moment I mean the protests <Speech_Male> have been <Speech_Male> amazing, <Speech_Male> and they haven't <Speech_Male> just been amazing, because <Speech_Male> there's so many people out in <Speech_Male> the streets all <Speech_Male> over the country. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> In a sustained <Speech_Female> way in <Speech_Female> large cities <Speech_Male> and small towns, <Speech_Male> you know young people <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> all races <Speech_Male> and languages and <Speech_Male> creeds <SpeakerChange> and colors, <Speech_Male> and just just <Speech_Male> beautiful, <Silence> but they've <SpeakerChange> also been. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Amazing and <Silence> I think unprecedented. <Speech_Male> In <Speech_Male> the way that <Speech_Male> we have seen. How <Speech_Male> May Institutions <Speech_Male> Act right <Speech_Male> and this is a really <Speech_Female> important point because I think <Speech_Male> Americans really <Speech_Male> to forget about <Speech_Male> this right, we think that institutions <Speech_Male> kind of <Speech_Male> exist in <Speech_Male> a vacuum. <Speech_Male> You <SpeakerChange> create them, <Speech_Male> and then they do their job. <Speech_Male> We take for <Speech_Male> granted they see. <Speech_Female> We <Speech_Female> really see how <Speech_Male> we <SpeakerChange> all <Speech_Male> create <Speech_Male> the circumstances for institutions <Silence> to function. <Speech_Music_Male> You <Speech_Male> know the <Speech_Male> the way that city councils <Speech_Male> have have <Speech_Male> started stepping up <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> cutting police budgets <Speech_Male> the way <Speech_Male> that the <Speech_Male> New York state legislature <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> repealed <Speech_Male> fifty eight <Speech_Male> witch was the <Speech_Male> provision that allowed <Speech_Male> for police secrecy <Speech_Male> <hes> you know <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the that that <hes> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> police records in <Silence> <Advertisement> a matter of days <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you know. <Speech_Male> That's <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> an <Silence> example for us. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> About people. <Speech_Male> Power <Speech_Male> and just <Speech_Male> the incredible effects <Speech_Male> of <Silence> people acting <SpeakerChange> collectively <Speech_Female> in <Speech_Female> a the third thing that is <Speech_Male> really unprecedented. These <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> protests is just the way <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that ideas <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that were so <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> marginal <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in just a few <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> weeks ago, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> liked to fund the <Silence> <Advertisement> police. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Are <Speech_Male> Now being <Speech_Male> discussed, but actually <Speech_Male> are starting to see <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> to be realized <Silence> legislatively. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And that's what I think <Speech_Male> really marks <Silence> a Is when things that <Speech_Male> seemed completely <Silence> <Advertisement> farfetched. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Quickly <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> simulated, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> so we have this incredible <Silence> <Advertisement> momentum. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and. <Speech_Male> It's up <SpeakerChange> to all of <Speech_Male> us to keep it <Speech_Male> going. We could <Speech_Male> not only win, <Speech_Male> but we could actually <Speech_Male> like create a much <Speech_Male> better country <SpeakerChange> <Silence> than we had before <Speech_Male> trump. <Speech_Male> I can't think of a better <Speech_Male> way to end <Speech_Male> the podcast <Speech_Male> then on that <Speech_Male> on that vision, <Speech_Male> which that's <Speech_Male> where our imagination <Speech_Male> needs to be as we <Speech_Male> really do have a chance <Speech_Male> to create a much <Speech_Male> better country <Speech_Male> than we have before <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> trump. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Masha <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Gessen. Thank <SpeakerChange> you so much <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement>

twitter New York York
Massive funding crisis for Palestine relief, compounds collapsing system: UN coordinator

UN News

06:15 min | 2 years ago

Massive funding crisis for Palestine relief, compounds collapsing system: UN coordinator

"This is Matt wells at U N, news Gaza hospitals, unable to feed their own patients elective surgeries perspective for years. Those are just a few examples of what the UN's deputy special coordinator for the Middle East. Jamie McGoldrick describes as a collapsing system in free fall on Monday, he issued an appeal as part of the humanitarian response plan for next year the three hundred and fifty million dollars to help one point four million people in the most need across the pied Palestinian. Territories chiefly the Gaza Strip are you a news Arabic chief Reema buzzer was in Gaza with Mr. McGoldrick several weeks ago, and after they visited the main hospital together she asked him to outline the extent of Gaza's plight. The health sector here has been under severe funding shortages for for years. The blockade for the last twelve years by Israel has prevented goods coming in movement. The lack of supply of key essential drugs has been one of the reasons why in the salad problem is one of the reasons as hospitals don't operate properly. L she has a special offer because it's a teaching hospital is one of the biggest hospitals here. And as a result of that when the greet. Macho return demonstration started the March. It was the police that absorb the biggest number of casualties people who are wounded as demonstrations those being twenty thousand people in jobs and five those of those with live bullets most of the injuries are below the knee. And so what we saw today in the hospital was hundreds of young men and women who have been short Belo's who need at least six seven very complicated vascular born reconstruction subsidies, which would take maybe two years seventy operations, and of course, millions of dollars and needs technical support a needs technical ability needs resources this hospital. This guy's doesn't have. Not even talking about the the stick. We're talking about only wounded emergency cases. But there's adults. Yeah. The delta said this morning, they've kgo eight thousand elective surgeries for heart surgery for cancer patients for people regarding tons plant Sodi operations, all of those have been left the being pushed the hospital that don't long do that in the hospital anymore. The only teach trauma Kazaks all the deal with all the other subjects have been postponed. Council delayed or send somewhere else, and that's up to it'll be years before they can clear that might log. Meanwhile, more and more people are getting sick. That exit of the hospital said that he was working he's working as a doctor for thirty years. And this is the first time ever that he sees a hospital unable to feed its patients, and he asked for more support. What can the U N do? Well, I mean, what we try to do when the guy the marches took place demonstrations, we a special people, which was a white paper, which was to try and bring donor specific funding for the health sector. We mighty stick over twenty million dollars. But that's twenty million less than we need. We need forty million. Plus, and that's just to deal with the case law would behalf today every Friday there are more patients who arrive with boom bullet wounds or requiring treatment, and it just answer the caseload. Meanwhile, the other subsidies are not team police because there's no key essential drugs. Can not enough essential drugs. We hear from the Central American see store, the drugstore that are some drugs that run on the running thet it is and forty days. And then when he he says he can't feed these people as indicative of the crisis that health system faces, but the health system is only power part of a broader issue. A broader issue of collage. Apps collapsing system in free fall. And if we said that the unemployment rate in Gaza is fifty percent, how Gessen's surviving always flagged this idea of resilience, which is something that are self reliance that the half here in Gaza. I mean, what is so willingness to survive under very terrible conditions of Nokia station. A blockade of an ability to move around freely unless you can p to go from there. Most people are stuck here for most of the lives. And it's not as you can buy everything you can have everything if you working seven and ten youth don't have jobs, and what we're trying to do is to create cash for what programs are we'll try to get people on what schemes that gives them a trade or skill that, they can go outside St. and say the to themselves, but this difficult to bring immaterial to actually, you know, build funded and self on a Sudafed to export matisyahu because of the restrictions are placed on Gaza. So it's a very very harsh environment for economic development. As a result of the economy is in freefall, the World Bank report in September said very very clear. The GDP gone to one person and to our declared this in poverty, as by the UN standards. So we're facing a crumbling collapsing situation here, and if you put on top of that all the stresses of the great March, Tom the demonstration, the health system, the psychosocial, and then you've got owner as the funding crisis for Indra as massive, you know, people are not George people are losing their jobs losing the support. And that's only adding further and further pressure on a very fragile precarious environment. And you mentioned before that two thousand eighteen was the worst humanitarian funding. What was the main reason for this? Well, I think there's a couple of reasons I think first of all this environment in the Middle East is a lot of other countries who may or higher profile than Palestine, and that would be the Yemen's of the series and the racks and then Libya's so you compete against those unfairly an also Palestine's been around for a long long time. People don't get the sense that there's a there's a political solution in any anything soon. And I think on top of that you've been doing fatigue. You know, then I think with the the fund. Cuts from the US towards Indra. I think that's basically been a catalyst other things to happen. I think is all of that. So we struggle as or humanitarian response plan for two thousand eighteen thirty five percent funded against the global average of fifty percent, which I fade how incredulous that has given the importance of Palestine to this Middle East region and the fighter this Palestinian question has been languishing for so many decades support you're getting from the Arab words from the region. Well, I mean, clearly not enough. I mean, I know the recently pledging event in the received some pledges of hundred twenty two million men much of that came from the Gulf countries, but it has to be a long term prospect has to be a regular prospect. It has to be something we can predictably expect from these donor countries and clued in the Gulf to make sure that we can plan properly because having a timing often ptunning on is not the base we plan for population who are vulnerable and Trump.

Gaza Middle East UN Gaza Strip Jamie Mcgoldrick Palestine Israel Matt Wells Nokia Gulf Coordinator United States Belo World Bank Delta Technical Support
Massive funding crisis for Palestine relief, compounds collapsing system: UN coordinator

UN News

06:15 min | 2 years ago

Massive funding crisis for Palestine relief, compounds collapsing system: UN coordinator

"This is Matt wells at U N, news Gaza hospitals, unable to feed their own patients elective surgeries perspective for years. Those are just a few examples of what the UN's deputy special coordinator for the Middle East. Jamie McGoldrick describes as a collapsing system in free fall on Monday, he issued an appeal as part of the humanitarian response plan for next year the three hundred and fifty million dollars to help one point four million people in the most need across the pied Palestinian. Territories chiefly the Gaza Strip are you a news Arabic chief Reema buzzer was in Gaza with Mr. McGoldrick several weeks ago, and after they visited the main hospital together she asked him to outline the extent of Gaza's plight. The health sector here has been under severe funding shortages for for years. The blockade for the last twelve years by Israel has prevented goods coming in movement. The lack of supply of key essential drugs has been one of the reasons why in the salad problem is one of the reasons as hospitals don't operate properly. L she has a special offer because it's a teaching hospital is one of the biggest hospitals here. And as a result of that when the greet. Macho return demonstration started the March. It was the police that absorb the biggest number of casualties people who are wounded as demonstrations those being twenty thousand people in jobs and five those of those with live bullets most of the injuries are below the knee. And so what we saw today in the hospital was hundreds of young men and women who have been short Belo's who need at least six seven very complicated vascular born reconstruction subsidies, which would take maybe two years seventy operations, and of course, millions of dollars and needs technical support a needs technical ability needs resources this hospital. This guy's doesn't have. Not even talking about the the stick. We're talking about only wounded emergency cases. But there's adults. Yeah. The delta said this morning, they've kgo eight thousand elective surgeries for heart surgery for cancer patients for people regarding tons plant Sodi operations, all of those have been left the being pushed the hospital that don't long do that in the hospital anymore. The only teach trauma Kazaks all the deal with all the other subjects have been postponed. Council delayed or send somewhere else, and that's up to it'll be years before they can clear that might log. Meanwhile, more and more people are getting sick. That exit of the hospital said that he was working he's working as a doctor for thirty years. And this is the first time ever that he sees a hospital unable to feed its patients, and he asked for more support. What can the U N do? Well, I mean, what we try to do when the guy the marches took place demonstrations, we a special people, which was a white paper, which was to try and bring donor specific funding for the health sector. We mighty stick over twenty million dollars. But that's twenty million less than we need. We need forty million. Plus, and that's just to deal with the case law would behalf today every Friday there are more patients who arrive with boom bullet wounds or requiring treatment, and it just answer the caseload. Meanwhile, the other subsidies are not team police because there's no key essential drugs. Can not enough essential drugs. We hear from the Central American see store, the drugstore that are some drugs that run on the running thet it is and forty days. And then when he he says he can't feed these people as indicative of the crisis that health system faces, but the health system is only power part of a broader issue. A broader issue of collage. Apps collapsing system in free fall. And if we said that the unemployment rate in Gaza is fifty percent, how Gessen's surviving always flagged this idea of resilience, which is something that are self reliance that the half here in Gaza. I mean, what is so willingness to survive under very terrible conditions of Nokia station. A blockade of an ability to move around freely unless you can p to go from there. Most people are stuck here for most of the lives. And it's not as you can buy everything you can have everything if you working seven and ten youth don't have jobs, and what we're trying to do is to create cash for what programs are we'll try to get people on what schemes that gives them a trade or skill that, they can go outside St. and say the to themselves, but this difficult to bring immaterial to actually, you know, build funded and self on a Sudafed to export matisyahu because of the restrictions are placed on Gaza. So it's a very very harsh environment for economic development. As a result of the economy is in freefall, the World Bank report in September said very very clear. The GDP gone to one person and to our declared this in poverty, as by the UN standards. So we're facing a crumbling collapsing situation here, and if you put on top of that all the stresses of the great March, Tom the demonstration, the health system, the psychosocial, and then you've got owner as the funding crisis for Indra as massive, you know, people are not George people are losing their jobs losing the support. And that's only adding further and further pressure on a very fragile precarious environment. And you mentioned before that two thousand eighteen was the worst humanitarian funding. What was the main reason for this? Well, I think there's a couple of reasons I think first of all this environment in the Middle East is a lot of other countries who may or higher profile than Palestine, and that would be the Yemen's of the series and the racks and then Libya's so you compete against those unfairly an also Palestine's been around for a long long time. People don't get the sense that there's a there's a political solution in any anything soon. And I think on top of that you've been doing fatigue. You know, then I think with the the fund. Cuts from the US towards Indra. I think that's basically been a catalyst other things to happen. I think is all of that. So we struggle as or humanitarian response plan for two thousand eighteen thirty five percent funded against the global average of fifty percent, which I fade how incredulous that has given the importance of Palestine to this Middle East region and the fighter this Palestinian question has been languishing for so many decades support you're getting from the Arab words from the region. Well, I mean, clearly not enough. I mean, I know the recently pledging event in the received some pledges of hundred twenty two million men much of that came from the Gulf countries, but it has to be a long term prospect has to be a regular prospect. It has to be something we can predictably expect from these donor countries and clued in the Gulf to make sure that we can plan properly because having a timing often ptunning on is not the base we plan for population who are vulnerable and Trump.

Gaza Middle East UN Gaza Strip Jamie Mcgoldrick Palestine Israel Matt Wells Nokia Gulf Coordinator United States Belo World Bank Delta Technical Support
"gessen" Discussed on AM Joy

AM Joy

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"gessen" Discussed on AM Joy

"They say, trust us, don't worry. We've got this. We're running the country. Yeah, I think it's exactly right. Look, I think it's evidence of the kind of permanent crisis that we live in and this is a very imperfect and flawed solution to it. One, I think that ultimately is not not the right solution, the solution to having a president who is who, as the author writes is a moral who acts recklessly who acts competently, who acts at times in contradiction with the with our law and the rule of law. The the solution to that problem is not to try to undermine that that that president from the inside through through undemocratic actions as Masha Gessen wrote, you know, somebody who's who's not elected. The answer is to remove that person from office. And so I think I've struggled with this question for a long time. What should people what should people who work inside the administration do? If you're someone like Jim Mattis, you better serve the country by stain and trying to constrain the president, or do you better serve the country by leaving. I think there was a time where you could make the argument and especially for national security positions, you were better serving the country by staying inside. But at this point in time where you see the president under direct assault in a couple of different legal investigations, you see his poll numbers really moving in a way that we haven't seen before where he's down. You know, around thirty six thirty, seven percent. I think that the much more responsible course of action would be for people to come forward in high profile resignations and say, what they've seen on the inside and if one person does it, you might see other people come forward and you might see people that have left the administration like HR McMaster and Gary Cohn who all know how fit this president is, but it said nothing you might see them actually come forward and that might actually make a difference. Absolutely. You know, Morale's Amana, gold has people are being asked to sign NDA's so that they can't speak out afterwards. She said she didn't sign what that other people did meeting. Even if they do agree with this writer, they can't even say anything doesn't sound like small democracy to me, but I wanna play former President Obama on this very point about the New York Times op Ed in that speech that he did on Friday take. The coin that everything will turn out. Okay, because they're people inside the White House who secretly aren't following the president's orders. Bet is not a check. I'm being serious here. That's not how our democracy supposed to work. These people aren't elected. Not countable. They're not doing us a service by actively promoting ninety percent of the crazy stuff that's coming out of this White House and then saying, don't worry, we're preventing the other ten percents Corinne dispersive wants clearly to be seen as a hero and be fitted for their superman cave. But who told who elected this person to run the government and by the way they're like, we're making sure the rich people get their tax cuts, don't worry. Yeah, which is kind of like, yeah, it's, it's, it's tells you exactly where they really are in all of this, but it's it's self serving. They're not a hero at all. What they're trying to do is rewrite history so that it's favorable to them. And I mean, these are the same, the same person, and he talks about other people. The person talks about other people being part of the quote unquote of resistance that stood by the president who who put babies in cages who refused to denounce Neo Nazis who are marching on Charlottesville two year ago who who signed the Muslim ban. And if they truly truly wanted to save this country, I agree with Matt. They should come out in a very public way front of congress in front of the American public and saying, xactly what's going on. But this is completely self survey and it's like I say, covering their behinds. That's all this is about. And you know, tearing a lot of ways. It's actually exacerbating some of Trump's worst, most authoritarian instincts. Now there's talk of purges. There's talk of him going in and trying to use the department of Justice to investigate..

president White House Jim Mattis Masha Gessen Gary Cohn Trump New York Times assault Obama department of Justice writer Matt Charlottesville congress ninety percent seven percent two year
"gessen" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"gessen" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Well it's their number and the way you go troubles down the drain i'm john batchelor this is the john batchelor show thaddeus mccotter my colleague wjr the great voice of the great lakes and were with lee smith whose new article in the tablet looks at the media and its dance with intelligence community actors one of whom is christopher steel but there are other voices that have piped up over these last months in the rush agape mr clamor who is dni mr brennan who was dci for the obama administration now we come to those who are reluctant to go along with taking handouts uh lee you mentioned masha gessen at the new yorker uh giuliani off at the atlantic and then particularly because he's a guess on my program all the time steve cohen in the nation you also mentioned lieres at the london review of bush and most importantly glenn ren glenn greenwald at the intercept they have not taken the handouts what are they see what are they make of russia gately well okla mentioned uh andrew mccarthy narrative yes national review in one of the points that i that i tried to make their is that again this is this is not really a last right saying it's not democrats versus republican the people who are seeing russia gay for what it is like the different people uh uh a you mentioned glenn greenwald jackson lieres uh steven cohen muster guess yes these are people mostly on the left and they are correct to look at this and they say what the heck is going on here journalist are teaming up with robe uh sectors of the intelligence community to wage an information campaign no i think they're exactly right and this is what andy mccarthy sees as well um what we're talking about is we're talking about i wouldn't even say there in the middle i would say different publication that continue to push the this it's not like they're in the middle bear part of the problem their part of the operation and i wanna make it clear uh i wanna make it clear this is certainly i'm not uh attacking our intelligence community i'm not in tacking are launch our federal law enforcement authorities god bless them and thank them for the important work they do and i think that they must be a paul themselves to see.

john batchelor lee smith christopher steel obama administration masha gessen london review bush glenn greenwald russia giuliani andrew mccarthy steven cohen andy mccarthy
"gessen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"gessen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"About is that every time we talk about mowing we're not talking about something else in there i think there are a lot more things that are incredibly important about this administration about then about this political moment uh that are not the muller investigation masha gessen and adrian chen thank you both some water we really appreciate it thank you thank you they both right for the new yorker and they were talking about why they believe the story of russian election interference has been overblown this is npr news what are we go wants to open charter schools even asked struggles to recover from hurricane maria unions say the government is taking advantage of the chaos to privatize the system officials disagree they don't think this future generation of puerto rico has any more time to wait i have an obligation to do something to improve this system that story this afternoon on all things considered from npr news the story earned kqed news all today starting at four thirty good morning i'm rachel martin the onion recently published in peace with following headline cleveland finishes construction anew elevated sewer system it's described as a quote one of a kind openair wastewater transportation system accompanied by a gross fake photo of brown liquid sloshing out of an open trough running through downtown clevelanders weren't amused maybe because it turned out the article was partially true city officials pointed out on twitter the city actually has to elevated sewers it's morning edition maybe you are sloshing around a bid on the freeways a look at traffic and transit this morning joe with the latest you sliding around and probably having hard time seeing in the sierra winter.

masha gessen adrian chen puerto rico cleveland twitter joe sierra winter muller npr kqed rachel martin
"gessen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"gessen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"By masha gessen use a writer for the new yorker she might no fan of lottery you're putin for certain but she's skeptical that this russian interference is as large as it seems to be your essay whereas we played it up to be she writes the kremlin in its media are tickled to be taken so seriously their saab grammatical imitations of american political rhetoric and a lot of it is kind of not very grammatical their overtures to the most marginal of political players are suddenly at the very heart of american political life are we overdoing our concerns about this i think yes and now there is a concern that we take this too seriously and maybe over correct in terms of heavyhanded regulation and that's actually what the russians did after the stunning affair they use that to push very sort of extreme restrictions on internet freedom so we clearly don't want to see that happened the stone when affair you said one of those snowden affair snowden affair i'm side in quite a fun laugh edward snowden correct correct so there is that fear that we could maybe blow this out of proportion at the same time by pushing the voices on the extreme and making these fringe voices seem like one voices 30000 because they're amplified by bots it's drowning out the sort of rational debate that should be happening at the center in about ten seconds does it effectively counter russia just for the public to know what is happening let's talk to june ten seconds no but i think it's the first step medi to to finding out a way to solve this came as schaefer thank you very much thank you brett schaefer tracks russian influence on twitter for the hamilton 68 project and the alliance for securing democracy.

writer edward snowden russia brett schaefer twitter masha gessen putin hamilton ten seconds
"gessen" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"gessen" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"This is what i think first of all that putin has done as i don't think has ever set out to recreate to tell totalitarianism in russia he set out to plunder yet and to hold onto power for as long as possible and the best term that i know for that is a mafia state which is which is a term that that was originally by a hungarian political scientist named baolin monger whose written a wonderful book called them off at the postcommunist mafiastate in which he describes her the way it functions as a family functions as a clan there is a patriarch in the centre who distributes money and power he talks about how you can be bored into the family or adopted into the family but she can never leave the family voluntarily you can only be kicked out your sending pushing was in it at the signals that he is sending out our mafiastate signals and he he doubled down on those signals when he was faced with popular protest and he was afraid of losing power but the society that he addressing is a society with an experience of totalitarianism that has been passed on from generation to generation and so the habits that kick in or the social institutions that are activated are the institutions of a totalitarian society so he hasn't actually institute a terror right but russians are reacting as though he had made just a little bit of selected law enforcement has the effect of terrorising most people interesting masha gessen is the author of the future is history how totalitarianism reclaimed russia thank you so much thank you or whoa whoa whoa whoa whoa whoa whoa whoa whoa.

putin russia scientist baolin monger law enforcement masha gessen
"gessen" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"gessen" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"Masha gessen is a russian american nonfiction writer s the author of several books among them the man without a face the unlikely rise of ladimir putin her newest book is the future is history how totalitarianism reclaimed russia thanks for coming on thank you for having here's my supposition of this book you've written so many books on putin you're the putin whisperer you can explain putin better than in everyone explain putin people say and invariably you will say well to understand putin you have to understand the whole middle you where he came from the country the culture so finally you sat down you said all right i'm explaining the whole shebang i'm explaining how the ussr became what it became how it created a guy like putin but a society like one that could be a run by putin that about right as an outright emanate another way to think about is that every couple of years somebody sits down and says i'm going to write that russia booked to end overbooking so i figured i've been i've been added for thirty years it's my turn to write the russia to end all russia books so you could have started at any point since the bolshevik revolution or maybe the czars you chose to start a few years before the downfall of the soviet union y what we're trying to do and then you write it any starting point is chosen randomly and because i was i was particularly focused on the concept of totalitarianism i thought that it made sense to focus on a time when russia was starting to understand that it was a totalitarian country on the seventy was starting to anderson that was at the taliban control it seems like an obe rainer right we in the west knew that it was a totalitarian state actually that was aware there was never used.

Masha gessen writer ladimir putin ussr russia rainer anderson taliban thirty years
"gessen" Discussed on I Have To Ask

I Have To Ask

02:19 min | 4 years ago

"gessen" Discussed on I Have To Ask

"Hey listeners this is neil obala when a panoply is managing producers i wanna ask you a small favour here at panoply were trying to learn more about our podcast listeners we want you to tell us about the podcast you enjoy end how often you listen to them so we've created a survey that takes just a couple of minutes to complete if he fill it out you'll help panoply to make great podcast about the things you love and the things you didn't even know you loved to fill out the survey just go to survey dot panoply dot fm or you can click the link we've provided in the show notes for this episode that's survey dot panoply dot fm or click the link in a show notes thanks it's pledge she's in here on slate podcasts if you like i have to ask you can help supported by joining slate plus just go to sleep dot com slash ask plus that sleep dot com slash ask plus we'll be talking about it more later in the show this episode of i have to ask is brought to you by smart biz loans smart based loans makes spa loans easy visit their website and see what you prequalify for good a smart bears last dot com and use promo code half to ask for five hundred dollars off your closing costs oh was late i have to ask climb isaac johner my guest today is masha gessen a journalist an activist wellknown for her writing about russia american politics guesses previous work includes the two thousand twelve book the man without a face which is a biography of ladimir put and her new book out this month is called the future is history how to tell a tearing of reclaimed russia guessing now lives in america and over the past year has become well known for essy's in the new york of you've books and elsewhere which of sought to warn americans of at donald trump's threat to democratic norms and the rise of autocracy great here in america normally i'd give a little more background on masha gessen life and journalistic career but we coverage in the interview so without further ado here's marsha thank you for being here thank you listen i want to uh normally i start with an introduction kind of uh giving some background about you and and your work which which i ate which i did but i uh.

neil obala ladimir russia new york donald trump america masha gessen five hundred dollars
"gessen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:16 min | 4 years ago

"gessen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Was not a major force in their government journalist masha gessen has deep ties to russia and the united states she examines her homeland's development through the eyes of that first generation to come to each in the new russia in her latest book called the future is history how totalitarianism reclaim brochure it's published by riverhead books a very please have his brought masha gessen back to our show low welcome bankin it's great to be here how many russians do have a clear memory of what things will like before 1991 you know i would actually argue that probably month depends on what you mean by clear memory while there are some older people ludwig go go all the way back to not long after the revolution what i'm trying to say though is that you know it's it's so contested serve the the memory of what the soviet union was like is the subject of so much argument and so much passion that the story has been told in retail so many times that i don't think that anyone can really sort of grasp what it was like and some people comparing it to the way southerners deal with the story of the confederacy you know i think it's a it's a wellfounded comparison because so much of people's contemporary identity depends on how they interpret that passed you quote a russian expression you'll have to say to russian which translates says there's no future right so that the russians persons buddhist shivering yet what is of me it means there's no future um the it's it figures prominently in the book and it's something that you know the book us is based on uh many indepth interviews with seven of the main characters read a so spent many my hours with them and as a certain point when we started to get to serve the the 2000s and the twenty tonnes this expression this clinical expression began spontaneously to come up in all the interviews nb came so important that i named a chapter buddha showing at an it also has echoed in the title do you think it's similar to william faulkner's statement is he said something like the past as an over it isn't even past i think it is similar um but but my characters we're talking about a boy was that they had they felt such overwhelming uncertainty.

masha gessen united states russia soviet union william faulkner twenty tonnes