35 Burst results for "German Government"

"german government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:12 min | 2 weeks ago

"german government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Like numeric according for 1%, a hundred basis points from the fed next week, three 43 on your U.S. ten year Brent currently trading at $92 per hour that's down three tenths of a percent of crypto, Bitcoin is at 20,386 after a significant sell off yesterday currently up 7 tenths of a percent. That's a check of your markets now. For the top stories and everything else that's going on around the world. Let's start here. So the UK's inflation rate has eased slightly from its highest level in four decades driven by changes in the price of fuel and transport, consumer prices rose by 9.9% year on year in August that is in line with what Bloomberg economics was predicting, and it is a fraction down on the market estimate of 10%. The Bank of England delivered a half point rate rise last month and it has signaled that it's likely to act again at next week's meeting. Meanwhile, equity markets had their worst day in two years yesterday after the new inflation figures from the United States showed that prices are rising faster than had been expected. The August CPI figure was 8.3% down on July number, but higher than the median forecast markets are now fully pricing in a 75 basis point hike from the Federal Reserve next week with some predictions of a full 1% interest rate rise from the fed. And just finally, the European Commission president Ursula von der leyen wants to raise a €140 billion as part of a series of radical steps to rein in the biggest energy crisis in decades. To underline the seriousness of the block's predicament, the German government has also revealed this morning that it may increase its stake in Juniper above 50%. Meanwhile, France's power grid operator expects to ask households, businesses, and local governments to reduce energy consumption several times over the next 6 months to avoid rotating power cuts as the country grapples with a regional energy crisis. Those are your top stories. Okay, coming up next, our colleagues in the U.S. are getting ready for Bloomberg, daybreak. Let's check in then with Nathan, hey, good morning, Nathan. The markets trying to pick themselves off up from the floor after the sucker punch yesterday. What's line up for you? Well, it is a bit of a breather. It was the biggest sell off in two years or more. Thanks to that hotter than expected inflation print. We did see some easing of inflation, at least on the headline, but obviously not as much as markets were expecting. And then we get that more than 4% sell off. And now the debate is on what the fed does now. Is it going to be 75? Is it going to be a hundred? Should we even be talking about a soft landing at this point? We have a stacked lineup of guests to assess this market and weigh in on this debate. SD dweck a flow bank will join us along with drew Madison, MetLife, Sam stoll at CFR all with us live this morning after the route and the disappointing data could also play into a midterm election now less than two months away, but here for President Biden, he says he's not worried about inflation. We're going to check in with Bloomberg government's Emily Wilkins on the politics of this economy in this market. Plus, we'll bring you updates on the procession for Queen Elizabeth this morning at a face to face meeting coming between presidents Putin of Russia and she of China on his first overseas trip since the pandemic. Karen Moscow and I have it all for you coming up here. Bloomberg daybreak America's just minutes away. Tom. Fantastic stuff, Nathan Hager, thank you Bloomberg daybreak is up next if you're listening on under DAB digital radio, you're going to hear Bloomberg surveillance. So we heard the pressure is on the Federal Reserve now after that August inflation print which came in hotter than expected 8.3%. Joining us now is Henrik Johnson, whose co head of capital markets at Deutsche Bank, great to have you in studio this morning. We're going to get to the flood of share sales that are heading just in September after what's been a very tough IPO year, but on the macro picture just firstly, hundred basis point move is what nama expects from the fed. Do you? So I think the market is pricing in 30% ish probability of a hundred bids. So I mean, that would be a massive move. I think I'm not sure what anyone surprised in terms of seeing the big equity sell off because the fed wants to cool the economy. And they're going to do whatever it takes. You know, the hard thing for them is calibrating it. And I think they'll be looking at not really market data, but frankly, economic data. So I think what we really should be watching is unemployment, corporate results, things like that. What short term equity market moves, I think they'll look through and just do what they think is right. What were the markets getting wrong? Why is this the dislocation between what we're hearing from fed officials, the consistency around that need to get back down to 2%? And that run up in equities that we saw. I think there's some flows probably into equities. U.S. equities in particular viewed as kind of a haven in sort of a very uncertain world. So people are sort of allocating assets into that. So that's one of the factors. And then two, I think most people are sort of naturally optimistic and one invest in the market is structurally long. So that's driving in the absence of bad news. It's driving the market tighter. And then you see these big flips as pieces of bad news come out, which surprise of everybody. Okay, so perhaps it's just all a relative game. Just on that IPO point, what is the picture now in Europe? I mean, there's an energy crisis on. Yes, we had a great earnings quarter, but things look much more difficult for the end of the year. And yet, a nice piece out on the terminal this morning about the Volkswagen IPO about welcome about a whole host of companies coming to market this September why now? Well, I mean, the market has been very difficult for a long time, right? And I think as we advise issuers to access the markets across different products, investment grade bonds leverage finance and equity, it's all about hitting the window. And many people think that

fed U.S. Ursula von der leyen German government Bitcoin SD dweck Nathan drew Madison Sam stoll President Biden Bloomberg government Emily Wilkins
"german government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:28 min | 3 weeks ago

"german government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And I'm Brian Kurdish, trading is 90 minutes out in places like Sydney, Tokyo, and Seoul, three hours away from Hong Kong and the China markets. And we probably will see some pressure on Chinese stocks. We had the NASDAQ golden dragon index, trading down 2.6% in the Friday session in the United States as a lot of the optimism there has dwindled. We'll take a closer look at markets in a few moments, but before we do, we'll get to some of the top stories of the hour. All right, Brian, well, German Chancellor Olaf scholz's coalition has sealed a relief plan worth about €65 billion for 65 billion U.S. dollars. We're told it's designed to help millions of households cope with soaring electricity prices. A key measure includes a vow to cap and even redistribute huge profits made by energy companies on the back of the current energy crisis. Germany is facing a crisis triggered by Russia's decision to all but shut down gas deliveries through the Nord stream one pipeline. The German government is considering relaxing several of its core energy environmental policies to mitigate the fallout. The OPEC plus coalition is looking at a different market now than just a few months back. Let's get the story from Bloomberg, Susanna Palmer. The narrative that's dominated the last few months is pressure from key consumers such as the U.S. to lower the rate of inflation by ramping up supply. But that's shifting toward concerns about a global economic slowdown. Now the organization of petroleum exporting countries and its partners say an output cut could be necessary. OPEC plus meets Monday and amid all the uncertainty there widely expected to keep production steady, but OPEC plus delegates privately say all options are on the table. Susanna Palmer Bloomberg daybreak Asia. Well, the Biden administration is considering moves that would restrict U.S. investments in Chinese technology companies. We're told the investment curbs taking shape would likely come as an executive order to be signed by President Biden in the coming months. We hear a separate action against TikTok is a possibility, but no action is imminent. Also the commerce department may place further restrictions on chips used for artificial intelligence, computing. At the same time, we hear The White House is in discussion with Congress on legislation requiring companies to disclose possible investments in certain Chinese industries beforehand. Among options being discussed is the establishment of a system that would give the government the authority to block investments outright. All right, the time is 32 and a half minutes past the hour. Let's get a check of markets. As mentioned, a lot of red numbers on the screens this morning. There was actually a bit of optimism in Europe and the United States. Europe on Friday was a strong day to the upside for equities of the Dax gaining 3.3% and the kakarot up 2.2%, but we had Russia's decision to curb gas deliveries through that Nord stream one pipeline that definitely cast a Paul over the crisis, the energy crisis in Europe. And then also the jobs report, which was initially deemed pretty positive because it made it look like growth was still pretty solid and inflation was actually coming down a little bit, hiring was strong while wage growth moderated. But the report in the end probably didn't do enough to signal a turnaround by the fed any softening and the key now all attention will be on the CPI report for August that is coming up. We also have a big ECB meeting this week and among the other challenges quite significant is the Biden administration proving that $1.1 billion of arms to Taiwan, as well as the lockdown in Chengdu being extended for another three days starting yesterday and Shanghai's major container port was suspended as a typhoon approaches. So that may get sorted out in the next day or two, but the lockdown in Chengdu could even be extended further. So these numbers are definitely to the downside China futures off a little more than half a percent. S&P E minis are now down about two tenths of 1%. EK futures flat to slightly lower hanging index futures down 6 tenths of a percent. The dollar picking up some strength, the Bloomberg dollar spot now up two tenths of 1%, one 40, 32, and we won't get some trading in treasuries for a while, but the ten year treasury finished up with a yield of 3.18% to two year at three 38. And oil now, 87, 99 a barrel. Steve. All right, Brian, time for global news now

OPEC Susanna Palmer Brian Kurdish U.S. Olaf scholz Biden administration German government President Biden Seoul Russia Tokyo Hong Kong Sydney Europe Bloomberg China
As Germany struggles in energy crisis, more turn to solar to help power homes

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | Last month

As Germany struggles in energy crisis, more turn to solar to help power homes

"German government ever since the Russian invasion of Ukraine in February the main reason is to avoid rationing for energy as demand rises in the winter in mid June Russian state owned energy company Gazprom started cutting supplies to Germany through Nord stream one it cited technical problems that German authorities have dismissed as cover for a political power play in recent weeks Nord stream one has been running at only 20% of capacity Gazprom recently announced that the pipeline was shut from August 31st to September the second for

German Government Gazprom Ukraine Germany
"german government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:37 min | Last month

"german government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Let's start with the market reaction to that CPI number in the UK 10.1% the highest inflation in 40 years the figure 4 July we've seen the ten, two ten yield curve, the most inverted since 2008 as guilt markets move in reactions to the ten year guilt now 5 basis points higher two spot 18, the two year 12 basis points higher to spot 26. Of course, that inversion is seen as a predictor of a recession in the economy, the Bank of England, of course, also projecting a 5 quarter resection beginning at the end of this year, they're expecting inflation to go even higher as high as 13% later this year as the energy price cap has lifted in October, the pound meanwhile a tenth of 1% weaker against the dollar one 2088 is the price on cable as we're seeing the dollar on the Bloomberg dollar spot index two tenths of 1% higher on the share markets, the 4100 is just slightly higher, almost a tenth of 1% at this point in the year the FTSE two 50, of course, more dramatically focused by two tenths of 1% more broadly in European markets, the stock 600, a tenth of 1% higher, the biggest movers there among them uniper, the German utility down 9.8% after its results reported a 12 million 12 €1 billion net loss in the first half of this year, that company bailed out by the German government just a couple of weeks ago across the sector's financial services seeing the biggest gains up by 7 tenths of 1% healthcare real estate basic resources utilities travel and measures and chemicals all in the red this morning so a mixed picture across the sector on European markets, looking ahead towards Wall Street, the S&P 500

Bank of England uniper UK German government
Germany announces new coronavirus measures for fall, winter

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 2 months ago

Germany announces new coronavirus measures for fall, winter

"The German government says basic coronavirus requirements would remain in place during the coming fall and winter when experts expect COVID-19 cases to rise again as people spend more time indoors Face masks and presenting proof of a negative coronavirus test will be mandatory for October until early April at German hospitals nursing homes and similar institutions with vulnerable people while passengers on airplanes and making long distance trips by train and bus also will have to wear masks during that period The government too plans a full vaccination campaign health minister Karl lauterbach says Germany should be better prepared for the next coronavirus winter than in previous ones I'm Charles De Ledesma

German Government Karl Lauterbach Germany Charles De Ledesma
"german government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:39 min | 2 months ago

"german government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And therefore, there is a need to replenish others for the Chinese airlines to be able to continue to grow. Let's talk about energy A number of different aspects to that question. Let's start off with energy shortages this winter. The German government is already talking about the potential for limiting energy availability to industry. One of your key lines is in Germany. Obviously you have lines in different parts of the world. Are you preparing are you getting ready for the possibility that you may see a reduction in the energy coming into the factories? What impact could that have? That's a scenario we have on our risk map. And we consider it's not unlikely that there will be energy shortages, not only in Germany, but in Europe, given the overall situation and the tensions with Russia. Therefore, yes, indeed, we are starting to analyze what would be the possibilities to adapt to such a scenario. It's part of the risk analysis that we are doing for availability of many things, including energy Could it affect the ramp? Could it affect delivery? The objective is to not impact our operational activities. And we are trying to look at different ways getting more energy, getting different ways of operating with less energy requirements. That's currently what we are doing. And we think that's manageable. But it will need a lot of work. And a lot of activity to get there. We're standing here. It's been incredibly warm here today, probably the warmest air show. Certainly one of the ones that I show is I've ever been to. I understand it's been super hot down in Toulouse as well. This is an example of why this industry needs to make the progression that it needs to make in terms of

German government Germany Russia Europe Toulouse
"german government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:54 min | 3 months ago

"german government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Statements out of the German government on the details of any potential support, as you say, for uniper and maybe it takes the shape of the kind of support they provided to Lufthansa, of course, the German airline. What about other industries? We heard this incredible response from the union suggesting that entire industries could be wiped out, and indeed our own team suggests that that's not just hyperbole. If the worst comes to pass when it comes to gas supplies into Germany, which industries are most vulnerable. So the natural gas for the joint industry is very important for two reasons. It's not only important to fire a power plant and for this the electricity is also pretty important as a raw material in many processes and on the chemical industry BASF is a chemical company which produces a lot of components which are actually needed in the car industry. So if the molecules of the natural gas is not arriving anymore from Russia it could have a pretty severe impact and affecting actually many other industrials not only the energy sector, but also the cost sector and many others. Given your long experience and knowledge, I mean, 30 years ago, Europe opened up the energy markets. Is there now a rethink as there has been in terms of German policy in some senses towards Russia, the idea that liberalizing this industry that's so kind of strategically fundamental that perhaps that was a bad idea is not just Germany pretty much all of Europe, the UK did too. Yeah, this is a clear reckoning and also sketching ahead and realizing. Sold himself said in several interviews that it's looking at and inside it was a mistake actually to push the German economy in such a big dependence on cheap Russian energy and the problem is you can not turn the switch overnight and reduces this dependence from one day to the next. So it takes actually a lot of months and probably years to start new contracts with alternative gas suppliers in Europe such as Norway or the Netherlands and this won't be enough. So Germany is already looking abroad to Canada, possibly sealing liquid natural gas contracts with Canada and also in the Middle East with Qatar, but this will take time and the question is how fast will Russia turn off the gas ten totally? Okay, just one final one, how bad is this likely to get is gas rationing on the table? Tenants work at the crucial gas pipeline north stream one, which is going through the Baltic Sea. Some say and actually also the net regulator already voiced concern that Russia might use this maintainance works to stop natural gas flows forever. If this should happen in addition to the already reduced pump through volumes of only like 40% now, Germany will struggle to fill the gastrologist, which is now at I think 60% now. But this won't be enough to get through the winter. So if Russia should stop guess deliveries in July is feared. Gas rationing will be on the table in the winter for sure. Yeah, it was very interesting when we were speaking to costume, but from ING Germany, their chief economist, and he was saying that it's very, very difficult to make that switch quickly and he had blamed frankly for government and industry for not working together and trying to resolve the issue more quickly and he says, you know, that there's even with the best one in the world not going to be able to be done by the winter here in Europe. So yeah, thank you so much. For being with us, really great to have you on Michael Nina bar is blue based German. Germany government reported there on the tricky situation that is Juniper. Okay, let's get to the situation in Ukraine, of course, which links in to what happens around the gas crisis, of course. Ukraine is planning to put forward a blueprint this week for rebuilding the country that could mobilize hundreds of billions of Euros. The plan around 2000 pages will be introduced in lugano, Switzerland, according to people familiar with the outline. Artem Chevrolet sits on the board of directors of the EBR D that's the European bank for reconstruction and development and the supervisory bank of private bank. That's the largest bank in Ukraine. He's at the summit and Bloomberg's Caroline Hepburn sitting next to me and Lizzie Burton asked him whether the figure of €500 billion for reconstruction will ultimately be enough. This will depend on a lot of factors primarily how long the war will last and of course how big the post war recovery will have to be given Russia's recent investments as we've heard in other pieces earlier today. And of course, the heavens of the physical damage that Russia will cause to Ukraine. Yeah, I mean, in some sense, it's quite difficult to be discussing rebuilding costs surely when the war is raging Ukraine is losing territory right now, most recently, a key city in the Hitler hansk region. This is quite difficult, isn't it? Indeed, Carolyn, but we also should not wait to start because what we are seeing now is that the country has showed tremendous resilience, the economy's still functioning banking systems functioning. I mean, key parts of the economy are pretty much it's hard to say on track, but definitely continue operating meaning that even if we do certain things now, they will happen. I mean, how we could we

Russia Germany German government German airline Europe Lufthansa BASF Ukraine Canada Michael Nina Germany government Baltic Sea Qatar Norway the Netherlands Artem Chevrolet European bank for reconstructi Middle East
Germany moves ahead with plan to legalize cannabis sales - ABC News

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 3 months ago

Germany moves ahead with plan to legalize cannabis sales - ABC News

"The German government is setting in motion plans to legalize the sale of cannabis for recreational purposes aiming to have legislation ready later this year The health ministry is holding expert hearings on various aspects of the issue saying more than 200 representatives from the medical legal and other fields will take part along with officials from various levels of government and unidentified international experts the pledge to legalize control sales of cannabis to adults in license shops is one of a series of reforms outlined in last year's coalition deal is thought the plan would ensure quality control while also protecting young people but the social effects

German Government
G7 foreign ministers meet to discuss Ukraine war, impacts

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 5 months ago

G7 foreign ministers meet to discuss Ukraine war, impacts

"Top top top top diplomats diplomats diplomats diplomats from from from from the the the the group group group group of of of of seven seven seven seven wealthy wealthy wealthy wealthy nations nations nations nations are are are are gathering gathering gathering gathering in in in in northern northern northern northern Germany Germany Germany Germany to to to to discuss discuss discuss discuss several several several several issues issues issues issues including including including including the the the the war war war war in in in in Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine and and and and energy energy energy energy and and and and food food food food security security security security the the the the meeting meeting meeting meeting at at at at the the the the Baltic Baltic Baltic Baltic Sea Sea Sea Sea resorts resorts resorts resorts of of of of vice vice vice vice and and and and house house house house located located located located northeast northeast northeast northeast of of of of Hamburg Hamburg Hamburg Hamburg takes takes takes takes place place place place amid amid amid amid tight tight tight tight security security security security with with with with about about about about three three three three thousand thousand thousand thousand five five five five hundred hundred hundred hundred police police police police officers officers officers officers deployed deployed deployed deployed at at at at the the the the event event event event sites sites sites sites the the the the foreign foreign foreign foreign ministers ministers ministers ministers of of of of Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine and and and and Moldova Moldova Moldova Moldova have have have have been been been been invited invited invited invited as as as as guests guests guests guests speaking speaking speaking speaking in in in in Berlin Berlin Berlin Berlin Ukrainian Ukrainian Ukrainian Ukrainian foreign foreign foreign foreign minister minister minister minister Dimitrov Dimitrov Dimitrov Dimitrov collabo collabo collabo collabo welcomed welcomed welcomed welcomed the the the the German German German German government's government's government's government's recent recent recent recent decisions decisions decisions decisions to to to to step step step step up up up up military military military military support support support support for for for for his his his his country country country country whether whether whether whether I I I I take take take take the the the the supply supply supply supply of of of of weapons weapons weapons weapons all all all all of of of of these these these these sanctions sanctions sanctions sanctions that that that that need need need need to to to to be be be be imposed imposed imposed imposed against against against against against against against against Russia Russia Russia Russia we we we we see see see see that that that that the the the the positive positive positive positive positive positive positive positive dynamic dynamic dynamic dynamic he he he he also also also also expressed expressed expressed expressed hope hope hope hope that that that that the the the the European European European European Union Union Union Union would would would would soon soon soon soon approve approve approve approve he he he he cranes cranes cranes cranes application application application application to to to to start start start start the the the the process process process process of of of of joining joining joining joining the the the the bloc bloc bloc bloc saying saying saying saying his his his his country country country country would would would would also also also also be be be be an an an an asset asset asset asset to to to to the the the the European European European European Union Union Union Union needs needs needs needs Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine as as as as much much much much as as as as you you you you can can can can use use use use the the the the European European European European Union Union Union Union I'm I'm I'm I'm Karen Karen Karen Karen Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas

Ukraine Hamburg Germany Moldova Group Group Group Group Of Of Northern Northern Berlin Baltic Baltic Baltic Baltic Se House House House House Foreign Foreign Foreign Foreig Dimitrov Dimitrov Dimitrov Dim German German German German Go Russia European European European Eur Karen Karen Karen Karen Thomas
German Embassy: Approving of Russia’s War in Ukraine May Be Prosecuted

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:01 min | 6 months ago

German Embassy: Approving of Russia’s War in Ukraine May Be Prosecuted

"I did myself a little bit of a double take when I was scrolling through social media and I came across a post on Twitter and this is by the German embassy. This is from the German embassy in America. I'm going to read it. They have it in German, but I hit the translate button. So here it is in English. Russia's war of aggression against Ukraine is a criminal offense. Anyone publicly approving the war may be liable to prosecution in Germany. This applies to using the Z symbol too. German security authorities are keeping an eye on the use of the symbol, ministry of the interior. Now, this is extremely disturbing. What the Germans are basically saying, and to me, there's a big non sequitur here. The second line doesn't arise out of the first. Let's look at the limes carefully. Russia's war of aggression against Ukraine is a criminal offense. I agree. Number two, anyone publicly approving the war may be liable to prosecution. Stop. The Manson murders are a criminal offense. Let's say that I was nuts and I went, I don't see anything wrong with the Manson murders. Well, I haven't committed criminal offense. Sure I'm an ass for defending Manson, but on the other hand, I don't deserve to be locked up. I'm nuts. Leave me alone. In other words, in other words, it's completely one thing for something to be a crime and something else for someone to say, it's my opinion that that's not a crime or it's my opinion that that's no big deal or it's my opinion that we're responsible for making them do it. This is what it means to live in a free society. So when I say a non sequitur or what I mean is, the fact that it may be a criminal offense for Russia to do this, it doesn't follow that any German citizen taking a position on the war that differs from the German government or the west or the Biden administration or whatever is somehow participating in the crime,

German Embassy Manson Ukraine Russia Twitter Germany America German Government Biden Administration
"german government" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:04 min | 6 months ago

"german government" Discussed on WTOP

"Voting map for the state Good morning and welcome in it is now 8 o'clock This is CBS News on the hour Your home for original reporting I'm Deborah Rodriguez Clean up is underway after an apartment building in the Ukrainian city of Donetsk was hit with a Russian missile today a neighborhood near the capital came under fire as the Kremlin issued a statement announcing their bid no sign of a breakthrough in talks that have been suspended in turkey Correspondent Debra patta begins our coverage from Kyiv Mean little on the battlefield Ukrainians are not letting their guard down The enemy is still here Sid president volodymyr zelensky missile and air attacks have not stopped That's the reality the UN says more than 4 million Ukrainians have fled their country since the war began U.S. officials are warning Americans again about going to Russia Correspondent cami McCormick The State Department issued a travel advisory warning that Moscow may single out and detain Americans in Russia There was already an advisory not to travel there and for Americans in the country to leave immediately There are limited commercial flights available and this advisory also warns about the dangers of trying to leave by land The German government is warning gas supplies may run low CBS's Vicky Barker is at the foreign desk Economics minister Robert habeck has just activated what's called the early warning phase of an emergency law authorizing government rationing He's urging German consumers and businesses to conserve their natural gas usage now saying every kilowatt hour counts The fear is that Russia might cut its natural gas shipments to Germany and the other G 7 countries that have rejected its demand that payment be made in rubles In Washington lawmakers investigating the January 6th attack are looking into the almost 8 hour gap in White House records uncovered by CBS News and The Washington Post Democrat Jamie Raskin I'm.

Deborah Rodriguez Debra patta Sid president volodymyr zelens cami McCormick Donetsk CBS News Russia Kyiv German government Vicky Barker Robert habeck turkey UN State Department Moscow U.S. CBS Germany Washington White House
"german government" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:55 min | 8 months ago

"german government" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Welcome back to the Jimbo Hannah showed one 8 6 6 5 O Jimbo when 866-505-4626 what may be happening about this time tomorrow night when we have dawn approaching in Ukraine our guest is Angela stent foreign policy expert and author of the book Putin's world here is Mike and Cleveland good evening Putin ain't gonna bust a grape and I'll tell you why Because I'm sorry he's not he's not gonna watch the great He ain't gonna do nothing Oh yeah ain't gonna do nothing Okay go ahead No no no She realizes the United States is divided We are at each other's pro trade here We're destroying our own answers You don't think and the I don't know that he's that concerned I think he's more concerned about building back that buffer area in Eastern Europe against the rest of the world but I'll let our guest offer thoughts how about that Angela stent that this is all a bluff that Putin will see what he can get merely by acting like he's going to invade Ukraine Well we'll only know that I guess in a few weeks or maybe or maybe 48 hours Right But I do know but I think the cooler is right I mean why is Putin doing this now Because he looks around the world and he sees the United States deeply divided And administration is having a hard time getting its legislation through where at each other's throats He looks at the Europe there's also distracted by COVID the German government is still working out its positions Vis-à-vis Russia is a coalition government which may or may not hang together for a long time And so he sees that he looks out and he sees less than weakness and he also seems a person of Ukraine isn't too popular at the moment And he thinks this is the time to strike And it may be a bluff He's had us all scaring around since December we've been responding to all of his automated So in some ways he's not going back position looking out at all the rest of us trying to do everything we can to forestall you know what could be the outbreak or the first outbreak of major conflict in Europe since the end of World War II Now then I've heard the theory put forward of course there was a mini summit at the start of the Olympics between president Xi of China and Putin and that they have formed essentially a new alliance if you will not based on ideology but based I guess on just the convenience of authoritarian states Now this time around it would not be the Soviet Union that was the senior partner in such an alliance with an economy about one tenth I guess that of China I guess the Russian economy amounts to roughly that of say I don't know California maybe that so this theory went the Chinese had told the Russians yes sure You want Ukraine take Ukraine but don't mess with the Olympics The Olympics are how I took power I she and I she would like to become a dictator for life over here So just wait until the Olympics were done Do you put any credence in that notion Well I do think that the timing if there is to be an invasion does have something to do with that In 2008 when Russia went to war with Georgia it was the beginning of the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing and the then Chinese leadership which is of course different from what it is now They were not happy about this because it distracted from the Olympics So that could have an influence But you know the Chinese really don't look approvingly on the idea that Putin is going to launch an invasion against Ukraine Yes in that 18 page document they signed when Putin was in Beijing week before last the Chinese said yes NATO shouldn't in America anymore We back up here decide to have security guarantees There wasn't the words Ukraine was not in that communique China has a pretty good trading relationship with Ukraine It has a pretty good political relationship with the Ukraine and at least formally and publicly China stands for non interference in the internal affairs of other countries sovereignty and territorial integrity So the idea of Russia marching and then taking part of Ukraine or launching a major war really is at the moment in the Chinese playbook Interesting In terms of the Germans do you take seriously there are words which don't specifically say flat out where if Russia invades we cut off the pipeline but it says well we're with you Some of our Friends are for the pipeline and some of our friends are against the pipeline and we always stick with our friends it seems to me both Merkel and her successor have been kind of a mealy mouthed about just how much support they would provide the United States Yes So on the question of the Nord stream two pipeline in the sanctions I mean the Chancellor was visiting with President Biden last week he's in Moscow tomorrow And he has not publicly said that Germany would support Well it's not a cutoff because the pipeline hasn't opened up yet But you haven't said that they would public support Not opening it up But apparently and this made it to the papers in a dinner that the German ambassador hosted for him with some of the Senate leaders including senator McConnell apparently he said that Germany would So I think there may be a difference between if they have gone that far then that might see far enough We will continue with more calls for I guess Angela stent the author of Putin's world published by 12 one 8 6 6 5 O Jimbo and will be back with more.

Putin Ukraine Angela stent Jimbo Hannah Olympics COVID German government America Russia Jimbo China Europe Eastern Europe Cleveland Beijing Mike Soviet Union Summer Olympics Georgia California
 Germany expels Russian diplomats over state-ordered killing

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 10 months ago

Germany expels Russian diplomats over state-ordered killing

"Germany Germany has has expelled expelled Russian Russian diplomats diplomats over over a a state state ordered ordered killing killing Germany's Germany's foreign foreign minister minister I I lay lay in in a a bed bed bug bug sister sister countries countries expelling expelling the the two two diplomats diplomats off off to to a a court court concluded concluded the the Moscow Moscow was was behind behind the the killing killing of of a a Chechen Chechen man man in in Berlin Berlin two two years years ago ago that that book book called called the the state state ordered ordered slaying slaying a a grave grave breach breach of of German German law law Russia's Russia's ambassador ambassador in in Berlin Berlin has has been been summoned summoned to to discuss discuss the the court's court's finding finding the the twenty twenty nineteen nineteen brazen brazen daylight daylight killing killing sparked sparked outrage outrage in in Berlin Berlin and and previously previously prompted prompted the the German German government government to to expel expel two two Russian Russian diplomats diplomats then then a a move move Russia Russia swiftly swiftly reciprocated reciprocated at at the the time time I'm I'm Charles Charles last last month month Germany Germany has has expelled expelled Russian Russian diplomats diplomats over over a a state state ordered ordered killing killing Germany's Germany's foreign foreign minister minister I I lay lay in in a a bed bed bug bug sister sister countries countries expelling expelling the the two two diplomats diplomats off off to to a a court court concluded concluded the the Moscow Moscow was was behind behind the the killing killing of of a a Chechen Chechen man man in in Berlin Berlin two two years years ago ago that that book book called called the the state state ordered ordered slaying slaying a a grave grave breach breach of of German German law law Russia's Russia's ambassador ambassador in in Berlin Berlin has has been been summoned summoned to to discuss discuss the the court's court's finding finding the the twenty twenty nineteen nineteen brazen brazen daylight daylight killing killing sparked sparked outrage outrage in in Berlin Berlin and and previously previously prompted prompted the the German German government government to to expel expel two two Russian Russian diplomats diplomats then then a a move move Russia Russia swiftly swiftly reciprocated reciprocated at at the the time time I'm I'm Charles Charles last last

Berlin Germany Russia Moscow German German Government Gover Charles Charles
 Deal to make Scholz German chancellor clears final hurdle

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 10 months ago

Deal to make Scholz German chancellor clears final hurdle

"Three three Ponti Ponti deal deal to to form form a a new new German German government government and and the the center center left left leader leader Olaf Olaf Scholz Scholz has has cleared cleared its its final final hurdle hurdle setting setting the the scene scene for for shields shields to to succeed succeed longtime longtime chancellor chancellor Angela Angela Merkel Merkel this this week week Germany's Germany's environmentalist environmentalist greens greens say say their their rank rank and and file file members members approved approved the the agreement agreement reached reached last last month month with with eighty eighty six six percent percent voting voting for for it it in in a a ballot ballot the the other other two two parties parties Schulz Schulz his his center center left left social social Democrats Democrats under under the the pro pro business business free free Democrats Democrats overwhelmingly overwhelmingly approved approved agreement agreement act act weekend weekend conventions conventions the the coalition coalition aims aims to to modernize modernize Europe's Europe's biggest biggest economy economy step step up up efforts efforts against against climate climate change change and and introduce introduce more more liberal liberal social social policies policies I'm I'm Charles Charles the the last last month month a a three three party party deal deal to to form form a a new new German German government government and and the the center center left left leader leader Olaf Olaf Scholz Scholz has has cleared cleared its its final final hurdle hurdle setting setting the the scene scene for for shields shields to to succeed succeed longtime longtime chancellor chancellor Angela Angela Merkel Merkel this this week week Germany's Germany's

German German Government Gover Olaf Olaf Scholz Scholz Ponti Ponti Shields Shields Center Center Angela Angela Merkel Merkel Schulz Schulz Germany Charles Charles Europe
"german government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:59 min | 11 months ago

"german government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And the World Health Organization sees a very bleak European COVID winter at Baxter has details Yeah that's right Paul the forecast hold for sure The WHO is forecasting deaths in Europe from COVID-19 will reach 2.2 million by March This is based on those current trends COVID is now the leading cause of death in Europe and the WHO is again advising vaccination to avoid further lockdowns France appears to be in or near a 5th surge of COVID Health ministry reporting out 30,000 new cases in the last 24 hours urgently asking people to get vaccinated German Chancellor Angela Merkel has held an emergency meeting with leaders of the likely next government coalition to discuss tougher measures to fight its explosion of cases 15 states in the U.S. are reporting critical increases in COVID cases in Michigan Some hospitals are reporting that they're operating over capacity with patients waiting in hallways and the ER for hours and the concern of course is that leaves many fewer beds for people who need other than treatment then COVID In Denver the city mayor Michael Hancock is reimposing mass and vaccine mandates for indoor activities for business owners If they don't want to require masks your businesses or venues can also implement a vaccine check before entry into your business And mayor Hancock says the city is seeing a large uptick in cases so it is get vexed or masked Sing Tao reporting to Hong Kong China border may begin opening December 10th New Zealand says it will slowly left some travel restrictions from January for travel China is calling for what it calls a malicious hyping of the Chinese tennis star Pong Shui controversy to end foreign ministry says to her well-being is not a diplomatic matter and should not be politicized Human Rights Watch has accused the IOC of what it calls sports washing and wants the agency to have China sure pung's well-being And the European Union has called for China to provide independent and verifiable proof of well-being and the whereabouts of Pong And we're reporting on U.S. president Joe Biden's announcement of the largest ever release of oil from the U.S. strategic petroleum reserve While political reaction is expected to be very strong and Bloomberg examiner a horn Dern says Republicans are expected To really try to rebuke what's going on in The White House saying that this is a White House that hasn't been welcoming in the fossil fuel industry We saw the killing of Keystone pipeline on day one in office with senator Joe Manchin as well mentioned But of course senator Joe Manchin is from a heavy energy state Now Manchin says this is just a band aid In San Francisco I'm at Baxter This is Bloomberg Brian Eduardo Thank you very much The time is 38 minutes past the hour It's time for a global sport And we turn to Dan Schwartzman who is looking at whether or not Byron.

COVID COVID Health ministry Michael Hancock Europe mayor Hancock Sing Tao World Health Organization China Baxter Angela Merkel Pong Shui pung Paul France U.S. U.S. strategic petroleum reser Michigan Denver senator Joe Manchin Human Rights Watch
"german government" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

The Last American Vagabond

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"german government" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

"It just it's hip hip policy so please go ahead gevork. The funny thing about germany was The government was following the actions If the people are gonna vote or not so. They didn't make any any statement about it until like two days before the elections and two days before the elections. The servants were already organized themselves and they have rented buses to come from all over germany from different federal states and they were like thousands of people coming to brilliant vote and this could be seen as a scandal for the german government because for the past ten years also. The german government is in the same bag and of jim. Change not only that in order to convince the people of germany to accept a around. The million syrian refugees. The initial argument was like they're fleeing The hitler the twenty first th century and they are fleeing from the massacres of that one insane guy was driving his own tanks and shutting the people indiscriminately and he has murdered over half a million people so we have to accept..

gevork german government germany government jim
"german government" Discussed on Reality Life with Kate Casey

Reality Life with Kate Casey

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"german government" Discussed on Reality Life with Kate Casey

"To the show is very next. Two guys will still think about your work that you made twenty three years ago big. Oh my gosh now. it's it is to me. One of the best documentaries that has ever been made. And i'm assuming that you're asked about it at least every four years when the olympics happen again. Yeah somehow or other. I'm seen as an expert in olympic security measures. Which very and i dare you got interested in film in in in that subject in a very roundabout way i on read an article which appeared in british newspaper which is an interview with one of the widows of one of these really athletes who died women gold anki spitzer and she was in nineteen ninety seven. When i read this interview. She was with the other. Witnesses still suing the german government. Compensation so twenty. Five years after their husbands died they were still doing the compensation that case was not closed and that was how i entered into this and then it became a much bigger film for political though. I can't even imagine this. Seems like it must have been a massive undertaking. Because you're calling our cable footage and accounts from the events did it seem like a massive undertaking at the time. It did but. I think i wouldn't have done it if i'd known have massive. It was going to be. I was very young. i was like thirty years old. I can have feature longer documentary..

anki spitzer german government olympics
"german government" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"german government" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Don had over the last decade or so infiltrated in a way they had Members and supporters within police departments. People have even accused the Greek police have not responding to certain incidents when when Golden don was involved, so it wouldn't be too far fetched to believe that they helped him now. As for Baba's, there was some reporting this week that he has made his way somewhere in the Balkans with the help of far right extremists. I haven't been able to independently verify that But regardless of where he is, you know, many people see his disappearance as an embarrassment and failure on the part of the Greek government, and many see it as a sign that you know, golden Dawn and their sympathizers are not a thing of the past. It was Lydia Mannelly do in Athens with the latest on the leader of the neo Nazi golden Dawn Organization. Lydia. Thank you. You're welcome, Marco. Last week, Ballerina Chloe Lopez Gomez was awarded €16,000 about $19,000 a settlement for the racism she says she experienced as he first ever blacked answer at the starts, Ballet and Berlin. Stories of racism in the workplace and at school are common in Germany, but difficult to measure. That's because no official data on race are collected or analyzed by the German government until now. The COBE reports from Berlin on a new effort to count black Germans. The stylist at Ebony and Ivory Salon in the Tony shoot back district. Know what it means to be black in Berlin when I went to school, and they were calling me fake hair because I was very great, and you Children, right? They didn't They weren't used to it. And, yeah, Charles Kristina villains a k A. C. C is a wig stylist at Ebony and ivory. It's a good thing her mates ignorance didn't keep her from getting a job or from living her best black life. But as I grew I found out there was special to be black and beautiful, you know, but sees he doesn't feel the word Black completely defines her. If someone asked me, I'm never like I'm black or like in America. You do. Event right like you're black. And whatever I do, say I'm German for say, I'm Danielle Cc's coworkers. Sonny Kim, however, doesn't hesitate on black fo Dodge. We say their boss is Salon co owner and beam a boy and better Or maybe, he says, growing up black in West Berlin near a U. S Army base during the height of nineties hip hop and Michael Jordan's popularity. Made him feel cool. But like his U. S counterparts, Evie is no stranger to aggressive policing. He says. Being German helps him avoid the worst of it. For example, if the police stopped you with the car or whatever, if they want to see your I D whatever. And you somehow don't know what they want, And this might lead to some tension for this and other reasons. Embarrass says I was born here in Berlin, but so from how are you? Feel more Nigerian than German. Which brings us to Afro Central's a coordinated attempt to quantify the experiences of people like villains, vacuum and emperor in a country that collects no data on race and ethnicity. It has a L S. Brown Bagger is Project co leader. It's a survey like people in Germany, Black African and Africa's forest people. It's the first of its kind. The hope is that Afro since Astana will support political organizing, as well as identify the resource is and services that black German communities need most. Afro census is an initiative of Berlin based each one teach one or a little, a Black Archive and Youth empowerment organization. But I am Baggo says a little's involvement was key. There is some research and Germany but it's always from a wet perspective, and we believe that it matters and that its changes something If we do this form of like perspective, Bram Bagha says German advocates for racial justice are often thwarted by a lack of data on race and ethnicity..

Michael Jordan Bram Bagha Athens Lydia Sonny Kim Marco €16,000 Germany Balkans West Berlin America Last week Evie Golden don Black Archive Ebony and Ivory Salon Danielle Cc Don Charles Kristina this week
Thousands flee into Thailand following Myanmar air strikes

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Thousands flee into Thailand following Myanmar air strikes

"The German government has condemned the use of violence by security forces in Myanmar calling for it to immediately renounce the use of force and release political prisoners and even securing football tights Tesco vitamins spokesman Steffen aside but says security force tactics unfortunately reached a new sign low at the weekend I think it is distressing to see the almost daily death toll including lots of children the escalating violence which took the lives of over one hundred people on Saturday this prompted the U. N. to accuse the Myanmar junta of committing mass murder and it to criticize the international community for not doing enough to stop it I'm Charles last month

German Government Myanmar Steffen Tesco Football U. Charles
looted treasures will return to Nigeria at last

The Art Newspaper Weekly

02:39 min | 1 year ago

looted treasures will return to Nigeria at last

"Catherine. This is a fast moving news story. What's the latest with. The latest is a statement from the foreign minister. Heiko maas makes it clear that is part of the policy of addressing the colonial past. He says it's part of an honest approach. And it's about justice so it's obvious that moves definitely afoot What we're talking about here. Is the government preparing the groundwork with nigeria together in order to pave the way for the restitution at some stage but obviously the restitution will have to be negotiated individually by the museums in question. Love the intent to rest These works was sort of expressed. Some time ago by the german government right. They talked about that. It was legally immorally. I'm justifiable but this is the first practical steps have been taken by the german government. Is that right. I don't think you can say that. No because the government has been funding. Providence research of last couple of years and providence research should lead to something at some point it is also setup contact had station in gemini for claimants to approach in to ask for information to be put in contact with the relevant people out the groundwork has been of the past two years has been done. And as he said that has been this agreement so the intent between the states and the and the government on the municipalities so the intent has been there for a while and this was just a matter of time. Actually so it shouldn't really be taking anyone by surprise but of course is because it's such a big deal right. yeah dan. Can you say something about that because you know it is big news this right because as your book details. There's been such reluctance from museums to in any way engaged with the idea of repatriation. That's why it's a main. I do think it's an incredibly important moment. The idea that we now have a german official. Who has undertaken a visit to nigeria in order to talk about the returns and also importantly the fact that the display in berlin is being talked about in a new language in terms of consent that we're gonna display african objects if we're allowed to we're going to ask actually that's incredibly important. It's interesting for many that this is coming from the germans. They were not from the british. So what do we make of this moment of the german reckoning with the empire that was built by the british a very very interesting.

German Government Heiko Maas Nigeria Catherine Providence DAN Government Berlin
Is This Ancient Biblical Forgery Actually Real?

Kottke Ride Home

05:48 min | 1 year ago

Is This Ancient Biblical Forgery Actually Real?

"So close to a century and a half ago. A man named moses wilhelm shapira found fifteen manuscript fragments in a cave near the dead sea. They were written in an ancient hebrew script and contained. What shapiro claimed was the original book of deuteronomy blitz despite interest from the british museum to the tune of a million pounds. The manuscripts were found to be forged. Shapiro was disgraced and the documents disappeared but now a scholar named don dershowitz is questioning. If those documents might have been real all along so while the british museum was examining the manuscript fragments for authenticity themselves. Back in the nineteen th century. A few of the fragments were also on display to the public already attracting tons of visitors. The news of the possibly oldest ever discovered biblical manuscript had made headlines around the world. While awaiting the museum's official decree of authenticity. Someone else decided to take matters into their own hands. Charles simone clermont. Is you know who the times describes as a swashbuckling french archaeologist and longtime nemesis of shapiro's end quote examined the fragments for a few minutes and immediately went to the press to say that they were fake. The risk he played on his cursory examination paid off when the british museum experts agreed. Shapiro was humiliated by this and ended up. Tragically dying by suicide a few months later. The documents were sold at auction for a fraction of what they were originally expected to sell for. And most people soon forgot about the whole thing now. Dershowitz from the university of potsdam germany has published a new paper and companion book making the case that the manuscript was real all along quoting the new york times but dershowitz makes an even more dramatic claim the text which he is reconstructed from nineteenth century transcriptions and drawings is not a reworking of deuteronomy. He argues but a precursor to its dating to the period of the first temple before the babylonian exile that would make it the oldest biblical manuscript by far and an unprecedented window into the origins and evolution of the bible and biblical religion dershowitz. His research closely guarded until now has yet to get broad. Scrutiny scholars previewed his findings at a closed-door seminar at harvard in two thousand nineteen are divided. A taste of fierce debates likely to come but of dershowitz is correct. Some experts say it will be the most consequential bible related discovery since the dead sea scrolls in nineteen forty seven and quotes the times. Sagely points out that it's much tougher to prove something authentic than it is to prove. It's fake but there's an additional hurdle to be jumped. In this case the physical fragments themselves may no longer exist so back in eighteen eighty three there was a mad rush at the time to find biblical artifacts that would prove or disprove various points of contention emerging in biblical scholarship moseley around the documentary hypothesis. The idea that the first five books of the bible or the pentateuch were actually written by various authors. Not just one traditionally thought to be moses. It was in this climate of aggressive archaeology that shapiro. I established himself as an antiquities dealer in jerusalem and during which time he and clermont no became enemies. After camacho correctly denounced a collection of pottery. That shapira had sold to the german government. It's also important to note that shapiro was a convert to christianity having been raised jewish in russia so he was viewed with some skepticism from the other biblical scholars and archaeologists and also faced intense antisemitism after the deuteronomy manuscript was denounced. Fast forward to now. Dershowitz says one of the main reasons he thinks the fragments could have been real is because their contents differs quite a bit from the deuteronomy in the bible and many of those differences lineup with discoveries that were only made when the dead sea scrolls were found in nineteen forty seven sixty four years. After chapitoulas discovery of the fragments dershowitz also investigated. Some of shapiro's personal notes archived at the berlin state library and found three. Handwritten pages of shapiro trying to decipher the fragments. Filled with question marks and transcription errors. Dershowitz said quote if he forged them or was part of a conspiracy. It makes no sense that he'd be sitting there trying to guess what the text is and making mistakes while he did it end quote while some scholars of the evolution of biblical text or undershoots side cautiously believing the deuteronomy fragments may be genuine. Most pig refers people who study inscriptions are the ones that usually authenticate documents. Most of them aren't convinced they say the original fragments bear the hallmarks of modern forgery. That they agree with the notes made by the experts who examined them at the time and since no one has the fragments to examine physically now. It's a closed case and as for the content being impressions christopher rolston leading pig refer at george washington university said quote. Forgers are pretty clever with regard to content and they've been very clever for twenty five hundred years and quotes despite dershowitz his published paper and companion book. The jury is still out and who knows if it will ever truly be born ounce. It would have some pretty huge complications. If it does due to some of its key differences for example. It's missing all of the laws of the deuteronomy were familiar with in the bible. Ones upon which traditions and entire libraries have been founded. It would also bolster the theory that are tons more stories and traditions out there than just the ones that have been preserved in the hebrew bible.

Shapiro Dershowitz Moses Wilhelm Shapira Don Dershowitz Charles Simone Clermont University Of Potsdam British Museum German Government Sagely Chapitoulas The New York Times Berlin State Library Moseley Shapira Camacho Germany Harvard Clermont
What Happened To Berlin After the Second World War?

Your Brain on Facts

06:19 min | 1 year ago

What Happened To Berlin After the Second World War?

"The end of world war two signaled and unsure future for the defeated germany. Between the alta and potsdam peace conferences it was decided to split germany into four allied zones the eastern part of the country going to the soviet union to control and the western parts going to the united states britain and eventually france west germany was technically the boondocks republik deutschland or federal republic of germany and east germany was the jewish democratic republic german democratic republic or gd are despite berlin sitting entirely in the eastern part of the country. And i constantly have to remind myself. That berlin was nowhere near the east west divide. The city was also divided into similar zones. The mere existence of west berlin a conspicuously capital city deep within the communist east germany quote stuck like a bone in the soviet throat according to soviet leader nikita khrushchev so tenuous where the relations between the east and west that russia began plotting to drive the us britain and france out of berlin for good in nineteen forty eight. A soviet blockade of west berlin was set up blocking off all rail and road access in an effort to starve the western allies out of the city. In one of the most dramatic standoffs in the history of the cold war the berlin blockade saw the us and its allies supplying their sectors of the city from the air known as the berlin airlift. The allied nations flew in more than two point. Three million tons of food fuel and other supplies over the course of a year until the soviets finally gave up an the blockade things. Were relatively calm for a while. But in the late nineteen fifties. The soviets noticed a trend. Developing people saw how life on the capitalist side was recovering faster than life on the communist side. Not to mention there were a lot fewer spies keeping tabs on regular folks on the western side and people began to emigrate. This was especially true of doctors. Scientists and skilled professionals resulting in a serious brain drain in the east got worse year. Over year khrushchev ordered the east german government to stop the flow of emigrants for good on the night of the twelfth nineteen sixty one in one night barbed wire barriers blockade and even some sections of brick and mortar wall were constructed. It was later reinforced multiple times to become an impenetrable twelve footer. Three point seven meter high concrete wall. Roughly one hundred miles or one hundred and sixty one kilometer. Long complete with no-man's-land. Landmines guard dogs guard towers and checkpoints the relatively fluid border which had until that point allowed some sixty thousand east germans to commute daily to good paying jobs in the west visit. Family and friends attend soccer games and so on was gone with no warning. Whatever side of the border you went to sleep on on august twelve. That was where you stayed for the next twenty eight years. This opposing structure didn't stop people from trying to make a great escape to the west. Roughly one hundred and seventy one people. Some of them defecting soviet soldiers lost their lives trying to cross the border but over five thousand more succeeded and some of them got really creative with it but the first person to cross that foreboding line just hopped over it when the wall was three days old much of it was not actually a wall at all but sections of barb wire fence though with soldiers and police to enforce it one of those was eighteen year old. Conrad shuman stationed at the corner of bernauer. Stresa and opener stresa. He might have been young but he could tell which way the wind was blowing. He wanted out of the gdr like now he pays his feet nervously while chain smoking and occasionally pushing down the barbed wire coil. It was only two feet high. While the other guards were distracted by a gathering crowd shuman swapped out his loaded. Submachine gun for an unloaded and therefore lighter one at four. Pm shoe inflict away. His cigarette took a running start and deathly leapt over the barrier dropping. His gun and just leaving it. As he was whisked into a waiting west german police car a west german journalist captured the leap to freedom in what would become one of the most famous images of the wall until nineteen eighty nine. The west loves shuman but many of the people he left behind considered him to be a lowly traitor even after he was reunited with his family after the fall of the wall a generation later many people still shunned him as a deserter. Shuman was the first soldier from the national people's army to escape. But it's estimated that twenty seven hundred east. German soldiers and policemen followed his example. If someone had turned your home into a prison then you should treat it like a prison and start digging a tunnel in nineteen sixty four thirty students from west berlin spent several months digging a four hundred and seventy six foot or one hundred and forty five meter long tunnel tell people in the east escape one assumes they had to crawl to freedom because the tunnel was only about three feet high less than forty eight hours after it was finished the stasi the german border patrol discovered it but not before fifty seven men women and children had managed to escape. Which i assume is why. It's referred to as tunnel fifty seven

East Germany Berlin West Berlin Britain East German Government France Nikita Khrushchev Potsdam Federal Republic United States Soviet Union Khrushchev Conrad Shuman Stresa Russia Shuman
Germany Gives Nuclear Plant $2.9B for Early Shutdown

Understanding CBD

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Germany Gives Nuclear Plant $2.9B for Early Shutdown

"The German government has agreed to pay for utility companies to combine $2.9 billion in compensation or early closure of their nuclear plants. Germany is on course to phase out the use of nuclear power by the end of next year. Six nuclear power plants that were still in use will need to be shot down before the end of their original operating

German Government Germany
Germany grapples with a growing number of new cases and deaths from the coronavirus

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Germany grapples with a growing number of new cases and deaths from the coronavirus

"The German government has warned the country faces difficult months ahead despite the imminent arrival of of coronavirus vaccine official figures show nearly thirty four thousand UT confirmed cases of curve in nineteen and just over eight hundred additional deaths in the past twenty four hour period government spokesman Steffen side but says the expected regulatory approval of the vaccine not truly gives us hope but obviously it won't solve the problem I think Germans need to be prepared for the month of January and February will still belong to the holidays that we've had in this pandemic so Paul said but declined to comment on what the government could have done to prevent the shop rise of infections in the full I'm Charles the last month

German Government UT Steffen Paul Government Charles
German government backs bill requiring 5G security pledge

Cyber Security Headlines

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

German government backs bill requiring 5G security pledge

"Germany approves use of alway five g gear. Chancellor angela merkel's cabinet approved a bill that would allow for the continued use and expansion of five commitment from alway. The bill requires vendors to give assurances that network equipment is safe to use with the ability to issue stiff fines for any breaches. The bill also requires network vendors and operators to give german security agencies technical and legal means to monitor network integrity. The bill now requires parliamentary approval. China is germany's largest trading partner and china's ambassador in germany has previously warned of trade consequences. If while we received an outright ban in the country.

Chancellor Angela Merkel Germany Cabinet China
What happened at the University of Chicago during the Manhattan Project?

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:49 min | 2 years ago

What happened at the University of Chicago during the Manhattan Project?

"Next week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of atomic bombs being dropped on japan. It's one of the most controversial decisions in us. History research resulted in the weapons of mass. Destruction took place at several locations but chicago became one of the main science centers. I spoke with writer. Terry mcclellan mcandrew about the work done in the state and the reasons chicago was a manhattan project site while there were several reasons wine wise. It was the home of arthur holly compton who was a physicist who was already working on some of this chicago is also seen as centrally located in the country. So that other manhattan project. Scientists around the country could excess it fairly readily also the university of chicago approved of being a manhattan project site and supported it. This work going on people unaware of it in a very busy location in a major city. It seems dangerous it does doesn't it It was a secret project and secrecy was something that was drilled into everyone's minds who worked on the manhattan project there have been some oral histories taking of people who worked on the project. And one was of william. J nicholson who helped. Create the pile as it was called. That was what became the nuclear reactor that developed the first self sustaining nuclear reaction at the university of chicago and he talks about this need for secrecy and how it was drilled into all of staff there there were known agents of the german government in and around the university of chicago and we were told that and that We were not to reveal anything of what you do. Don't take up with strangers If you're having a sandwich someplace or beer or whatever Watch out that people who may engage you in conversation. would be damaging to the war effort and that the they may actually be the enemy so one huge question that comes up about this manhattan project site at the university of chicago in the in. The middle of this metropolitan side is where danger. Was there a danger to the university chicago illinois even the mid west region and the physicists. I spoke to said in essence no the nuclear reactor that the scientists were developing at the chicago at chicago was very low powered in comparison to what we see today at most. It could have powered a two hundred watt lightbulb therefore it was not putting out the kind of radiation that one of our nuclear directors today could could do in there for the harm was not significant. Now there was some danger to the people who were in the room where that nuclear reactor was working one of the dangers. Although the scientists in charge had done innumerable calculations to make sure the danger was very small. There was still a worried that the nuclear reactor could get out of control and they took protection against that and they had what they called the suicide squad two to three men who stood atop the nuclear reactor with the cadman solution. So that in case it did run away and start to melt down. They would pour this over the pile and hopefully it would stop but as one. Scientists told me the suicide squad would not live to tell about it. The first nuclear reaction took place there and it was momentous you know especially when you think about it in terms of what would come later but at the time from what i read in your story to those folks sorta matter of fact it was a big deal but their reaction was a bit anti-climactic. They basically broke out a bottle of chianti and also signed the basket that the bottle of chianti was in and that was pretty much it. The physicists i talked to said that the lead scientists on the reactor enrico fermi was so sure he had done endless calculations he carried his slide rule around with him for those who don't know what a slide rule is. That was your pre computer calculator in the days and he cared around with him. He did endless calculations to make sure he knew what was going to happen with this nuclear reactor and so it went exactly as planned and in essence while it was an enormous event. It changed our lives. It changed science and international relations forever. The scientists there. Just pretty much congratulated. Each other broke out a bottle

Chicago Terry Mcclellan University Of Chicago Arthur Holly Compton J Nicholson German Government Mcandrew Manhattan Japan Mass William Cadman Illinois Enrico Fermi
"german government" Discussed on Pressure Points

Pressure Points

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"german government" Discussed on Pressure Points

"Describe in more recent times. i think. Twenty thirty years ago. And you know to appoint still a ukrainian fighters given to speed scranton. Child soldiers in the congo and other places are usually given a drug called bubbles which you guessed it. Amphetamines jesus christ. Everybody's on surprise is the. That's the the combat drug of choice if you haven't seen it is You should definitely check out requiem for a dream. i. I don't know if you've seen it but it was one that like you can't show it in high school like you can't show it to kids that are in like middle school or that are like like fourteen fifteen year old kids just because it's very visceral but i would say it is probably one of the best examples of like an anti-drug movie that like it doesn't over glorify it it's just like hey these guys doing drugs again in a fucking drugs like this old lady starts doing speed so shing lose weight and works destroys. Everyone's life like it is the most disheartening movie. I've ever watched like you leave. And you're like fuck but definitely everyone should watch that movie. As soon as you said speed. I was like oh no So talking about german efficiency turns out the reason they were so efficient is all cracked out. That drug pervert in it was created by a pharmaceutical company. It was market as a wonder drug. You could go down to the pharmacy and just buy it over the counter. Todd and yeah. It's it's meth and you. It was wonderful you could go raise a family of five alone as a as the wife who stays home. Clean your entire house. Do fifteen sets of like hit exercise. You go to cross fit and five kids and same time and cleaner tire house and saw enough clothing for the entire right. And you're set in a week in a day in day. Jesus and later later it was restricted to just military use. And there was another guy. I of course i didn't write down his name he was high ranking. He was A hiring doctor in the reich in the german government as well and he towards the end of the war was kind of came out and said. Hey this isn't good. This is like really addictive is really bad but nobody listened like he. He banned it on the home front but everybody was still selling it. Nobody gave a shit because they were addicted to it. Of course he was the faucher of his time. He's like don't think this is a good idea like it's fine. Yep pretty much but rated but to the german government at the time. Total war maine's total commitment. So they found out how to get a person to more than they're physically able to commit. And that's meth. god. Of course. And i also love it every time every different source that i found for this story always quoted the same thing you know the art of war by sun suu or whatever it is speed is the essence of war and one hundred percent correct. Because they're on a lot of speed but they. Yeah let's see what was the. There's a book called blitz by norman. Oehler pretty sure. That's how you say it norman rockwell. No you should definitely read it. I my father for christmas urge birthday or something a couple years ago. It's a fantastic book. It talks about drugs in world war two germany and.

german government norman rockwell congo scranton Todd germany maine
TheLatest Brexit News

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:39 min | 2 years ago

TheLatest Brexit News

"Older listeners may recall a time when October fifteenth was last ditch do-or-die deadline by which agreement between the UK and the EU had to be reached else the UK would sail full steam ahead and damn the torpedoes towards a no deal brexit on December thirty first that deadline yesterday and almost as if the UK government is desperately bluffing negotiations appear to be very much ongoing after a you leaders conclude a meeting in Brussels UK Prime Minister. Boris. Johnson will speak on this subject later today one join with more on this by Stephanie, Boston UK and Ireland correspondent for developed. Stephanie How Does the EU take the UK's deadlines at this point the. Statement suggested that it's now up to the UK to quote. Mike necessary moves. I think the the European Union never took that deadline series at all I. Mean after all as you just set a new introduction. To have been so many deadlines I admit I'm also old I forget. deadlines that Boris Johnson has been giving thirty to thirty. First, of January, thirty first of December now, it's the fifteenth Tober. Never took it seriously because if you talk to the people who really understand the? Material Challenges in drafting legal texts they were saying First of all, there were two big gaps in really crucial issues and the second is even if you then can fill gaps politically, you have to then do the precision work of legal wording and that can't be done. In the Metro for night and so there was always an expectation that this European Council will come and go, and then they will sit down again and by early November conclude hopefully. So what are those gaps as things stand such sticking points as there are what other? where the main thing is state aid or what would with the would of other term state aid is meant which is well the Europeans rather call it playing seal that is something that has been written into the mandate from the very beginning back in twenty seventeen. And that means that because the United Kingdom is not a member of the European Union anymore. But is so close. It's a neighbor and should have free access to the European market. The British government needs to follow also the rules of competition. So for example, state eight, I remember in the summer I was in Berlin and someone in the German government made the point to me that. What the Europeans cannot accept for example, the British government giving millions and millions to Japanese carmaker. Attracts them to come to say Sunderland Create fifteen thousand jobs not fulfill the standards that the European Union expects for this kind of production and then be able to. Export freely into the European market. So basically dumping wages dumping competition that's something that is not not on the cards. For the Europeans, we would be deeply cynical view for the EU to take but then this is politics. Do they feel like the pandemic and the associated economic damage caused by might actually have strengthened the E. US hand in these negotiations, which is to say the UK will be much much less keen to risk the further disruption and expense no deal brexit. Yeah I think I mean you might say that's a bit cynical but of course, they looking at the situation in their own countries and of course, at the situation, the economic situation in the United Kingdom, which is very, very dire expected to be many many job losses in the months to come already we had. An economic downturn of almost twenty percents of GDP, of course. If there wasn't the pandemic, it would be easier for Boris. Johnson to walk away also had in mind when he won the election year ago December twenty nineteen, he campaigned on the platform saying I have a deal. So people believed him and he they voted him because he had an oven ready deal now, not even twelve months later he comes back and says, oh, by the way, I don't have a deal and that means that will be tariffs that will be used on the border. They will be higher prices they will be again problems to have everything in the supermarkets to the towards the end of the year early twenty twenty one. So that doesn't really go down well with his new voters in the north who were expected to not only brexit but sunlit landscapes. I mean from your point of view covering all this for a a German readership how hard is it to keep them interested in this especially given the the pandemic, which is much greater priority for all countries to do you get the sense that not necessarily European leaders but European public still paying any attention to this at all. They do a little bit of attention but to be honest yes, I mean in Germany because of rising number SOC new infections and new rules coming in and quite a lot of tensions now between Democrats and the the region's a difficult to to get attention I'm I think there is also an image problem for the United Kingdom now because all the news that are coming out whether it's with German TV radio or even pay person. Is Rather say not very complimentary of the British government in how they manage covet in how they manage. Brexit. But I must say when I read David tweet class. WHO's the chief negotiator for Britain and he said he was very disappointed and then set the prime minister said something on September nine, which was if there's nothing we can work with on October fifteen we will walk away. I think is a slight chance. He might walk away because they have been reckless if you remember the internal market bill with which they brought. Have Broken International Law I. Think There's a certain recklessness in this government so I don't completely exclude that in two or three hours whenever he announces stays, he might walk away. So on that from, there's been a lot of talk in British press. This week of those aerial photographs of sections of Kent being turned into a lorry parked does it strike you that perhaps those are actual serious preparations rather than more theatrical bluffing. No of course, these are serious preparations you have to be prepared and not only even in the case of a deal. If there is if there's no deal will be catastrophic even if it's the deal, still the fact is the United Kingdom has left the European single market, and therefore they have to be checks on the border whether it's from Franz coming into job. I think it's around ten thousand lorries a day in maximum times that have to cross go back and forth in this tiny little place pulled off Dover. And therefore you have to expect massive queues and they they already started with these preparations I remember like almost two summers ago when you drove down to what Folkston, you would see these additional catch that we're building. Now they're building the parking spaces. So obviously we have to expect. Destruction and maybe severe disruption Stephanie. Balls and. He's joining us.

United Kingdom European Union Boris Johnson British Government European Council Stephanie Brussels Prime Minister Boston Berlin United States Mike Ireland British Press Germany Kent Folkston Dover
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 2 years ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Policy Technology Economics Science Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
"german government" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:51 min | 2 years ago

"german government" Discussed on KCRW

"And Germany are both leading democracies and not far apart on the globe. They took very different approaches to the pandemic with very different results. The UK has suffered the most covert 19 deaths in Europe. Germany, with a much bigger population has lost far fewer people. NPR's correspondent in each country, Rob Schmitz in Berlin and Frank length in London have been talking among themselves. Hey, Rob Frank. So tell me what happened in the UK There are so many mistakes. A big reason is the government honestly doesn't really seem to think ahead. Boris Johnson. You remember he sold Brexit to the British people in 2016, with no plan on how to execute it. So when the virus began spreading here, Johnson course he's now prime minister. He was slow to recognize the threat. Here he is. On March 3rd. I was in a hospital the other night where I think the riff you were actually a few credit bars patients. I should cancel everybody of April. Johnson's in a nice see you with covert. 19 was talking to you and Boyd. He's a member of the scientific group that advises the government. The UK didn't really grasped the speed with which the epidemic was entering the country and there are all sorts of reasons for that, some of which are down too. Lack of organizational capability. Sometimes when there's very high uncertainty, you simply have to shut things down really quickly and Frank here in Germany, that's what they did. On January. 27th, the first known case of current virus was sent to Dr Clemens Ventnor, chief physician at the Munich shoving clinic. We have very similar principle like the Boy Scouts be always prepared. Vendor watched what was happening in Italy in January, where the virus was spreading pretty fast on DH. We knew that we have to flatten the kerf. So even before the first case of Cove in 19 in Germany, he was working on slowing its progress. And he says the German government was involved from day one. They've been asking us. What do you need? We we We didn't have to ask them. For example, Germany already had a big supply of I C U beds. Klaus Gunter Deutsch is at the Federation of German industries. You know, there has been a long debate on whether we have had too many intensive care beds that weren't used that often. Obviously, that debate is over. Deutsch says. Germany also has a lot of hospitals. If you take all the beds in all of Germany's hospitals, you get four times more per capita than what the UK has. Rob. You had slack in your system in Germany. There was not much here because the government had been cutting funding to the National Health Service. For years. The hospitals were afraid of getting swamped with covert patient. So they sent elderly patients back to nursing homes. Some broad covert witham infected other residents. At least 20,000 nursing home. Residents died of Cove. It That's terrible. And while in Germany deaths were prevented through testing and contact tracing, that doesn't have a whole hell of a weekend at the health authority in the Berlin district of Panko and operator talks to a man who's had contact with a positive case. There are around 400 call centers like this across Germany. Who ve Peter's directs this one become a film. We have traffic wardens and librarians working for us. We've even recruited gardeners from parks and recreation. Germany had a lot of manpower and testing to and infrastructure filled with labs in university medical centers across the country. You know here, the government mis read the Corona virus. They thought it was going to spread as quickly as the flu so they didn't even try to develop a testing system or re Stuart. He's a former British Cabinet minister. They were very, very confident and slightly arrogant in their belief that they understood this disease better than other countries. I think the lack of scientific education amongst the lot of the British political elite. Meant that they were very reluctant to challenge the scientists. But here in Germany, Frank, a trained scientist is at the helm and Chancellor Angela Merkel gave one of the most powerful and heartfelt speeches in her life when she made a rare national address on March 18th. The spirit is a crazy above in then, doesn't Benny for comes here? I have absolutely no doubt that we will overcome this crisis. But how many victims? Will it claim? How many loved ones will we lose to a large extent? The answer lies in our own hands. Miracle has a doctorate in quantum chemistry, and in another speech, she patiently explained how important it was for Germany to reduce the viruses reproduction rate. Her tone was always humble and deadly serious I was doing this I P Chan shags are that we are on thin ice. This's a fragile situation in which caution, not overconfidence is the order of the day. It really different here. Johnson studied classics at Oxford University. He was president of debating society and as prime minister. He's tried to rally the country with rhetoric. We must act. Like any wartime government and do whatever it takes to support our economy Genesis Awards where he helped win a landslide election last year, but a pandemic, of course not a campaign. Here's where we Stewart again. He sees himself as somebody who is encouraging a rugby team for 90 minute match, telling them they're fantastic to make thumb play well. He doesn't primarily see himself as somebody whose job is to get into uncomfortable details or two over policy and strategy. But Frank it's thiss chewing over of policy and strategy. This technocratic nature of the German government that may have also contributed to Germany success. Hans could. Nani is senior research fellow at Chatham House. There's this sort of doubling down on technocracy. It was idea that's populism has now been discredited by the Corona virus, he says. That's potentially dangerous because if technocrats feel to emboldened, there might be an even bigger global populist backlash in the future. Some people blame Johnson for Britain's handling of Cove it but John Camped er. He thinks Johnson's more symptom than cause captors. Just written a book called Why The Germans Do It Better notes from a grown up country. We've descended into Ah, believing that somehow because we're always muddled through in the past, muddling through is a recipe that will get us through in the future. So Rob, Where's Germany? Now with Corona Virus? Well, cases are rising deaths are not that tells us these new cases air from young people. Children across the country are back in classrooms. But the German government seems so far Okay With the dangers of this, there remains a strong infrastructure of hospital beds. Testing tracing Germany feels prepared and Chancellor Angela Merkel popularity ratings are sky high 86% wow cases here rising rapidly to we've got new restrictions, but Johnson actually had trouble explaining them to the nation recently. The last surveys. Rod Johnson is under 40% approval rating. Testing capacity here still can't meet.

Germany Boris Johnson Rob Frank German government UK Angela Merkel Rod Johnson Berlin prime minister Johnson NPR Europe Rob Schmitz Brexit London Klaus Gunter Deutsch British Cabinet flu Dr Clemens Ventnor Rob
UK and Germany's different approaches to the pandemic

NPR's World Story of the Day

07:00 min | 2 years ago

UK and Germany's different approaches to the pandemic

"The UK and Germany are both leading democracies and not far apart on the globe. They took very different approaches to the pandemic with very different results the UK as suffered the most covid nineteen deaths in Europe Germany with a much bigger population has lost far fewer people. NPR's correspondent in each country rob Schmitz in Berlin and Frank Langfitt in London had been talking among themselves. Hey Rob Frank. So tell me what happened in the UK. were. So many mistakes a big reason is the government honestly doesn't really seem to think ahead Boris Johnson you remember he sold Brexit to the British people in two thousand sixteen with no plan on how to execute it. So in the virus began spreading here Johnson course he's now prime minister. He was slow to recognize the threat here he is on March Third I was at movie night. where I think the rush if you credit ours patience and I shook hands of everybody. So by April Johnson an icy ICU covid nineteen I was talking to you in Boyd he's a member of the scientific group that advises the government. The UK didn't really grasped the speed with which the epidemic was entering the country under are all sorts of reasons for that, some of which are to. Lack of organisational capability sometimes when there's very high uncertainty, you simply have to shut things down really quickly and frank here in. Germany. That's what they did on January twenty seven. The first known case of coronavirus was sent to Clemson ventner chief physician at the Munich Schwab in clinic we have very similar like the boys gall. Be always prepare. Then you're watched what was happening in Italy in January where the virus was spreading pretty fast and we knew that we have to flatten the curve. So even before the first case of Covid nineteen and Germany, he was working on slowing its progress and he says the German government was involved from day one asking us what do you need we? We? We didn't have to ask them for example, Germany already had a big supply of ICU beds clouds Deutsche is at the Federation of German. You know that it's been a long debate on whether we had too many intensive care beds that warned us that often obviously that debate is over Deutsche says, Germany also has a lot of hospitals. If you take all the beds in all of Germany's hospitals, you get four times more per capita than what the UK has rob. You had slack in your system in Germany there. Was Not much here because the government had been cutting funding to the National Health Service for years, the hospitals were afraid of getting swamped with Cova patients. So they sent elderly patients back to nursing homes some broad cove with them infected other residents at least twenty, thousand nursing home residents died of covid. That's terrible in while in Germany, deaths were prevented through testing and contact tracing. The health authority in Berlin district of Hong, Kong and operator talks to man at conduct with a positive case, there are around four hundred call centers like this across Germany Peters directs this one become Austin We have traffic wardens and librarians working for us. We've recruited gardeners from parks and recreation Germany had a lot of manpower and testing to infrastructure filled with labs and university medical centers across the country. You know here the government misread the corona virus they thought it was going to spread as quickly as the flu. They didn't even try to develop a testing system where we steward he's a former British cabinet minister they were very, very confident. And slightly arrogant neb beliefs that they understood this disease better than other countries, I think the lack of scientific education amongst a lot of the British political elite meant that they were very reluctant to challenge scientists but here, Germany. Frank. A trained scientist is at the helm and Chancellor Angela Merkel. gave one of the most powerful and heartfelt speeches in her life when she made a rare national address on March. Eighteenth dusted fees above in then. Comes here. I have absolutely no doubt that we will overcome this crisis. How many victims will it claim? How many loved ones lose to a large extent? The answer lies in our own hands miracle has a doctorate in quantum chemistry, and in another speech, she patiently explain how important it was for Germany to reduce the viruses reproduction rate. Her tone was always humble and deadly serious. I'm. Doing this Icefield is off that. We are thin ice. This is a situation in which caution not over-confidence is the order of the day it really different here Johnson studied classics at Oxford University. He was president the debating society and as Prime Minister he's tried to rally the country with rhetoric. We must act like any wartime government and do whatever it takes to support our economy Johnson's Ori helped win a landslide election last year, but a pandemic, of course, not a campaign. Here's where. We store again he sees himself as somebody who is encouraging a rugby team for nineteen minute match telling them that fantastic to make them play. Well, he doesn't primarily see himself as somebody whose job is to get into uncomfortable details were chew over policy and strategy but frank, it's this chewing over of policy and strategy. This technocratic nature of the German government that may have also contributed to Germany's success hunts could is senior research fellow at Chatham House this sort of doubling down on technocracy. Populism has now been discredited by the Corona Virus. He says, that's potentially dangerous. If technocrats feel too emboldened, there might be an even bigger growth populist backlash in the future some people will blame Johnson for Britain's handling of covid campaigner. He thinks Johnson's more symptoms than 'cause captors just written a book called why the Germans do it better notes from grownup country. We've descended into believing that somehow because we always muddled through in the past muddling through is a recipe that will get us through in the future. So rob where's Germany now with crow verse? Well cases are rising deaths are not that tells us these new cases are from young people, children across the country are back in classrooms, but the German government seems so far. Okay. With the dangers of this, there remains a strong infrastructure of hospital beds, testing, tracing Germany fields, prepared and Chancellor Angela Merkel's popularity ratings are sky high eighty, six percent. WOW cases rising rapidly to we've got new strictures but Johnson actually had trouble explaining them to the nation recently the last surveys Ron Johnson is under forty percent approval rating testing capacity here still can't meet demand. And Winter's coming. NPR London correspondent Frank Langfitt, and Berlin correspondent. Rob? Schmitz.

Germany Boris Johnson Frank Langfitt German Government UK Berlin Rob Schmitz Rob Frank Prime Minister Covid Chancellor Angela Merkel NPR Europe London UK. Brexit Boyd Clemson Coronavirus
"german government" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"german government" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"ABC News on Cheri Westin. German government officials say they have no doubt that Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny was poisoned with the Soviet era nerve agent Nova Chuck, the same poison used on Russian spy Sergei's Cripple and his daughter in England, too. Zago. Germany is demanding a response from the Russian government. The Kremlin says it has not been notified about it. Yet. Navalny remains in a coma in a Berlin hospital. A memo from the Department of Homeland Security about Russian meddling in our upcoming election. ABC NEWS chief White House correspondent Jonathan Karl draft bulletin titled Russia Likely to denigrate Health of US candidates to influence 2020 election. Said intelligence analysts had determined with high confidence that Russia is trying to convince voters that Joe Biden isn't mentally fit to be president as evidence. The bulletin site stories by Russian controlled news outlets from September 2019 until May of this year. Claiming without evidence that Joe Biden's quote verbal miscues are symptoms of dementia. Bulletin, however, was never sent the Department of Homeland Security, saying it did not meet its standards. A new report today shows Americans were getting hired last month, but not enough of them to put a dent in pandemic layoffs. A survey by payroll processor ADP showing private companies in the U. S hired 428,000 workers in August. Economists had expected that number to be closer to 1,000,080 P said Most of the job growth came from big companies with more than 500 employees. Government is set to release its official August employment report on Friday. A teepee survey could raise concerns about the pace of the jobs recovery ahead of that report, though it hasn't always been a good predictor of the government's data. Elizabeth Chelsea ABC NEWS Washington saying it'll help stop the spread of the Corona virus. The CDC is announcing a sweet being moratorium on evictions due to job loss because of the pandemic. In Washington, Senate Republicans are also looking to introduce a scaled down Corona virus package next week. This is ABC News, All right time now to get outside and check traffic.

ABC News Joe Biden Department of Homeland Securit Russia Alexei Navalny Cheri Westin Washington nerve agent Nova Chuck CDC chief White House corresponden Elizabeth Chelsea Jonathan Karl US Senate coma Berlin hospital Germany England
"german government" Discussed on AP News

AP News

11:18 min | 2 years ago

"german government" Discussed on AP News

"Berlin police ordered a protest by people opposed to Germany's pandemic restrictions to disband off the participants refused to observe distancing roles thousands of people gathered in a show of defiance against the country's corona virus prevention measures protesters carried a wide range of grievance and banners proclaiming the opposition to vaccinations face moss and the German government in general prior to the protest the Berlin at regional government had sort of banned the protests citing rallies earlier this month what rules intended to stop the virus being spread weren't respected I'm sorry I shockingly

Germany German government Berlin
"german government" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"german government" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Unsuitable the German government had kept that secret so that was the the heart beat of the German anti nuclear movement that led to the nuclear power stays out in Germany and so by twenty twenty two the final reactor was shut down they're gonna replace not only nuclear but they're gonna replace most fossil fuel when when your bowls and efficiency and it'll take some years and even decades to completely phase out or largely phase out fossil fuel combustion but they're working on it and now the fourth largest economy on the planet we have more renewable resources in Germany by far we could do it too we just choose not to while we're talking to Kevin Kamps the radioactive waste specialist would be on nuclear dot org Kevin we got and forty five seconds or so hot we're working people outside are going to be on nuclear dot org which kind of get a given working people focus their activism on these issues man we really welcome help on fighting this New Mexico don we now have until July twenty first to try to break our own records from the past we generated nearly a hundred and fifty thousand comments against the New Mexico and Texas dumps in earlier stages of this proceeding and we'd love to break that record and show the NRC that they're not going to get away with it proving this thing so please visit our website yeah I'm good at org we'll try to have sample comment you can use and where to send and how to ask for one of these hearings where you live because the mobile Chernobyl issue getting it to New Mexico affects all of us.

Germany Kevin Kamps New Mexico Texas NRC twenty twenty
"german government" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"german government" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The German government is spending forty million euros on the anniversary celebrations in twenty twenty that they have in house is anticipating tens of thousands of visitors and similar numbers are expected in Vienna wed Beethoven spent most of his adult life what's perhaps less well known is that brand Beethoven was created really by the composer himself in his own lifetime in this program I'm gonna look at Beethoven the entrepreneur a an innovator ahead of his time obsessed with disrupting the status quo adapting to new markets sometimes even creating those new markets and driving change in virtually everything he touched but have been transformed music and all sorts of ways music printing publishing how musicians made their living not to mention the very instruments they played especially in the case of Beethoven's own instrument the piano on of classical music's best known Beethoven interpreted as is the pianist Stephen Hough Beethoven was someone who who strode out on his own I mean we really do get the sense that Beethoven was born as a time of incredible social change and it's it's the French Revolution is it it's the pollen is the industrial revolution everything was changing in so many ways and I think date of relish this you feel even from the earliest Beethoven pieces that he's pushing at the walls of the instrument his arms were bigger than the piano was I have this image of him like in a cage saying let me out my music is I have more to say than this instrument will allow me to say Beethoven was demanding from piano money fetches across Europe cannons with larger keyboards and more notes but also canons of a more robust the families that he had just went up to the job it's well documented that they haven't played his cameras so hard it would literally for the pots at this stage he was more famous for being a virtuoso performer than a composer with the reputation and a self.

German government Vienna Stephen Hough Beethoven Europe