4 Burst results for "Geraldine Mohan Geraldine"

"geraldine mohan geraldine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:57 min | 3 years ago

"geraldine mohan geraldine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Nikki daily the activists Alex Smith in the right and actress Stephanie prize now over now to another question. This one is from Geraldine Mohan Geraldine the last two referenda marriage equality and repeal the eighth amendment demonstrated. The power of direct action grassroots mobilization. How could this mobilization be maintained? And how can continue to be effective? That's a really good question. How do you keep the momentum going NICKY as someone who's been campaigning to promote women in motorsports? What would you say has worked for you? I think just awareness and visibility is a huge thing in my sports. You know, they've just launched the twenty by twenty campaign, which is a movement here in Arlington to increase the participation the awareness and the media coverage of women's sport by twenty percent by the year, twenty twenty and a huge part of that is bringing role models in the visibility of role models to the younger generation, and especially younger girls, and they have a tagline. That's if they can't see us, then they can't be. And I think in my sport and motorsport it couldn't be more true. Because it's such a small percentage of women that are involved in this. And I think from my own experience younger generations, especially girls. They don't even really know what motorsport is they've never seen a go-cart or they've no real experience of it. Unless they've been kind of brought up within the sport themselves, and Stephanie is a writer and actress uses Yuma does a help to engage people. It certainly makes you more palatable on creating characters. When I'm writing it's like when he says like what people see is important, it's crucial. When I was growing up, the president of Ireland was female, and I thought. A role for a woman. It was Mary Robinson, those maim athletes, and I just thought oh like the president is a woman I could be president. Because what you see is important. And then I was like all it could also be a man for that. That's so inverted in terms of how the narrative goals. And so it's something that I think about constantly when I'm writing when I'm creating which is what people see is important. So I put these two difficult girls with a difficult friendship on screen with canco bone cope and continuously oh came up against that. Can you make her more likable? No, I can't make more likable because she's not like willing. That's grand because some people just aren't like, you know, like I want to be able to measure myself against the characters that I'm seeing on screen and always feel like I'm not as good as them. You know, I want people to make dirty decisions of badgers and be messy and be difficult and still feel like they are worthy of of of love and their place in the world. And so in order to make people want to watch that car crash of a lifestyle. Infusing it with humor. I think gets people on site. I find an aggressive approach has never really helped me even though I can kind of naturally go that way. Deal. I wanna come to you. Now, I want to hear about your story. So you were born in Italy tissue Lincoln parents and then dipped in Sri Lanka Bahrain, and then moved to Ireland. What was your first impression of the emerald isle? I suppose why I was directed to move into Ireland's because it has living in Bahrain. I found most of my friends were Irish. And then somehow I saw river dance. And I thought. Repaid apart. I think it was Jean Butler. I think I have a massive crush on her. Imagine. She heard. I found myself moving to Ireland and really coincidentally the twenty four hours after my feet touched Irish soil. I found myself dancing down O'Connell street singing, it's raining men because it happened to be Dublin pride Italy was very conservative. Seventy. Bahrain. Let's talk very so when I came to Ireland it within twenty four hours, I found myself in broad daylight in the company of amazing individuals that are the Smith pride was still quite smart. But still nobody was throwing stones at us. And there was a real feeling of celebration. And I remember thinking my goodness. This is where I'm meant to be all the countries are lived in before they didn't give me the ability or even couldn't even feel that I could possibly fulfilled my full potential where in Ireland would the frustration four hours. I thought this place is amazing, and I can speak. I can be myself. And it's going to be great. And it was right? Well, you set up shop here as a successful broadcaster. I'm one of the only openly gay migrant voices on the radio, but things didn't work out because in two thousand seventeen another male presenter on your station made some questionable comments about a rape case. And you took a stand. Why was it so important to you deal to take that stand? First of all one of the reasons why I got into media was because all everything I do is firmly based on the fact that absolutely love island, and I feel I want to make a difference. I feel I want to make fun tradition after ten years of presenting a program that talked about social Justice and mental health this, of course, happened and my daughter exhibit was just a month old so many things have happened in my career in that particular station that I didn't feel I could speak out. But for some reason when my daughter came around, I realized I just couldn't live with myself because I know there's been many occasions in my life where I. Was not able to speak out. Exactly what our said vestige. I got as a woman as a young girl, I should not speak out. And when this happened I felt as a survivor of sexual abuse as a woman, I just felt it would have been absolutely hypocritical for me to go and present the show on social Justice and not take a stat. And I did. And I say, I probably one of the proudest things I've done in my life..

Ireland Bahrain Geraldine Mohan Geraldine Stephanie prize Alex Smith president Nikki Mary Robinson Jean Butler Dublin Arlington Italy tissue Lincoln twenty twenty rape Yuma writer Sri Lanka Italy
"geraldine mohan geraldine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:39 min | 3 years ago

"geraldine mohan geraldine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Child. You're listening to a special edition of the conversation. In Dublin I'm here with four move is in Shaka's, the journalists a mental health advocate dill fit Chroma singer, the hockey star motor sport engineer. Nikki daily the activists Elvis Smith the writer and actress Stephanie prize now even now to another question. This one is from Geraldine Mohan Geraldine the last two referenda merge equality and repeal the eighth amendment demonstrated. The power of direct action grassroots mobilization how can this mobilization being maintained? And how can it be continue to be effective? That's a really good question. How do you keep the momentum going and NICKY as someone who's been campaigning to promote women in motorsports? What would you say has worked for you? I think just awareness and visibility as a huge thing in my sports. You know, they've just launched the twenty by twenty campaign, which is a movement here in Ireland to increase the participation the awareness and the media coverage of women's sport by twenty percent by the year, twenty twenty and a huge part of that is bringing role models in the visibility of role models to the younger generation, especially younger girls, and they have a tagline. That's if they can't see us, then they can't Bs, and I think in my sport and motorsport it couldn't be more true. Because it's such a small percentage of women that are involved in this. And I think from my own experience younger generations, especially girls. They don't even really know what motorsport is they've never seen a go-cart or they've no real experience of it. Unless they've been brought up within the sport themselves and Stephanie as a writer and actress uses you might as a help to engage people. It certainly makes you suck more palatable one on creating characters. When I'm writing it's like when he says like, oh, people see is important, it's crucial. When I was growing up, the president of Ireland was female, and I thought. There's a role for a woman it was may Rumson those main athletes, and I just thought oh like the president is a woman could be president. You know because what you see is important. And then I was like all it could also be a man for that. That's so inverted in terms of how the narrative goals. And so it's something that I think about constantly when I'm writing when I'm creating which is what people see is important. So I put these two difficult girls with a difficult friendship on screen with canco bone cope and continuously came up against I can you make her more likable. No, I can't make more likable because she's not like ground for some people. Just like, you know, like I want to be able to not measure myself against the characters that I'm seeing on screen and always feel like I'm not as good as them. You know, I want people to make dirty decisions of badgers and be messy and be difficult and still feel like they are worthy of of of love and their place in the world. And so in order to make people want to watch that car crash of a lifestyle. Infusing it with humor. I think gets people on site. I find an aggressive approach has never really helped me even though I can kind of naturally go that way. Dill? I wanna come to you. Now, I want to hear about your story. So you were born in Italy tissue Lincoln parents and then lived in Sri Lanka Bahrain. And then moved to island. What was your first impression of the emerald isle? I suppose why I was tracked to move into Ireland's because living in Bahrain, I found most of my friends were Irish and then somehow river dance, and I thought. Part. I think it was Jean Butler a.

Ireland Geraldine Mohan Geraldine president Stephanie prize writer Bahrain hockey Dublin Jean Butler Shaka Nikki NICKY engineer Dill Elvis Smith Italy tissue Lincoln twenty twenty twenty percent
"geraldine mohan geraldine" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:26 min | 3 years ago

"geraldine mohan geraldine" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Dill Vic missing a hockey star motor sport engineer. Nikki daily the activists elder Smith and the writer and actress Stephanie prize now over now to another question. This one is from Geraldine Mohan Geraldine the last two referenda marriage equality and repeal the eighth amendment demonstrated. The power of direct action grassroots mobilization. How can this mobilization be maintained? And how can it be continued to be effective? That's a really good question. How do you keep the momentum going and NICKY as someone who's been campaigning to promote women in motorsports? What would you say has worked for you? I think just awareness and visibility is a huge thing in in my sports. You know, they've just launched the twenty by twenty campaign, which is a movement here in Ireland to increase the participation the awareness and the media coverage of women's sport by twenty percent by the year, twenty twenty and a huge part of that is bringing role models and the visibility of role models to the younger generation, and especially younger girls, and they have a tagline. That's if they can't see us than they can't be as and I think in my sport and motorsport, it couldn't be more true. Because it's such a small percentage of women that are involved in this. And I think from my own experience younger generations, especially girls. They don't even really know what motorsport is they've never seen a go-cart or they've no real experience of it. Unless they've been kind of brought up within the sport themselves and Stephanie as a writer and actress uses you may help to engage people. It certainly makes you more palatable when I'm creating characters on. When I'm writing it's like when he says like what people see is important, it's crucial. When I was growing up, the president of Ireland was female, and I thought. A role for a woman. It was Mary Robinson those maim athletes. And I thought oh like the president is a woman I could be president. Because what you see is important. And then I was like all it could also be a man for that. That's so inverted in terms of how the narrative goals. And so it's something that we think about constantly when I'm writing when I'm creating which is what people see is important. So I put these two difficult girls with a difficult friendship on screen with can't cowpoke and continuously came up against like, can you make her more likable? No, I can't make more like because she's not like ground because some people just aren't likable, you know, like I want to be able to measure myself against the characters that I'm seeing on screen and always feel like I'm not as good as them. You know, I want people to make dirty decisions of bad choices and be messy, and and be difficult and still feel like they are worthy of of of love and their place in the world. And so in order to make people want to watch that car crash of a lifestyle. Infusing it with humor. I think gets people on site. I find an aggressive approach has never really helped me even though I can kind of naturally go that way. Okay deal. I wanna come to you. Now, I want to hear about your story. So you were born in Italy tissue Lincoln parents and then lived in Sri Lanka Bahrain. And then moved to Ireland. What was your first impression of the emerald isle? I suppose why I was tracked to move into Anna's because as living in Bahrain, I found most of my friends were Irish. And then somehow I saw river dance. And I thought. I think it was Jean Butler. I have massive.

Ireland president Geraldine Mohan Geraldine Stephanie prize writer Bahrain Dill Vic hockey Jean Butler Mary Robinson Nikki NICKY engineer elder Smith Anna Italy tissue Lincoln twenty twenty twenty percent
"geraldine mohan geraldine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:44 min | 3 years ago

"geraldine mohan geraldine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Nikki daily activists Elvis Smith and the writer and actress Stephanie prize now over now to another question. This one is from Geraldine Mohan Geraldine the last referenda marriage equality and repeal the eighth amendment demonstrated. The power of direct action grassroots mobilization. How can this mobilization be maintained? And how can it be continued to be effective? That's a really good question. How do you keep the momentum going and NICKY as someone who's been campaigning to promote women in motorsports? What would you say has worked for you? I think just awareness and visibility is a huge thing in in my sports. You know, they've just launched the twenty by twenty campaign, which is a movement here in Ireland to increase the participation the awareness and the media coverage of women's sport by twenty percent by the year, twenty twenty and a huge part of that is bringing role models and the visibility of role models to the younger generation, and especially younger girls, and they have a tagline. That's if they can't see us, then they can't be. And I think in my sport and motorsport it couldn't be more true. Because it's such a small percentage of women that are involved in us. And I think from my own experience younger generations, especially girls. They don't even really know what motorsport is they've never seen a go-cart or if they've no real experience of it unless they've been kind of brought up within the sport themselves and Stephanie as a writer and actress uses Yuma. There's a help to engage people. It certainly makes you more palatable on creating characters on. When I'm writing it's like when he says like what people see is important, it's crucial. When I was growing up, the president of Ireland was female, and I thought. A role for a woman. It was Mary Robinson, those main fleets, and I thought oh like the president is a woman I could be president. You know because what you see is important. And then I was like all it could also be a man for that. That's so inverted in terms of how the narrative goals. And so it's something that I think about constantly when I'm writing when I'm creating which is what people see is important. So I put these two difficult girls with the difficult friendship on screen with canco bone cope and continuously I came up against I can you make her more likable. No, I can't make more like because she's not like well, and that's grand because some people just like, you know, like I want to be able to not measure myself against the characters that I'm seeing on screen and always feel like I'm not as good as them. You know, I want people to make dirty decisions of badge racism, be messy and be difficult and still feel like they are worthy of of love and their place in the world. And so in order to make people want to watch that car crash of a lifestyle. Infusing it with humor. I think gets people on site. I find an aggressive approach has never really helped me even though I can kind of naturally go that way. Okay deal. I wanna come to you. Now, I want to hear about your story. So you were born in Italy to Sri Lankan parents and then dipped in Sri Lanka Bahrain, and then moved to Ireland. What was your first impression of the emerald isle? I suppose why attracted to move into Ireland's. Because when I was living in Bahrain, I found most of my friends were Irish. And then somehow I saw river dance. And I thought. I think it was Jean Butler. I think I have a massive crush on her. Imagine. If you heard this. I found myself moving to Ireland and really coincidentally the twenty four hours after my feet touched Irish soil. I found myself dancing down O'Connell street singing, it's raining men because it happened to be doubling pride. Italy was very conservative very conservative barring. Let's talk very so when I came to Ireland it we didn't twenty four hours I found myself in broad daylight in the company of amazing individuals like Albert Smith pride was still quite small. But still nobody was throwing stones at us. And there was a real feeling of celebration. And I remember thinking my goodness. This is where I'm meant to be all the countries. I lived in before they didn't give me the ability or even couldn't even feel that I could possibly fulfill my full potential where in Ireland within the first twenty four hours. I thought this place is amazing, and I can speak. I can be myself. And it's going to be great. And I was right. Well, you set up shop here as a successful broadcaster. I'm one of the only openly gay migrant voices on the radio, but things didn't work out because in two thousand seventeen another male presenter on your station made some questionable comments about a rape case. And you took a stand. Why was it so important to you deal? Take that stand. First of all one of the reasons why I got into media was because all everything I do is firmly based on the fact that absolutely love, and I feel I want to make a difference. I feel I want to make fun tradition after ten years of presenting a program that talked about social Justice and mental health this, of course, happened and my daughter exhibit was just a month old so many things have happened in my career in that particular station that I didn't feel I could speak out. But for some reason when my daughter came around, I realized I just couldn't live with myself because I know there's been many occasions in my life where I. Was not able to speak out is exactly what our said that. I got as a woman as a young girl, I should not speak out. And when this happened I felt as a survivor of sexual abuse as a woman, I felt it would have been absolutely hypocritical for me to go and present a show. And so for Justice and not take a stand, and edit, and I'd say, I probably one of the proudest things I've done in my life. Just say there, can you know, I miss I know so many other people do I miss that program. And I missed voice precisely because she did do or up those things and the point is that no other radio station. Never mind TV is actually doing is really. So that we are with us, and it shows the depth of kind of ignorance under deliberate closing of the is to real difference and inequality in this country. So we've got to set up a new radio station. You heard it here. And I just have to say that we did news talk for a statement, but declined to comment. Time now for another question. This one is from Allison MacKenzie Addison. Questions for all the pattern after the recent abortion campaign and metoo movement. There was an inspiring minds of positive responses and this is so race. But there was also a lot of negative on sex abuse of comments and some boys. My may say, no, we're extremely critical an ignorant of any changes that are made. I find it difficult to translates into my everyday life as a young woman in Ireland especially coming from a rural town. The panel at any advice, and how to deal with this sort of Sachs's them just in everyday experience in Ireland. I was thinking I ask can you give us an example of what sort of sexism, you're encountering? Well. For example, when I was in secondary school icons, boys. Laugh, not me. And if I ever tried to make a point to try to speak in class, I was often laughed ash. And I find her to tell people how I feel when I'm at home because I just don't think that they want to listen they want to change. I think thank you. Alison, that's an excellent question. And yes, it's all well and good when you're in the center of Dublin with like minded people, but the pictures often quite different. Elsewhere stephanie. Coming to you. So those attitudes the city versus sort of rural towns, I mean, what are your thoughts on that? I'm also from rural town, and it is like comparing apples and oranges and people will say like auto mind them, but like the intestinal fortitude. It takes like the magnaminity up to someone to be like. Personally, I find that I use humor just making a joke that sort of undermines them and then walking away because I don't have it in me anymore to like try to educate other people, and that's not my job. And I just lost me. I try to first of all remember that. These are people who have like missed an evolutionary stage. I.

Ireland Stephanie prize Geraldine Mohan Geraldine president writer Italy NICKY Elvis Smith Jean Butler Mary Robinson twenty twenty Bahrain Sri Lanka rape Alison Dublin Allison MacKenzie Addison Yuma