23 Burst results for "Georgina Godwin"

"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:33 min | 3 weeks ago

"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Write that I <Speech_Male> was surprised that I could <Speech_Male> remember it in <SpeakerChange> its entirety <Speech_Male> but then <Speech_Male> music has that capacity <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Music_Male> once you hear it or <Speech_Music_Male> once you know it it <Speech_Music_Male> just you can <Speech_Music_Male> recall it much <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> more readily than <Speech_Male> names <SpeakerChange> even <Speech_Male> or <Speech_Male> faces. <Speech_Female> It somehow <Speech_Male> holds a place <Speech_Male> in our minds. <Speech_Male> We have a <Speech_Music_Male> kind of archive <Speech_Music_Male> actually of <Speech_Music_Male> music that <Speech_Music_Male> we don't <Speech_Music_Male> always know we have <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> until <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> it's triggered <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by something. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Yeah and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> how does it feel to be <Speech_Music_Male> representing Britain <Speech_Music_Male> on this <Speech_Music_Male> grand stage <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> at this <Speech_Music_Male> time in 2022? <Speech_Music_Female> I <Speech_Music_Female> am incredibly <Speech_Music_Male> nervous because <Speech_Music_Male> there's a cure people <Speech_Male> outside coming <Speech_Male> to see this <Speech_Music_Male> show and <Speech_Music_Male> I mean, of course it <Speech_Music_Male> was enormous <Speech_Music_Male> honor and I was <Speech_Music_Male> completely <Speech_Music_Male> shocked when they <Speech_Music_Male> gave me a call because <Speech_Music_Male> I didn't apply for <Speech_Music_Male> it. <Speech_Music_Male> They just gave me a call and <Speech_Music_Male> said we want you to know <Speech_Music_Male> there's a time of people <Speech_Male> who sat around and <Speech_Music_Male> said we <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> should give this this on your voice <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and it's like <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I have to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> admit and this is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> terrible. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> My first response was <Speech_Music_Male> why <Speech_Music_Male> because I could as like <Speech_Music_Male> why now <Speech_Music_Male> how did that happen? <Speech_Music_Male> I was a bit confused <Speech_Music_Female> but <Speech_Music_Female> I'm really <Speech_Music_Female> really <Speech_Male> pleased and honored <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> to have been <Speech_Music_Female> thought of by my <Speech_Music_Female> peers <Speech_Music_Female> to be <Speech_Music_Female> I don't want to <Speech_Music_Female> say worthy but to <Speech_Music_Female> be interesting enough <Speech_Music_Female> for <Speech_Female> this platform because it <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> the biggest platform within <Speech_Music_Male> the visual arts <Speech_Music_Male> being on. <Speech_Music_Male> I have come to the <Speech_Music_Male> pavilion <Speech_Music_Male> many, many times. I've <Speech_Music_Male> always just come <Speech_Music_Male> to see the shows to <Speech_Music_Male> see the artists that <Speech_Male> are biggest platform within <Speech_Music_Male> the visual arts <Speech_Music_Male> being on. <Speech_Music_Male> I have come to the <Speech_Music_Male> pavilion <Speech_Music_Male> many, many times. I've <Speech_Music_Male> always just come <Speech_Music_Male> to see the shows to <Speech_Music_Male> see the artists that <Speech_Male> are in those shows. <Speech_Male> So I'd never ever <Speech_Music_Male> looked at <SpeakerChange> the actual <Speech_Female> space before. <Speech_Female> That <Speech_Female> was the British artist <Speech_Female> Sonia Boyce <Speech_Female> in conversation with <Speech_Female> Monaco's Alexa <Speech_Female> itself. And you can hear <Speech_Female> their full conversation <Speech_Female> and many interviews <Speech_Female> with artists <Speech_Female> at the Biennale on <Speech_Female> this week's episode of <Speech_Female> monocot and culture. <Speech_Female> And that's all <Speech_Female> for today's program. <Speech_Female> Thanks to our producers <Speech_Female> MSL page Reynolds <Speech_Female> and Sophie monaghan <Speech_Female> coombs <Speech_Female> are researchers Lillian <Speech_Female> fawcett and Samson <Speech_Female> and bogu and our <Speech_Female> studio manager <Speech_Female> Christy Evans with <Speech_Female> editing assistance <Speech_Female> from Steph Chung. <Speech_Female> After the headlines, <Speech_Female> there's more music on <Speech_Female> the way, my chat <Speech_Female> with Chloe ashby <Speech_Female> a former monocle <Speech_Female> staffer who's just <Speech_Female> come out with her debut <Speech_Female> novel wet paint, <Speech_Female> and then we'll also be <Speech_Female> hearing from Ilya <Speech_Female> Leonard Pfeiffer, the Dutch <Speech_Female> author of <Speech_Female> grand hotel <Speech_Female> Europa. You can <Speech_Female> read all about him in <Speech_Female> the May issue of <Speech_Female> Monaco magazine <Speech_Female> and see pictures of <Speech_Female> our time together <Speech_Female> in Genoa. <Speech_Female> I'm Georgina Godwin, <Speech_Female> I'll return at the globalist <Speech_Female> at the same time <Speech_Music_Female> tomorrow. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> Thank you, for listening. <Music>

Sonia Boyce Sophie monaghan Christy Evans Steph Chung Chloe ashby Leonard Pfeiffer Monaco magazine Georgina Godwin Genoa
"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:43 min | 3 months ago

"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"The movie, James Bond shoots and kills a Chinese security guard. And that scene had to be removed from the film because Chinese leaders said it made China look weak. If that level of detail is being scrutinized, you can imagine how quickly we get to a place where no Hollywood movie has been put into production in a decade that has China as the villain. I wouldn't have now, you know, with relations so low between China and the west. Where you see this intertwining between the Communist Party of China and Hollywood, where you see this going in the next few years. I think that right now, as more and more focus is put on Hollywood's bending the Chinese rules, it puts the studio chiefs at odds with lawmakers frankly on both sides of the aisle. I spent some time when I was reporting this book in Kenya where there has been quite a bit of built in road activity. These gleaming new train stations. There's a railway running from inner Kenya to Mombasa. But what I was fascinated to learn is that there is also a program known as the 10,000 villages project, which is outfitting 10,000 African villages with low cost Chinese satellite dishes that Chinese movies and TV shows. One of the most remarkable moments in my entire life of reporting was walking into an apartment building outside of Nairobi on a Saturday afternoon and seeing a family watching a Chinese soap opera. That was Monaco's Chris lord speaking to Eric schwartzel author of red carpet Hollywood, China and the global battle for cultural supremacy. Now, just before we go a reminder of the date, it's February 14th, Valentine's Day. And if you're sick of all the cliched hype, there is a different way to mark the occasion. There's a new book out called anonymous sex. It's an elegant international anthology of erotica that explores the diverse spectrum of desire it's written by the bestselling winners of some of the most prestigious literary prizes. There are stories of sexual obsession and sexual love of domination and submission there is revenge sex unrequited sex, funny sex tortured sex fairytale sex and even sex in the afterlife, but the twist is that 27 stories or the authors listed but none of them with their names on the story. It's completely anonymous. So here you have these wonderful writers who have been liberated and set free. Well worth a listen, you can find it on Monaco reads on our website. And that's it for today's program. Thanks to our producers Emma Sel and Charlie film with court and to our studio manager, Christy Evans. I'm Georgina Godwin, Harvey back on the globalist at the same time tomorrow. Thanks for listening..

China Hollywood Kenya James Bond Chris lord Eric schwartzel Communist Party Mombasa Monaco Nairobi Valentine Emma Sel Charlie film Christy Evans Georgina Godwin Harvey
"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:53 min | 3 months ago

"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Of refugees arriving. And just because a lot of times, you know, refugees are portrayed very one sided very black and white on headlines. And to just share a story tell a story that gives some perspective to that because I mean start to place more than 20 years ago and also because it's told me inside of a friendship I hope that this story could give some nuance to what's going on right now and refugees arriving at our borders. I made a part of the film and of course, you know, it's such an important story to me. So every time it gets a nice review or gets in a wall somewhere, it's a further push to get out there and then to have a broader audience for the film. And I think it's just so important that we have these kind of stories out there that give some new ones to both the refugee and the gay experience and finding out. And just showing people how much people can carry around that you don't see normally. I'm of course thrilled that it gets a life up there. And as poor Rasmussen, the director of flea, which is out in cinemas today. And that's all for today's program. Thanks to our producers Reese James page Reynolds Emerson and Charlie filmer court are researchers Sophie monaghan's and Lillian fawcett, and our studio manager Nora hole with editing assistance by a dominant gozo. After the headlines, there's more music on the way, the briefing is live at midday in London and the globalist returns at the same time on Monday, which is, of course, Valentine's Day. And if you'd like some Valentine's appropriate listening, we'll do listen to Monaco reads where I've spoken to the editors of a short story collection called anonymous sex 27 short erotic stories by 27 different writers famous writers most of them only they never tell you which writer wrote which story. Lots and lots of room for experimentation there. I'm Georgina Godwin. Thank you, for listening..

Reese James Reynolds Emerson Charlie filmer Sophie monaghan Lillian fawcett Nora hole Rasmussen Valentine Monaco London Georgina Godwin
"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:33 min | 6 months ago

"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"That's a really big question. You see, I don't necessarily think art is there to provide a sense of hope. I know a lot of people do. They think it's a kind of failure of art if it's not pointing away forward. I've never really worked with that belief. I see art as a record rather. I see the job of a novel to present as accurately as possible a picture of how things are rather than a picture of how things ought to be. The way things ought to be is always a signpost to hope in the future, but I don't think it's the duty of a writer to point the way forward. There's, I don't know. The other way is for people to be hopeful. I think artists there to help us see things more clearly. That was this year's Booker prize winner. Damon galgate in conversation with me yesterday. And if you had to Monica reads on our website, you can hear the full interview with Damon, who was just fascinating on what it means to be a white writer from Africa and many things to do with his politics. As you might know, ANC just suffered shocking defeats in the municipal elections. And you can also look out for shortlisted author Richard powers on meet the writers at noon on Sunday. That's all for this program. Thanks to our producers color to rubella, page Reynolds Daniel bate and Charlie from the court are researchers surfing monaghan coombs and lilian faucet and our studio manager nor a hole. There's more music on the way, the briefing is live at midday in London and the globalist returns at the same time on Monday. I'm Georgina Godwin, thanks for listening..

Damon galgate Damon Monica Richard powers Daniel bate ANC monaghan coombs lilian faucet Africa Charlie Georgina Godwin London
"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:10 min | 9 months ago

"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"We will not forgive. We will not forget we will hunt you down make you pay defend our interests in our people with every measure at my command. These american service members who gave their lives so overused word but it's totally appropriate were heroes multiple explosions rocks the area outside kabul's airport yesterday as western countries race to complete a massive evacuation of their citizens and afghan allies following the taliban takeover of the country. According to afghanistan's ministry of public health more than sixty afghans are dead and at least one hundred forty have been wounded while thirteen. Us service members were killed in the deadly blast. Such go hell visiting teacher at the london. School of economics and political science is on the line a such an thanks for joining us. Can you explain the sequence of events yesterday. Well it seem stat. This was a coordinated terrorist attack involving two suicide bombers won the targeted the airport specifically and another targeted at a hotel which was adjoining The airport it's also believed that the terrorist group isis k. An affiliate to isis a coordinated. This attack itself and it had to poppas to kill off guns and tolls kill a coalition troops and sadly unfortunately disturbingly. It achieved both objectives. And two we have an updated casualty and death count. Well disturbing again. The numbers just keep growing in terms of casualties and fatalities it was a very powerful coordinated attack. These individuals went to the thickest pod crowds they also specifically targeted the perimeter off the app. Or where they knew. Us troops were based which meant that. There was intelligence. They had done their reconnaissance. This wasn't just some sort of spontaneous sporadic

midori house georgina godwin joe biden kabul Us london baghdad middle east bismarck germany hallett dean australia cricket
U.S. And Britain Warn People to Avoid Kabul Airport

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:43 min | 9 months ago

U.S. And Britain Warn People to Avoid Kabul Airport

"A number of nation. Say there is a high threat of a terrorist attack ads couple airports and have warned their citizens not to travel there australia. The us and uk shoot alerts to their citizens. Those already outside. The airports have been advised to leave the area immediately. So what other things currently like in the country. Melissa fung is a canadian journalist filmmaker and author back in two thousand and eight. She was captured by the taliban and held hostage. Melissa's recently returned to afghanistan to make a film about women therefore aljazeera here is what she told monocle. Twenty four so. Georgina godwin about her efforts to help afghan women. I feel so helpless right now. Just trying to get some my friends on the last flight to canada and being told that the taliban not allowing any afghan nationals into the airport only people with foreign passports or allowed even if you have a letter of these from canada you can't get on that plane you can't get into the airport and so i just feel so i just feel so helpless and so it's personal. These women are my friends. I care about them. They're scared they're in hiding. And i can't help them right now. And it's just been really emotional and frustrating couple weeks since the taliban took the country. And i'm not the only one feeling this one day. Somebody who write the story of this community of women around the world networking trying feverishly to get their friends out. And we're all heartbroken. That's the bottom

Melissa Fung Georgina Godwin Taliban Melissa Australia Canada Afghanistan UK United States
Taliban Crush Opposition Across Afghanistan, as Chaos Builds at Airport

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:05 min | 9 months ago

Taliban Crush Opposition Across Afghanistan, as Chaos Builds at Airport

"Let's sally. Takeover of afghanistan has post more questions than it has on stirred the insurgency groups. Promise that the country would no longer be a violent basil filtering hollow. As at least three people were short and killed at a protest in jalalabad. Senior taliban leaders also say afghanistan under their watch will not be a democracy. Mas will be ruled by sharia law will earlier. Today monaco's georgina godwin spoke to helene o'donnell a columnist for foreign policy magazine who witnessed to the changes in the country firsthand. She and tour photographer. Who recently left kabul for the netherlands. Let seventy seven. I was in herat the west and a couple of weeks ago. And i was there to cover what seemed to be at the taliban is sold it was actually taliban incursion into The western city of herat. It's very big important. Wealthy part of the country. I spent time on the front lines with a called ishmael. Khan who since given oak And he was working at the time with his militia alongside Soldiers on the national security directed afghanistan's who do how do we know a former perhaps secret service. And i watched them really losing and i thought i tried to get out up to two days. My plan had been forty eight hours. I was there for five days. Because the taliban taking the road to the airport the airport was causing. It was very difficult. And i decided dan event as was watching the reality of herat full. That tyrod was a big step towards kabul and that it was time to make arrangements to leave an i. I can't tell you how lucky. I was in my tiny because via flight that i took out We've my friend and colleague westwood hosseini the pulitzer prize winning photographer from afghanistan. Who i've been working with for a decade It was the last commercial flight wheels up on sunday morning.

Taliban Afghanistan Georgina Godwin Helene O'donnell Foreign Policy Magazine Herat Jalalabad Kabul Monaco The Netherlands Tyrod Khan Westwood Hosseini DAN Pulitzer Prize
"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

"This is monocle reads on Georgina Godwin, , and today I'm speaking to sue Armstrong Science writer broadcaster and a foreign correspondent. . He's worked everywhere from Brussels to South Africa. . She's been a consultant writer for the World Health Organization for more than twenty five years and written extensively on all areas of health and science. . Her latest book is borrowed time the Science of how and why we age. . Sue Welcome to the program. . Thank you very much and be with you if we could start with a really basic question what is aging? ? You say it's a really basic question. . It's a very good question but I mean, that's , it's really difficult to know because there lots of different definitions and they keep changing over the years. . Very interesting. . Actually some people say, , Oh, , it's dying from the inside out some people say it's genetically driven. . Some people say it's just wear and tear some people actually even go far as to say aging is a disease and I remember the first time I heard somebody say that I wrote my eyes and thought. . Oh goodness. . It's like everything else like birth and things like that. . The scientists are coming in and medicalising the whole thing. . But in fact, , I came round to seeing their point of view on that to quite an extent by the end of my interviewing and so on. . But basically, , it happens to all of us but one of the great mysteries of aging is the fact that you look at a whole range of different species in so many different lifespans including some creatures. . which seemed to be almost immortal things like that it'll hydra that we used to find when in pond water and look at under the microscope and sort of early biology lessons and so on. . I'm to be almost immortal. . So it's to a great extent. . It's a mystery and there are still quite a number of different theories of what exactly it is. . So let's look at the impact that it has on the body and the diseases that is ultimately responsible for. . Yes I think going back to this whole question about what is aging. . This also comes down to the diseases I think the definition that's most or the explanation that's most widely accepted at the moment is one called. . The disposable Soma theory, , which basically translates into ordinary language as built in obsolescence, , and how it works is this that it takes an awful lot of energy and resources to build and maintain a body such as and in the end nature doesn't care about US individuals are tall nature. . Whole purpose is to ensure the survival of the species, , not us as individuals, , and so most of the effort goes into ensuring that our Jones sells the sperm and the are immortal and can get passed on from one generation to the next and our bodies nature's invested in the sort of. . Mechanisms for repair and maintenance to keep us going to we've grown up being able to pass on our genes and bring up the next generation nurture the next generation to it's on its feet, , and then after that may Chazan got too much use for us and the repair mechanisms in our body, , which is I say are extremely expensive in terms of resources and so on. . Resources would have been very difficult to come by in our earliest for our earliest ancestors, , those sort of rundown, , and it is the gradual loss of maintenance inefficiency of maintenance and repair that seems to be at the root of aging. . So now, , a lot of the research seems to be lumped in with pseudoscience, , snake oil cosmetics, , and so on. . Why do you think that is? ? Well I think. . That's been a terrible problem for Gerontology, , the actual science of aging because it is lumped in and it's got to be stigmatized by the snake oil salesman and saw and I think very basic this since time immemorial I mean, if , you look back over centuries, , people have always wanted to find the Elixir of youth and I think to a certain extent. . It's that life is so rich and sweet. . That people can't bear the idea of dying and a also as a as a species. . We're fairly arrogant. . We don't like to think that we are awful and I think it's it's been the search for immortality. . This has given the Gerontology a bad name and you know it's it's really it's really a very sad because aging is massively important because you were just asking a minute ago about the diseases. . Of Aging, , and as I said earlier, , there's some people actually call aging itself disease, , and this is because the diseases that we know that we recognize very much age related things like heart disease and dementia and cancers, , and diabetes, , and strokes, , and frailty the single biggest risk factor for all of these these diseases that we recognize very much as diseases voltage is the aging process itself. . It's literally sort of. . Wearing away of the body that gives rise to these diseases, , and so you could save the diseases of old age are in a way just the sort of points on a spectrum, , the most the most obvious and severe points on a spectrum of what is a generally debilitating and pathological process, , which is the aging process.

Georgina Godwin writer Armstrong Science World Health Organization Brussels South Africa consultant
Interview with Sue Armstrong

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

05:20 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Sue Armstrong

"This is monocle reads on Georgina Godwin, and today I'm speaking to sue Armstrong Science writer broadcaster and a foreign correspondent. He's worked everywhere from Brussels to South Africa. She's been a consultant writer for the World Health Organization for more than twenty five years and written extensively on all areas of health and science. Her latest book is borrowed time the Science of how and why we age. Sue Welcome to the program. Thank you very much and be with you if we could start with a really basic question what is aging? You say it's a really basic question. It's a very good question but I mean, that's it's really difficult to know because there lots of different definitions and they keep changing over the years. Very interesting. Actually some people say, Oh, it's dying from the inside out some people say it's genetically driven. Some people say it's just wear and tear some people actually even go far as to say aging is a disease and I remember the first time I heard somebody say that I wrote my eyes and thought. Oh goodness. It's like everything else like birth and things like that. The scientists are coming in and medicalising the whole thing. But in fact, I came round to seeing their point of view on that to quite an extent by the end of my interviewing and so on. But basically, it happens to all of us but one of the great mysteries of aging is the fact that you look at a whole range of different species in so many different lifespans including some creatures. which seemed to be almost immortal things like that it'll hydra that we used to find when in pond water and look at under the microscope and sort of early biology lessons and so on. I'm to be almost immortal. So it's to a great extent. It's a mystery and there are still quite a number of different theories of what exactly it is. So let's look at the impact that it has on the body and the diseases that is ultimately responsible for. Yes I think going back to this whole question about what is aging. This also comes down to the diseases I think the definition that's most or the explanation that's most widely accepted at the moment is one called. The disposable Soma theory, which basically translates into ordinary language as built in obsolescence, and how it works is this that it takes an awful lot of energy and resources to build and maintain a body such as and in the end nature doesn't care about US individuals are tall nature. Whole purpose is to ensure the survival of the species, not us as individuals, and so most of the effort goes into ensuring that our Jones sells the sperm and the are immortal and can get passed on from one generation to the next and our bodies nature's invested in the sort of. Mechanisms for repair and maintenance to keep us going to we've grown up being able to pass on our genes and bring up the next generation nurture the next generation to it's on its feet, and then after that may Chazan got too much use for us and the repair mechanisms in our body, which is I say are extremely expensive in terms of resources and so on. Resources would have been very difficult to come by in our earliest for our earliest ancestors, those sort of rundown, and it is the gradual loss of maintenance inefficiency of maintenance and repair that seems to be at the root of aging. So now, a lot of the research seems to be lumped in with pseudoscience, snake oil cosmetics, and so on. Why do you think that is? Well I think. That's been a terrible problem for Gerontology, the actual science of aging because it is lumped in and it's got to be stigmatized by the snake oil salesman and saw and I think very basic this since time immemorial I mean, if you look back over centuries, people have always wanted to find the Elixir of youth and I think to a certain extent. It's that life is so rich and sweet. That people can't bear the idea of dying and a also as a as a species. We're fairly arrogant. We don't like to think that we are awful and I think it's it's been the search for immortality. This has given the Gerontology a bad name and you know it's it's really it's really a very sad because aging is massively important because you were just asking a minute ago about the diseases. Of Aging, and as I said earlier, there's some people actually call aging itself disease, and this is because the diseases that we know that we recognize very much age related things like heart disease and dementia and cancers, and diabetes, and strokes, and frailty the single biggest risk factor for all of these these diseases that we recognize very much as diseases voltage is the aging process itself. It's literally sort of. Wearing away of the body that gives rise to these diseases, and so you could save the diseases of old age are in a way just the sort of points on a spectrum, the most the most obvious and severe points on a spectrum of what is a generally debilitating and pathological process, which is the aging process.

Georgina Godwin Writer United States Armstrong Science World Health Organization Brussels Diabetes South Africa Consultant Jones Salesman
"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

"Guest. Today is a Slovenian philosopher and writer whose vast catalogue of work because earned him celebrity status across the globe, radical leftist, his work compasses, everything from psychoanalysis and political theory to art and film. Criticism Hegel in a wired brain evaluation of the German philosophers relevant in the twenty first century, tying in the two hundred fiftieth anniversary of his birth is his latest book. Saliva Jack Welcome to meet the rices. I'm here. Thanks very much. Now listen, you've been called the Elvis of cultural theory, the most dangerous philosopher in the West and I'm keen to know how you go from your birth in Louisiana through film studies and writing copy fat, but convince fit to this revered status in in the philosophical and academic world, so let's stop them in the former Yugoslavia. Tell us about your home. Life and the influence is there on you as as a child is an incredible story. Place Myself, but how might Chedda experiences in Oak Yugoslavia? We're really a blessing in disguise. I won't. At the university? Being attacked as <unk> after I finished my studies, I wasn't able to get a job, but after tutoring here so unemployment they put me into a research institute, which was basically opposed, gave me of the freedom of it was that she needs who dabbled and. So. You know is out of Communist <unk> was other the freedom that I needed I sat through. The West connections I in frowns then in the UK in United States, also another thing you can sign me communist kind but communism we don't opened walks the west, and I saw the big thing in my life was debt. Early seventies late sixties nineteen shakes ditch and I was in my studies. The scene was dominated in republic Slovenia by on drunken, <unk> fundamentalist on the other hand. Frank with school much then there was defense right of a disaster local. Rochon journalism and the younger generation immediately found a way that. Also Changed Yugoslavia was open towards the West. We didn't have any usuals in the sense of Oh my go- democracy we meeting. Everything will train <unk> usually about socialism, but also no illusions about Western democracies combat in an ideal. I, did so it's not me. It's also whole group of people. I was listening to lock you on, but now other sound following me getting international recognition. It was an incredible luck. You know when French asked me. What would you be if you were to get your boats? After finishing, your starts may honestly clear. I moved to an unknown professor in this fee. troll over country called. Slovenia own, <unk>. It's not a joke. Thanks communist oppression I Orient Myself. The roads are I was I must admit this incredibly lucky. Tell me about your movie making stint shaky. Joe People think it's some kind of both modern joke and so on, but you know many of might be nervous <unk> so in the wrong I cannot walks myself. It's not a joke for more than half a minute on beverages guide <unk> overdose. Documentary movies that are made until note I am. To meet I shake, or my gestures <unk> especially soccer snow, because seeking all the time, so people can see me. The mathematically covet positive until if you don't get me, you have everything that you need to know.

Yugoslavia Frank writer Hegel Georgina Godwin Louisiana Slovenia UK United States
"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

07:20 min | 2 years ago

"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

"Stephanie Scott Welcome to meet the writers. Hydrogen thank you so much for having me. It's it's lovely to speech I'm sorry. It's not in person. I just need to stop by saying I loved this book, and it was the perfect kind of lockdown distraction, a wonderful sort of through under love story that just just kept me absolutely engaged to thank you for that all. Thank you, thank you so much. That's wonderful to hear and I glad you enjoyed. The multi genre aspects I was very attached to them when drafting. Yeah, let's let's start at the beginning. Tell me about your own background I. Well, I am half Indian half. British and my family from Singapore we off the generation Singapore, and so that's where you grew up. And that's yes. I was born in. Singapore and I grew up. That and my family still live there now and. It was actually I think my family experiences from both the British and the Asian sides in the Second World War and their experiences with Japan and the Japanese that led me to you. Begin to think that I could perhaps. Write this novel. In that during the Second World War, my Asian family were. In malaria when the Japanese invaded on that by schools, and took the peninsula and Singapore, and they had to hide in the rubber plantations, and my Indian Singapore. Singaporean grandma actually the friend did a Japanese soldier, and taught him English and my grandfather Rochat guide to learn Japanese because you couldn't walk onto the occupation unless you spoke Japanese so both my Asian grandparents learned, and then my English Grand Parent Grandfather for the Japanese in Burma and we've lost lost a great uncle to the death railway in Thailand as well and so they had very different experiences, but growing up in Singapore. Particularly, there is A. Those assassination with Japan that has shifted very much. Since the ocupation and Japanese culture is extremely popular and. Present that are actually we have Japanese supermarkets and. allotted influences and the more I spoke to Japanese friends of mine. Actually, the more I saw similarities between never not bringing and and my licensing. And do you speak Japanese? I don't speak it badly. I have Japanese go children and I can communicate with them, but the seven year old has surpassed me now and seen the four year old will too, and then my humiliation will be complete But but I am interested I am very interested in in S -nology, and and and in the Japanese language. I mean to say linguistically. My Romance languages stronger, but I still I still very interested in the study of Japanese Nara session. What's written characters that have? Multiple Meanings and tremendous resonance that I explore the novel I. I thought it was impossible to. Ignore that and actually I didn't want to. We'll suggested to me by someone that I just using Schwartz but. I, I! Really didn't want to. There are for example the word landscaping in Japanese means, something quite different. I mean I could have just said landscape in English, but in Japanese

Singapore Japan Indian Singapore Georgina Godwin Stephanie Scott malaria Thailand Burma
Robert Mugabe will have private burial at national Heroes' Acre

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:48 min | 2 years ago

Robert Mugabe will have private burial at national Heroes' Acre

"Last week's death of former former Zimbabwean tyrant Robert Mugabe at the age of ninety five presented his country with a problem if from the worst problem with which Mugabe presented Zimbabwe during he's later decades of deranged misrule. How does one commemorate the passing of a figure who was both hero and villain in Mugabe's case indeed both with the founder and destroyer of his nation after an amount of agonizing it has now been decided that Mugabe will be interred in the National Heroes Acre in Harare Laura a public memorial ceremony will be held on Sunday one joined in the studio with more on this bond monocle twenty regular Georgina Godwin Georgina as our listeners are probably aware you are yourself Zimbabwean and I remember we spoke at the time of Mugabe's removal by coup data at how we had that atwells that he was no longer enough and what an I guess a big mental adjustment that was for generations of Zimbabweans. How are we is it adjusting to the fact that he's no longer here at all. You know I think people feel slightly cheated in a way that he went out really with a bit of a whimper not a bang that we and indeed he probably expected and he's no longer there but I gather that in his last few months. He wasn't all there mentally anyway. If you look at the photograph few months well I I mean from when he started wearing you know dribbles and chuck suits but and obviously as you point out his his last years were were he was in the grip of definitely something probably dementia but for him to be dead is something that's quite odd because what you're seeing in Zimbabwe's as you alluded to is people wanting still to hate him but also really wanting to acknowledge the role that he played in in in the formations the country and say so there's quite a lot of them big dichotomy between how people feel because us as I think we discussed at the time if Mugabe is say had sort of cheerfully stepped down from office circa the late eighties and sort of idled into a retirement of giving elections and writing books he would be regarded as one of the twentieth century's heroic figures wouldn't they completely and utterly and he would have got a hero's funeral. Oh hang on the funeral which does prompt the question though that who who turns up for Mugabe's Hero's funeral thousands of people have been attending the lying in state. At referrers stadium in Harari who still is Mugabe's constituency well at the formal proceedings. You'll have a lot of heads of state state. I think Cyril Ramaphosa is coming from South Africa and various other people from from around the continent impacts further afield but in terms of ordinary people what generally happens in in in situations like this is that people have Boston and their promised food and those are the two things that people have that they don't have any fuel in Zimbabwe so they wouldn't be able to get there by themselves. They don't have the money money for bus fare and they're desperate to eat so if you promise people all of that they will turn up much. I mean I'm sympathetic to an extent extent or to this extent with the current Zimbabwean government. You have to acknowledge his passing some how you have to do something if not not what is being done what other suggestions have people made there was an argument of course to whether he should be buried in National Heroes Acre. But where else would you put him well. He is family. It appeared wanted him buried in his home area of Qatar which is where he comes from and I think would have been one way around it but it appears that the government was really pushing to have him in heroes. Acre which apparently he had not wanted himself. There was another really interesting piece of not not legislation but something else he put in his will. I think which was that his wife Grace Mugabe was to stay with the casket at all times until he was buried therefore what he's doing doing that is guaranteeing her starring role in his final Hurrah. Do you get the sense that the current government and we should remind ourselves that the current President Emmerson Mnangagwa was for many years Zimbabwe's Robert Mugabe's kind of conciliatory if you will are they trying to reanimate the myth of Mugabe the liberator to to their own ends. I think that that would certainly serve a purpose that the end but I mean at the same time time. Mugabe's very useful is somebody that you can up lay all the blame on and say look it wasn't us it was the previous guy where clean we're going forward and of course that's what the what Managua A and his cronies would like us to think that this is a completely new dispensation. It really isn't make no mistake.

Robert Mugabe Cyril Ramaphosa Zimbabwe Georgina Godwin Georgina Acre Harare Emmerson Mnangagwa Managua Founder Harari Boston President Trump South Africa Qatar
"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"This week Kensington here in London is playing host to London's book for while wandering around. It monocle resident bookworm do Georgina Godwin took took caught up with the man Booker international. Judge Maureen freely to hear more about the price. We just did our job, and we put together the thirteen books that we thought were most interesting. Why are people fascinated by your choices? I think that it's partly that we somehow managed without design to have writers from twelve different countries out of thirteen books. So that's one thing and that happened all by itself. And another thing that happened all by itself is for us from our point of view is that almost all of the books are from independent publishers. And so that's quite amazing because it's very unusual for small independent publishers to get a look-in on price lists when I judge the predecessor of the independent Booker that's foreign fiction prize. And that would have been about twelve years ago thirteen years ago. It was not the case. And I remember that we looked at our shortlist in some embarrassment to see that almost more than half of them were published by Christopher Michael hosts and. I think it was before he had his own imprint, but he was such a powerful force in promoting fiction and translation that it wouldn't have been a surprise. But was embarrassing because we were just talking about the books, we weren't looking at to publish at all I in the years since I think when I was judging the foreign fiction prize back in the naughtiest bit not the thing that was to be opened for me was how interesting new growing, independent sector was and as a novelist I felt that they were collectively could collectively putting out more interesting books, then they market driven marketing departments dominated main publishers at the time. So I started looking to them for company..

Booker London Georgina Godwin Christopher Michael Maureen thirteen years twelve years
"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

03:50 min | 3 years ago

"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"Indeed, it does this takes. It's a bit of a very simple ballot. Which you don't see that those days in the chart side. They're kind of hip hop track or EDM. I mean, it's it's underwhelming. But she's very popular from row today. And she does lot of covert especially from pink songs as well. Good. Does she do them in Dutch in erase thinking both both because this is the very real risk of setting many Dutch listeners while I admire the Netherlands hugely as a nation and a people, and indeed culture, I am unpersuaded that it's in many respect memorable language is necessarily suited to put music. Maybe not to hip hop because it can be a tiny bit harsh language. So may being hip hop team. My work better is this you'll seamless intro into what's number three in the Netherlands, which is a combination of load of talent you have been current. Jona Fraser and remarks the song through which is dripped. We'll. Bowed how could fail the oven fantastic. Coating. Someone attend to introduce not merely. The Dutch language, but the piano, accordion to hip hope. Easy refrained owed through through you know, and the vehicle is quite funny as if they make fun of that film will Farell the anchorman. So fun of the a film, which was about making the world has got to met. That was definitely that was an accordion Fernando. Do. You know, the joke about what you throw to a drowning accordionist no his accordion. What what's it? If you like the cheap more for you. If is doing a lot of work has been more gangster from what can kill. It's it's Frenna featuring Moulavi with Vero which means viral. Let's. Fool me. Yeah. I mean, I it's it's so far it's been in the mean, but don't worry on the world is is a good watered. Well, it's I think I could see it being the entry for Eurovision for examples. Good as that good. The number one song in the Netherlands this week already. Tipped by monocle revision disc chief another Augusta per oh. As a potential duck Eurasian entry is Walt. It's crisscross Amsterdam there three of producers, featuring Mon and Tabitha and busy as well. In the songs. Call high is fun. My or is mind. If that is the sheer vision entry Fernando is going to come seventeenth if it's lucky though, no bad for twenty three. Listen, I think that's the better. So that's doing that made me happier. You know? And I and the the work from criss cross quite a good producers there internet's good. Well, let's quote for the posters. Schick? Oh, thank you. As always for bringing us, the global counter listening to the daily on monocle twenty four. And that is your lot for today's edition of the monocle daily. The show was produced by Marcus hippy, and Tom holder searches definitely Condie's and may Lee Evans studio manager was Christie Evans these day weekend dishes. He nine hours from now with Georgina Godwin the daily returns at the same time Monday twenty two hundred London, I'm Andrew Mullah. Thanks for listening and have a terrific weekend.

the Netherlands Fernando Christie Evans Jona Fraser Georgina Godwin Mon Walt Schick Andrew Mullah Marcus hippy Augusta Amsterdam London Tabitha Condie Tom holder nine hours
"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

02:52 min | 3 years ago

"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"In terms is going on in the Italian media as well, very popular crime series, cold Montalban, oh is soon to a with an episode dedicated to migrant boats, and this is a huge, but it's cool topic right now in Italy. And the very FOX that we don't even know what denial of the episode is going to be a very that. This this very popular TV show. It's it's tweet. Should it's popular across the political spectrum will even tackle this issue has created enormous debate in in the media. So I like to think that cultural artifacts that can be approached and and feel parallel to the normal political debate ten touch people in different ways. So I don't know if they will shift policy, but I like to believe that they can have effect on people who wouldn't normally be receptive to certain degrees in certain themes, drew from the point of view of a non astray. Alien such as yourself. Does it strike you that whatever you may or may not think of stray Leah's asylum policies in this respect, it's it's handled the messaging badly because this is the thing that occurs to me at least in it doesn't get covered. Certainly in the international media is that stroll, you're actually does okay. In taking asylum seekers and refugees in two thousand and fifteen sixteen. It was thirteen thousand seven hundred fifty an additional twelve thousand from Syria and Dirac, whereas the the view of a struggle that tends to get projected Czyz of this absolutely rigidly inhospitable place. You might wasn't aware of this is an indeed I'm surprised I just do here. The general media view that Australia has this blanket policy that nobody gets in an I think awarding a prize light. This is useful. Because it highlights that message. It gets the discussion going it makes fucks like come out more. But I also think that we're I an Australian writer, I might be slightly dismayed by this that in fact, somebody who was not eligible in any way for this prize one it I haven't read the book, it might be a fantastic piece of lich drive. No doubt that it is it wouldn't obviously have one. But of course, there's got to be a little bit of politicking behind it. If you look at 'em. So on the shortlist was Gail Jones who quick plug for the program. Meet the writers previous guests, also Kim Scott who's also been on the program. Now, he's an indigenous Australian writer, and it's very vocal for for indigenous people in Australia, and I think that there is a lot of work to be done in highlighting that section of literature perhaps before going on to to. The things that really can't be changed. Georgina Godwin, Ben Ryland and Kiara melody speaking to me earlier, you listening to the daily do stay tuned. Tomorrow's edition of the foreign desk. Takes an extended look at Venezuela a country, which has recently suffered shortages of many Staples..

Kim Scott Australia writer Leah FOX Ben Ryland Italy Gail Jones Georgina Godwin Syria Venezuela Kiara melody
"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

04:39 min | 3 years ago

"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"I'm Andrew Miller on today show seriously considering running for president as a centrist independent, and I wanted to clarify the word independent which view merely as a designation on the ballot. How well you. Equivocal response to Howard Schultz his plans to run for president my guests. Ben Ryland, Georgina Godwin and Kiara Ramona will be discussing this and the day's other top stories, including Zimbabwe's depressing failure to improve a year and more after the removal of Robert Mugabe, the unlikely winner of a strain the is richest literary prize and arguably even less likely media startup that's all coming up on the Dory. House monocle twenty four right now. And world consumer Dory. House. My guest today are monocle twenty four Georgina Godwin, Kiara removal, and Ben Ryland. Welcome all and we will start tonight in the United States and this week suggestion by former Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz that he might have a crack at the presidency. Presumably on the assumption that runs for the job by billionaire businessman with no experience of elected office have always worked out. So well before Mr Scholz also appears set on running as an independent candidate doubtless with a view to bequeathing the same sort of legacy to progressive politics for which Ralph NADA and Jill Stein. Both so fund -ly remembered today Kiara first of all how how excited are we by the prospect of Howard Schultz, former Starbucks CEO running for president. I think I speak for my fellow gentlest at the table right now in saying that we're probably not excited because as you rightly highlighted right there. There's a. I don't really think this is the right moment for billionaire without particular political experience be running for presidency. However, I've got to say the all of this possibly because I come from European specifically Italian political background. I can see the appeal of breaking be partisan situation. So staunchly ingrained does is in America. Whether this is the right person to be doing this right now. I don't know Bennett's. It's it's touching verging on quaint that Mr Schulz seems actually surprised by the coast to coast clamor of OD gold knows that has attended. He's announcement of his plans. It is I didn't expect that to settle in in Mr Schulz's mind, quite so quick given that he's traveled this fall without sensing the wind at all I was having a bit of a chat to Jonathan Chait a New York magazine yesterday, and he wrote a wonderful take-down of shelters self-delusion. Let's call. It that to be polite, and he was remarking on how he thinks that shields has made it this fall simply because he surrounded himself with high paid consultants who are willing to tell him exactly what he wants to hear. Because of course, their entire existence their employment existence is resting upon shields continuing to believe that he has a shot at the presidency. And I think that explains a lot of the remarkably bizarre things that he said all over he's meteor appearances this week one of my personal favorites was when he pointed out to the hosts of morning Joe that that there about forty two percent of American voters who identify themselves as independents with well at the same time seeming to fail to grasp that identifying yourself as an independent doesn't mean you part of some sort of other party called the independent party, which he's just parachute himself into as the as the current leader. They could be they could be on the far side of the left on the fall side of the right? They could be anywhere on the political spec. Tremain then not going to simply say, oh, look there's shields. He's an independent. That's me over for him in fairness to how short safari could afford to surround myself with people who spent all day telling me always up -solutely, bloody. Listen should be the leader of the free world. I totally would instead on stuck with you people. Georgina. I've never done quite well to think about this. Because obviously one of the great marvels of American democracies that anybody can have a lash running for president if they feel like it. But if you are somebody who has serious money series heft and series chance of actually treating a bit of attention, perhaps some votes. Do you have a responsibility to worry about splitting the vote because because there is of course, the argument that Ralph Nodar effectively gave the two thousand election to George W Bush that Jill Stein gave the two thousand sixteen one to Donald Trump. But are they not entitled to run for the job?.

Howard Schultz president Mr Schulz Georgina Godwin Ben Ryland Starbucks Tremain Jill Stein Kiara removal CEO Kiara Ramona Robert Mugabe Kiara Andrew Miller Mr Scholz Jonathan Chait Zimbabwe Donald Trump United States Ralph Nodar
"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:11 min | 3 years ago

"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"I don't know a lot of the people that are concerned with with that theory of conveniently died so conveniently or not. But it's it's one of these things that I think we can say this is dangerous. This is fake news. People are going to believe this. That is always been the case people people think. Avatars true. So it's it's what's important is that we're discussing what's important is that we're questioning these things and there are blowing realities out there. I'm sure and if a film wants to get hold of it and give it a good shake, then then we're better for it. But I mean in something like vice which is basically entertainment saying this this is, you know, was there anything in there that that really struck? You is factually problematic. No, not really because I mean, the great thing about Dick Cheney is that he is he disappears. Even though he's very very powerful. He's kind of an invisible, man. And I think that that's why ETA McKay was was did such a good job with with this. Because nobody really knew Dick Cheney looked like until Christian bale decided to show us and Christian. Was just weird. But also, the vice president has never been as as as the the movie says has never been a very hands on role. It's always looks a little bit. Like just in case, the president dies, or if he doesn't want to go to an event, the vice will go, and I think it's interesting to see that. It's possible the device could actually get more power than normally allotted. Some people think films about historical figures have a responsibility to the truth similar to newspaper, for instance. But I shouldn't assume audiences cheated should we? Yeah. We, but we should I think I go into a movie you don't want to sit there and have a lesson. You know, you want to be entertained. You wanna be an intrigued an as a journalist? I know that when I'm writing something I choose the facts that I want to use. So I'm not going to give you the whole argument. Number one time number two. I don't have all the facts. In fact, nobody does. So I think it's it's silly to suggest that a documentary is very close to the fact at all because it is a way of showing you a set of facts. So that aside is that a good movie. Should we go and see it? Yes. I was really not looking for it. I'm american. I wasn't looking forward to seeing it. It's hugely entertaining. It's fast. It's pacey. It's funny and it's an eye opener. Absolutely. Karen, Crisanto vich. Thank you very much. Lead. And that's vice which I understand is on on general release at the moment. Not. So we have time for today. Thanks to offer. Jesus Ben Ryland and Daniel bait research is today with patrons and mainly Evans, an Ostade marriage. It was David Stevens. Now up to the headlines. There's much more music on the way, Ben Ryland will be returning with the continental shift. Lots of great music coming up. Looks K pop guaranteed and various other pieces from ROY the world. The briefing is live at midday. That's London time. And then the glibness will return at the same time tomorrow. I'm Georgina Godwin. Thank you for listening..

vice president Dick Cheney Ben Ryland Georgina Godwin ETA McKay David Stevens Christian bale London Crisanto vich Karen Evans Daniel
"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"What is it like to be a city forgotten and rediscovered Monaco films travels to Gooden San in South Korea to bear witness to its oven revival natives and new come as a creating quirky buzz spaces and a bright future for this charming coastal outpost? Good San building on the past playing. Now the film section at Monaco dot com. Still with me, Georgina Godwin and joyless deco. If there's a couple of things that the retail market has come to rely on in recent years hits the apple products sell well in many of them sell in China, but the company reduced its revenue expectations for the first time in a decade and a half yesterday citing falling sales in China as one of the prominent causes of the reassessment shares in apple took a ten percent hit as a result, a joy. Are we starting to see the end of the retail love affair with apple do you think? Well, I how many apple finds that. We got in the studio at the moment, I've sat and he got one apple products in front of me, the the she sales still rising says why pets still rising is rest of the world is doing fine is actually just China where it's been a stalling, and that's partly because the top end of the China economy seems to be stalling. It's also because go big competition from this company called tricon pronounce, thanks. Very much which is taken it's rising by that sort of thirteen cents year in China it selling products of same quality is the iphone for half, the mice. And so I think what you're seeing is not just a slowdown in China, but also arise in their technological capabilities. And the fact that actually the renown a number of phones on the market, including some of the Google pixel which she rival the only phone so suddenly had been a complete standard of the hipsters around. The world is note is is no more. Georgina have we reached peak upgrade fatigued, you think on clamoring for new new devices do and again, I think it goes back to this whole thing of rejecting big brands and of just wanted to live a simple life. You've got a perfectly worth working iphone? They also expensive. There is an economic downturn. Why would you get the next next one just for slightly better picture quality? She I actually rebooted. So I'm on an iphone six I actually rebooted my old five. Five s the other day. What you find? In fact, she was nice. And I'm about to dig out my five seed. Going backwards on the upgrade. So she's the last thing for wants to hear from us. Oh, I consider just going back to the the Nokia. And so I can just on my Email solution to being off social media in the new year. But interesting time for for apple. We will see what their next strategy is. I Finally, I just wanna make sure we have time for this. Last topic. A tale of a runaway pooch who's been living in the woods of Suffolk in the UK. The dog was lost by its owner. Who has now spent thousands on efforts to recapture the pet interestingly called China no relation to our previous story, including enlisting drones specialist trackers and even a marksman to try and tranquilize the dog.

China apple Georgina Godwin Monaco dot com Gooden San San South Korea Google Nokia Suffolk UK ten percent
"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"However, we think it's better that we're able to continue operating offering some of our other content in Saudi Arabia rather than just blanket banning and shutting down the surface ole to get a especially when you consider that. This isn't the first time the Netflix has had to modify. By it's offering. I think a lot of people would be surprised to learn that net. Flicks ease actually available mostly in its entirety in Russia. However, the Netflix film, Alex Strangelove, which is about a gay teenager coming out conspicuously not available in Russia. Even though that is considered to be a global Netflix release. These things quietly happen all the time. It's just that this one is a little bit more public. Ben. Thank you very much. Indeed. And that's all full the sedition of the briefing just before we go. I just like to us Ben Ryland high within say happy new year in Australian, I think it's something along the lines of happy new year. Oh, happy new happy new year. I'm trying to straighten out my accent. It doesn't really work. Does it too long collie dog? Now in Zimbabwe. We would say we'll Makoto congratulations. Happy new year to you. All thanks very much to produce Marcus hippie hours to page Reynolds, nNcholas was our seconds such a here and stadium manage it was David Stevens. The reaching is back tomorrow at the same time, and you can join Ben Ryland full Midori house complete with non Austrailian accent live at eighteen hundred dollars yet in London. Let's thirteen hundred in New York. I'm Georgina Godwin thanki listening.

Ben Ryland Netflix Saudi Arabia Russia New York Georgina Godwin Alex Strangelove David Stevens Zimbabwe Midori Marcus Reynolds nNcholas London eighteen hundred dollars
"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"You're listening to a special edition of the globalist in association with UBS. Hello and welcome to a special edition of the globalist. I'm Ben Ryland over the festive season, we're looking back at some of the best interviews we did here on call twenty four in twenty eighteen the big interview brought you the fascinating stories of some of the most influential people from the worlds of arts and culture business politics and design today, we listen back to the also winning actress Sally field the minute. I walked on stayed something. Struck me electricity, a bell rang, and the self-imposed fog that I had been living in just cleared, and I could hear myself, and I was alive for this moment for the second. I was free and weightless I spent my life chasing, the firefly's on the edges of my is. That was Sally field. The double Oscar winning actress and the fog she was escaping descended following sexual abuse. By a stepfather jock Mahoney when she was a child she lost herself in acting career began as a teenager playing the all American lead in gidget. She went on to star in the flying nun, and then made her first film the way west with Kirk Douglas in nineteen sixty seven a host of television movies, followed before she joined her then boyfriend, but Reynolds in the box office hit smokey and the bandit Reynolds was another controlling man in her life. As was the film director, Bob Raffelson's. She was forced to kiss before being cast by him in stay hungry. She won her first Askar for the title role of Numa Ray in nineteen eighty and she's appeared in amongst others. Steel magnolias, MRs Doubtfire and Forrest Gump winning another best actress Academy Award for places in the heart in one thousand nine hundred five she was given an outstanding lead. Actress EMMY for television show. Brothers and sisters and most recently was nominated for best actress in Lincoln in two thousand and twelve she's written a memoir in pieces. I'm Georgina Godwin, and I sat down with her in the big interview. Sally. We're here in London. And you've been hit promoting your book, which is an extraordinary book. It's about this amazing life full of experience, but also Chuma to degree a wonderfully brave book, but it also charts your acting career, and I wondered if you'd always known that you were going to act well by the time, you know, you're thinking about what are you going to be when you grow up kind of thought, I think it was always an actor..

Sally field Numa Ray Georgina Godwin UBS jock Mahoney Reynolds MRs Doubtfire Bob Raffelson Ben Ryland Kirk Douglas EMMY Oscar director Academy Award London Lincoln Forrest Gump
Sally Field on a lifetime in Hollywood

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:19 min | 3 years ago

Sally Field on a lifetime in Hollywood

"Today, we listen back to the also winning actress Sally field the minute. I walked on stayed something. Struck me electricity, a bell rang, and the self-imposed fog that I had been living in just cleared, and I could hear myself, and I was alive for this moment for the second. I was free and weightless I spent my life chasing, the firefly's on the edges of my is. That was Sally field. The double Oscar winning actress and the fog she was escaping descended following sexual abuse. By a stepfather jock Mahoney when she was a child she lost herself in acting career began as a teenager playing the all American lead in gidget. She went on to star in the flying nun, and then made her first film the way west with Kirk Douglas in nineteen sixty seven a host of television movies, followed before she joined her then boyfriend, but Reynolds in the box office hit smokey and the bandit Reynolds was another controlling man in her life. As was the film director, Bob Raffelson's. She was forced to kiss before being cast by him in stay hungry. She won her first Askar for the title role of Numa Ray in nineteen eighty and she's appeared in amongst others. Steel magnolias, MRs Doubtfire and Forrest Gump winning another best actress Academy Award for places in the heart in one thousand nine hundred five she was given an outstanding lead. Actress EMMY for television show. Brothers and sisters and most recently was nominated for best actress in Lincoln in two thousand and twelve she's written a memoir in pieces. I'm Georgina Godwin, and I sat down with her in the big interview. Sally. We're here in London. And you've been hit promoting your book, which is an extraordinary book. It's about this amazing life full of experience, but also Chuma to degree a wonderfully brave book, but it also charts your acting career, and I wondered if you'd always known that you were going to act well by the time, you know, you're thinking about what are you going to be when you grow up kind of thought, I think it was always an actor.

Sally Field Bob Raffelson Numa Ray Georgina Godwin Jock Mahoney Mrs Doubtfire Reynolds Kirk Douglas Emmy Oscar Academy Award Director London Forrest Gump Lincoln
"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"georgina godwin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"I think you should go back to him because he's right for you. I am not. And it's so I think that this kind of common go has been my life in everything in the places have been through the books of read the people, I know the desires of nurtured and cradled, oh my life. It's all there. Do you know where it's going when no no, I never know. And I'm always afraid of where it might go. Because you know, we all when you in the boat in the notion, and you don't have any oars, which is how my life field. Yes. I know I can go and but in in my psychic life. I am a boat in the notion with no ORs, you don't take Chris. You don't move from one places the other you say, I hope the wind will take me to the right place because I have no no sense of where I'm headed. And when I write I have no sense of where I'm headed. Absolutely, none. And I love that. Is it cathartic view? All you just. Thirteen or something within your own life. I don't know. That's a very good question. I don't know what I'm searching for. But I know that on paper it is magnificent travel. I mean, my my stories are travelogue of all the places I might have had but never would will have but might still happen and repeating the same sentence because it's key. But my whole life I wanted. I don't want it. I hope I get it. I would afraid might get it. So I'm not going there. So I stay what where do I want to live New York? Yes. And no elsewhere. Maybe do I wanna take risk of moving to? I don't know why. Oh, Ming or Canada or Europe, which I love. But can I stand your for more than a week? I don't know. I better stay put in New York, then that's my life. But what you have given us is this most fantastic journey through books under. Thank you so much. Thank you for having me on j s men is the author of indignation, which is published by. Favor and it's out now. You've been listening to meet the writers, thanks to the production team of Christie, Evans jobs. Mcdonagh and mother LeBron. You can download this show on previous episodes of my website up from soundcloud, mixed clouds, or I on Georgina Godwin. Thank you. Phyllis. You've been listening to a special edition of meet the writers. You can hear

New York Chris Georgina Godwin Mcdonagh LeBron Canada Europe Christie Evans
Obama delivers veiled rebuke to Trump during Mandela address in South Africa

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:06 min | 4 years ago

Obama delivers veiled rebuke to Trump during Mandela address in South Africa

"Hello this is the globalist coming to you live from dory house in london i'm georgina godwin on the show ahead victor auburn arrives in israel for a controversial visit we ask what this meeting of rightwing minds means for the jewish population in hungary prime minister theresa may narrowly won a key brexit vote in parliament last night we'll bring you the latest wranglings over britain's attempts to leave the european union then it's one hundred years today since the birth of nelson mandela and his life has been celebrated in events all over the world that's what we need just need one leader we don't just need one inspiration what we badly need right now is that collective scoop that's barack obama the former us president addressing huge crowds in hannah's berg yesterday we examined mandela's legacy with one of the key antiapartheid campaigners all that business in japan the changing face of air travel in africa plus a flick.

Hannah Africa Berg Prime Minister Hungary Victor Auburn Georgina Godwin London Japan Dory House President Trump United States Barack Obama Nelson Mandela European Union Britain Theresa Israel One Hundred Years