17 Burst results for "Georgia Public Broadcasting"

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:19 min | 11 months ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Creator of poverty, insecure housing in the renting economy. That story straight ahead in the next 30 minutes. Here on all things considered from 90.3 kz. You Will be sunshine for the fourth. Partly to mostly sunny skies through the weekend. High temperatures along the coast will be in the upper sixties and low seventies. Inland. Temperatures will range from the seventies to the low eighties. Mm hmm. Support for KZ You comes from 14 40 multiverse itty in the redwoods offering live well. Weekends, which included a two nights stay meals and daily signature classes offered select weekends through July. More at 14 40 dot org slash day. 20 minutes past three on all things considered, and this is KZ you streaming at kstu dot org. Support for NPR comes from this station and from your part time controller specializing and nonprofit accounting. You're part time controller helps non profit organizations with their accounting needs remotely or in person. More at your part time controller dot com. And from C three. A. I C three AI software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence at enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable problems. C three a. I. This is Enterprise Ai. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ailsa Chang and I'm Ari Shapiro. What sustains former President Trump's lies that he won the 2020 election while in several key states it's a growing media network that is creating an alternate reality for some Republican voters and politicians. Georgia Public Broadcasting's Stephen Fowler takes a look at one outlet. If you don't follow politics in Georgia closely or even if you do, you might be forgiven for not knowing much about the Georgia Star News. Founded just after the November election. It looks like a regular news site. There's a lifestyle section, a widget for the weather and stories about local and national goings on, But there's more going on, says Steve Bannon, former Trump strategist describing the outlets focus in a radio interview. I mean this content, you can't get anywhere else. It's.

Steve Bannon Ari Shapiro Stephen Fowler Ailsa Chang Georgia July Trump Georgia Public Broadcasting fourth C three two nights 20 minutes one outlet KZ A. I C three Georgia Star News NPR President Trump upper Republican
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

02:01 min | 11 months ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on WBUR

"NW bur I'm Tanya Mosley and I'm Peter wrote down. This is here and now U. S. Attorney General Merrick Garland announced today that the Department of Justice is suing the state of Georgia over that state's controversial new restrictive voting law. Stephen Fowler of Georgia. Public Broadcasting is here to join us here to tell us more. And Stephen what exactly is the argument that the Justice Department is making here? Well. The Justice Department is saying that the 98 page voting law that was signed earlier this year contains several provisions that are intentionally designed to make it harder for Black Jordans to vote that includes a ban on government entities, mailing out absentee ballot applications, limitations on dropbox uses and a narrower window to request an absentee ballot. And they say all of this taken together is in retaliation for record turnout record black turnout in the 2020 election. Does the challenge affect the law right now, as it is? Well. There are currently now eight lawsuits pending challenging Georgia's different election law. Virtually every part of it is being challenged, and so it will take some time for those things to be sorted out. All right. Well, this is the first significant move by the Biden administration against the number of new restrictive voting laws that have been passed by a Republican led state legislatures all over the country. Do you think this could be the beginning of something larger? Absolutely. What we saw from the attorney general. Today was a note that the Justice Department was going to use every available tool and their arsenal and every aspect of voting law to examine these changes that Republicans put forth after the 2020 election. And they say that Georgia is the first of potentially many that they're going to look at to see if these laws hold up to the scrutiny of the intended results or if they were actually disenfranchising people. Stephen Fowler is a reporter with Georgia Public Broadcasting. Thank you very much for joining us..

Stephen Fowler Tanya Mosley Stephen Peter Georgia Public Broadcasting Today 98 page Justice Department Department of Justice Republican Republicans first Georgia today Merrick Garland earlier this year S. Attorney General eight lawsuits Public Broadcasting U.
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Him the first black senator to represent Georgia and the first black Democrat elected to the Senate from a southern state. There's war, not earlier on NPR's morning edition. Welcome to the New Georgia. It is more diverse it, it's more inclusive. And it readily embraces the future. And I'm the product of of that, among other side that you can see right on the ground here in this state. The other race between Democrat John OSS. Often Republican David Perdue is still too close to call. But Ausaf is holding on to a narrow lead. Let's bring in Stephen Fowler, a reporter for Georgia Public Broadcasting on Steven. What a historic moment for Georgia today. What's the feeling? Well, Excuse me. Well, if you ask Democrats, it's a feeling of relief. For years. They've been telling people that Georgia as a flip couple state, it's a winnable state. If you just invest time and money and manpower, and not only did they give Joe Biden 16 electoral votes, but they ended up likely flipping the Senate majority because of that investment. And so it's really a feeling of elation there. And Republicans are already beginning the soul searching to figure out what is to blame for this loss who was to blame and how they attempt to move forward in the state that is rapidly diversifying away from their favor. The historical context here is important because run offs in Georgia have been on favorable to Democrats to say the least. And yet we just heard Warnock say, Welcome to the New Georgia. What do you think? His victory says about the evolving political landscape of the state?.

Georgia New Georgia Georgia Public Broadcasting Senate NPR Steven Joe Biden senator David Perdue Ausaf John OSS Warnock Stephen Fowler reporter
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"We've had as far as Election Day goes just to follow on what I was raising their the assault on the voting process itself by President Trump. Whoever wins among the casualties of this election will be anything resembling Republican unity. In Georgia. How are Georgia voters Responding to that? Well, you know Democrats are you know riled up because of the call that President Trump had with our secretary of state over the weekend, where he pressured the secretary to try and overturn the results. But also Republicans are energized to because they think that you know the president is defending the vote, and they turned out today. But then there's people like Wayne and best lever in Middle Georgia. We talked to that makes things even more unpredictable. Well, uh, we voted against the Republicans this time and I've never voted Democrat. So it was a big change for me. So we just really don't know how things are going to shake out. But definitely people just don't trust the system like they used to. Suggests that whoever wins and whenever we get the result, tonight's results will be controversial and possibly contested. Exactly if candidate finishes within half a percentage point of the other one. They can request a recount, which would have every single vote run through scanners again, and it's definitely a safe idea to think that there's going to be litigation coming. No matter who wins. Mm. So just the fact that we were getting returns maybe earlier than had been anticipated. Does that adjust your timeline at all in terms of when we might no winner in one or both of these races? Well, it just really depends on how many people show up during Election Day, Mary Louise because if there's a larger turnout, then that means that it's gonna be a closer race. No. All right. Well, the ballots are coming in. We appreciate you keeping us updated. Thanks, Stephen. Thank you. Stephen Fowler of Georgia Public Broadcasting. Thistles, all things considered from NPR news. Staying at home. So much has brought to life the idea off flourishing within the boundaries of a smaller world. One of my favorite spots in my backyard is underneath my manzanita Bush. The hummingbirds are coming to visit the white Globe shaped flowers coming up from K easy You news with going on a backyard exploration. Join us. That's this Wednesday on morning edition on.

President Trump Georgia president Stephen Fowler Middle Georgia Georgia Public Broadcasting assault secretary NPR Wayne Mary Louise
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mm just to follow on what I was raising their via the assault on the voting process itself by President Trump. Whoever wins among the casualties of this election will be anything resembling Republican unity. In Georgia. How are Georgia voters Responding to that? Well, you know Democrats are, you know riled up because of the call that President Trump had with our secretary of state over the weekend, where he pressured the secretary to try and overturn the results. But also Republicans are energized to because they think that you know, the president is defending the vote, and they turned out today. But then there's people like Wayne and best Lever in Middle Georgia. We talked to that makes things even more unpredictable. Well, uh, we voted against the Republicans this time and I've never voted Democrat. So it was a big change for me. So we just really don't know how things are going to shake out. But definitely people just don't trust the system like they used to. Suggests that whoever wins and whenever we get the result, tonight's results will be controversial and possibly contested. Exactly if candidate finishes within half a percentage point of the other one. They can request a recount, which would have every single vote run through scanners again, and it's definitely a safe idea to think that there's going to be litigation coming. No matter who wins. Mm hmm. So just the fact that we were getting returns maybe earlier than had been anticipated. Does that adjust your timeline at all in terms of when we might no winner in one or both of these races? Well, it just really depends on how many people show up during Election Day, Mary Louise because if there's a larger turnout, then that means that it's going to be a closer race. Yeah. All right. Well, the ballots are coming in. We appreciate you keeping us updated. Thanks, Stephen. Thank you. Stephen Fowler of Georgia Public Broadcasting. Thistles, all things considered from NPR news in a 5 18. There is traffic.

President Trump Georgia president Georgia Public Broadcasting Stephen Fowler Middle Georgia assault NPR secretary Wayne Mary Louise
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

"High stakes. NPR's Sue Davis and Stephen Pallor of Georgia. Public Broadcasting. Thank you both so much. You're welcome. Thank thank you. Kim Waylay is with us next for some analysis. She is a professor of law at the University of Baltimore. Happy New Year. Good morning. Good morning, Steve. What is a proper legal term for what the president did on that call? We just heard. Well, potentially soliciting election fraud as we've heard from the Republicans now for months, voter fraud election fraud is a crime both the federal and the state level and it's also a crime to request solicit or ask someone else. To say, falsify returns or falsify reports of votes and arguably, that's what we heard on the call. Let me let me make sure I'm clear on this. Because the president has talked for months and months about election fraud. He's promoted election fraud. He's talked about a stolen election. I think you're telling me it's the president. Potentially remember this comes down to a showing of intent, he said. I won by 400,000 votes in Georgia. Georgia was certified three different times. He lost by about 12,000 votes s O. I guess he could make the argument. I didn't have the intent. I really believed That I won Georgia. But then the question is almost a 25th amendment one is he so sort of untethered from facts and reality that he's not fit. Even for the remaining days of the office. It seems like He can't have it both ways. But whether this is prosecutable is a different question from whether it's antithetical to the rule of law and the Constitution and democracy itself. And I would say clearly it is. It's It's very disturbing. Let me ask you about the other people on this call. We heard that Mark Meadows, the White House chief of staff, is on the call. Also clean up Mitchell New name to this continuing effort to overturn a democratic election. She's a Republican lawyer. She's on the call. We just heard the recording. She's repeating false statements. She's repeating those false statements in service of the president's larger lie that he won the election. Is it ethical for a lawyer to participate while her client tells obvious lies and tries to use them to overturn an election? Well under the model rules of professional conduct. It's a little bit delicate. It is. It is unethical for a lawyer to assist a client in some kind of fraudulent or criminal activity. It's not unethical to advise the implications of a certain course of action and say, Listen, that's a problem that's going to get you in trouble. But once it becomes clear to a lawyer that your client is asking you to help them engaged in something that's illegal, then it's ethically the obligation of the lawyer to withdraw from that representation. So you're saying that the only way she could claim that she was ethical in this situation is to say, Listen, I actually believed all these lives or, you know, I I told him this is a problem behind closed doors that he should really pivot off of this, given the potential legal implications of it. And we just don't know those are. Of course, those communications would be covered by the attorney client privilege. You said. It gets down to the question of intent, and of course, it's hard to determine anyone's anyone's intent. But there is the fact of what the president did. Is it legally meaningful here that in raising questions with the Georgia secretary of state for an hour, I mean, raised various conspiracy theories, I guess, in a way he was talking about the process, even though those facts were wrong, according to the Georgia secretary of state, But is it legally meaningful that his specific request to the secretary of state Was to quote find exactly enough votes for Donald Trump to happen to win the election by exactly one vote. Well, I think the argument there is he's not asking for 1/4 certification. Listen, we really want to make sure this was done accurately. Because if it was, we know that factually. So the question is, was he seeking under federal law knowingly attempted To stop a free and fair election and have votes Wade in his way. I think that some would say yes. Would you support the calls by some Democrats for a criminal investigation here? Is there enough to look at No, I leave that to the prosecutors. I think it's really a political question here. I think that certainly is impeachable. We have to remember what's going on here. This is a plea across the board to take democracy away from the people and give it to politicians. We should have that debate, but name it for what it is. Kim Waylay is a professor of.

president Georgia fraud Kim Waylay Donald Trump Mark Meadows NPR University of Baltimore professor of law Sue Davis Stephen Pallor Steve chief of staff professor attorney White House
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Into my schedule, then I take away all of the decision making in the stress about when I'm going to do it habits how to build them how to maintain them. First this news Live from NPR news. I'm nor Rahm In a recorded phone call this weekend, President Trump has heard urging Georgia's Republican secretary of state to overturn the state's presidential results. Georgia Public Broadcasting's Stephen Fowler has details. In an hour long call Saturday obtained by Georgia Public Broadcasting President Trump continued to claim without evidence that he won Georgia and that fraud tainted the election. He told secretary of State Bride Rapids Burger to undo the certified results that were confirmed by a full hand audit and a machine recount and to do it fast ahead of crucial Senate run offs Tuesday, and you would be Respected. It's really respected. If this thing could be straightened out before the election, you have a big election coming up on Tuesday. The White House has not responded to NPR's requests for comment. Republican incumbents David Perdue and Kelly Leffler, face Democrats Jonah Stop and Rafael Warnock on Tuesday in run offs that will decide control of the Senate. Trump also suggested Republican turnout would be lower Tuesday because Georgia officials did not alter the results for the president for NPR news. I'm Stephen Fowler and Atlanta, California Democrat Nancy Pelosi has been re elected speaker of the House in a narrow vote. NPR's Kelsey Snell reports Speaker Pelosi was reelected with five Democrats choosing not to select her for the job. Democrats begin the new session of Congress with a narrow 222 2 211 majority. This marks Pelosi's fourth term as speaker. She was first elected the job in 2007 and regained the gavel in 2019. Pelosi will lead Democrats as they prepared to work with President elect Joe Biden to enact his agenda. The new session of Congress is beginning under 10 circumstances as the Corona virus crisis continues to ravage the country. Roughly 50 members of Congress have tested positive for the virus since the pandemic began. One member elect Louisiana Republican Luke let Lowe died last week of complications from covert 19. Kelsey Snell. NPR NEWS Washington In East Texas of pastor is dead and two other people are injured after a shooting this morning inside a church building. Authorities say a suspect is under arrest. From member station K E R A Miranda Suarez has more. Smith County Sheriff Larry Smith told reporters on Sunday. The suspect was fleeing law enforcement for an unknown reason on Saturday night. Smith says. The suspect you starve ill Methodist Church and Wynonna as a place to hide, he says. The pastor found the suspect in the bathroom on Sunday morning, and according to the sheriff, it seems the suspect shot and killed the pastor with the pastor's own gun that related.

Speaker Pelosi President Trump NPR Stephen Fowler Georgia Congress president Kelsey Snell Georgia Public Broadcasting Senate Sheriff Larry Smith Rahm Wynonna Smith County State Bride Rapids Joe Biden White House Miranda Suarez
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:32 min | 1 year ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news. I'm Michelle Martin. We're going to begin with news of an extraordinary phone call in which President Trump pressured Georgia's top election official to overturn the state's presidential results. Audio of yesterday's hour long call was first reported by The Washington Post and obtained by Georgia Public Broadcasting. At some points, cajoling and others threatening. The president pushes Georgia secretary of State and fellow Republican Bread Rapids Burger to undo his narrow defeat and fast before the Senate run offs in the state. This week, you would be respected, if really respected if this thing could be straightened out. Before the election. You have a big election coming up on Tuesday. Joining us now is reported Stephen Fowler from Georgia Public Broadcasting. Stephen Thank you so much for joining us. Thanks for having me and I just have to say the president of the United States seems to be blatantly asking an official to break the law. In fact, here's part of what he said. Well, I want to do is this I just wanna find Uh, 11,780. Votes, which is one more that we have. What was secretary reference burgers? Response to this. So Brad Rapids Burger is a Republican secretary of state and one of the few Republicans that has stood up to the president in public, saying there was no evidence of fraud. And throughout this call of the times that Rapids Burger was able to speak because the president dominated it. He pushed back on these claims, noting that many allegations were false and that law enforcement and judges and courts and elections officials that all looked into these allegations and found that there was no there there and the general counsel for the secretary of state's office also repeatedly reinforced to the president. That Georgia's elections were secure, and in fact they were counted three different times, once by hand, five million votes counted and two other times by machines to find that Joe Biden did narrowly win the state. But you know, in other parts of the college, you just said President Trump made baseless claims of absentee ballot fraud. He falsely claimed that he won George's election by hundreds of thousands of votes. And you know more statements that have not been confirmed in any way but remind us why Georgia officials are so convinced that November's election was in fact, secure. So this is the first year that Georgia has a new election system that has a paper ballot trail. Peoples who vote absentee by mail, submit a paper ballot. Those that show up in person use a touch screen machine that prints out a paper ballot. So when they did an audit a hand on it, they physically touched and counted five million votes, and so If somebody double scanned ballots it would show up if balance were added in somewhere it would have shown up and the state says none of that was true. And so you know, you can count on literally five million votes being accurate. And of course, all of this comes ahead of Tuesday's to U. S. Senate run offs in Georgia. The president alluded to that We're going to talk about that more later in this program, but President Trump is headlining a big rally there tomorrow night. Is there any sense of what these revelations could mean for that race? Well, President Trump. If the Republicans do lose, he's got an idea of who to blame. You know, the people of Georgia know that this was a scam and because of what you've done to the president, a lot of people are going out to vote. And a lot of Republicans are gonna vote negative because they hate what you did to the president. That is Georgia Public Broadcasting. Stephen Fowler. Stephen Thank you, Thank you. And the pressure campaign from the president in Georgia comes as a new Congress is being sworn in today, a Democrat Nancy Pelosi, was narrowly re elected as speaker of the House leading an historically narrow majority. The balance of power in the Senate is still undecided. Waiting on Georgia's run offs. Republicans are openly warring over the decision by some members to object when Congress gathers Wednesday to certify President elect Joe Biden's electoral College win. NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell has been following these battles and she is with us now, Kelsey. It's good to hear from you. Thanks for having me. So let's start with the Republicans. A dozen Senate Republicans say they're going to join a group of House Republicans to contest the electoral College votes on January 6. What will this mean for the process? So this is being led by Ted Cruz of Texas, and he's joining Josh Holly of Missouri. Have the power to slow the process and force extended debate in direct defiance of Republican leaders. No other Republicans like Mitt Romney of Utah and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska are calling. These people have directly and a bipartisan group put out a statement today, saying that the voters have spoken and Congress must fulfill their constitutional responsibility. No, the objectors air, saying that they're standing up for people who don't trust the election results. But that distrust is based on misinformation and false claims shared by Trump and others, And this is all happening is that audio you mention has been released. It's kind of I mean, it really is just driving it an enormous rift in the Republican Party. It is a clear demonstration, the Republicans fear of the backlash from Trump supporters. And that trumps influence on the party just isn't going to disappear when he leaves office, and the important question is, Will this have any effect on the outcome of this vote? Well, this will force Republican leaders and those who disagree with the objectors to publicly split with Trump to uphold the election results. But Joe Biden won the election and that reality is expected to be certified by Congress this week. Let's go to the Democrats. Now. Nancy Pelosi was re elected as speaker, but the margin was extremely tight. How will her narrow majority effect the Democrats? Ability to enact Joe Biden? Kamala Harris is agenda after they take office, You know, moderates and progressives each claim that they are the ones who are responsible for delivering the wind for Biden and Harris. They also have very different visions about one of the priorities should be for their party. You know. They do generally agree, though, that Cove in 19 is the top priority and that the focus of the party needs to be on relief and recovery. But the issues I'm watching in particular are how the party navigates where they're really divided now, like stone student loan debt relief for the role of climate policy, and you know how they're going to approach that in the 1st 100 days. Yes, but isn't new. But the ranks of the outspoken progressives has grown a little bit and a large portion of the losses for Democrats in 2020 came from more moderate wing. You know, That means that it may be more difficult to find legislation that can appease both sides of the party and get enough votes to actually pass the house. And some of those decisions will certainly be influenced by the outcome of the Senate runoff elections in Georgia, right? Yeah, absolutely. You don't. Biden's ability to enact his agenda would be significantly changed by Georgia. Republican senators Kelly Leffler and David Perdue are fighting to keep their jobs and if they win they Republicans will retain control of the Senate in control over what gets a vote on the Senate floor, and that's critical. If Democrats win, they can shape the basic entire path of Biden's term and to be largely decided by those two runoff races. That was NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell. Kelsey. Thank you so much Glad to be here. The oil industry was dealt a devastating blow by the pandemic so well vaccines me to return to big profits for oil. Not so fast as NPR's Camilla Domina Ski reports look Beyond the pandemic headlines and oil companies have a lot more to worry about. Oil producers complain the coronavirus for a lot of their woes. Lockdown sent demand cratering. Crude prices even went negative for the first time in history. Their finals don't want it. There's no Storage space left. So sellers literally paying Myers to take this stuff with their hands. But.

president President Trump Georgia Joe Biden U. S. Senate Georgia Public Broadcasting Democrats Congress Stephen Fowler Kelsey Snell official NPR Republican Party Nancy Pelosi fraud Michelle Martin Trump
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Dave Freeman on Tuesday. Good morning to you. It's 6 35. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm David Greene in Los Angeles. And I'm Layla folded in Culver City, California We are a week away from two crucial Senate runoff elections in Georgia. The outcome will determine which party controls the Senate and early voting has been underway for weeks. Stephen Fowler of Georgia Public Broadcasting has been covering both races and is with us. Good morning. Good morning. So Stephen. People have been casting ballots for a few weeks now. So what can you tell us about the votes so far? Well, more than 2.3 million. Jordan's have already voted in this election through early in person voting or returning an absentee by mail ballot. That's pretty stunning for a runoff, which typically doesn't have that many people voting. But like you said control of the U. S Senate is on the line. Now what we know is that these voters are slightly younger and slightly more diverse than what we saw in the general electorate. So that typically means that Democrats are ahead as of right now, and we look at the data of where people are voting, and most of these early votes are coming from metro Atlanta, suburban counties around the state and in typical democratic strongholds. How much can we really tell back in November we really saw Democrats dominate the early and absentee vote while Republicans turned out more on election day. So is that pattern repeating itself this time around. Yes and no, we are seeing, you know people voting at a similar pace that they were in the general election. But what's noticeable is who's not showing up to vote mean. Republicans do typically use Georges three weeks of early voting, but the numbers of Republican leaning counties and rural strongholds are way down from what you would expect to see. Compared to some of the other counties. And so it's an uphill battle for Republicans to try to counter act all of the Democratic early voting that made more complicated by the holiday where early voting is actually going to end a couple days early this time because of the new year Interesting because Georgia has been the focal point for President Trump's baseless claims that the election was stolen from him. So how much is that impacting what voters air doing now? It definitely has an impact. But it's hard to really quantify that because many of the people that have attended his rallies throughout the state and said that the system is rigged and the Trump should have won and that there's problems with our voting system are lining up to vote in these early voting sites. And so it's just really hard to square but also President Trump is Holding a rally the night before the election in northwest Georgia, the 14th congressional district where Marjorie Taylor Greene is about to take office. She's leading the charge of trying to challenge election results. And that district has the lowest turnout of any congressional district in Georgia, and none of those things are coincidences. That's Stephen Fowler of Georgia Public Broadcasting. He's been covering this closely for us. He also hosts the battleground ballot box podcast. Thank you so much, Stephen. Thank you. This pandemic continues to disproportionately impact communities of color in South Florida, a nonprofit is helping Latino and black residents get access to covert testing. They're also trying to build trust in the vaccine. From member station W. Lrn Veronica Sarah Go via reports, a group called Healthy Little Havana received an assignment this summer convinced residents of this neighborhood in Miami to get a covert 19 test. Nonprofit has lots of outreach experience. It helped with the census counting and because of the pandemic, it did that by phone. But this new challenge needs a face to face.

Stephen Fowler Georgia President Trump Georgia Public Broadcasting David Greene NPR News Senate Dave Freeman Marjorie Taylor Greene Los Angeles U. S Senate W. Lrn Veronica Sarah Go Culver City Little Havana South Florida Jordan California Georges Miami
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

06:36 min | 1 year ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Virus? And that's just how long people wait to get the result. It often takes a few days between the time people are cold. The needy attested and they actually managed to get a test. So put it all together, and it's taking almost a week to get tested and gets results for a lot of people. Here's David Laser from Northeast there who's helping leave the survey. Even with the improved testing speed, there's almost a week lag between the time that they're told to get attest to where they might get a positive test. And at that point much of the harm that could be done in spreading throughout that person Social network has already occurred. We need to do a lot better. So after a person gets a positive test result, they're supposed to be this contact tracing right? What is the national survey say about how that's going? Yes. Oh, that's more bad news from the survey and found that only a little more than half of people who test positive ever hear from a health worker to find out who they may have had contact with. So those people can be cold the quarantine and get tested to find out if they caught the virus and you know to stop new operates from occurring. Here's David loser organ from Northeastern in the ideal world that would all go rather tight tat, you know, test trace contact, isolate right and that would all happen in a matter of a few days. That way. We don't have to have lockdowns if we can zoom in on the people who are most likely to be infecting. Other people. Rob is you've reported from the very beginning of this pandemic, Black and Latino communities were harder hit than white communities. Is that still playing out with these results of this survey about testing and contact tracing? Yeah, you know are. Unfortunately it is. The survey found that on average Hispanics wait about a half day longer than whites and Asian Americans to get their test results and blacks wait almost a whole day longer. So that's just, you know, one more way that blacks and Latinos are getting it harder by this pandemic, and it could be contributing to the disparities that we've been saying all along. One of the federal officials from the Trump administration who are leading the fight against the pandemic, saying about this You know, so I got a statement from federal health officials you know, late today defending the administration's testing efforts, the statement says. The federal government has given states billions of dollars to bolster their testing and has invested millions to develop new tests and distributing millions. Tens of millions of new fast has to provide results in minutes. They also say turnaround times have fallen and argued that an average turnaround time of just under three days. Is sufficient as long as people follow CDC guidelines to isolate when they've been exposed to the virus or of symptoms and are careful to take other steps, you know, like wearing masks and avoiding crowds. It's NPR health correspondent Rob Stein. Thank you. You better hurry. Recent elections in Georgia have been marked by long lines at the polls for some voters, especially a non white communities around metro Atlanta, and a new investigation by Propublica and Georgia Public Broadcasting found that rapid population growth in a failure to add more polling places has contributed to the states voting problems. Joining us now is Stephen Fowler, reporter and host of Battleground ballot box. Ah, Voting podcast by Georgia Public Broadcasting. Hey there, Stephen Tanya. So in the story you wrote about this investigation. You say that since 12 2009 Metro Atlanta counties have been added nearly a million more voters to the roles, but the number of polling places in those counties have either closed or stayed stagnant. What has this meant for elections in Georgia? Well, the average number of people assigned to a polling place statewide and Georgia has jumped nearly 50% since 2012. That's also because the number of voting locations has been decimated. In 2013, The Shelby versus holder Supreme Court decision meant Georgia no longer had to get permission to make those changes or had to prove that they were not discriminatory. So what we found in these big metro Atlanta counties were polling places that are 2 to 3 times larger than the state average and many of the long lines and problems we've seen in recent elections. Okay, Speaking of thes lines when early voting started in Georgia last week, we saw these pictures of people waiting up to eight hours to cast their ballots in some of these metro Atlanta counties. How does that connect to this larger story about access to the polls? Well, there were some technical issues and record turnout last week, but many voters were just trying to avoid long election day lines like 71 year old John Glover told US I have bullet in every election. Not overheard Stand in. The line is long, but it is worth the while. You're just an eight hour of this. I have to simply put black voters in particular. Don't trust Georgia Elections officials to ensure they can easily cast their ballot and they're willing to do whatever it takes for such a big election. Um, okay, So as we've seen in many states, people can vote in Georgia, either by mail early in person or election day. So how does how does this failure to add more polling places actually impact voters? Well, Tanya, our analysis found that many of them or crowded poles in the state are in predominantly black neighborhoods like Union City, just south of Atlanta. There's about 22,000 people assigned to just three polling places this year, making those some of the largest and the state. That's where I talked with a woman named Kathy, who waited five hours to vote and she was one of the lucky ones. The last voter at her polling place and the June 9th primary actually voted June 10th. Here's what Kathy had to say about why she thinks it's not a coincidence when you look at the systemic issues that plagues us as a society, but also as a people often times We're spraining. Well, we're not being heard. In fact, the data that we analyse from the primary showed that two thirds of the poles that had to stay open late or in these majority non white communities. Steven, who's Who's responsible for these decisions to close thes polling places or not at additional ones? And what do they have to say about these findings? Well, there are bipartisan county elections boards that make these decisions in conjunction with their hired supervisors and the county commissions that provide funding for their budgets. It's important to note that this is an issue that affects both white Republican areas of the state, as well as black Democratic strongholds. So it's not a partisan issue. It's ultimately about resource is And what we've seen in the numbers here in Georgia is that black voters in particular are hit the hardest by not having the same access to resource is as white voters. Stephen Fowler is the host of Georgia Public Broadcasting's battleground ballot box. Ah podcast and author of a Propublica investigation.

Georgia Atlanta Georgia Public Broadcasting David Laser Stephen Fowler Georgia Elections Stephen Tanya Rob Stein federal government NPR Supreme Court Kathy Trump Northeastern CDC Steven John Glover reporter
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

"And that's just how long people wait to get the result. It often takes a few days between the time people are cold. They needed a tested and they actually managed to get a test. So put it all together, and it's taking almost a week to get tested and gets results for a lot of people. Here's David deserve from Northeastern who's helping leave the survey. Even with the improved testing speed, there's almost a week lag between the time that they're told to get attest to where they might get a positive test. And at that point much of the harm that could be done in spreading throughout that person Social network has already occurred. We need to do a lot better. So after a person gets a positive test result, they're supposed to be this contact tracing right? What is the national survey say about how that's going? Yes. Oh, that's more bad news from the survey found that only a little more than half of people who test positive ever hear from a health worker to find out who they may have had contact with so those people can be cold. The quarantine And get tested to find out if they caught the virus. And you know to stop new operates from occurring. Here's David loser organ from Northeastern in the ideal world that would all go rather tight tat, you know. Test trace contact, isolate right And that would all happen in a matter of a few days. That way. We don't have to have lockdowns if we can zoom in on the people who are most likely to be infecting. Other people. Rob is you've reported from the very beginning of this pandemic, Black and Latino communities were harder hit than white communities. Is that still playing out with these results of this survey about testing and contact tracing? Yeah, you know are unfortunately it is. The survey found that on average Hispanics wait about a half day longer than whites and Asian Americans to get their test results and blacks wait almost a whole day longer, So it's just, you know, one more way that blacks and Latinos are getting harder by this pandemic, and it could be contributing to the disparities that we've been saying all along. One of the federal officials from the Trump administration who are leading the fight against the pandemic, saying about this You know, so I got a statement from federal health officials you know, late today defending the administration's testing efforts, the statement says. The federal government has given states billions of dollars to bolster their testing and has invested millions to develop new tests and distributing millions. Tens of millions of new fast has to provide results in minutes. They also say turnaround times have fallen and argued that an average turnaround time of just under three days is sufficient as long as people follow CDC guidelines to isolate when they've been exposed to the virus or of symptoms and are careful to take other steps, you know, like wearing masks and avoiding crowds. It's NPR health correspondent Rob Stein. Thank you. You better hurry. Recent elections in Georgia have been marked by long lines at the polls for some voters, especially a non white communities around metro Atlanta, and a new investigation by Propublica and Georgia Public Broadcasting found that rapid population growth in a failure to add more polling places has contributed to the states voting problems. Joining us now is Stephen Fowler, reporter and host of Battleground ballot box. Ah, Voting podcast by Georgia Public Broadcasting. Hey there, Stephen Tanya. So in the story you wrote about this investigation. You say that since 12 2009 Metro Atlanta counties have been added nearly a million more voters to the roles, but the number of polling places in those counties have either closed or state stagnant. What has this meant for elections in Georgia? Well, the average number of people assigned to a polling place statewide and Georgia has jumped nearly 50% since 2012. That's also because the number of voting locations has been decimated. In 2013, The Shelby versus holder Supreme Court decision meant Georgia no longer had to get permission to make those changes or had to prove that they were not discriminatory. So what we found in these big metro Atlanta counties were polling places that are 2 to 3 times larger than the state average and many of the long lines and problems we've seen in recent elections. Okay, Speaking of thes lines when early voting started in Georgia last week, we saw these pictures of people waiting up to eight hours to cast their ballots in some of these metro Atlanta counties. How does that connect to this larger story about access to the polls? Well, there were some technical issues and record turnout last week, but many voters were just trying to avoid long election day lines like 71 year old John Glover told US I have bolted. Every election I overheard standing lined is long, but it is worth the while. I'm just an eight hour have to simply put black voters in particular. Don't trust Georgia elections officials to ensure they can easily cast their ballot and they're willing to do whatever it takes for such a big election. Um, okay, So as we've seen in many states, people can vote in Georgia, either by mail early in person or election day. So how does how does this failure to add more polling places actually impact voters? Well, Tanya our analysis found that many of the more crowded poles in the state are in predominantly black neighborhoods like Union City, just south of Atlanta. There's about 22,000 people assigned to just three polling places this year, making those some of the largest and the state. That's where I talked with a woman named Kathy, who waited five hours to vote and she was one of the lucky ones. The last voter at her polling place and the June 9th primary actually voted June 10th. Here's what Kathy had to say about why she thinks it's not a coincidence. When you look at the systemic issues that plagues us as a society, but also as a people, oftentimes We're spraining. Well, we're not being heard..

Georgia Atlanta Northeastern Georgia Public Broadcasting Stephen Tanya David Rob Stein federal government Kathy NPR Supreme Court Trump Stephen Fowler Union City CDC John Glover reporter Propublica
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And that's just how long people wait to get the result. It often takes a few days between the time people are cold. The needy attested and they actually managed to get a test. So put it all together, and it's taking almost a week to get tested and gets results for a lot of people. Here's David Lizard from Northeastern who's helping leave the survey. Even with the improved testing speed, there's almost a reek lag between the time that they're told to get attest to where they might get a positive test. And at that point much of the harm that could be done in spreading throughout that person Social network has already occurred. We need to do a lot better. So after a person gets a positive test result, they're supposed to be this contact tracing right? What is the national survey say about how that's going? Yes. So that's more bad news from the survey and found that only a little more than half of people who test positive ever hear from a health worker to find out who they may have had contact with. So those people can be cold the quarantine and get tested to find out if they caught the virus and you know to stop new operates from occurring. Here's David loser organ from Northeastern in the ideal world that would all go rather tight tat, you know, test trace contact, isolate right and that would all happen in a matter of a few days. That way. We don't have to have lockdowns if we can zoom in on the people who are most likely to be infecting. Other people. Rob is you've reported from the very beginning of this pandemic, Black and Latino communities were harder hit than white communities. Is that still playing out with these results of this survey about testing and contact tracing? Yeah, you know are unfortunately it is. The survey found that on average Hispanics wait about a half day longer than whites and Asian Americans to get their test results and blacks wait almost a whole day longer, So it's just, you know, one more way that blacks and Latinos are getting it harder by this pandemic, and it could be contributing to the disparities that we've been saying all along one of the federal officials from the Trump administration who are leading the fight against the pandemic, saying about this You know, so I got a statement from federal health officials you know, late today defending the administration's testing efforts, the statement says. The federal government has given states billions of dollars to bolster their testing and has invested millions to develop new tests and distributing millions. Tens of millions of new fast has to provide results in minutes. They also say turnaround times have fallen and argue that an average turnaround time of just under three days is sufficient as long as people follow CDC guidelines to isolate when they've been exposed to the virus or of symptoms and are careful to take other steps, you know, like wearing masks and avoiding crowds. It's NPR health correspondent Rob Stein. Thank you. You better hurry. Recent elections in Georgia had been marked by long lines at the polls for some workers, especially in non white communities around metro Atlanta, and a new investigation by Propublica and Georgia Public Broadcasting found that rapid population growth and a failure to add more polling places has contributed to the states voting problems. Joining us now is Stephen Fowler, reporter and host of Battleground ballot box. Ah, Voting podcast by Georgia Public Broadcasting. Hey there, Stephen Tanya. So in the story you wrote about this investigation. You say that since 12 2009 Metro Atlanta counties have been added nearly a million more voters to the roles, but the number of polling places in those counties have either closed or stayed stagnant. What has this meant for elections in Georgia? Well, the average number of people assigned to a polling place statewide in Georgia has jumped nearly 50% since 2012. That's also because the number of voting locations has been decimated. In 2013, The Shelby versus holder Supreme Court decision meant Georgia no longer had to get permission to make those changes or had to prove that they were not discriminatory. So what we found in these big metro Atlanta counties were polling places that are 2 to 3 times larger than the state average and many of the long lines and problems we've seen in recent elections. Okay, Speaking of thes lines when early voting started in Georgia last week, we saw these pictures of people waiting up to eight hours to cast their ballots in some of these metro Atlanta counties. How does that connect to this larger story about access to the polls? Well, there were some technical issues and record turnout last week, but many voters were just trying to avoid long election day lines like 71 year old John Glover told US I have bullet in every election, not overheard standing lined his long lost awhile. Just an eight hour have simply put black voters in particular. Don't trust Georgia elections officials to ensure they can easily cast their ballot and they're willing to do whatever it takes for such a big election. Okay, So as we've seen in many states, people can vote in Georgia, either by mail early in person or election day. So how does how does this failure to add more polling places actually impact voters? Well, Tanya our analysis found that many of the more crowded poles in the state are in predominantly black neighborhoods like Union City, just south of Atlanta. There's about 22,000 people assigned to just three polling places this year, making those some of the largest and the state. That's where I talked with a woman named Kathy, who waited five hours to vote and she was one of the lucky ones. The last voter at her polling place and the June 9th primary actually voted June 10th. Here's what Kathy had to say about why she thinks it's not a coincidence. When you look at the systemic issues that plague us as a society, but also as a people, oftentimes We're spraining. Well, we're not being heard. In fact, the data that we.

Georgia Atlanta David Lizard Northeastern Georgia Public Broadcasting Rob Stein Stephen Tanya federal government Kathy NPR Supreme Court Trump Stephen Fowler CDC John Glover reporter Union City Propublica
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Like nothing had happened on. Then on May 5th she gets a call from her lawyer. A local radio station has posted the video of the shooting on their Facebook page. He said, Well, I want to show you the video is out. It is going to be everywhere. So I would advise you to if you're going to want you to get around people who love you and watch it. And He said. Do you want me to tell you What was on it and I said, No, I don't want to. I told him that I don't want to know. Larry Hobbs, The Brunswick News reporter was at home when the video came out. This thing gets picked up everybody This sees it for, however long gets up, And I guess it would have been more than 30 or 40 minutes on their Facebook page. By now, That thing is all over the world. And you're listening on Georgia Public Broadcasting today. The case of Ahmad Armory is making international news headlines. CNN has obtained video of Aubrey being Shot video has surfaced of an African American man being chased down and killed the case. You're widespread public attention after a video of the shooting was released. You remember what I don't know. Did it change the way you had thought about your reporting or the last few months, it confirmed everything I suspected and worse. Did you hear three shotgun blast That's buckshot. Hey. He stumbles away on Travis Mint. Michael's got that gun in his hand. And just this The 10,000 yard stare and just walks right into the camera. Just like I don't know what's going on in his mind. What was pretty. It was It wasn't.

Facebook Georgia Public Broadcasting Ahmad Armory Larry Hobbs Travis Mint CNN reporter Aubrey Michael The Brunswick News
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

"During the pandemic one of the nation's top health officials says the centers for disease control and prevention will soon release step by step guidance on how local authorities can begin safely re opening their economies and peers Franco donors reports that's not good enough for some lawmakers during a Senate hearing on restarting the economy democratic senator Chris Murphy of Connecticut press the director of the CDC Dr Robert Redfield to release its detailed plan to help these local groups and businesses reopen Murphy accused Redfield and other trump administration officials with providing quote criminally vague guidance to the states for reopening Connecticut in five days in ten days this guidance is going to be useful to us in two weeks so is it this week is next week when we gonna get this expertise from the federal government Redfield said he anticipated the CDC guidance would be posted soon Murphy's response soon isn't terribly helpful Franco or down yes NPR news the White House the judge presiding over the criminal case of president trump's former national security adviser Michael Flynn is giving interested third parties time to file briefs in the case NPR's Ryan Lucas has more in a brief order U. S. district court judge Emmet Sullivan says due to the quote current posture in the Flynn case he's going to give outside groups and individuals a chance to file so called friend of the court briefs Solomon says he will provide a schedule for those at an appropriate time the order comes five days after the government move to drop its case against flint the former trump national security adviser pleaded guilty in twenty seventeen to lying to the FBI about his contacts with the Russian ambassador it is highly unusual for the justice department to seek to drop its prosecution of an individual who has pleaded guilty John Sullivan does have a say in whether the case will indeed be dropped and his latest order suggests he is still in the process of making up his mind Ryan Lucas NPR news Washington Georgia state lawmakers are pushing for a hate crimes law after the killing of an unarmed black jogger in February two white men are charged in the murder of Armand are berry Georgia public broadcasting's Emily Jones has more federal authorities are weighing whether hate crime charges apply in the shooting death of armory in February Georgia is one of four states without its own hate crime law I'm a bill has passed the state house but stalled in the Senate lawmakers now want to pass the bill and are hoping for support from Republican governor Brian Kemp Emily Jones reporting from Brunswick Georgia you're listening to NPR news the US is condemning an attack yesterday in Afghanistan on a maternity hospital in the capital Kabul more than twenty people were killed including newborns and mothers no one has claimed responsibility for the attack although the Taliban say it wasn't their fighters with votes still being counted Republican Mike Garcia leads democratic candidate Christie Smith in early returns in a special election in southern California from member station KPCC Libby Duncan says the winner will replace former representative Katie hill in Congress Garcia a former navy pilot spoke on a conference call shortly after polls closed on the twenty fifth district north of Los Angeles they were inspired by having a political outsider running for the right reasons with the right message to do the right thing for this country and at a time where we needed the most as a corona virus safety measure California's governor ordered counties to send every voter a mail in ballot some election watchers worried the virus and reliance on absentee ballots would dampen participation but interest in this race was high TV spots and mailers funded by outside groups and both campaigns boosted turnout vote totals for the special election are on track to equal or surpass the March primary for NPR news I'm Libby Duncan in Los Angeles a transgender woman from Michigan who fought for civil rights for people who are transgender has died Amy Stevens was fifty nine and had kidney disease she had gone to the U. S. Supreme Court with an employment rights case last fall Stephens had been fired by her employer and she transitioned to a woman the Supreme Court has not yet ruled this is NPR support for NPR comes from NPR stations other contributors include the John D. and Catherine T. macarthur foundation supporting creative people and effective institutions committed to building a more just verdant and peaceful world more information is at mac founder dot org and the Annie E. Casey foundation coming up on morning edition.

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jim hawk House Judiciary chairman Jerry Nadler says the committee will call attorney general William bar to testify in the near future. He'll be questioned about his four page summary of the report released on Sunday Barr says the investigation did not find sufficient evidence to establish that President Trump committed obstruction of Justice. But it also does not exonerate him. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis has more House Judiciary, chairman Nadler has made clear that he wants to continue his lines of inquiry. He has said in a statement that he intends to ask attorney general William bar to come up and testify. You know, he does have some six five six dozen Inc. Lines of inquiry out to members of the Trump administration. And Trump associates that he's looking into. I do think there's a question that's raised over whether these people who had been cooperating to some degree step up and maybe one play hard ball a little bit more on what Jerry Nadler wants from them NPR's. Susan Davis reporting. Meanwhile, sent a demo. Migrants Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer say attorney general William bar is quote, not a neutral observer, and they urge full release of Muller's report. President Trump, meanwhile, proclaiming complete and total. Exoneration has now arrived back in Washington after a weekend in Florida. Seems just about everyone has an opinion about the four page summary of the Muller report. Georgia public broadcasting. Stephen Fowler has reactions from Atlanta. It's just after Kamla Harris for president rally, but the California Senator isn't on everyone's mind pockets of people are discussing the four page summary that found no evidence of conspiracy with Russia, but did not take a stance on whether President Trump obstructed the investigation. Rhonda hall is one of them. She considers herself a political independent says the letter just wasn't enough information. It did not go far enough to me. It was just a waste of time and energy. Meanwhile, President Trump tweeted the reports summary showed quote, no collusion..

President Trump William bar Jerry Nadler Trump President attorney NPR Susan Davis chairman Washington Muller Jim hawk House Rhonda hall House Judiciary Barr Nancy Pelosi Kamla Harris Chuck Schumer
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:58 min | 3 years ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on AP News

"Amazon music app. Today. Francis is declining to accept the resignation of a French cardinal after he was convicted of failing to report a known predator priests to police AP correspondent Charles de LA desma reports Philippe Bob Iran, had traveled to the Vatican to present his resignation fully six months suspended sentence handed down on March seven but Francis didn't accept the resignation offer. An instead ask Bob around to do what he thinks is best for the lien archdiocese, a French court found the Barbara had obligation to report the Reverend Bernard printer to civil authorities when he'd learned of his abuse whose scheduled to be tried on sexual violence charges next year confessed to abusing boy scouts in the nineteen seventies and eighties. I'm Charles de LA desma. Dozens of deadly rattlesnakes were found living under a home in Texas. The home owner had. Reported seeing a few snakes under his home. But when big countries snake removal came out to help they pulled forty five rattlesnakes from underneath his home near Albany about one hundred fifty miles west of Dallas, the company said on his Facebook page that the homeowner found the snakes because he crawled underneath his home after high winds disrupted his cable television service, snakes will begin emerging from underneath Texas homes as the weather warms up. Increasing the risk of snake. Bites officials say that on average one to two people die in Texas each year from venomous snake bite. Actor and filmmaker Tyler Perry is stepped up in a big way to help a family after the tragic killing of a mother of four it comes less than a day after the family of tiny show Evans who was forty five launched a fundraising. Appeal berry has reportedly offered to take care of the families rent range for evidence body to be floated Wisconsin for burial and cover her eighteen year old daughter's tuition at Spelman college. So she doesn't have to drop out. Evans was killed Saturday morning outside of Bank near Atlanta, her boyfriend was arrested at the scene. Evans was an author fulltime healthcare worker, according to the families. Go fund me to over four children are still minors. One of them fourteen year olds Jamaica Turner, called Perry. An angel letter. Trump says McCain again, I'm Tim Maguire within AP news minute. Once again, President Trump attacks late Republican Senator John McCain telling workers at a military tank factory Ohio that he thinks McCain tried. They use the still dossier against him. John McCain got it. He got it. And what did he do didn't call me? He turned it over to the FBI hoping to put me in jeopardy trap. Repeated his complaint that McCain voted against the repeal of the Affordable Care Act and at the visit Vietnam prisoner of war was not supportive of veterans. Georgia Republican Senator Johnny Isakson, chairman of the veterans affairs committee tells Georgia public broadcasting it's deplorable what he said for the third time in two years. Google has been hit with a big fine by Europe's. Antitrust regulators regulators ordering the company to pay one point seven billion dollars for freezing out rivals in.

Senator John McCain Evans Charles de LA desma Texas Tyler Perry Francis Philippe Bob Iran Senator Johnny Isakson Tim Maguire Amazon President Trump Google Facebook Europe Georgia FBI berry Spelman college Atlanta AP
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Steven Portnoy, CBS news, the White House on Georgia public broadcasting's, political rewind Republican Senator Johnny Isakson called the president's comments. Deplorable. There are Dr Greg casualties and Republicans. On the battlefield. There are American casualties, and we should never reduce the service that people give to this country. A Bloomberg report says last foles lion air crash that killed all on board could have been averted. But CBS's Kris van cleave says there was a communications break over problems with the seven thirty seven max that plane had had the same malfunction on multiple flights leading up to the day of the crash and the crew on board when that third pilot was there did not fully report the incident. So the next crew up weren't necessarily well informed as to what had transpired on the previous flight. There were a lot of opportunities where this crash could have been avoided the Senate plans to call Boeing executives to a hearing for questioning about the two crashes involving the seven thirty seven max jets that killed more than three hundred people and the Pentagon watchdog has launched an investigation into allegations. That acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan used his office to promote. Knowing his former employer. Good news for consumers and businesses the Federal Reserve decided to leave interest rates unchanged, and suggests that there will be no more rate hikes this year. Then chairman Jerome Powell says it's not because of a diner outlook for the economy. That the limited data that we have do show a slowdown on the other hand as I mentioned, we see the underlying economic fundamentals for growth. This year is still very positive. The Dow fell one hundred and forty one NASDAQ was up five now this Capital One quicksilver card earn unlimited one point five percent cashback on every purchase everywhere. That's all. There is to just unlimited one point five percent cashback on everything you buy what's in your wallet radio continuing coverage, and we've got some brushfires cooking this afternoon Pierce county. Firefighters are asking people to evacuate from an area in Eaton Ville. This is near state route.

Dr Greg casualties Senator Johnny Isakson Steven Portnoy CBS Kris van cleave Eaton Ville Patrick Shanahan Federal Reserve Bloomberg White House Senate Pierce county Jerome Powell Boeing president Capital One Georgia chairman