17 Burst results for "Georgia Public Broadcasting"

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:57 min | Last month

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on AP News

"On the same day, President Joe Biden used UN American to describe Republican efforts to tighten state election laws. The Georgia Legislature passes a bill to overhaul state elections. The election bill passed by Republicans in the Georgia Legislature includes requiring people to have a photo I d to cast an absentee ballot. Republican governor, Brian Kemp signed the measure and then this from Georgia public broadcasting, Kemp criticizes opponents who say the law is designed to suppress the vote. Left wing groups funded by out of state billionaires are already doing that now. They're using outrageous faults, rhetoric to scare you and put millions of dollars in their own pocket. Georgia had record voter turnout last November, more than a million people voting by mail. The new measure cuts the time people have to request an absentee ballot limits where ballot drop boxes can be placed and when they can be accessed and gives the legislature and its appointed head of the state elections board control over elections and local election officials. I'm Tim McGuire. The election bill passed by Republicans in the Georgia Legislature includes requiring people to have a photo I d to cast an absentee ballot. Republican Governor Brian Kemp signed the measure and in this from Georgia Public Broadcasting kept criticizes opponents who say the law is designed to suppress the vote. Left wing groups funded by out of state billionaires already doing that now. They're using outrageous faults, rhetoric to scare you and put millions of dollars in their own pocket. Georgia had record voter turnout last November, more than a million people voting by mail. The new measure cuts the time people have to request an absentee ballot limits where ballot drop boxes can be placed and when they can be accessed and gives the legislature and its appointed head of the state elections board control over elections and local election officials. I'm Tim McGuire..

Tim McGuire Kemp Georgia Public Broadcasting Brian Kemp Republican Republicans last November more than a million people millions of dollars Georgia Legislature President Joe Biden Governor Georgia UN American
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:46 min | 2 months ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

"New restrictions on voting. It's a response to President Biden's win in the 2020 election. Donald Trump tried to overturn that Democratic vote by making false claims about it, his allies said at the time, they would use those falsehoods to shape future elections. Sponsor of the bill that passed yesterday, says he wants to restore voter confidence. Many voters believed that the false things Trump said were true. Stephen Fowler of Georgia Public Broadcasting has been all over this story. Good morning, Steven. Good morning. How would this bill change voting in Georgia? So house Bill 5 31, which runs about 66 pages would cut back on access to in person, early voting and absentee voting by making a lot of things a uniformed across Georges 159 counties don't know Well, that's an issue because these counties are very different sizes with vastly different populations that vote in a lot of different methods. The main provisions with cartel weekend voting mandating one Saturday and then the option of an additional Saturday or Sunday and that would harm souls of the polls, events that have been key for black voter participation in Georgia over the years. Would also cut back on access to drop boxes. One Republican even falsely suggested that drop boxes were the most inconvenient way to cast a ballot regarding things like souls to the polls before the House vote yesterday, did lawmakers talk openly about which voters were going to be disenfranchised by these new restrictions? Oh, yeah. Democrats spoke extensively about that, you know, saying that uniformity was not the same as equity and the many of these changes would end up hurting lower income voters, Voters of color older voters in Georgia Here's representative Jasmine Clark, She's a Democrat from Gwinnett County. The numbers are clear. HB 5 31 is textbook voter suppression. This bill reduces, restricts and limits every single aspect of our elections. And there were a number of protesters at the capital's saying that H p 5, 31 and other voting bills were silencing their voices. How did Republicans responded? They just come out and say, Look, we want this because we lost the state in 2020, or was it more subtle than that? Well, it was a little bit more subtle than that. I mean, buried within this 66 page bill. There are some provisions that county elections, officials say would make running elections easier and smoother. But there was a lot about of these controversy over the voting and A record number of people voting and that Republicans said that their voters need their confidence restored. And it's also partially because of how the state voted that you saw record number of people vote and that ended up with some key Democratic victories, especially with both U. S Senate seats. Here's Republican representative Alan Powell. There were untold numbers of people who voted. So much that it created such a problem with the system. Because our system is flawed. Ladies and gentleman. The system is flawed because the county's run the system, 159 counties run the election system. So there are these changes that maybe need to be made with George's voting system. But others, Republicans say the connection's a little more tenuous. Okay, So this bill now goes to the Senate, which is also led by Republicans, what's likely to happen in the Senate? Well, the Senate did pass their own package of election reforms that would do things to make it easier for counties to process absentee ballots and other things, but they have their own omnibus version of the bill that's making its way through the committee process. And it would do things like get rid of no excuse absentee voting because it is something that Republicans say just absolutely can't happen because there were too many people have voted. Stephen Fowler of Georgia Public Broadcasting. Thanks, Stephen. Thank you. We report next on a protest movement in India. It has drawn the interest of pop stars and climate activists and sent people into the streets for a cause. What's fascinating about the cause they're fighting for? Is how unfasten ating initially seems, farmers are protesting over new rules for wholesale markets. Why did those rules matter so much? The answer reveals something about a giant nation, its past and its possible future. NPR's Lauren Frayer begins at one of the markets in western India. Yeah, I like. So this is a wholesale market and sort of a dusty lot between looks like warehouses here. Yes, Yes. This is far. Good skunk..

Stephen Stephen Fowler Donald Trump Alan Powell Jasmine Clark Trump Lauren Frayer Steven George Georgia India Gwinnett County H p 5 Georgia Public Broadcasting Sunday Democrats yesterday Senate Republicans Democratic
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 4 months ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Him the first black senator to represent Georgia and the first black Democrat elected to the Senate from a southern state. There's war, not earlier on NPR's morning edition. Welcome to the New Georgia. It is more diverse it, it's more inclusive. And it readily embraces the future. And I'm the product of of that, among other side that you can see right on the ground here in this state. The other race between Democrat John OSS. Often Republican David Perdue is still too close to call. But Ausaf is holding on to a narrow lead. Let's bring in Stephen Fowler, a reporter for Georgia Public Broadcasting on Steven. What a historic moment for Georgia today. What's the feeling? Well, Excuse me. Well, if you ask Democrats, it's a feeling of relief. For years. They've been telling people that Georgia as a flip couple state, it's a winnable state. If you just invest time and money and manpower, and not only did they give Joe Biden 16 electoral votes, but they ended up likely flipping the Senate majority because of that investment. And so it's really a feeling of elation there. And Republicans are already beginning the soul searching to figure out what is to blame for this loss who was to blame and how they attempt to move forward in the state that is rapidly diversifying away from their favor. The historical context here is important because run offs in Georgia have been on favorable to Democrats to say the least. And yet we just heard Warnock say, Welcome to the New Georgia. What do you think? His victory says about the evolving political landscape of the state?.

Georgia New Georgia Georgia Public Broadcasting Senate NPR Steven Joe Biden senator David Perdue Ausaf John OSS Warnock Stephen Fowler reporter
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:38 min | 4 months ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"We've had as far as Election Day goes just to follow on what I was raising their the assault on the voting process itself by President Trump. Whoever wins among the casualties of this election will be anything resembling Republican unity. In Georgia. How are Georgia voters Responding to that? Well, you know Democrats are you know riled up because of the call that President Trump had with our secretary of state over the weekend, where he pressured the secretary to try and overturn the results. But also Republicans are energized to because they think that you know the president is defending the vote, and they turned out today. But then there's people like Wayne and best lever in Middle Georgia. We talked to that makes things even more unpredictable. Well, uh, we voted against the Republicans this time and I've never voted Democrat. So it was a big change for me. So we just really don't know how things are going to shake out. But definitely people just don't trust the system like they used to. Suggests that whoever wins and whenever we get the result, tonight's results will be controversial and possibly contested. Exactly if candidate finishes within half a percentage point of the other one. They can request a recount, which would have every single vote run through scanners again, and it's definitely a safe idea to think that there's going to be litigation coming. No matter who wins. Mm. So just the fact that we were getting returns maybe earlier than had been anticipated. Does that adjust your timeline at all in terms of when we might no winner in one or both of these races? Well, it just really depends on how many people show up during Election Day, Mary Louise because if there's a larger turnout, then that means that it's gonna be a closer race. No. All right. Well, the ballots are coming in. We appreciate you keeping us updated. Thanks, Stephen. Thank you. Stephen Fowler of Georgia Public Broadcasting. Thistles, all things considered from NPR news. Staying at home. So much has brought to life the idea off flourishing within the boundaries of a smaller world. One of my favorite spots in my backyard is underneath my manzanita Bush. The hummingbirds are coming to visit the white Globe shaped flowers coming up from K easy You news with going on a backyard exploration. Join us. That's this Wednesday on morning edition on.

President Trump Georgia president Stephen Fowler Middle Georgia Georgia Public Broadcasting assault secretary NPR Wayne Mary Louise
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 4 months ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mm just to follow on what I was raising their via the assault on the voting process itself by President Trump. Whoever wins among the casualties of this election will be anything resembling Republican unity. In Georgia. How are Georgia voters Responding to that? Well, you know Democrats are, you know riled up because of the call that President Trump had with our secretary of state over the weekend, where he pressured the secretary to try and overturn the results. But also Republicans are energized to because they think that you know, the president is defending the vote, and they turned out today. But then there's people like Wayne and best Lever in Middle Georgia. We talked to that makes things even more unpredictable. Well, uh, we voted against the Republicans this time and I've never voted Democrat. So it was a big change for me. So we just really don't know how things are going to shake out. But definitely people just don't trust the system like they used to. Suggests that whoever wins and whenever we get the result, tonight's results will be controversial and possibly contested. Exactly if candidate finishes within half a percentage point of the other one. They can request a recount, which would have every single vote run through scanners again, and it's definitely a safe idea to think that there's going to be litigation coming. No matter who wins. Mm hmm. So just the fact that we were getting returns maybe earlier than had been anticipated. Does that adjust your timeline at all in terms of when we might no winner in one or both of these races? Well, it just really depends on how many people show up during Election Day, Mary Louise because if there's a larger turnout, then that means that it's going to be a closer race. Yeah. All right. Well, the ballots are coming in. We appreciate you keeping us updated. Thanks, Stephen. Thank you. Stephen Fowler of Georgia Public Broadcasting. Thistles, all things considered from NPR news in a 5 18. There is traffic.

President Trump Georgia president Georgia Public Broadcasting Stephen Fowler Middle Georgia assault NPR secretary Wayne Mary Louise
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:31 min | 4 months ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

"High stakes. NPR's Sue Davis and Stephen Pallor of Georgia. Public Broadcasting. Thank you both so much. You're welcome. Thank thank you. Kim Waylay is with us next for some analysis. She is a professor of law at the University of Baltimore. Happy New Year. Good morning. Good morning, Steve. What is a proper legal term for what the president did on that call? We just heard. Well, potentially soliciting election fraud as we've heard from the Republicans now for months, voter fraud election fraud is a crime both the federal and the state level and it's also a crime to request solicit or ask someone else. To say, falsify returns or falsify reports of votes and arguably, that's what we heard on the call. Let me let me make sure I'm clear on this. Because the president has talked for months and months about election fraud. He's promoted election fraud. He's talked about a stolen election. I think you're telling me it's the president. Potentially remember this comes down to a showing of intent, he said. I won by 400,000 votes in Georgia. Georgia was certified three different times. He lost by about 12,000 votes s O. I guess he could make the argument. I didn't have the intent. I really believed That I won Georgia. But then the question is almost a 25th amendment one is he so sort of untethered from facts and reality that he's not fit. Even for the remaining days of the office. It seems like He can't have it both ways. But whether this is prosecutable is a different question from whether it's antithetical to the rule of law and the Constitution and democracy itself. And I would say clearly it is. It's It's very disturbing. Let me ask you about the other people on this call. We heard that Mark Meadows, the White House chief of staff, is on the call. Also clean up Mitchell New name to this continuing effort to overturn a democratic election. She's a Republican lawyer. She's on the call. We just heard the recording. She's repeating false statements. She's repeating those false statements in service of the president's larger lie that he won the election. Is it ethical for a lawyer to participate while her client tells obvious lies and tries to use them to overturn an election? Well under the model rules of professional conduct. It's a little bit delicate. It is. It is unethical for a lawyer to assist a client in some kind of fraudulent or criminal activity. It's not unethical to advise the implications of a certain course of action and say, Listen, that's a problem that's going to get you in trouble. But once it becomes clear to a lawyer that your client is asking you to help them engaged in something that's illegal, then it's ethically the obligation of the lawyer to withdraw from that representation. So you're saying that the only way she could claim that she was ethical in this situation is to say, Listen, I actually believed all these lives or, you know, I I told him this is a problem behind closed doors that he should really pivot off of this, given the potential legal implications of it. And we just don't know those are. Of course, those communications would be covered by the attorney client privilege. You said. It gets down to the question of intent, and of course, it's hard to determine anyone's anyone's intent. But there is the fact of what the president did. Is it legally meaningful here that in raising questions with the Georgia secretary of state for an hour, I mean, raised various conspiracy theories, I guess, in a way he was talking about the process, even though those facts were wrong, according to the Georgia secretary of state, But is it legally meaningful that his specific request to the secretary of state Was to quote find exactly enough votes for Donald Trump to happen to win the election by exactly one vote. Well, I think the argument there is he's not asking for 1/4 certification. Listen, we really want to make sure this was done accurately. Because if it was, we know that factually. So the question is, was he seeking under federal law knowingly attempted To stop a free and fair election and have votes Wade in his way. I think that some would say yes. Would you support the calls by some Democrats for a criminal investigation here? Is there enough to look at No, I leave that to the prosecutors. I think it's really a political question here. I think that certainly is impeachable. We have to remember what's going on here. This is a plea across the board to take democracy away from the people and give it to politicians. We should have that debate, but name it for what it is. Kim Waylay is a professor of.

president Georgia fraud Kim Waylay Donald Trump Mark Meadows NPR University of Baltimore professor of law Sue Davis Stephen Pallor Steve chief of staff professor attorney White House
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:48 min | 4 months ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Dave Freeman on Tuesday. Good morning to you. It's 6 35. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm David Greene in Los Angeles. And I'm Layla folded in Culver City, California We are a week away from two crucial Senate runoff elections in Georgia. The outcome will determine which party controls the Senate and early voting has been underway for weeks. Stephen Fowler of Georgia Public Broadcasting has been covering both races and is with us. Good morning. Good morning. So Stephen. People have been casting ballots for a few weeks now. So what can you tell us about the votes so far? Well, more than 2.3 million. Jordan's have already voted in this election through early in person voting or returning an absentee by mail ballot. That's pretty stunning for a runoff, which typically doesn't have that many people voting. But like you said control of the U. S Senate is on the line. Now what we know is that these voters are slightly younger and slightly more diverse than what we saw in the general electorate. So that typically means that Democrats are ahead as of right now, and we look at the data of where people are voting, and most of these early votes are coming from metro Atlanta, suburban counties around the state and in typical democratic strongholds. How much can we really tell back in November we really saw Democrats dominate the early and absentee vote while Republicans turned out more on election day. So is that pattern repeating itself this time around. Yes and no, we are seeing, you know people voting at a similar pace that they were in the general election. But what's noticeable is who's not showing up to vote mean. Republicans do typically use Georges three weeks of early voting, but the numbers of Republican leaning counties and rural strongholds are way down from what you would expect to see. Compared to some of the other counties. And so it's an uphill battle for Republicans to try to counter act all of the Democratic early voting that made more complicated by the holiday where early voting is actually going to end a couple days early this time because of the new year Interesting because Georgia has been the focal point for President Trump's baseless claims that the election was stolen from him. So how much is that impacting what voters air doing now? It definitely has an impact. But it's hard to really quantify that because many of the people that have attended his rallies throughout the state and said that the system is rigged and the Trump should have won and that there's problems with our voting system are lining up to vote in these early voting sites. And so it's just really hard to square but also President Trump is Holding a rally the night before the election in northwest Georgia, the 14th congressional district where Marjorie Taylor Greene is about to take office. She's leading the charge of trying to challenge election results. And that district has the lowest turnout of any congressional district in Georgia, and none of those things are coincidences. That's Stephen Fowler of Georgia Public Broadcasting. He's been covering this closely for us. He also hosts the battleground ballot box podcast. Thank you so much, Stephen. Thank you. This pandemic continues to disproportionately impact communities of color in South Florida, a nonprofit is helping Latino and black residents get access to covert testing. They're also trying to build trust in the vaccine. From member station W. Lrn Veronica Sarah Go via reports, a group called Healthy Little Havana received an assignment this summer convinced residents of this neighborhood in Miami to get a covert 19 test. Nonprofit has lots of outreach experience. It helped with the census counting and because of the pandemic, it did that by phone. But this new challenge needs a face to face.

Stephen Fowler Georgia President Trump Georgia Public Broadcasting David Greene NPR News Senate Dave Freeman Marjorie Taylor Greene Los Angeles U. S Senate W. Lrn Veronica Sarah Go Culver City Little Havana South Florida Jordan California Georges Miami
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

06:36 min | 7 months ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Virus? And that's just how long people wait to get the result. It often takes a few days between the time people are cold. The needy attested and they actually managed to get a test. So put it all together, and it's taking almost a week to get tested and gets results for a lot of people. Here's David Laser from Northeast there who's helping leave the survey. Even with the improved testing speed, there's almost a week lag between the time that they're told to get attest to where they might get a positive test. And at that point much of the harm that could be done in spreading throughout that person Social network has already occurred. We need to do a lot better. So after a person gets a positive test result, they're supposed to be this contact tracing right? What is the national survey say about how that's going? Yes. Oh, that's more bad news from the survey and found that only a little more than half of people who test positive ever hear from a health worker to find out who they may have had contact with. So those people can be cold the quarantine and get tested to find out if they caught the virus and you know to stop new operates from occurring. Here's David loser organ from Northeastern in the ideal world that would all go rather tight tat, you know, test trace contact, isolate right and that would all happen in a matter of a few days. That way. We don't have to have lockdowns if we can zoom in on the people who are most likely to be infecting. Other people. Rob is you've reported from the very beginning of this pandemic, Black and Latino communities were harder hit than white communities. Is that still playing out with these results of this survey about testing and contact tracing? Yeah, you know are. Unfortunately it is. The survey found that on average Hispanics wait about a half day longer than whites and Asian Americans to get their test results and blacks wait almost a whole day longer. So that's just, you know, one more way that blacks and Latinos are getting it harder by this pandemic, and it could be contributing to the disparities that we've been saying all along. One of the federal officials from the Trump administration who are leading the fight against the pandemic, saying about this You know, so I got a statement from federal health officials you know, late today defending the administration's testing efforts, the statement says. The federal government has given states billions of dollars to bolster their testing and has invested millions to develop new tests and distributing millions. Tens of millions of new fast has to provide results in minutes. They also say turnaround times have fallen and argued that an average turnaround time of just under three days. Is sufficient as long as people follow CDC guidelines to isolate when they've been exposed to the virus or of symptoms and are careful to take other steps, you know, like wearing masks and avoiding crowds. It's NPR health correspondent Rob Stein. Thank you. You better hurry. Recent elections in Georgia have been marked by long lines at the polls for some voters, especially a non white communities around metro Atlanta, and a new investigation by Propublica and Georgia Public Broadcasting found that rapid population growth in a failure to add more polling places has contributed to the states voting problems. Joining us now is Stephen Fowler, reporter and host of Battleground ballot box. Ah, Voting podcast by Georgia Public Broadcasting. Hey there, Stephen Tanya. So in the story you wrote about this investigation. You say that since 12 2009 Metro Atlanta counties have been added nearly a million more voters to the roles, but the number of polling places in those counties have either closed or stayed stagnant. What has this meant for elections in Georgia? Well, the average number of people assigned to a polling place statewide and Georgia has jumped nearly 50% since 2012. That's also because the number of voting locations has been decimated. In 2013, The Shelby versus holder Supreme Court decision meant Georgia no longer had to get permission to make those changes or had to prove that they were not discriminatory. So what we found in these big metro Atlanta counties were polling places that are 2 to 3 times larger than the state average and many of the long lines and problems we've seen in recent elections. Okay, Speaking of thes lines when early voting started in Georgia last week, we saw these pictures of people waiting up to eight hours to cast their ballots in some of these metro Atlanta counties. How does that connect to this larger story about access to the polls? Well, there were some technical issues and record turnout last week, but many voters were just trying to avoid long election day lines like 71 year old John Glover told US I have bullet in every election. Not overheard Stand in. The line is long, but it is worth the while. You're just an eight hour of this. I have to simply put black voters in particular. Don't trust Georgia Elections officials to ensure they can easily cast their ballot and they're willing to do whatever it takes for such a big election. Um, okay, So as we've seen in many states, people can vote in Georgia, either by mail early in person or election day. So how does how does this failure to add more polling places actually impact voters? Well, Tanya, our analysis found that many of them or crowded poles in the state are in predominantly black neighborhoods like Union City, just south of Atlanta. There's about 22,000 people assigned to just three polling places this year, making those some of the largest and the state. That's where I talked with a woman named Kathy, who waited five hours to vote and she was one of the lucky ones. The last voter at her polling place and the June 9th primary actually voted June 10th. Here's what Kathy had to say about why she thinks it's not a coincidence when you look at the systemic issues that plagues us as a society, but also as a people often times We're spraining. Well, we're not being heard. In fact, the data that we analyse from the primary showed that two thirds of the poles that had to stay open late or in these majority non white communities. Steven, who's Who's responsible for these decisions to close thes polling places or not at additional ones? And what do they have to say about these findings? Well, there are bipartisan county elections boards that make these decisions in conjunction with their hired supervisors and the county commissions that provide funding for their budgets. It's important to note that this is an issue that affects both white Republican areas of the state, as well as black Democratic strongholds. So it's not a partisan issue. It's ultimately about resource is And what we've seen in the numbers here in Georgia is that black voters in particular are hit the hardest by not having the same access to resource is as white voters. Stephen Fowler is the host of Georgia Public Broadcasting's battleground ballot box. Ah podcast and author of a Propublica investigation.

Georgia Atlanta Georgia Public Broadcasting David Laser Stephen Fowler Georgia Elections Stephen Tanya Rob Stein federal government NPR Supreme Court Kathy Trump Northeastern CDC Steven John Glover reporter
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:42 min | 9 months ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Like nothing had happened on. Then on May 5th she gets a call from her lawyer. A local radio station has posted the video of the shooting on their Facebook page. He said, Well, I want to show you the video is out. It is going to be everywhere. So I would advise you to if you're going to want you to get around people who love you and watch it. And He said. Do you want me to tell you What was on it and I said, No, I don't want to. I told him that I don't want to know. Larry Hobbs, The Brunswick News reporter was at home when the video came out. This thing gets picked up everybody This sees it for, however long gets up, And I guess it would have been more than 30 or 40 minutes on their Facebook page. By now, That thing is all over the world. And you're listening on Georgia Public Broadcasting today. The case of Ahmad Armory is making international news headlines. CNN has obtained video of Aubrey being Shot video has surfaced of an African American man being chased down and killed the case. You're widespread public attention after a video of the shooting was released. You remember what I don't know. Did it change the way you had thought about your reporting or the last few months, it confirmed everything I suspected and worse. Did you hear three shotgun blast That's buckshot. Hey. He stumbles away on Travis Mint. Michael's got that gun in his hand. And just this The 10,000 yard stare and just walks right into the camera. Just like I don't know what's going on in his mind. What was pretty. It was It wasn't.

Facebook Georgia Public Broadcasting Ahmad Armory Larry Hobbs Travis Mint CNN reporter Aubrey Michael The Brunswick News
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

"During the pandemic one of the nation's top health officials says the centers for disease control and prevention will soon release step by step guidance on how local authorities can begin safely re opening their economies and peers Franco donors reports that's not good enough for some lawmakers during a Senate hearing on restarting the economy democratic senator Chris Murphy of Connecticut press the director of the CDC Dr Robert Redfield to release its detailed plan to help these local groups and businesses reopen Murphy accused Redfield and other trump administration officials with providing quote criminally vague guidance to the states for reopening Connecticut in five days in ten days this guidance is going to be useful to us in two weeks so is it this week is next week when we gonna get this expertise from the federal government Redfield said he anticipated the CDC guidance would be posted soon Murphy's response soon isn't terribly helpful Franco or down yes NPR news the White House the judge presiding over the criminal case of president trump's former national security adviser Michael Flynn is giving interested third parties time to file briefs in the case NPR's Ryan Lucas has more in a brief order U. S. district court judge Emmet Sullivan says due to the quote current posture in the Flynn case he's going to give outside groups and individuals a chance to file so called friend of the court briefs Solomon says he will provide a schedule for those at an appropriate time the order comes five days after the government move to drop its case against flint the former trump national security adviser pleaded guilty in twenty seventeen to lying to the FBI about his contacts with the Russian ambassador it is highly unusual for the justice department to seek to drop its prosecution of an individual who has pleaded guilty John Sullivan does have a say in whether the case will indeed be dropped and his latest order suggests he is still in the process of making up his mind Ryan Lucas NPR news Washington Georgia state lawmakers are pushing for a hate crimes law after the killing of an unarmed black jogger in February two white men are charged in the murder of Armand are berry Georgia public broadcasting's Emily Jones has more federal authorities are weighing whether hate crime charges apply in the shooting death of armory in February Georgia is one of four states without its own hate crime law I'm a bill has passed the state house but stalled in the Senate lawmakers now want to pass the bill and are hoping for support from Republican governor Brian Kemp Emily Jones reporting from Brunswick Georgia you're listening to NPR news the US is condemning an attack yesterday in Afghanistan on a maternity hospital in the capital Kabul more than twenty people were killed including newborns and mothers no one has claimed responsibility for the attack although the Taliban say it wasn't their fighters with votes still being counted Republican Mike Garcia leads democratic candidate Christie Smith in early returns in a special election in southern California from member station KPCC Libby Duncan says the winner will replace former representative Katie hill in Congress Garcia a former navy pilot spoke on a conference call shortly after polls closed on the twenty fifth district north of Los Angeles they were inspired by having a political outsider running for the right reasons with the right message to do the right thing for this country and at a time where we needed the most as a corona virus safety measure California's governor ordered counties to send every voter a mail in ballot some election watchers worried the virus and reliance on absentee ballots would dampen participation but interest in this race was high TV spots and mailers funded by outside groups and both campaigns boosted turnout vote totals for the special election are on track to equal or surpass the March primary for NPR news I'm Libby Duncan in Los Angeles a transgender woman from Michigan who fought for civil rights for people who are transgender has died Amy Stevens was fifty nine and had kidney disease she had gone to the U. S. Supreme Court with an employment rights case last fall Stephens had been fired by her employer and she transitioned to a woman the Supreme Court has not yet ruled this is NPR support for NPR comes from NPR stations other contributors include the John D. and Catherine T. macarthur foundation supporting creative people and effective institutions committed to building a more just verdant and peaceful world more information is at mac founder dot org and the Annie E. Casey foundation coming up on morning edition.

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jim hawk House Judiciary chairman Jerry Nadler says the committee will call attorney general William bar to testify in the near future. He'll be questioned about his four page summary of the report released on Sunday Barr says the investigation did not find sufficient evidence to establish that President Trump committed obstruction of Justice. But it also does not exonerate him. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis has more House Judiciary, chairman Nadler has made clear that he wants to continue his lines of inquiry. He has said in a statement that he intends to ask attorney general William bar to come up and testify. You know, he does have some six five six dozen Inc. Lines of inquiry out to members of the Trump administration. And Trump associates that he's looking into. I do think there's a question that's raised over whether these people who had been cooperating to some degree step up and maybe one play hard ball a little bit more on what Jerry Nadler wants from them NPR's. Susan Davis reporting. Meanwhile, sent a demo. Migrants Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer say attorney general William bar is quote, not a neutral observer, and they urge full release of Muller's report. President Trump, meanwhile, proclaiming complete and total. Exoneration has now arrived back in Washington after a weekend in Florida. Seems just about everyone has an opinion about the four page summary of the Muller report. Georgia public broadcasting. Stephen Fowler has reactions from Atlanta. It's just after Kamla Harris for president rally, but the California Senator isn't on everyone's mind pockets of people are discussing the four page summary that found no evidence of conspiracy with Russia, but did not take a stance on whether President Trump obstructed the investigation. Rhonda hall is one of them. She considers herself a political independent says the letter just wasn't enough information. It did not go far enough to me. It was just a waste of time and energy. Meanwhile, President Trump tweeted the reports summary showed quote, no collusion..

President Trump William bar Jerry Nadler Trump President attorney NPR Susan Davis chairman Washington Muller Jim hawk House Rhonda hall House Judiciary Barr Nancy Pelosi Kamla Harris Chuck Schumer
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on AP News

"Amazon music app. Today. Francis is declining to accept the resignation of a French cardinal after he was convicted of failing to report a known predator priests to police AP correspondent Charles de LA desma reports Philippe Bob Iran, had traveled to the Vatican to present his resignation fully six months suspended sentence handed down on March seven but Francis didn't accept the resignation offer. An instead ask Bob around to do what he thinks is best for the lien archdiocese, a French court found the Barbara had obligation to report the Reverend Bernard printer to civil authorities when he'd learned of his abuse whose scheduled to be tried on sexual violence charges next year confessed to abusing boy scouts in the nineteen seventies and eighties. I'm Charles de LA desma. Dozens of deadly rattlesnakes were found living under a home in Texas. The home owner had. Reported seeing a few snakes under his home. But when big countries snake removal came out to help they pulled forty five rattlesnakes from underneath his home near Albany about one hundred fifty miles west of Dallas, the company said on his Facebook page that the homeowner found the snakes because he crawled underneath his home after high winds disrupted his cable television service, snakes will begin emerging from underneath Texas homes as the weather warms up. Increasing the risk of snake. Bites officials say that on average one to two people die in Texas each year from venomous snake bite. Actor and filmmaker Tyler Perry is stepped up in a big way to help a family after the tragic killing of a mother of four it comes less than a day after the family of tiny show Evans who was forty five launched a fundraising. Appeal berry has reportedly offered to take care of the families rent range for evidence body to be floated Wisconsin for burial and cover her eighteen year old daughter's tuition at Spelman college. So she doesn't have to drop out. Evans was killed Saturday morning outside of Bank near Atlanta, her boyfriend was arrested at the scene. Evans was an author fulltime healthcare worker, according to the families. Go fund me to over four children are still minors. One of them fourteen year olds Jamaica Turner, called Perry. An angel letter. Trump says McCain again, I'm Tim Maguire within AP news minute. Once again, President Trump attacks late Republican Senator John McCain telling workers at a military tank factory Ohio that he thinks McCain tried. They use the still dossier against him. John McCain got it. He got it. And what did he do didn't call me? He turned it over to the FBI hoping to put me in jeopardy trap. Repeated his complaint that McCain voted against the repeal of the Affordable Care Act and at the visit Vietnam prisoner of war was not supportive of veterans. Georgia Republican Senator Johnny Isakson, chairman of the veterans affairs committee tells Georgia public broadcasting it's deplorable what he said for the third time in two years. Google has been hit with a big fine by Europe's. Antitrust regulators regulators ordering the company to pay one point seven billion dollars for freezing out rivals in.

Senator John McCain Evans Charles de LA desma Texas Tyler Perry Francis Philippe Bob Iran Senator Johnny Isakson Tim Maguire Amazon President Trump Google Facebook Europe Georgia FBI berry Spelman college Atlanta AP
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Steven Portnoy, CBS news, the White House on Georgia public broadcasting's, political rewind Republican Senator Johnny Isakson called the president's comments. Deplorable. There are Dr Greg casualties and Republicans. On the battlefield. There are American casualties, and we should never reduce the service that people give to this country. A Bloomberg report says last foles lion air crash that killed all on board could have been averted. But CBS's Kris van cleave says there was a communications break over problems with the seven thirty seven max that plane had had the same malfunction on multiple flights leading up to the day of the crash and the crew on board when that third pilot was there did not fully report the incident. So the next crew up weren't necessarily well informed as to what had transpired on the previous flight. There were a lot of opportunities where this crash could have been avoided the Senate plans to call Boeing executives to a hearing for questioning about the two crashes involving the seven thirty seven max jets that killed more than three hundred people and the Pentagon watchdog has launched an investigation into allegations. That acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan used his office to promote. Knowing his former employer. Good news for consumers and businesses the Federal Reserve decided to leave interest rates unchanged, and suggests that there will be no more rate hikes this year. Then chairman Jerome Powell says it's not because of a diner outlook for the economy. That the limited data that we have do show a slowdown on the other hand as I mentioned, we see the underlying economic fundamentals for growth. This year is still very positive. The Dow fell one hundred and forty one NASDAQ was up five now this Capital One quicksilver card earn unlimited one point five percent cashback on every purchase everywhere. That's all. There is to just unlimited one point five percent cashback on everything you buy what's in your wallet radio continuing coverage, and we've got some brushfires cooking this afternoon Pierce county. Firefighters are asking people to evacuate from an area in Eaton Ville. This is near state route.

Dr Greg casualties Senator Johnny Isakson Steven Portnoy CBS Kris van cleave Eaton Ville Patrick Shanahan Federal Reserve Bloomberg White House Senate Pierce county Jerome Powell Boeing president Capital One Georgia chairman
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

"City employees remained locked out of their computers court dates are being postponed as hackers hold the city's data hostage joining us with more is emily cureton reporter for georgia public broadcasting and emily i mean seems like obviously a very serious attack it's still crippling the city then city services five days later yes we're actually in day six now ransomware encrypted city data early last thursday morning right now the responses kind of into two distinct categories with a team of it experts working around the clock to try and figure out how to get the data back and then other city employees are helping a the effort to keep the business of government running so most city services that are available are working on pen and paper they're not processing payments online and it's kind of taken the government back a couple of decades in terms of how they do their business it's remarkable to think how vulnerable we are to these kinds of hacks i mean the hackers are demanding a ransom how much is it and is the city even considering paying it they are considering paying it and it is a strange figure the ransom is fifty one thousand dollars that's about six bitcoins one theory is that it's just low enough where it might be easier to pay it then to go through the headache of trying to get the cyber crisis resolved another way the trouble with that is that there's no guarantee the city will actually get it state of back if they pay the attackers what they're asking for and i asked the mayor if the data that was taken was backed up elsewhere and the response was not exactly clear she said while they do have backup systems they can't be sure those aren't compromised to while.

reporter emily cureton georgia fifty one thousand dollars five days
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Georgia public broadcasting stephen fowler reports that the winner of the election could change the city's political landscape since 1973 the mayor of atlanta has been black democratic an instrumental in picking their successor but white independent mary nor what has earned support across party lines and for many of her black democratic opponents in the general election her opponent kishan lands bottoms's banking on the current mayors endorsement and last minute support from national senators cory booker and kamala harris steven fowler reporting this is npr the house has voted to open negotiations with the senate on a tax overhaul bill each chamber has voted for its own version now the work out the differences in a conference committee both houses must pass the same version of the bill before it can be sent to the president for his signature later today president trump will welcome some republican senators for lunch at the white house the city of los angeles is suing ride hailing company uber after it admitted concealing a huge databreach last year hackers stole data on some sixty million drivers and customers daniel carson reports the suit aims to find how many california drivers were affected more than half a million drivers and riders in the us had their names email addresses and mobile phone number stolen city attorney mike fewer says california law requires companies to disclosed data breaches to consumers it gives those victims an opportunity in a timely way to attempt to protect information but otherwise might be compromised the lawsuit is seeking civil penalties under california's consumer.

california mike fewer attorney mobile phone daniel carson kamala harris cory booker stephen fowler Georgia atlanta us los angeles white house trump president senate the house steven fowler
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Little garcia navarro npr news miami georgia governor nathan deal has ordered a mandatory evacuation for coastal areas ahead of hurricane erma bradley george of georgia public broadcasting reports shelters are opening around the state for those fleeing the storm governor deal says there's still a lot of uncertainty about when or mobile reached georgia and what the impacts will be but he says all residents need to take the storm seriously and he urged those living in the evacuation zone to get out this is a rapidly movie hurricane and the weather and the consequences of that hurricane changed dramatically within a relatively short period of time state parks are prepared to house as many as ten thousand people the national guard is mobilising to help with storm recovery georgia is already seeing a rush of evacuees from florida highways in the southern part of the state or jammed and many hotels are full for npr news i'm brantley george in atlanta authorities in mexico say at least sixty people died in a powerful earthquake last night it's drunk off the country's southern coast just before midnight hundreds of buildings collapsed or were damaged about one point eight million people lost electrical service the quake also triggered soon nami warnings this is npr news from washington the us today hold the united nations security council intends to call a meeting monday to vote on additional sanctions against north korea for its weapons program the resolution would impose an oil embargo and a ban on textile imports.

nathan deal erma bradley george georgia washington us united nations security counci north korea miami florida npr atlanta mexico npr
"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:23 min | 4 years ago

"georgia public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The trump administration has certified that iran is keeping the terms of the international nuclear accord that means ron can continue to get relief from international sanctions this is the second time the trump administration shen has verified that iran is keeping the terms of the deal president trump has previously called for the deal to be ended or insisted iran is not keeping the spirit of the accord this is npr rescue teams in arizona will resume searching for a man who went missing after an arizona flash flood on saturday the flash flood killed nine people for them children when it swept through a swimming whole about ninety miles north of phoenix several members of one family perished a jury in georgia has found railroad giant csx partially responsible for the death of reproduction assistant who was killed while filming a movie on a train trestle in southeast georgia georgia public broadcasting steven fowler reports it's part of an eleven million dollar settlement a jury has awarded more than eleven million dollars in damages to the family of sara jones she was hit by csx freight train south of savannah in 2014 while working of the cameras than on a movie about the late rocker gregg allman six other people were injured as the crew scrambled to escape the train although the crew was repeatedly denied permission to film on the tracks jurors say the movie's director the owner of the land and the train company share responsibility for the accident theory sex must pay three point nine million dollars of the eleven million dollar settlement the company plans to appeal the decision for npr news i'm steven fowler in atlanta the bank of england is preparing to unveil the new ten pound english note the currency features a portrait of english author jane austen it's being shown on the twohundredth anniversary of her death the bbc reports the note is likely to be available for use in september the united kingdom's royal man has also released a limited supply of a new to pound coin this coin will also honour the author jane austen i'm korver coleman npr news from washington support for npr comes from npr stations other contributors include disperse ski lab internet security giving four hundred million users the power to protect their money privacy computers and mobile devices from cyber theft viruses and other online threats learn more at kaspersky dot com.

director kaspersky theft washington jane austen bank of england atlanta president mobile devices npr united kingdom bbc iran gregg allman savannah sara jones steven fowler csx georgia phoenix arizona the deal trump ron eleven million dollar eleven million dollars nine million dollars ten pound