35 Burst results for "Georgetown University"

"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:39 min | 2 weeks ago

"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My my yesterday's Call nicole who is professor of economics. at georgetown university. she studied skis. Using given up and economics says his aspirations informed credit and insurance markets in the house. For bob eating social networks tolerance and inequity eating quality. Welcome hi thank you get this type of recent papers parlance and compromise in social networks. You say individuals typically different their identities the behaviors that they deem ideal for themselves and for the members of the network their tolerance added behavior that deviate from their own ideals. This team for studies. His the possibility of compromise deposited his once idea points to be accepted by others because some video law and social networks. Now i think facebook has to big beaver and most people have expanded sort of the networks. They they are. They're part of the snake sort of intuitive sense You you cannot be you know sort of big legion about. You'll ideals do join network because the net will pass some videos in behaviors and expectations. So what's the date that you're using here. And what are some of the major conclusions. So i'm not using data so this is a territory so what i wanted to explore is what happened when individuals formed this social network and they can change their behavior in order to fit it. So i want to abide josh allen. T action so that you're going to interact with people And when you interact with people and this is what. I need by social action than than we can discuss whatever Means impacting people on but when attacked with people friends colleagues. And so on you need to spend time with them and we as human being died quite In tam of abound chauvel behavioral attitudes opinion and so on and we own have some ideal behavior behavior. So the In some sense You sit the is likely to think about this In some sense in the behavior space you have some sort of o.'neil you are at the center at you have some ebay Let's call it back that allows you to move around their behavior space but there is a limit beyond which you won't go so that saw the tolerance limit lay exactly so i might have. Id's it a vaguely. I'll i might accept people while voicing. Id's it the more conservative than what. I would want to hear or what i would want in my but if it's not too far from where i am. I stated value their friendship that is expected to be friends with them but not but defer he'll opinions the extremely Aw extreme right opinion. That's too far from Does not the goal. I prefer not to interact with data intact with them because evading tax. We've them than hearing those opinions hearing those just give me so much displeasure that i'm better off not having deming my myself media so you seem the paper that hideous genetically intolerance is necessary for compromise. Yes and you at your security shouldn't be still need. Belletti is sort of a tolerance limits in the members of the network for it to work. So what's intuition behind. it's not fully. Let me. I tell you need to what happened in the paper in that..

josh allen georgetown university nicole bob facebook neil ebay Belletti
International Scientists Say Booster Shots Are Not Necessary

Mark Levin

01:25 min | Last month

International Scientists Say Booster Shots Are Not Necessary

"Story that broke a few hours ago. We're now we have international group of experts. Saying no if the experts among group opposing US booster shot plan The authors include two leading vaccine reviewers at the FDA. Doctors fill Krause and marrying Gruber, who recently announced they will be stepping down this fall. Among the other 16 authors are leading vaccine researchers in the US, Britain, France, South Africa and India. Plus scientists with the World Health Organization, which already has urged a more tournament boosters. In the US The White House has begun planning for boosters later this month of both the FDA and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention agree. Advisors to the FDA will weigh evidence about an extra fighter shot Friday to keep public meeting. Now the reason these two resigned and they are the two top experts at the FDA, not just to experts. Doctors fill Kraus man groupers, They said the Biden ministrations pressuring them. To approve the boosters. Georgetown University's Larry Gostin said the paper throws gasoline on the fire in the debate about whether most Americans truly need boosters whether the White House got ahead of the scientists. It's always a fundamental error process to make a scientific announcement before the public health agencies have acted and that's exactly what happened here is that Boston There's also a lawyer in public health specialists.

FDA Centers For Disease Control An Krause Gruber United States World Health Organization White House Larry Gostin South Africa Britain France India Kraus Biden Georgetown University Boston
Vaccine Chief Kono Popular Favorite to Become Japan's Leader

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last month

Vaccine Chief Kono Popular Favorite to Become Japan's Leader

"Japan's vaccine chief is looking like the favorite to become the nation's next leader Indian polls showed the outspoken cabinet minister in charge of vaccinations Tero Colo has the most popular support to become the country's next leader current prime minister Justin Heidi soon because something announcement last week that he will not seek another term has opened the way full array of candidates single spaced nose diving popularity over the government's coronavirus response fifty eight year old co no a graduate of Georgetown University and fluent in English is a rarity in Japanese politics usually dominated by elderly man he's got many fans among younger people with whom he communicates via social media I'm Charles Taylor this month

Tero Colo Justin Heidi Japan Cabinet Georgetown University Government Charles Taylor
Oklahoma NAACP Files Suit Challenging Anti-Protest Law

Pacifica Evening News

00:58 sec | Last month

Oklahoma NAACP Files Suit Challenging Anti-Protest Law

"Lawsuit claiming a new anti protest bill approved by lawmakers this year is unconstitutional. The Oklahoma chapter of the ACP filed the lawsuit and federal court along with the National NAACP and the Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection at Georgetown University Law Center. The lawsuit argues the Oklahoma law was written to discourage peaceful demonstrations and that it violates the first and 14th amendments to the US Constitution. The law is set to take effect November 1st. It increases the penalties for blocking roadways. And grants motorists civil and criminal immunity if they kill or injure someone while quote fleeing from a riot. It also authorizes hefty fines for national organizations that coordinate with those sound guilty of committing crimes under the state's rioting statutes. The president of the Oklahoma State

National Naacp Institute For Constitutional A Oklahoma ACP Georgetown University Law Cent United States
"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:24 min | 5 months ago

"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Different states of the world and sopa. We have Is afoot here. You know right from the Catholic been successful in convincing policymakers of your ideas that you know taxing gas would be listed Well so let me back up a second so you said the analysts can do whatever they want. It goes up to the decision. Makers the ceo of the company and that's true with the federal government level as well the trump administration wanted to roll back the fuel economy standards that were set by the obama administration and so they went to the epa and the department of transportation. They said in order to rollback regulations. You have to do the same serious analysis as was done to to enact the regulation in the first place and so the analyst did the regulation the analysts it was the same analyst who had done analysis to put the regulation forward in the first place that had net benefits that were positive and so undoing. The regulation would reduce those would have net costs. And in fact that's what the department of transportation's regulatory impact analysis showed it showed. This will be net harmful to american cars consumers and yet the olympic passed it and president trump signed it and it was Finalized as regulation now this week in the news. It's come under scrutiny. Because some of the epa analysts Work were complained about the process and left out of the loop on that process but they announced this was done. It showed net costs. It went to the ceo which was in this case. The president and the president signed it anyway. I sometimes think the solutions office better has even if even if I don't have all your analysis. I would say you know. Some sort of a consumption tax on gas or some sort of carbon carbon emission tax would be the simplest hicham. Brian's they'd easily understood is likely to be the the dogma policy. But it's not that simple is it. it's simple economically. it's just not simple. Politically intersts symbol politically. Yeah so we have to some figuring out a way to do you think. Are you optimistic. That i mean from an economics perspective because bissett's in the of the of the best understanding.

Brian olympic this week obama Catholic department of transportation trump president first place second american
"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:52 min | 5 months ago

"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Of cost savings you'll drive ten percent more something like that. It's not But it's the back of the envelope calculation. It's a very hard behavioral It's a very hard behavior to estimate since open. Then you of obama administration is a duty have from a policy perspective. It seems to me that being need some sort of a normalization. We need some sort of evaluation process for every policy suggestion. So what's the net present brad you to society that calculation for every suggestion they will turned is being compare them. Do we have a process like that. Just like the doing business we do. It's and i think it's spectacularly Important then spectacularly effective dates back to ronald reagan. An executive order that ronald reagan issued and it was reissued by bill clinton and by barack obama and it Oregon set up an office in the office of management and budget called the office of information and regulatory affairs. Oh era is the acronym And they are the gatekeeper for these regulations. So every regular every regulatory agency that promulgates a economically significant piece of regulation like cafe standards or carbon standard or a new healthcare rule. They have to really serious cost benefit analysis which they calculate what you said the net present value of the benefits versus the costs and they have to compare that against alternatives. And if they don't do that right the of information and regulatory affairs can send it back and if they don't do that right they can get sued in court and have the Have the regulation Sent back to the agency so it's taken really seriously. There are good engineers and good economists at the agencies that work on these things. They're nine hundred. Page long documents with charts and tables and graphs and everything you want to know about the industry so this is a is a serious process and And i think it's pretty well done in a lot of cases so let me push on this little bit hard so in companies You know be be do this because our spreadsheets lot of Finance and accounting Folks who do this models But oftentimes they you know nothing is intimate mistake. Be hell uncertainty flexibility of sequences of decision making what companies hold our options that cash flows in kansas at the day than it Rises up key or level. He or she makes a gut based decision based on experience. What sneak you. Add in process in the government You can't really recreate. Mpv the way that we do necklace bad you. Because there's so much uncertainty so much feedback processes gluing onto the policies. How do they do the incorporators things. They incorporate a couple of ways. Some of them Just doing sensitivity analysis. So we think that the ill people will drive ten percent less in response to a Doubling of the gas tax What if it's only five percent. Or what if it's twenty percent so we can put both those in the table and look at the different parameters. And no one of these cost-benefit they're called regulatory impact analyses none none of these regulatory impact analysis exist without abundant sensitivity..

twenty percent ten percent bill clinton nine hundred kansas ronald reagan both five percent barack obama obama Oregon
"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:02 min | 5 months ago

"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"That goes across states and countries is harder to solve and the worst problem of all of course is climate change because there's no governance so if you think about a small town If small town is poor and they have really good government they solve the local environmental problems But they might pollute in such a way that it harms the neighboring town young so s- adult lice. Asian of pollution never is not going to work right right and so is that is that sort of issue that you're dealing with that you just So it'd be asked. Why do you find from the data. So it's not really income. It's factors driving this dissertation. So the what. The the thing that jim and i wrote down in this paper called the simple analytics of the environmental kusnits kurt. It's a it's a really simple economic model it's called a robinson crusoe model named for the the castaway The literary Castaway the ideas that is an economy of one person on one island and he does something for his sustenance. Let's call it picking coconuts and He's the sole person on the island. So he's both the employee and the employer if you want and to add pollution to the mix we suppose that everything that he does also creates pollution. Think every coconut creates an coconut. Shell that's litter on the beach. If robinson crusoe is poor then he Would pour by which i mean. It's really hard for him to get coconuts. There aren't many trees around. It can barely feed himself that he doesn't devoted time to cleaning up the shells and the richer he gets the more polluted the beach gets but at some point land. He's rich enough. Which is that. There are lots of coconut trees around then he will Be well-fed and decided to devote some of his time to cleaning up the beach gets beyond that the cleaner the beach gets and that's the pattern in the environmental business curve. That's the same pattern that the world bank noticed. This is obviously a metaphor. But it's a metaphor that's interesting because there's no international trade so you can see this pattern without exporting or importing pollution from abroad. It's economically efficient. It's not that robinson crusoe made a mistake because there's only one person in the economy must be efficient and it's also not a sign that it's automatically it's necessarily efficient because if you think of a small island with ten people on each acting their own best interests they're each going to pick coconuts themselves but also gonna litter the beach and not care about it because of each other and so it it. The paper is is a simple economic model and all and what it says. Is that the data that we don't have any policy implications..

ten people both one island one person jim each robinson Asian
"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:44 min | 5 months ago

"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Mike yesterday. Professor rx levinson. Who is professor of economics at georgetown university. He's known for his defeat of energy conomic and glad middle economics. Welcome thank you nice to be here. Thanks for doing this. I wanted to start with one of your earlier. Peoples in two thousand one the simple analytics of the end blind mental kushner's curve in which you say evidence suggests that some pollutants photo an inwards u-shaped pattern ltd two countries incomes edition. Should that has been called an environmental kusners curve. So this this idea eric. I know much about this. Obviously so the. The low income countries have consumption and cans low put pollutants level in high income countries white consumption but the technology to take care of that. So the clarity sort of stuck in the middle who is creating the pollution is is that true. I think that You kept you you. You captured it. Pretty well The idea goes back to the early. Nineteen nineties when Some researchers at the world bank noticed this pattern that in the early nineteen nineties data was first starting to come in at about pollution levels all over the world and researchers the world bec noticed. The poor countries don't have much economic activity and so they don't have much industry don't have many cars since they don't have much pollution. The middle income countries are the ones that were industrializing and getting worse and worse. Pollution and the richest countries in the world like the united states and japan and northern europe didn't have much air pollution and clean water and that was a On one level that was a a revelation because before that there was a sentiment among a lot of analysts that economic growth and environmental degradation went hand in hand. And so if we're gonna solve the environmental problem we would have to slow economic growth. Yes this documentation of this patterns showed that at least on the surface. That wasn't true. But as you intimated in your introduction this could be for a lot of reasons it could be that poor countries make a mistake and they have bad policies and then they they fix it. Your you know some conservatives pointed to this pattern and said oh this is evidence that that clean up automatic and all we have to do is get rich. And then the environmental take care of itself.

Mike yesterday northern europe early nineteen nineties japan first two thousand rx levinson united states georgetown university Nineteen nineties early one two countries one level
"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:35 min | 5 months ago

"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:26 min | 6 months ago

"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"To people self segregating around smaller subgroups of people that the trust Yeah people who essentially Look like them to to use a casual. Don't mean literally but like people who share the same identity right will be a better way of putting right So if you think about the three papers we discuss right so the first one we took Clears as genius as given in on that context. We didn't look at things that could change that Then the second paper. A short two to morality as a way to change trust And and here. We look more at the factors. That facts The type of people leaving community and would leave this community. Right i have a bitty cynical taught jill Equal if a politician using this as a strategy then the politicians requires exogenous shocks to the community at some regular intervals rights. But you know if you if you Conjure images of a death on the basis You might actually get the same the same effects right so if running political ads with a death angle like a better word You may you may have a stricken where people focus on their core identity and depending on the political situation that may or may not be to the advantage of of certain politicians right. He said simple addition wants to keep people afraid And it has to be sort of a continuous inflammation.

three papers second paper first one two jill
"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:54 min | 6 months ago

"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"It was did any Did you look at his full perfomance again. Yeah so I'm so what we find is that the performance of the firm is is higher when it operates in armaments. Were more people trust each other. You waste less resources trying to maximize your yinka the executive maximize your own welfare. And instead you end up doing what's right for the for the company. I was thinking that because people use closed as a as an important proxy for decisions it has a downside because if you look at financial markets like private equity or venture capital People tend to invest in others that did know from previous transactions. So he tested. It has the net effect of capitulating as small group of people getting capital Than others because the the if you had the initial conditions are in the mora less trusting Community your culture is going to be The more the effect that you described is likely to happen in. I would imagine the. Ceo's have a big effect on the full Tool right the. I kept seeing some notch companies culture change in a matter of months charles could be. I mean like so when i teach about those issues in class. i i. I often talk about a company. Tyco longer exists now but was called into a scandal and there was a new c. You was brought in and completely changed the culture of the companies within Within few months but he had to Change the leadership To a very large extent Yeah So you're right but one would have presumably to take the extreme measures like the the gentleman who came to that particular company You know Chance to leadership. I like like pretty much. Everyone in the top hundred of the from Moved on if i remember correctly a very large proportion of leadership was changed. And you mentioned the so one of the things you examining. The paper is expected for sudden in negative Shock on community trust caused by misbehavior. You say by leading representatives In this case you're looking at the sexual abuse by catholic. Please so So so what's the alexa conclusion. Here one issue when you're researcher and you look at the culture of the firm is that you're dealing with is known as indulge eighty..

charles one issue one Ceo eighty Tyco alexa
"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:16 min | 6 months ago

"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"And maybe not for the best in term of culture and term trust. He also wanted necessarily that is more prone to legal Legal maneuvering leg scholar. That Whether you can Really change change the To be more persuasive. Maybe the initial conditions are so bad. I wondered if it is. It is challenging. It is challenging I mean it's not really what we do in this paper but other people have shown that there are a deep cultural effects with some cultural. You know for whatever reason more trusting than others in that effect can last for generations right. So if look at the level of trust in the country's from Were people emigrated to move to the us So it could be in the nineteenth century Ucla at in candies were That particular group of people is located. Today is still affected by the trust's From from the best right so if you haven't one of sweets in one area i and you know sweden. I think immigration from sweden was nineteenth century. If i remember correctly in the us so if trust level was high in sweden at the time then counties. Were you know those folks would move to would still have a high trust today and conversely if you're emigrated trauma country were Trust miss lewis. The thomas emmigration. You can still find the effects on the culture in the us century. Better w. saying the paper Behind pocket-sized at the level of close komi observed in a given community affects the way full located in that community became Analogous to the leading city of visas talked about. So there was a property of the community in which the fullness based and the full became some certain way a given that property. But then you're looking at the paper until the denominations rate And so so. The interplay between organizational culture in the community invasive illness us right so We look at contracts again. We looked at the type of investments the economic performance again conditioning on On the Environments of of the firm so some extent we you know the two papers are speaking to each other. press one difference between the two is Really jersey dis something. That doesn't evolve too much right so it takes away before cultural norms or cultural practices would would change But in the trust paper we also looked at a sudden shock to trust right. We looked at what happened when Community leaders are behaving and with the dust due to trust in. And that's not. That's not good shell so we couldn't do this in the religious. Et paper..

nineteenth century sweden two two papers Today one today one area Ucla lewis
"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:24 min | 6 months ago

"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Nothing wrong with one or the other it's preference it's a preference and also indicate that us in more conservative firms. I tend to switch jobs. Less is i. I know that you didn't look at that. But i wonder if this percents That's an interesting hypothesis right. So so If if indeed there is a greater risk of version you might change jobs less than But i don't know if that's a. Prediction is supported by the by the data. Yeah what what does what is your. what what. What is your thinking. But what is religion religion forcing who's coercion. But yeah so so at at the individual level There has been some studies in in your science and I'm probably not the right person to do justice to those studies But it's possible that part of the brain that is associated with both risk aversion and rhodesia's. Each you might be activated at the same time So that's you know the small experiment that we conducted when you read about s- Religious buildings you become more risk averse And you know we did that in room and if you're sitting on the left you're at one tax if you're sitting on the right you were seeing on the other texts tony random So there seems to be something in the brain that so that trips or that he's activated when you think about religion The exact mechanism. Probably not the right person to do justice to expand this in and grit details..

Each both one
"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:31 min | 6 months ago

"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Let's say should lead to some sort of economic profitability metrics weekend begins see at the food So the the bigger porn was to try to link the environment in which a firm is operating to its corporate culture but to make question more more concrete more specific will link the social environments To the behavior of the firm in term of restocking and drove profitability. And things of that nature is okay. And so i find is waiting to saint. Joe's sobek that the the risk aversion is higher flow would then require a higher rate of return on their investments. That's right so holding. The investments said constant. you would expect those firms. Invest less refined They so they're discount. Rate is hoyer and so projects that might have to be positive elsewhere in these films will not be taken out because they believe a higher discount rates That's right but Our listeners should fear from this that this is a bad thing. Right is this is a preference right so So some communities have a preference for taking more risk in on average that generates more rewards but also creates more failure and some community. You have some communities have the opposite preference right. So what you're saying is absolutely true but When should not infer that. It's a bad thing from that. I was thinking Joseph look at the u. s. That are poor. Soul in ohio. Activity escort ups. A high risk You know high-technology by biotechnology and so on they appear to be highly concentrated And i'm thinking silicon valley and thinking cambridge Any collection there between that sort of a natural hypothesis to To test but we have not tested this paper But that would seem like a natural extension to to this paper. Yes you you're right okay. Okay and so for larger firms If we take us of our anti intensity you will see that that lower to write these films. would focus on more more casual type businesses so any type of investment being in in a tangible assets or an intangible essence like aren t be subject to the same facts In yes you would expect to receive actually a less investment in our india's well.

Joseph ohio india Joe silicon valley u. s. cambridge
"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:23 min | 6 months ago

"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Mike yesterday's jill. Hillary who's counting at georgetown university. He's founding member of the circle. Kate to frank think tank management. He's also research fellow at the french military police academy at the senior fellow at the asian bureau financing economic surge local. Jill thank you very much tation. Thanks doing this. So i learned to start the bone of the papers From two thousand eight It's entitled this religion matter it corporate decision making america. You see the excitement of corporate culture. Influences firms behaviors most specifically have religiosity in films environment effects. Its investment decisions and you focus on the us here demeaning economic environments. So could find at the speaker right. So part of my research is Behaviorally nature right. So so that's one example of that stream off of research that i'm engaged in So this is called through with Y hoy and so we were curious to see if the government in which a firm is operating is affecting its operation and more specifically if like the type of people you're interacting with will affect the corporate culture of the firm and so What we did in that paper is that We got some data on how religious ah given county in the. Us is right so how many people would go to a place of worship out since it's the us it's typically a church Bloody could be. It could be any type of Mesa where like mosque laura or a synagogue or any other place of worship Then we look at what the literature in psychology telling us about the link between Religiously t in and risk aversion and we found civil a papers that focused on experimental evidence suggesting that There is a positive link between the two like religious t and risk aversion Often correlated. And so what we did in the paper is ted weather That extent to communities. And we find indeed that that's when a firm is located in place in county Were a lot of people are agreeing to replace worship then That firm is Much more risk averse doesn't invest as much The cash was less volatile and so forth.

Hillary Mike Kate yesterday Jill georgetown university two Mesa two thousand french military police academy one example america jill frank think asian eight
"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:35 min | 6 months ago

"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

Intelligence Report Says Russia Tried To Help Trump In 2020

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

03:01 min | 7 months ago

Intelligence Report Says Russia Tried To Help Trump In 2020

"Russia tried to influence a U. S presidential election. That's the conclusion of a new U. S intelligence report this time the 2020 election. Says Russian President Vladimir Putin authorized a misinformation campaign against Joe Biden and used people close to President Trump to undermine the election and to try to divide America. President Biden was asked about it in an interview today on ABC is Good Morning America. He will pay a price. We had a long talk and I we've known relatively well. And the conversation. Start off. I said, I know you and you know me If I established this occurred, then be prepared well, President Biden has his work cut out for him when it comes to repairing the U. S relationship with Russia. Says My next guest, Angela Stent, a long time Russia watcher, She leads the center for Eurasian, Russian and East European studies at Georgetown University. Welcome to the program. Glad to be on your program. Well, what do you make of that report? So I think the report confirms things that people had already suspected. So the Russians wanted to do at least two things. One of them was obviously to boost a president Trump's chances of being re elected and to denigrate Joe Biden when it became clear that he was going to be the candidate on particularly all of these rumors about his son and the son's laptop and corruption. And then the second one really had to do with Ukraine, because when President Biden was vice president, he really had the Ukraine account. He was very active there, and they knew that if he got reelected, probably the United States would ramp up its efforts to help the Ukrainians in their struggle against the Russians. And so that's where the Ukraine anger comes in. To try and reinforce the idea that no one should want to deal with this country because it was so corrupt. And when they talk about people close to President Trump being used by the Russians to spread disinformation. They didn't name any names in the report. But were they really referring to, really Giuliani? I think we have to assume they were because we have photographs off Mr Giuliani with some of the Ukrainians and Russians that are mentioned in the report. And what did they say? The Russians did with someone like Giuliani, how exactly where they being used to spread misinformation. So they, you know, they told them all these things they presumably may have given them some things and writing. They had these recordings off vice president. Then Biden talking to various Ukrainians, and then they also reached out to the U. S media. So, Mr Giuliani, if it is, indeed him had this information, but they reached out to the media via. You know their contacts. And if you like agents in the United States So you have some of this obviously made its way to Fox News on another pro trump media outlets again. All of the you know, accusing candidate Biden of being in cahoots with

President Biden President Trump Russia U. Joe Biden Angela Stent Center For Eurasian, Russian A United States Ukraine Vladimir Putin Mr Giuliani Georgetown University ABC Donald Trump Giuliani Biden Fox News
Washington DC University Law professor terminated after ‘reprehensible’ comments about Black students

The Boxer Show

00:22 sec | 8 months ago

Washington DC University Law professor terminated after ‘reprehensible’ comments about Black students

"Now on a Friday morning with Mr Scott Jenny Scott, what he working on for eight o'clock. While Brandon Georgetown University's fired a professor. After she made some controversial comments about black students, professors Sandra Sellers remarked about the performance of black students in our class during a recent soon call. In which she thought it was private. That conversation was posted online. Another professor was placed on

Mr Scott Jenny Scott Brandon Georgetown University Sandra Sellers
Georgetown Law fires professor who made 'reprehensible statements' about Black students on viral video

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 8 months ago

Georgetown Law fires professor who made 'reprehensible statements' about Black students on viral video

"Georgetown University Law Center, firing a professor placing another on leave after making what the dean called reprehensible remarks about black students in video leaked to this week by a Twitter user named Hassan Ahmed. Professor Sandra Smith is her talking to her colleague David Batson, about student performance having this ext. Every semester that a lot of my lower ones are blacks. That's it appears to say nothing in response, calling it a painful incident and a message online. Dean William trainer says they plan to address many structural issues of racism at the school, including explicit and implicit bias, bystander, responsibility and the need for more comprehensive anti bias training.

Hassan Ahmed Sandra Smith Georgetown University Law Cent David Batson Dean William Twitter
Washington DC's First High-Capacity COVID-19 Vaccine Site Opens

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 8 months ago

Washington DC's First High-Capacity COVID-19 Vaccine Site Opens

"District has launched its first high capacity vaccination site over the weekend about 2500 shots of the single dose. Johnson and Johnson vaccine were doled out yesterday at the Walter Washington Convention Center downtown. One newly vaccinated woman spoke to NBC four outside the site. It was so easy, it's well organized. We walked right in every step of the way. We just flowed right through. Was wonderful. I haven't seen my grandkids in a year. I am so excited. They finally got it right. Other mass vaccination clinics include the entertainment and sports arena in southeast in Providence Health System in Northeast George Washington and Georgetown University. Physician students and staff are volunteering to administer the shots at these larger

Walter Washington Convention C Johnson NBC Northeast George Washington Providence Health System Georgetown University
White House moves up vaccine supply timeline, says U.S. will have enough for every adult by end of May

1A

03:12 min | 8 months ago

White House moves up vaccine supply timeline, says U.S. will have enough for every adult by end of May

"Good news this week in the race to end this pandemic, this country will have enough vaccine supply of state again for every adult in America. By the end of May. By the end of May. That's progress. Important progress. This comes as the governors of Texas and Mississippi have lifted all pandemic restrictions in their states and new variants of the Corona virus are popping up around the world and in the U. S. There's a lot to talk about that we're setting aside the next hour to answer your questions about the vaccination effort. Joining me now is Dr Lena when she's a visiting professor at the Milken Institute School of Public Health. She's also an ER physician and the former Baltimore City health commissioner. Dr Wen. It's always great to have you To speak with you. Also with us Angela Rasmussen. She's a virologist, and she's also an affiliate at the Georgetown University Center for Global Health, Science and Security. Angela Welcome back. Thanks for having me back then a doctor win enough vaccine for every adult in America by the end of May. That's an aggressive timeline. Do you think we can get there? Well, I think we should break this down into three categories. In terms of where are the barriers to vaccination to having people actually getting the vaccine and their arms. The first barrier is that of supply. The second is that of distribution. The third. Is that a vaccine hesitant or acceptance of the vaccine. What President Biden announced is that by the end of name, we're going to solve the supply issue. That is we'll have enough supplies. You were saying for every adult American to have the vaccine. That doesn't mean that by the end of May, everyone is going to be able to get the vaccine because then once we get the supply, we need to move into addressing these other issues of administration and also of addressing hesitancy. So do I think that will get the supply? I certainly hope so. And so far, President Biden has been very good about not over promising. So I expect that this is going to be the case, which is fantastic, because supply right now is the limiting factor. Um I do think that a lot more work lies ahead of us in terms of actually getting that last mile logistics of getting the vaccines into arms and then also overcoming vaccine hesitancy. Available. Vaccines do not equal shots in arms. As you say, Doctor win, and the previous timeline was to have every American adult vaccinated by the end of July. Angela's we're seeing more variants. Developed. How urgent is it that we really ramp up vaccination? Well, it's very urgent on So given that people will be out there moving around more, the variants are becoming more and more prevalent. It's really, really crucial that we get vaccines into arms as quickly as possible. One thing people should really keep in mind and echoing what Dr Wen just said. Is that vaccines don't save lives. Vaccination saves lives, So we really, really need to buckle down and focus on making sure that we can get people vaccinated as quickly as possible. Well, we got this

President Biden Dr Wen Dr Lena Milken Institute School Of Pub Baltimore City Angela Rasmussen Georgetown University Center F Angela Welcome America Mississippi Texas Angela
The Power of Black Female Voters With Marcia Chatelain

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

04:49 min | 9 months ago

The Power of Black Female Voters With Marcia Chatelain

"I recently wrote in forbes about how kamala harris may be able to heal the wounds between black women and white women but i defer to our terrific yesterday on these issues. I'd like you to meet dr. Marcia chatelaine a provost distinguished associate professor of history and african american studies at georgetown university here in washington dc. She's a scholar of american life and culture previously. She was an assistant professor of honors in african american studies at the university of oklahoma in norman. She earned her. Phd at brown university and her undergraduate studies at the university of missouri columbia in journalism and religious studies fellow aspiring journalists. They go. Marsha was a terrific expert featured in the recent pbs series. The vote on how women fought for and won the right to vote over an eighty year struggle or more welcomed green connections radio. Marcia thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me. Oh you're welcome. You're welcome so our start in the heart of this issue. As i said in my introduction i've understood the black and white women had a kind of love hate relationship if you will during the suffrage battles as i understand it. Black women wanted white women to include abolition in their struggle. But the white women leaders believe the combining the two would keep the legislation from. What is your take on it. Tell us the truth. Because you're the historian so the issue at hand between abolition and suffrage are deeply tied. And that's because a number of figures in the suffrage movement were first activists in the fight against slavery and i think the poignancy of the battle for women's suffrage was the fact that many of the white women who were at the lead of the suffrage movement were anti-slavery and they had supported. Abolitionist may have believed that there was a moral reason to end the system of slavery but when it came to suffrage they were divided over the issue of universal suffrage Some do not believe that black women white men should equally have the vote. Some did not believe that black men and black women should have the vote. So i think that the suffrage movement really exposes the limitations of racial solidarity even among people who were on the right side of history one issue were not able to transfer that sense of grace to the issue of suffrage. And that's where you see the fault lines. In the suffrage movement really emerged from it was the fact that they did not want include african american women visibly or prominently or ideologically in their fight for the right to vote because they believed that it would degrade the quality of the vote of degrade the preciousness of the right and a number of these women again. Even though they were morally opposed to slavery they would not immune from white supremacist ideas. Okay so there's so much to unpack in there. You said something really interesting you said and i paraphrase of course but the the the divisions over the vote represented larger divisions in the racial schisms. If you will Racial solidarity behind the vote. Yes so one of the things that i think. A lot of people don't understand from how they're taught history is that we often think of the issue of slavery as one in which people were either pro or anti and it's often presented as a matter of north versus south union versus confederacy. But if you look at the movement to end slavery and look at abolitionists. They all had very different ideas of what happens next. They knew that slavery is a scourge on the nation. But they didn't agree on. What would it mean for african americans to be elevated to the level of status rather the level of a citizen and what that status should mean and so there were people who were abolitionists but they were segregationists. There were abolitionists who believed that african americans should be repatriated to colonies in africa. They were people who believed in complete and total social equality in some people believed in some level of social quality but not marriage and so those debates among the abolitionist movement i think are very much mirrored in the debate among white selfridge's who should get the vote i who should be allowed to vote. And what measures should be taken in order to ensure their desired goals

Marcia Chatelaine University Of Missouri Columbi Kamala Harris University Of Oklahoma Georgetown University Brown University Marsha Marcia PBS Norman DC Washington South Union White Selfridge Africa
Extremists Emboldened by Capitol Attack Pose Rising Threat, Homeland Security Says

Morning Edition

03:47 min | 9 months ago

Extremists Emboldened by Capitol Attack Pose Rising Threat, Homeland Security Says

"Security says the country faces ah heightened risk of attack by domestic extremists in the coming months. Such warnings have been rare in recent years. But DHS says the recent attack on the U. S Capitol may have emboldened radicals across the U. S for more. We're joined by NPR National Security correspondent Greg Marie. Hi, Greg. Hi, Sarah. So is the Department of Homeland Security, citing a specific threat here. No, they aren't. This bulletin doesn't name any individual or any group or any specific threat. It's a very generalized warning. It's clearly referring to the far right, though it doesn't mention anybody by name. And there is this sense that there's an elevated threat for the next few months. It talks about domestic extremists who may be fueled by what they say is false narratives related to the election last November, the January 6th assault on the Capitol and even last week's presidential transition. And people may remember Homeland Security was known for its warnings in the past those color coded warnings about jihadist groups like Al Qaeda, for instance. But is this new to to warn about domestic far right groups? Yes, it really is. DHS was created after the 9 11 attacks almost 20 years ago, and those color coded warnings that were around for nearly a decade, they were often mocked. It was hard to understand. Is this an imminent threat? Should you avoid airports and and they faded away on Gwi don't see a lot of these warnings anymore. But it really is unique and new here to see the government issuing a warning about the far right. President. Biden clearly believes that his predecessor, President Trump didn't deal with this and played it down despite mounting evidence. There was no strong public warning leading up to the January 6th events, and Biden clearly wants to get ahead of this. His homeland security nominee for secretary of that department, Alejandro New Yorkers hasn't been confirmed yet. But the Biden administration has already asked for DHS and FBI to heaven intelligence assessment about this threat. And now we see this warning issued by DHS. Okay, So what do we know about what we should make of this morning? What should the general public think? So I spoke about this with Daniel Byman. He's a Georgetown University professor who studies terrorism. And he says the Biden administration is sending a message to several groups. It's telling law enforcement. This is going to be a priority is telling far right groups. They're going to be under scrutiny. But, he says it's also important to see this is a message to the public. It's a warning to the broader public. It trying to say that this is a genuine threat on power with other forms of terrorism and is trying to say to do administration is going to upset not only jihadist terrorism by groups like Isis, we're just going to focus on a much wider range of domestic threats. There's been a growing number of arrests Greg since the January sex violence at the Capitol. How's the far right? Responding? Well on social media. We see that there is a lot of talk that they know they're being watched. It may be a good time to be cautious and stay under the radar. Have been about 150 arrests related to the January 6th events and hundreds more cases or under investigation. Now we still have several 1000 National Guard forces in the D C area. They're expected to stay here through the Trump impeachment trial next month and maybe well into March just to make sure the atmosphere stays calm. Buying up really appears to be laying down a marker and declaring that this issue is going to be a priority throughout his entire tenure. That's NPR's Greg. Marie. Greg. Thanks so much for talking with us. My pleasure, sir.

DHS Npr National Security Greg Marie Biden Administration U. President Trump Biden Greg Daniel Byman Al Qaeda Sarah Alejandro Georgetown University FBI National Guard NPR Marie
Georgetown University to discipline ineligible students who received COVID-19 vaccine, Washington DC

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 9 months ago

Georgetown University to discipline ineligible students who received COVID-19 vaccine, Washington DC

"Georgetown University who got a Corona virus vaccine that they weren't eligible for, will be disciplined The school says. 3rd and 4th Year Med students can get vaccines because they're interacting with patients. But other students who aren't working in the health care setting. Also got the shots. Information was not released about how many ineligible students received. The vaccines and school hasn't identified who they are, but it does say it will make sure it doesn't happen again. Sports on the way 10

Georgetown University
Lady Gaga will perform the national anthem at Biden's inauguration

Rush Limbaugh

00:41 sec | 10 months ago

Lady Gaga will perform the national anthem at Biden's inauguration

"A party with megawatt Star Power and Joe Biden's inauguration ceremony at the Capitol next Wednesday. Lady Lady Gaga Gaga will will perform perform the the national national anthem anthem during during Joe Joe Biden's Biden's inauguration inauguration ceremony ceremony next next Wednesday. Wednesday. Jennifer Jennifer Lopez. Lopez. We We give give a a musical musical performance. performance. Both Both artist artist endorsed endorsed Biden Biden and and did did campaign related events for him last year. The inaugural committee also announced the ceremony will begin with an invocation by father Leo Donovan, a longtime friend of the Biden family and former president of Georgetown University. Here in Washington. The Biden inaugural events have been dramatically scaled back due to Cove in 19 and now concerns about security in the wake of last week's violent attack at the Capitol. Karen Travers, ABC NEWS Washington Bite knees this

Lady Lady Gaga Gaga Joe Joe Biden Jennifer Jennifer Lopez Biden Biden Biden Joe Biden Leo Donovan Lopez Georgetown University Washington Karen Travers Abc News
Author of 'Reckoning With Race in America' Explains Structuring of His Book

Influencers with Andy Serwer

01:47 min | 10 months ago

Author of 'Reckoning With Race in America' Explains Structuring of His Book

"To influencers. I'm Andy serwer and Welcome to our guest Michael Eric Dyson, who is a professor of Sociology at Georgetown University will be going to Vanderbilt University MSNBC political analyst and author of the new book long time coming Reckoning with race in America Michael. Nice to see you dead red to see you as well my friend and it's great to be on your show. Thank you very much. So the new book long time coming Reckoning with race in America is written as litters. Mm ordered African-Americans. Can you talk about the structure of the book and why you wanted to do the piece the the the work this way? Yeah, you know, I wanted to write letters to these murdered Martyrs and incense not simply talk about them. But speak to them a kind of rhetorical munja. Intimacy through the epistolary form letters that allow me to speak out loud think out loud. How come talk out loud about what happened to them. We are to commune with them. So to speak not in the kind of loosey-goosey spiritualist way, but in an ancestral recognition way and many of them recently arrived ancestors, Brianna Taylor Sandra boss and the Reverend clementa Pinckney hadiya Pendleton and some much older like Emmett Till. So I wanted to think out loud talk about the issues that confronted them that issues that continue to confront us off. And in communing with them talking with them talking to them about what happened after they died too in a way give a progress report of the soul of Black America wage and to figure out how we move forward

Andy Serwer Michael Eric Dyson Vanderbilt University Georgetown University America Msnbc Brianna Taylor Sandra Reverend Clementa Pinckney Michael Emmett Till Pendleton Black America
"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

07:58 min | 10 months ago

"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation be color a wide variety of domains. Red new discoveries are made and new technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society and help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation v seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do a companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com and displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics guests at other ideas please send up to info at scientific sense dot com and i can be reached at gil at eappen dot info mike. Yesterday's pufus a michael almond whose purpose of neuroscience but take to appointments in the departments of psychology neurology at georgetown university. He is the director of the brain and language lab and director of the georgetown ee. Gop lab the plain language lab aims to elucidate how language is learned the percentage in processed in the mind brain. Welcome bike thank you very much yet. Thanks thanks for doing this from germany. yeah i want to start with one of your book chapters The declarative procedural more like sometimes de model a noodle biologically motivated theory of first and second language in which us talked of saying in evolution and biology previously existing structures and mechanisms are constantly being reused and that is co opted for purposes. So you are arguing in this chapter. Mike lange tend to that that the subjects in the brain that appeared to be involved in language learning and language. Three production also gets that That we have been using for other purposes so he takes sort of even predates homo sapiens. Right that's correct. So the basic idea is that given that in evolution and biology. Existing mechanisms are systems tend to be reused for new functions rather than completely the novo appearing from scratch. That should be the case for language as well. And simply we focus on these two learning and memory circuits often referred to as declarative memory and procedural memory because these are arguably the two most important learning and memory circuits in the brain and most of all language has to be learned and therefore it seems. We've the goal to predict that language should therefore be learned importantly in these two learning memory. Circuits anita really old. Forcus as you were saying. So you can find these circuits or precursors to them in other vertebrates. So for example The circuits underlying procedural memory a structure called the basal. Ganglia are what helps sombre thumbs or declarative memory. Also example in birds of both existed. Mammals of course Declarative memory helps a burbs. Remember for example where they stash their acorns so these are all circuits and the basic idea. Is these have been. We used co opted for this new function in homo sapiens. Even if they might have become more specialized for language right so it could be co opted for language without being changed or with some further changes for this particular domain yet. That's fascinating because Often be think of language as Something unique to humans and And so if the steelers correct michael and i think that it's enough evidence it is It basically means that we had the hardware and the sort of stumbled onto language and started using the existing hardware for language. That's right and it's not exactly clear to what extent there might be additional specialization for language. Rights you can ask the question. Why if this is correct. Why don't mice have have language for example or songbirds and we don't know the answer to that you know. It's probably some combination of the circuits becoming more specialized. An additional circuitry in the brain evolving for example that massive frontal lobe develop frontal lobe development in humans. That baby gives these circus circus moore to work with something like that but the bottom line is that language is rooted in his preexisting shortcuts. Even if something new all sort of yes. I would Big little deeper into these two circuits so declarative and procedural circuits and they are both Both involved in memorization but in different ways right. So how'd you could french shaved clean to do so the way that we define the to learning and memory systems is neuro anatomically. So it's quite a precise definition. So we define declared if memory as the learning and memory that or rooted in the hippocampus and associated circuitry breakfast connected to the hippocampus and procedural memory as the learning and memory that or wooded in the basal ganglia and associated circuitry. And so they were saying ever learning happens in kept us and connected. Structures is declarative memory and analogously for procedural memory and the basal ganglia. Now this is somewhat a more precise more. Testable definition of to earning memories that have traditionally been used Where for example. There's a lot of times in the past declared a memory with simply defined as the learning and memory that is explicit that we are conscious. Awareness can verbalize that we can declare the original name and procedural memory s kind of implicit non learning that his burning of stuff. That's not available to conscious but are are much more precise and it could like. I can also talk about what these what these brain structures actually are like where they aren't the brain. Yeah yeah that'd be good michael. Yeah just briefly. How river located and do they interact with each other and also instead of specialization between short and long-term.

Eappen michael almond departments of psychology neur Mike lange gill georgetown university georgetown Gop mike germany anita steelers michael moore
interview With Kara Swisher, host of Pivot And Sway podcasts, co-founder Of Recode

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:23 min | 10 months ago

interview With Kara Swisher, host of Pivot And Sway podcasts, co-founder Of Recode

"Hey everyone it's carly today. Cara swisher joins me on skimmed from the couch. She has been called. The most feared an well liked journalists in silicon valley cara has been covering the tech world for decades and is also the co founder of the site. Recode she's currently the host of to podcasts. Sway pit cara. Thank you so much for coming on the show. Welcome to skim from the couch. Thank you there's no couch. though that's true well welcome from my kitchen. First question we ask everybody. Skim your resume. I'm really old. You really want my resume okay. I went to georgetown. University went to columbia journalism school. I worked for lots of people in very low level. Jobs like delivering mail at the washington. Post being assistant people return type people. And then i got an internship the washington post which i then got hired from and i were there and then worked at the wall. Street journal wrote a book during the nineties about The beginnings of the internet Which nobody was paying attention to. And then i worked for the journal. For many years doing a wide range of things beat reporting columns and then i started sort of an entrepreneurial activity inside the journal which was a conference and then a new website blog. Essentially i started their first real blog effort which was all things d and then i left and got investments and started recode sold that to vox media and then i now also hosts i started doing podcasting about five six years ago early on and then shifted a lot to that and writing for the new york times and doing a podcast but i also do a pint yesterday new york magazine too so i do podcasting and writing now and events but events now with copen said say you're pretty busy. What if something that people don't know about you that they'd be surprised. I spent a lot of time with my family. I mean i'm really busy. I make a lot of content. I four five podcasts. A week major podcasts. A week and i'll read column every week. And so i work a lot. But i actually spent a lotta time with my family and i just had another child a little girl so i spent a lot more time with my family and i think people would imagine given how much content iming congratulations on the new baby. So before we dive into your career. I want to go back and stand a little bit about where you came from. Which is what was little like the same the same the same the same. I mean. I think i had a very strong personality from the get. Go as a especially as a girl where people want you to shut up. Essentially i didn't shut up very much. I had a nickname tempestuous. My family's italian. Which is i think it's a compliment. They meant as a compliment. But i would always sort of upend things to if i didn't like them. I did very well in grammar school. I was considered very very smart. Read very early. People caught up with me pretty quickly. But i always knew what i wanted. You get that from your parents know. My dad died when i was really little. He was very sweet actually had a very sweet personality. My mom no. I don't think so. I think my mom talks in shades a lot. She doesn't say what she means. A lot of the time. And i was very forthright. I don't wanna make you can't make sort of like italians are loud but we are a very in your face family so we say what we think but i think my mom talks more and as most people do they say things that that's not what they mean and much more. I say exactly what. I mean when i say something so i don't know how i got it i just did. When did you realize he wanted to be a journalist. Not for a while. actually i was. I went to the school. Ford service at georgetown which is for diplomats and spies essentially it. So i wanted to go into the military. My dad was in the military. And i wanted to serve but i wanted to do and everything else that i didn't because i was gay it i it was illegal and that it was. Don't ask don't tell which was even worse in some weird way which is just sort of separate but equal kind of thing though. That was much worse but it still wasn't it was not it was civil rights violation. I think of gay people. So i didn't want to serve by lying like keeping it to myself. I thought that was stupid. And so i never served and by the time they sort of ended. I was too old. I was going to serve in the reserves. But i i just didn't want to just lie and i was like this is ridiculous and so i would have had a career. I suspected military appropriate running the right now but being fired by trump at this moment. But i want it to be in military intelligence or in the cia some in some fashion to be an analyst. And which is what i do. Anyway on a analyze and try to find out information in an opinion about

Cara Swisher Silicon Valley Cara Columbia Journalism School Street Journal Copen Georgetown Cara New York Magazine Washington Post The Journal The New York Times Washington Ford CIA
Interview With Kara Swisher, host of Pivot and Sway podcasts, co-founder of Recode

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:23 min | 10 months ago

Interview With Kara Swisher, host of Pivot and Sway podcasts, co-founder of Recode

"Hey everyone it's carly today. Cara swisher joins me on skimmed from the couch. She has been called. The most feared an well liked journalists in silicon valley cara has been covering the tech world for decades and is also the co founder of the site. Recode she's currently the host of to podcasts. Sway pit cara. Thank you so much for coming on the show. Welcome to skim from the couch. Thank you there's no couch. though that's true well welcome from my kitchen. First question we ask everybody. Skim your resume. I'm really old. You really want my resume okay. I went to georgetown. University went to columbia journalism school. I worked for lots of people in very low level. Jobs like delivering mail at the washington. Post being assistant people return type people. And then i got an internship the washington post which i then got hired from and i were there and then worked at the wall. Street journal wrote a book during the nineties about The beginnings of the internet Which nobody was paying attention to. And then i worked for the journal. For many years doing a wide range of things beat reporting columns and then i started sort of an entrepreneurial activity inside the journal which was a conference and then a new website blog. Essentially i started their first real blog effort which was all things d and then i left and got investments and started recode sold that to vox media and then i now also hosts i started doing podcasting about five six years ago early on and then shifted a lot to that and writing for the new york times and doing a podcast but i also do a pint yesterday new york magazine too so i do podcasting and writing now and events but events now with copen said say you're pretty busy. What if something that people don't know about you that they'd be surprised. I spent a lot of time with my family. I mean i'm really busy. I make a lot of content. I four five podcasts. A week major podcasts. A week and i'll read column every week. And so i work a lot. But i actually spent a lotta time with my family and i just had another child a little girl so i spent a lot more time with my family and i think people would imagine given how much content iming congratulations on the new baby. So before we dive into your career. I want to go back and stand a little bit about where you came from. Which is what was little like the same the same the same the same. I mean. I think i had a very strong personality from the get. Go as a especially as a girl where people want you to shut up. Essentially i didn't shut up very much. I had a nickname tempestuous. My family's italian. Which is i think it's a compliment. They meant as a compliment. But i would always sort of upend things to if i didn't like them. I did very well in grammar school. I was considered very very smart. Read very early. People caught up with me pretty quickly. But i always knew what i wanted. You get that from your parents know. My dad died when i was really little. He was very sweet actually had a very sweet personality. My mom no. I don't think so. I think my mom talks in shades a lot. She doesn't say what she means. A lot of the time. And i was very forthright. I don't wanna make you can't make sort of like italians are loud but we are a very in your face family so we say what we think but i think my mom talks more and as most people do they say things that that's not what they mean and much more. I say exactly what. I mean when i say something so i don't know how i got it i just did. When did you realize he wanted to be a journalist. Not for a while. actually i was. I went to the school. Ford service at georgetown which is for diplomats and spies essentially it. So i wanted to go into the military. My dad was in the military. And i wanted to serve but i wanted to do and everything else that i didn't because i was gay it i it was illegal and that it was. Don't ask don't tell which was even worse in some weird way which is just sort of separate but equal kind of thing though. That was much worse but it still wasn't it was not it was civil rights violation. I think of gay people. So i didn't want to serve by lying like keeping it to myself. I thought that was stupid. And so i never served and by the time they sort of ended. I was too old. I was going to serve in the reserves. But i i just didn't want to just lie and i was like this is ridiculous and so i would have had a career. I suspected military appropriate running the right now but being fired by trump at this moment. But i want it to be in military intelligence or in the cia some in some fashion to be an analyst. And which is what i do. Anyway on a analyze and try to find out information in an opinion about

Cara Swisher Silicon Valley Cara Columbia Journalism School Street Journal Copen Georgetown Cara New York Magazine Washington Post The Journal The New York Times Washington Ford CIA
Government Systems Hacked By International Threat

TIME's Top Stories

10:44 min | 10 months ago

Government Systems Hacked By International Threat

"S cyber experts scramble to assess the scope of the hack of a decade by kimberly dosier. Us government cyber experts are working furiously. Insecure offices around the globe sifting through computer traffic to figure out which federal systems have been penetrated in the sweeping cyber-spying attack. The fbi warned this week is significant and ongoing suspected russian. Hackers have broken into sensitive. Us government computer networks from the pentagon to the department of energy as well as top us private businesses rummaging around in them and likely reading emails and gathering data the department of homeland security cyber security and infrastructure security agency called the attack which started in march or possibly earlier a grave risk to the us government experts from both the government and top us private firms compromised in the attack are taking whole sections of their computer networks off line or quarantining them for a deeper forensic dive to figure out what was copied or taken. And if the hackers left any malware code behind the hackers exploited a little known but widely used software. Program called a ryan made by a cyber company called solar winds whose client list includes the office of the us. President the pentagon nasa nsa all five branches of the us military and most of the fortune five hundred companies including the top ten u s communications companies the austin texas based company removed. Its client list from its website. After reporting the hack may have affected some eighteen thousand customers. The company says it has been quote advised that the nature of this attack indicates that it may have been conducted by an outside nation state and is urging clients to update their systems to remove the threat. The company didn't immediately respond to a request for comment ceasar referred to the attackers has quote a patient. Well resourced and focused adversary adding that. The orion software vulnerability wasn't the only way it attacked but declining to share further details since it was first reported by reuters on sunday the known extent of the hack has grown wider each day so far government agencies including the departments of commerce and energy are among those confirmed to be infected though energy. Spokesperson said the hack only compromised business networks and didn't reach the national nuclear security administration on thursday microsoft reported that it's found the malware uploaded to some of it systems. You've got to assume that they're still in right now. And they're going to stay in says cyber experts suzanne spaulding who led the homeland security office. That is now ceases during the obama administration so you pretty quickly have to start looking at what they could have gotten access to president. Donald trump has so far been silent on what appears to be one of the worst cyber attacks on the united states in decades. The white house has offered little public comment beyond confirming via twitter that an investigation is underway. A senior administration official speaking anonymously to describe the ongoing investigation told time that the list of compromised. Us government agencies will likely include the pentagon as well as other agencies that use the software. The official also confirmed time that the attackers are believed to be russian state. Operatives reported by the washington post to be the infamous hacking collective known as abt twenty nine or cozy bear russia's ambassador to washington anatoly. I- antonoff denounced. Those reports is quote unfounded attempts of the us media to blame russia for hacking attacks on the us government bodies in remarks this week where georgetown university virtual forum the diplomat. Who complained that. He can't get a meeting with top government officials or lawmakers to discuss a host of accusations against moscow offered to arrange a meeting between russian intelligence. Fbi and cia officials to get to the bottom of it. The orion software is used to monitor and manage computer systems the kind of program and in house. It tech might use to remotely fix an employee's computer when it has a meltdown. The hacker is essentially piggybacked on the orion program software updates so when users updated their systems. They unwittingly uploaded. Malware that gave the hackers. A back. Door explains dmitri alperovitch former co founder and cto of cybersecurity firm crowd strike. His former cybersecurity company was hired by the democratic national committee. When it's emails were hacked in two thousand sixteen which the fbi later attributed to russia when the update came down it basically was a master key for the russians to get access to every single one of these systems. Alperovitch says calling it a heck of a decade and one of the most significant cyber espionage operations in history though it apparently did not penetrate classified systems he says citing conversations with industry insiders. The fbi is leading an investigation to track the hackers while cease which became a household name this year after disputing trump's allegations of election fraud resulting in trump's firing. Its director is sending out new warnings on what they've found and how government and private companies should respond to fix it. The spying attack was first discovered by cybersecurity. Firm fire which reported being hacked by a quote highly sophisticated threat actor that it says inserted malware onto its own network via the solar winds ryan software and then stole some of the cybersecurity companies own quote unquote ethical. Hacking tools. used to probe fire eye. clients networks for vulnerabilities aaron hughes former. Us deputy assistant secretary of defense for cyber policy says the sophistication of targeting contractor in the government supply chain to get to its clients immediately points to an actor like russia or china impersonating users and using inherently trusted mechanisms to conduct what appear to be trusted communication. That's not an insignificant task says hughes. Who's now a cyber expert with the center for strategic and international studies cis. Is the level of effort in stealth. That goes into instituting. That sort of computer to computer communication requires the skill set and breath of a nation state. He said there's a ranking in terms of urgency that governs what cyber-attacks combing their networks for i they make sure. The enemy hasn't accessed critical. Us weapons systems like the launch codes for nuclear bombs. Then they look at things like control of electricity or water supplies triaging a malthusian. Hierarchy of threats says spalding. Who's a senior homeland. Security adviser with csis. After you figure out what the adversary access you play out the worst case scenario of what they might do with what they were able to reach she adds and the game is still on hackers off in store things. They want a copy within the system. They've targeted so they can download it in a way. That won't arouse copying the data a few kilobytes at a time. So there may be packets of information that they've marked to move that are still untouched. And the race is on to cut the hackers off and then rebuild. It can't just go in and kind of surgically remove the adversary spalding. Explains you have to rebuild a completely new infrastructure that isn't connected to the old infrastructure though. The operatives were still active while americans were voting in the presidential election. This fall spalding. Doesn't think the suspected russian hackers were able to effect twenty twenty voting because of quote such overwhelming use of paper ballots and the ability to audit. I think it would have been detected. She said russian government. Hackers have penetrated sensitive systems before they did in two thousand sixteen. When russian military intelligence officers were indicted for crimes including hacking the computers of the democratic national committee primarily through phishing emails. Russian hackers were also blamed for a two thousand fifteen fishing attack that seized control of the pentagon joint staff's unclassified email systems retired chairman of the joint chiefs general martin dempsey told. Cbs news that within an hour of accessing the system. The hacker seized dempsey's computer credentials as well as hundreds of other senior officers and the only way to stop. It was to take the system down cyber expert hughes who was serving as the pentagon seibert defense deputy assistant secretary at the time recalls that his team had to quote isolate and shut down. Parts of the unclassified network to identify and then eradicate the threat actor. Ironically it was the failure to update software that enabled what still seen as the worst cyber attack on the us government. When chinese hackers stole the personnel files of four point two million government employees as reported by the us office of personnel management in two thousand fifteen including the real names of intelligence officers serving in covert positions around the world responding to news the hack the incoming biden administration released a statement thursday vowing to make dealing with quote what appears to be a massive cybersecurity breach affecting potentially thousands of victims a top priority. From the moment we take office alperovitch. Who's now the chairman of the silverado. Policy accelerator a washington dc based cyber think tank warned against us officials or lawmakers reacting to what he calls run of the mill spying as opposed to enact of war. This is a case where we should say good for them. Shame on us for letting them he says we need to use this as a wake-up call to reorganize our government to better deal with this massive intelligence failure and massive failure

United States Pentagon FBI Kimberly Dosier Department Of Homeland Securit Us Government Departments Of Commerce Russia Suzanne Spaulding Homeland Security Office Obama Administration Antonoff Dmitri Alperovitch Alperovitch National Nuclear Security Admi Ceasar Department Of Energy Democratic National Committee NSA Aaron Hughes
Rudy Giuliani Has Tested Positive For Covid, Trump Says

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

00:38 sec | 11 months ago

Rudy Giuliani Has Tested Positive For Covid, Trump Says

"Corona virus has again hit president trump's inner circle this time. It's his personal attorney rudy. Giuliani who was admitted yesterday to georgetown university medical center in washington rudy. Giuliani appeared on television sunday morning claiming president. Trump's fight to overturn. The election. results was making progress just hours later. The president revealed that giuliani tested positive for covid nineteen. He spoke in arizona georgia and michigan often without covering his face to do this. If you feel uncomfortable but would you be comfortable taking him. Ask also so people could hear you more clearly. Can't can you hear me now.

President Trump Giuliani Rudy Georgetown University Medical Donald Trump Washington Arizona Georgia Michigan
Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani admitted for Covid-19 in Washington, D.C.

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:31 sec | 11 months ago

Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani admitted for Covid-19 in Washington, D.C.

"Trump's Personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani has covered 19, NBC's Kelly O'Donnell reports, the president announced. Giuliani's covert diagnosis on Twitter get better soon. Rudi we will carry on a 76 year old was reportedly admitted to Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, D. C Sunday. Giuliani said on Twitter that he's getting great care and recovering quickly. The former New York City mayor has been crisscrossing the country in recent weeks to raise claims of election fraud in battleground states that the president lost.

Kelly O'donnell Giuliani Rudy Giuliani Donald Trump Rudi Georgetown University Hospital NBC Twitter Washington New York City
"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guest today is perfect. Brooks coached him WHO's a professor of management at Georgetown University Kiss with such focused on organizations, acquire, develop, and retain human and social capital. Here's Lucille Human Resource Management Scholarly Achievement Award, and he has performed research in or several as a consultant in your organizations. Welcome Brooks. Thank you. I'm very pleased to be with you. So I want to start with with your book Richard. Searches I Guess Publishing Twenty Thirteen Disrupt Hobby disrupted a blueprint for change in management education. and S you know, get a lot going on. Structure and content of education today because of the panic. But in the in the book, you say, in the past twenty, five years dramatic marketplace plans to mation technology advances and globalization have led to completely new rates of interacting, sharing, learning and doing. And that challenge the very core of graduate management education. So, get today's challenges why balancing relevance value and reputation you say, the player business school administrators to engage in unprecedented amounts of strategic thinking creativity take hold engaged in an enterprise effectiveness. Now I would I would think Brooks from twenty thirteen to twenty twenty that assault more data around these types of things a lot of things have changed. So do want to talk a bit about what the US are laying out in the book and how things might change over time. Absolutely I grateful to collaborate with Eric Dorf Co editor on this volume that was sponsored by the Graduate Management Admissions Council, and the purpose of the focus really to help administrators think about how do they shape a portfolio of business school offerings in the future and I don't want to be chew self congratulatory. But as you suggested seven years later in twenty twenty, many of these trends now are playing out seeing see, for example, the explosion and specialty master's degrees not only in the number of degrees offered but the number of people pursuing those degrees. Yes. Whereas twenty years ago it was really you know. You on MBA will you want it during the daytime or do you want it during the night time out was really sort of the options that you had but now there's a version for people who are straight out of Undergrad, many schools call it a master's in management. Might have been undergrads who were. Studying foreign a relations or political science or Spanish, and they decide they WANNA pivot to business but they don't WanNa wait five years to go back and get him va so they get. Really a one year intensive experience and we see that market blooming across the US and across other countries. You've got many other specialty masters like Masterson H. R., or accounting or finance. That have come out in the last. Five. Years or so. But what we're seeing right now is the continued in ovation there and things like sustainability. and. Healthcare informatics were getting specially sort of focus in narrow and it's fascinating to watch. Yeah. So I don't a lot about this brooks and you are in a very unique position of its responsibilities both in administration as a lesson teaching. At. So I think about specialty management degrees. You know as sometimes gets used to be a bit of a crisis around that, and that is the most specialized you.

Brooks US professor of management Graduate Management Admissions Georgetown University Kiss consultant Eric Dorf Co Masterson H. R. Richard assault editor
"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"georgetown university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

"georgetown university" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"georgetown university" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Eso undergrad was at Georgetown University in D. C. And then I got my MBA at Duke. You don't choose cheap school? No, although sometimes I rethink it, but it is not working itself out. Wow, That's very impressive Pedigree. They're very well done. Good for you. Thank you. So, your your MBA and your undergrad was in HR. So my underground was actually finance international business. Okay, So did investment banking for a little bit then also did nonprofit before making the switch to HR After getting my MBA. Why do I have the feeling she could do anything? She is very focused, young lady Crystal. What did you learn throughout this debt attack? You know? I learned a lot. I would say the biggest thing wass resilience and knowing my Y and keeping my focus there. There was so many times where it got really difficult having to say no to myself and to my friends on the budgeting process. That was not fun. So what started you on this journey? So if we flash back to may, 2016 when I graduated, I had my job lined up to start off in August. And as you know, they give you that six month Grace period, which I feel like is a sham but got the six month grace period and decided to take it as such, which was not smart. I took the summer off Teo Hangout vacation. Just chill out a bit. And as I got closer to that six months, I realized that I need to figure out what I was dealing with because I knew I still had undergrad loans in addition to my grad school loans, so I go through my email, and I totally all of the numbers in the balances across private and federal loans. And see that it's $200,000. You never totaled it before. Freakout. Exactly So complete freak out, And I'm thinking everything from OK. How am I gonna pay this off? When I am I ever gonna be able to buy a house Who's gonna date somebody who has $200,000 instead of major concerns, and at some point during that freak out actually called my dad, And he said something to the effect of You know you are where you are, or you can do now is make a plan and make it happen. So very practical did make me feel good. But it was practical. And thankfully, around that same time my church had announced financial piece university. So I enrolled there. And that's how it all got started. Wow. Okay. Good timing. Yes, very much. Well done. Yes. Oh, I met your dad mom at the break of minute ago and They seem like really reasonable people like smart people and all. So I imagine when your dad heard $200,000. He is staying calm for you. But he probably went. Oh, my God. So, yes. What's funny is I was if I'm being very honest, Dave. I was Not only was I freaking out, but I was ashamed because I see myself as someone who typically has a handle on those type of things. And so I didn't tell him the number. Oh, I didn't tell either of my parents the number until I was maybe You know, maybe $40,000 out of completing it. So you're almost done before? Yeah, Yeah. I didn't want it. I didn't want to tell them so I told them that it was a lot, but I didn't. But they didn't know how much it was a lot of variable term. Yes. Whoa! Look at you. You know what that does to your credit? Sometimes when you look at that And you go. How did not do that? That sense of shame does come. A sense Regret comes sometimes that paralyzes people. Yes, but to your credit it cause you to bolt in action. No, not this girl. That's what you said. And you know you got a freaking finance degree. So the MBA. Yeah, well, the irony of me too, and I went broke following that stuff. Yeah. So Yeah, that's ah. Man. That's amazing. I love the motivation. You had to total it up. T just stared in the face. And I think I would love to hear your advice to people that are out there that are young. Or maybe not so young. That are staring at that student loan debt. We've got $53 Trillion in student loan death impact on 47 million Americans right now. I'm sorry. 470.71 Point seven trillion It grew while you were talking Crystal. What advice would you give to people out there that find themselves in that first step. It is definitely one step in front of the other. You can't elephants happen to be my favorite animal. You can't take a whole bite, but it's taking it one step at a time on DH, just realizing Okay, it happened on how can you get organized? And not just having a budget but actually sticking to it. That was one of the most humbling aspects of it. There was one time where I recall, I had figured out a way to get my grocery bill toe only $100 a month and a lot of rice and beans. And so I In the line. And I purposely when I was in the grocery store would not bring my debit card. Just just prevent myself from spending more. I love to eat and I love to cook. So I'm in line and I remember the cashier ringing up everything and I might have been. I don't know. Seven or 10 bucks off and so there's a line behind me and I have to say I'm sorry, but can you take those items off? And so that was hard because I know in my bank account. There's money, but I was committed and so to answer your question, Chris, I think it's you know..

Dave Georgetown University Duke Chris