35 Burst results for "Georgetown Law"

Georgetown Law Professor Barnett on What to Expect From the Presidential Commission

Mark Levin

01:13 min | Last week

Georgetown Law Professor Barnett on What to Expect From the Presidential Commission

"Pros and cons. Um, of in favor of the different report foreign proposals that they're listening to, so they're going to do the pros and the cons and I, the witnesses that they have are hearing from by and large. I think the majority of them have been against core packing, including Left of centre professors from Harvard, like Noah Feldman and from Duke, like Neil Siegel. Um, now there's been some Ford it but mostly they've been against it where I think they're going to see more pros than cons, and I already get that sense from listening to their questioning is on court is on term limits. Because I would say more a majority of people. They're hearing from kind of favorite term Memphis, and I think that's even true. Some of the commissioners so they're going to get you're not going to get a recommendation. You're going to get a balance. You're going to get a report that shows pros and cons and there is like there are like seven or eight right of center originalist scholars on this commission Which is kind of how I got to testify out of how many Out of 30 or more. I mean, it's it's imbalanced. But look, there's more balance on this commission. And there is at the Georgetown law School. I can tell you Well, yeah, there's more balance at the, uh, on the in the polar Bureau and Communist China than there is any. Now let me ask you You're

Noah Feldman Neil Siegel Harvard Duke Ford Memphis Georgetown Law School Polar Bureau China
Georgetown Law Professor Barnett Explains Why Court Packing Is Unconstitutional

Mark Levin

01:58 min | Last week

Georgetown Law Professor Barnett Explains Why Court Packing Is Unconstitutional

"You in when we need you. Court packing is unconstitutional. This is a statement you gave to this. So called Presidential Commission on the Supreme Court, which is shocking to me in and of itself. I'm sure the Supreme Court justices are keeping an eye on this and it could well affect them and depending on how they feel about things. Tell us what you you said to the commission and which is not printed here in reason Magazine. Yeah, I testified orally, and I submitted written testimony, which I recommend that people take a look at because it's got a longer version of the article, and really mark. The argument is actually very simple. And that is that this Congress does have the power to set the number of justices at any number of wishes, and that number is varied from six on the low side to 10 on the high side. The last 150 years. It's been nine. But whenever Congress changes the law, it has to do so constitutionally that and you have to ask what power is it using to accept the number and change change the number? And it's the necessary and proper clause, which gives Congress the power to make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution, its powers, including and the powers of any other department, which is the judicial department. That's what it is, which means a law to change the number must be necessary. And it also must be proper. So we have to look and see what the meaning of necessary is and what the meaning. Alright, let's slow down because you make it very, very important point. This clause. Which is kind of tucked away necessary and proper clause. As the court recognized this as an important clause, absolutely, including in the affordable, including in the Affordable Care Act challenge in the Affordable Care Act Challenge. Five justices said that the individual insurance mandate Was not a proper exercise of Congress's power. Um they can't make you buy insurance under the commerce power that's improper under the necessary and proper clause. Mhm. So this is

Reason Magazine Supreme Court Presidential Commission Congress
What Sets Social Media Platforms Apart From Broadcast and Cable?

UnCommon Law

01:49 min | Last month

What Sets Social Media Platforms Apart From Broadcast and Cable?

"With me to talk about these early days of the internet is g g. G is a fellow at the georgetown law institute for technology law and policy she also worked at the fcc during the second obama administration so jeep before we get into some of the concerns. You and others have about big tech. Could you just start by explaining what separates social media companies apart from traditional medium in terms of their business model what sets social media platforms apart. From let's say broadcast and cable is that while they all depend on advertising the advertising that social media companies depend on is targeted so essentially your browser your social media platform collects an unbelievable amount of information about u Whether it's demographic information where you live what you races what your age is also collects data about where you go on the web right so i buy a lot of athletic wear right the room covid nineteen and so i do a lot of shopping for that online and then i go to my go to facebook and all of a sudden i'd get delivered dozens of ads for other companies That sell athletic. Wear so you know. A lot of data is gathered about us soul to advertising networks. And then they deliver the as you so that's targeted advertising advertising that advertisers believe again based on a lot of data that you wanna see as opposed to legacy media which just broadcasts what they think. The most general audience would be interested in cars. Doritos other consumer goods like that.

Georgetown Law Institute For T Obama Administration FCC Facebook
Washington, DC's Georgetown law professor resigns after Zoom call comments

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:57 sec | 5 months ago

Washington, DC's Georgetown law professor resigns after Zoom call comments

"Second Georgetown law professor has left the school professor David Batson has turned in his resignation. This follows an investigation into a conversation with another professor on zoom that included negative comments about black students. Batson had been on administrative leave after a video clip showed him talking about student performance with Professor Sandra Sellers, both of whom are white Sellers said during the conversation having this thanks Every semester that a lot of my lower ones are blacks in another clip shared on Twitter bats and questions his own unconscious bias. You know the concept of how that plays out whether that is, you know, my own perceptions playing in here and with certain Yeah, I own my own. Unconscious biases, you know, playing out in the scheme of things. Students, including the university's Black Law Students Association, say Batson is at fault for not condemning sellers

David Batson Sandra Sellers Batson Georgetown Twitter Black Law Students Association
Georgetown law professor terminated after remarks about Black students

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

01:57 min | 5 months ago

Georgetown law professor terminated after remarks about Black students

"Is fired Professor Sandra Sellers after she made some controversial comments about her black students. ABC is TJ Holmes reports. You know what I hate to say this I end up having this No angst every semester that a lot of my lower ones are blacks. Happens almost every semester. The video call was between sellers who has taught at the school for nearly 20 years, and Professor David Batson, another Georgetown law professor. Part of the recording was posted online in the cliff Sellers claims her black students routinely gray lower than her other students, and it's like Oh, come on. Yeah, get some really good ones, but they're also usually somebody just played at the bottom. It drives me crazy. Georgetown terminated sellers and place Batson on administrative leave, while the school's Office of Diversity Equity and affirmative action investigates, saying Batson has been removed from any involvement he has in the course he was discussing with sellers. The university also says It's taking significant steps to ensure that all students in this class are fairly grated without the input of either professor. The Dean called the conversation reprehensible and a boring, adding that determination and investigation is by no means the end of our work to address the many structural issues of racism reflected and this painful incident and that there's a need for more comprehensive. Anti bias training. I was shocked but not surprised. You would hope that we were farther along. Professor Anthony Cook also teaches at Georgetown law. He says he thinks the school's reaction was appropriate, but says further action is needed. We're moving on now to try to see if we can figure out what systemic and structural changes might be made to Prevent this kind of thing. Sellers apologized for what she called her hurtful remarks, but acknowledged irreparable harm. She's done two students she's supposed to help excel. When it

Sandra Sellers Tj Holmes Professor David Batson Georgetown Batson Office Of Diversity Equity And ABC Professor Anthony Cook Dean
Georgetown Law fires professor who made 'reprehensible statements' about Black students on viral video

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 5 months ago

Georgetown Law fires professor who made 'reprehensible statements' about Black students on viral video

"Georgetown University Law Center, firing a professor placing another on leave after making what the dean called reprehensible remarks about black students in video leaked to this week by a Twitter user named Hassan Ahmed. Professor Sandra Smith is her talking to her colleague David Batson, about student performance having this ext. Every semester that a lot of my lower ones are blacks. That's it appears to say nothing in response, calling it a painful incident and a message online. Dean William trainer says they plan to address many structural issues of racism at the school, including explicit and implicit bias, bystander, responsibility and the need for more comprehensive anti bias training.

Hassan Ahmed Sandra Smith Georgetown University Law Cent David Batson Dean William Twitter
Georgetown law professor under fire for comments on Black students' performance

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:50 sec | 5 months ago

Georgetown law professor under fire for comments on Black students' performance

"To George Town law school professors are under investigation after making comments about their black law students in a recorded zoom meeting why Professor Sandra Sellers and David bats and evaluated a black law students performance for a course they teach together. Sellers complained that the majority of her low performing students are black, saying quot drives her crazy bats and can be heard initially agreeing with sellers than recognizing his own biases. You know the concept of how that plays out and whether that is, you know, my own perceptions playing in here and with certain Yeah, I own my own. Unconscious Biases. Horse sounds Black Law Students Association says the professor should be fired the schools law Dean Bill, trainer says he finds the concept of

George Town Law School Sandra Sellers David Bats Quot Horse Sounds Black Law Student Dean Bill
Merrick Garland Confirmation Hearing For AG

Morning Edition

06:35 min | 5 months ago

Merrick Garland Confirmation Hearing For AG

"But today is all about Merrick Garland. He'll appear before the Senate to take questions from lawmakers for the position of attorney general. Most people know Merrick Garland's name because of something that didn't happen. Garland never got a hearing after President Obama nominated him to serve on the Supreme Court five years ago. Here's NPR justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. Merrick Garland has devoted nearly 45 years to the law. But he didn't start out that way is, he told Professor Martha Minnow at Harvard Law School in 2016. Why don't you go to law school in the first place? Chemistry, well chemistry and math. Garland had planned to become a doctor. He wanted to help people one on one, but his collision with the hard sciences spun him toward the law, where he's looked for that sort of direct connection ever since. In the mid 19 eighties. At his law firm in Washington, Garland became a rising star. He made time for a young college graduate who worked in the copy center to Randy Thompson says Garland reviewed one of his papers, photocopied it and rearrange the paragraphs. That was the beginning of In essence and becoming a riding coach. For me, it was just extraordinary experience and became my coach. Eventually, my mentor and 30 something years later, a friend. Eventually Garland Road, MMA reference for law school and has kept in touch ever since, Thompson says garlands Still a little old school still humble, still looking to help. The only thing that really has changed about him, And I guess me as well is the color of hair. I don't know, well respected judge as attorney general. Help get the department under the quagmire of partisan politics that many people think it devolved to under President Trump and Attorney General Bar That's Georgetown law professor Paul Butler. He says the DOJ has been reeling from political scandals and racing to confront the threat from homegrown extremists. Merrick Garland has faced both before. After clerking on the Supreme Court. Garland took a job as an advisor in President Jimmy Carter's Justice Department. In those years after Watergate, DOJ struggled to separate partisan influence from law enforcement and establish new boundaries for the FBI. Garland also played a bit part in some of the biggest investigations of that era from political corruption to national security that Garland says later turned into hit movies. American Hustle about the Abscam case. Argo about the ex filtration of hostages in Iran and the most important the miracle on ice. Which was about the Lake Placid Olympics, where I did work on the security for the Olympics By the 19 nineties, Garland was prosecuting a violent gang that terrorized people in a public housing project. And helping build a case against DC's mayor Marion Barry. On drug charges Back inside Justice Department headquarters, Garland became the man to see for the hardest problems. The car bomb exploded outside of a large federal building in downtown Oklahoma City, Garland would soon travel to the site of the most deadly domestic terror plot in American history. 168 people died in that bombing in Oklahoma. Former deputy Attorney General Jamie Go Relic remembers watching that day with Garland by her side, he basically said while watching Children being pulled out of the wreckage. That he had to go. He really wanted to go. We both had young Children at the time and What we saw on those screens was so affecting. Garland oversaw the search warrants protected the chain of evidence and insisted that reporters have access to court proceedings. We wanted somebody Who could make sure that the investigation was done by the book. And that any indictment was bulletproof. Prosecutors later convicted Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols for their role in that bombing. Former prosecutor Beth Wilkinson says Garland played an important role in other confrontations with extremists in those years, including a standoff with the heavily armed Montana free Men. One of the examples I can think of is sometimes and there were these stand downs where there would be, you know, arrest warrants for someone, or there would be some kind of controversy between people who were challenging the federal government. America's first instinct wasn't to go in and arrest everyone. It was to try and along with the FBI to see if there's a dispute could be resolved. Wilkinson says. The FBI went on to arrest those men later. She credited garlands, quick thinking and cool head that may have prevented a tragic outcome. Just about the only criticism Garland's nomination has drawn is in the area of civil rights. Garland is a moderate, so I don't see him as the bold and visionary leader or racial justice that some people were hoping for again. Georgetown law professor Paul Butler that he's not an ideologue is both discerning for people who want an attorney general. To meet this moment of national reckoning inspired by the movement for Black lives and the killing of George Floyd Butler says he thinks girls just from the White House long time civil rights advocate Wade Henderson says Garland is up to the task. But Henderson says it's a big one. The next attorney general, for example, has to do everything In his or her power to fight for voting rights. Police reform Criminal justice reform and LGBT Q equality. For the past 23 years, Garland has been a federal appeals court judge in that role, he doesn't have much of a chance to share his personal views. Carolyn Lerner, the chief mediator at the courthouse, says Garland took an early, an important lead to update policies that protect workers from sexual harassment and other misconduct. I think it's very clear that Judge Garland cares a lot about these issues, and he really wants employees to be happy and comfortable in the workplace, and when he was chief judge, he took his responsibility. To these employees very seriously, she says. Garland wants to continue another of his projects at the Justice Department tutoring sessions with a young public school student. This year. The judge is working with an 11 year old boy and his twin sister. Your mom is Andrea Tucker. He makes this so interactive for them and so much fun and they can't get enough of it. It's the kind of public service that Garland has always wanted to

Garland Merrick Garland Justice Department Carrie Johnson Professor Martha Minnow Randy Thompson President Trump Paul Butler Supreme Court FBI Harvard Law School Jamie Go Olympics Georgetown NPR Beth Wilkinson President Obama Marion Barry Senate Jimmy Carter
Unpacking Biden's Executive Orders Advancing Racial Equity And Tribal Sovereignty

Morning Edition

02:49 min | 6 months ago

Unpacking Biden's Executive Orders Advancing Racial Equity And Tribal Sovereignty

"Faith and morality require. Among the executive orders He's signed since arriving in the Oval Office for are aimed at advancing racial equity and tribal sovereignty. Earlier this week, we spoke with the Brookings Institution's Andre Perry about one of those initiatives. Tackling discriminatory federal housing policies. I do think this is a start. You have to start somewhere you start with HUD and hopefully mo mentum from the public. Can encourage these other areas to make change. We called on three experts to address the other pillars of the Biden plan, reaffirming tribal sovereignty, ending the federal government's use of private prisons and condemning discrimination, bias and hate crimes against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Ethel Branches. A former attorney general for the Navajo Nation. Paul Butler, is a former prosecutor and author and professor at Georgetown Law and from Citizen University and the Aspen Institute. Eric Liu. I started off by asking. Will these executive orders make a difference? Ethel Branch spoke first. Absolutely. It sends a strong message. Using the language of equity is very hopeful. It's a needed reaffirm INTs to Indian country that this administration's engagement with Indian nations will be very different from the last administration and also signals that some of the things that were under way under the Obama administration will be put back into place. But I think this is just a start. If President Biden really wants to reaffirm tribal sovereignty we need to start talking about Lifting the federal chains essentially that restrict tries from controlling their territory and governing with respect to their people. And Eric Liu, you have written about the experience of Chinese American families. I wonder what you make of this order fighting xenophobia against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. I think President Trump created a frame of permission. That it was okay to be casually racist toward Asian Americans and people of Asian descent. And, as with so much of President Trump's racism he could say, at least on the surface, plausibly. Oh, I didn't mean that that's not meant to be that you're being too sensitive. But I think anybody of actual Asian descent could feel the vibe of disrespect and menace and the form of disrespect comes in this way in particular. Which is You look Asian. I don't really care whether you're Asian, American or Asian from Asia. I'm going to see you as a threat. I'm going to see you as a problem. I'm going to see his escape goat President Biden Simply by changing the tone simply by refusing to speak in that way, makes a big difference. I want to turn to

Eric Liu Andre Perry Mo Mentum Ethel Branches Georgetown Law And From Citize Ethel Branch President Trump Brookings Institution Oval Office President Biden Obama Administration Paul Butler Aspen Institute HUD Biden Federal Government Asia
Do armed right-wing militia groups pose a threat to U.S. presidential election?

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:03 min | 10 months ago

Do armed right-wing militia groups pose a threat to U.S. presidential election?

"Election is nine days away, and experts at Georgetown University are preparing for election day. Disruptions by so called militia groups is not Institutionalist not protected by the Second Amendment. Mary McCord with Georgetown Law Schools Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection, says it's aware of both left and right wing groups who are taking President Trump's words, literally when he told supporters at the last debate, quote, go into the polls and watch very carefully hearing already in the chatter, their groups that are going to self activate in the streets. And so this is one of the Things that we're trying to help local jurisdictions prepare for by making sure that at all levels, people are aware of the prohibitions on the SEC Attorneys General of D. C. Maryland and Virginia issued reminders to residents following the president's statement outlining the official process to become a poll watcher and the laws that protect you as a voter. The institute's guide breaks down voter intimidation laws by state, read our full story and find the link to the guy that w GOP dot com.

Georgetown Law Schools Institu President Trump Georgetown University Mary Mccord SEC GOP Maryland Virginia Official
Supreme Court to have Barrett confirmation hearing in Washington DC this week

Reveal

01:11 min | 10 months ago

Supreme Court to have Barrett confirmation hearing in Washington DC this week

"News. I'm Barbara Klein, President Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Amy Cockney, Barrett is vowing to rule based on law, not her personal views. In prepared remarks released today ahead of her Senate confirmation hearing that begins tomorrow. Barrett also says courts are not designed to right every wrong in public life. NPR's Windsor Johnston reports It's expected to be a bitter four day process. Judge Barrett is likely to face a barrage of questions, including issues and cases involving abortion, specifically the landmark Roe vs Wade decision. Senate Democrats are also likely to press her on whether a justice Barritt would recuse herself from a potential election dispute. Post November Georgetown law professor Paul Butler would judge here it would choose herself. There's not much binding law about when injustice should recuse herself. The Supreme Court level, It's pretty much up to her. Barrett is also certain to face questions about the affordable care act. The high court is set to hear a challenge to the law next month. Windsor Johnston. NPR NEWS Washington

Judge Barrett Supreme Court Barritt Windsor Johnston Amy Cockney Senate NPR Barbara Klein President Trump Washington Paul Butler Professor ROE Wade
Senate Judiciary Takes Up Barrett Confirmation

NPR News Now

00:58 sec | 10 months ago

Senate Judiciary Takes Up Barrett Confirmation

"Confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett get underway on. Capitol Hill next week. NPR's went Johnston reports. Senate. Republicans. WanNa confirmation vote before the election. While Democrats continue to push back Senate Democrats are expected to press judge Barrett on several key issues including abortion and whether she would recuse herself from a potential presidential election dispute. Georgetown law professor Paul, Butler says, Barrett will also face questions about a pending challenge to the affordable care act. Herself with regard to this case, it's likely that she would tip the balance in favor of overturning obamacare either in a narrow way based on the specific provisions that the court is considering four more. Supreme Court is expected to hear the legal challenge to the ACA next month Windsor Johnston NPR

Judge Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court Windsor Johnston Npr Senate NPR Johnston ACA Georgetown Professor Paul Butler
Floridians With Felony Convictions Must Pay Fines Before They Can Vote

Morning Edition

03:58 min | 10 months ago

Floridians With Felony Convictions Must Pay Fines Before They Can Vote

"Legislature appears to be succeeding in its drive to prevent people with felony convictions from voting. The people of Florida voted otherwise. Two years ago by an overwhelming margin, Floridians overturned the state's lifelong ban on voting for most people who were convicted of felonies and ER done serving time. Then Florida lawmakers stepped in. The legislators barred people with felony convictions from voting if they still owe outstanding fines. Danny Rivero of W. LRN reports on the result. The big promise when voters passed a ballot initiative in 2018 was that more than a million Floridians would get the right to vote back, but after the state connected voting with making payments Less than 10,000 ex felons are expected to vote in November, according to research from Georgetown Law Center. That's because the majority of people can't afford to pay what they owe. Even if a tiny percent of them can have paid all my thighs. I have paid my debt to society. And now maybe Sean Jones came out of Florida State prison six years ago when she was serving time for drug charges. When I met her in August, she was marching to the polls in Miami to vote in Florida's primary election. Today. Jones is a social worker now. And for the occasion, she's wearing a homemade black and pink shirt that celebrates how far she's made it. So my short says she's then reform have DC number, which is day County corrections, and I have my voter's registration number checked, so No longer a felon and my eyes. I'm not a few Florida counties have come up with programs that allow judges to modify someone sentenced to allow them to vote even if money is still open. In the program's first launched there was a lot of promise that they could help people register to vote. Democratic State Senator Jason Pizzo helped create one of these programs in Miami Dade County a year ago. He says. The biggest problem with the program is that so few people have used it less than 100. People of their cases have been modified in the largest county in Florida and the third largest, Pizzo says there's more pro bono attorneys that have offered to help with cases than people who have called for help. Is it apathy or is it beating down people and Basically digging and feel so disheartened and disenchanted with a system that I give up. You know, I just give up. I won't engage. I don't know. A fund to help would be voters was created last year and has raised million so far. But even those charitable contributions are facing pushback from the state. After billionaire Michael Bloomberg announced he would help donate nearly $20 million for the effort. Florida's attorney General Ashley Booty, asked the FBI and state police to investigate in the letter, She cited laws against election bribery. It's hard not seeing this as a bit of voter intimidation. Daniel Length, is an attorney with the campaign legal center. She represented plaintiffs in the federal court case. And she says Florida is trying to scare people away from accepting help for paying off their fines and fees. There is no criminal investigation to be had here. The law is about paying people to vote or paying people in order to induce them to vote. Instead, the generosity of fellow citizens is allowing individuals to become eligible to vote. Most of us don't have to pay to become eligible to vote. But unfortunately, these folks dio Betty Riddle was a plaintiff in the federal lawsuit, and now she's scrambling to come up with the money. She needs to be able to vote in November. It doesn't make that frustrates free meat is unbelievable What these people will go through to stop from bone. I mean, you you want we got okay, Riddle says Despite all the legal rulings, she's going to keep trying to get her voting rights back even if it takes until the next presidential election. For NPR news. I'm Danny Rivero in Miami.

Florida Senator Jason Pizzo Danny Rivero Betty Riddle Sean Jones General Ashley Booty W. Lrn Miami Miami Dade County Legislature Georgetown Law Center NPR Michael Bloomberg Attorney Daniel Length FBI Bribery
Floridians With Felony Convictions Must Pay Fines Before They Can Vote

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:54 min | 10 months ago

Floridians With Felony Convictions Must Pay Fines Before They Can Vote

"Dot com slash NPR to learn more. Florida's Republican legislature is largely succeeding in its drive to prevent people with felony convictions from voting the people of Florida voted otherwise two years ago by an overwhelming margin Floridians overturned the state's lifelong ban on voting for people convicted of crimes. Then Florida lawmakers stepped in the legislators barred people from voting if they still owe outstanding fines, which most can't afford to pay Danny Rivera of member station, wwl R. N. reports on the result. The Big promise when voters passed a ballot initiative in two thousand eighteen was that more than a million Floridians would get the right to vote back. But after the stay connected voting with making payments, less than ten thousand ex-felons are expected to vote in November according to research from Georgetown? Law. Center. That's because the majority of people can't afford to pay what they owe. Even if a tiny percent of them can have paid all my fines. I have pay my dentist society. And now, maybe Bolt Sean came out of Florida State. Prison six years ago where she was serving time for drug charges. But when I met her in August, she was marching to the polls in Miami to vote in Florida's primary election. Jones a social worker. Now for the occasion, she's wearing a homemade black and pink shirt that celebrates how far she's made it. So my shirt says she's been reform. DC number, which is day county corrections crossed out. And I have my voter registration number checked So no longer a felon and my is not a few Florida counties have come up with programs that allow judges to modify someone sentenced to allow them to vote. Even if money is still out when the programs I lost, there was a lot of promise that they could help people registered to vote. Democratic. State Senator Jason Pizzo helped create one of these programs in Miami Dade. County a year ago and he says the biggest problem with the program is that so few people have used it less than one hundred people out of their cases modified in the largest county in Florida in the third largest country pizzo says there's more pro Bono attorneys that have offered to help with cases. Then people who have called for help is it apathy or is it beating down people and basically Nagin and feel so disheartened and disenchanted with system like I give up Give up I don't WANNA gauge. I don't a fun to help would be voters was created last year and has raised million so far. But even those charitable contributions are facing pushback from the state after billionaire Michael Bloomberg announced he would help donate nearly twenty million dollars for the effort. Florida's Attorney General Ashley. Moody. Asked the FBI in State police to investigate and the letter she cited laws against election bribery. Not See this as a bit of voter intimidation. Then you link is an attorney with the campaign legal center. She represented plaintiffs in the Federal Court case, and she says, Florida's trying to scare people away from accepting help for paying off their fines and fees. Air is no criminal investigation to be had here. The law is about paying people to vote or paying people. In order to induce them to vote instead the generosity of fellow citizens is allowing individuals to become eligible to vote Most of us don't have to pay to become eligible to vote unfortunately these folks do, but he riddle was a plaintiff in the federal lawsuit, and now she's scrambling to come up with the money she needs to be able to vote in November government. Fustrates me I mean unbelievable what these people will go through to stop

Florida Senator Jason Pizzo Florida State R. N. General Ashley Danny Rivera Attorney NPR Miami Dade Michael Bloomberg Georgetown Sean FBI Jones Nagin Federal Court Miami Bribery
Broadband for All?

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

04:42 min | 1 year ago

Broadband for All?

"I have two guests joining us I I want to say welcome to agree to disagree to G. G soon TJ year distinguished fellow at Georgetown. Law and you are recognized as one of the nation's foremost advocates for open and affordable Internet, welcome to intelligence squared. Thanks, John and your opponent in the conversation. It's different from saying opponent in a debate, but the opposing view in the conversation is brought to us by Christopher Christopher welcome to intelligence squared, and to agree to disagree your professor at Penn Law, and among the leading authorities on law and technology today. Great to have you with us. Thank you for having me. So I WANNA start by putting before the two of you, a series of very short questions and all I want to hear from you is whether you agree with the statement says or whether you disagree and I'm going to start. Statement number one for millions of Americans pandemic has increased reliance on the Internet to substitute for or enhance variety of normally face to face activities such as getting an education being seen by a doctor going to the bank shopping for basic needs again. The pandemic has increased reliance on the Internet for those things. Do you agree or disagree with that Statement Agree Chris Totally agree? Second Statement, the thirty three million Americans who lack broadband service in their own homes are disadvantaged by that fact, G G I don't agree with the number, but I agree with the statement. Correct me on the member. So thirty, three million, a third of American households don't have Internet access. The FCC's numbers, which are actually less than thirty three million. They're closer to eighteen million grossly under understate the number of Americans. Who Don't have access to the broadband internet? A thirty three million is too little as well. I testified in front of Congress that it's closer to one hundred, forty, one million okay Microsoft estimates that is closer to one, hundred, sixty, two million all right so somewhere between thirty three million in one hundred sixty two million Americans lack of broadband service in their own homes. Are disadvantaged by that fact. Do you agree or disagree great? Chris without disputing the numbers at this point are those without broadband in their homes disadvantaged by that fact, absolutely the third question, the user experience on faster broadband connection is preferable to the experience on a slower connection. Kiji, agree a hundred percent. Chris wanted to know more about what you mean faster and slower the generally. Yes, it's always better to be faster. There is diminishing returns. We're GONNA talk about gigabit speeds at some point I presume, and basically there's a point where you just don't need any more speed, but within a certain range absolutely okay. The fourth question broadband service should be seen as a right underlaw gee-gee. I think it's essential a writer very very legalistic term I think every American should have Internet access whether it's a right like the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. It's hard for me to agree with that statement depending on what you mean by right. If, you're asking me if everybody should have it whether it's an essential service, I agree one hundred percent. Asking me it's. Is it a right under the bill of rights? I would disagree. Chris I think Z. said a perfectly. It's an important service, but I don't think for him. Getting rights, discourse helps okay. It's very interesting. Point is that you've agreed fundamentally basically on all four questions so far are fifth question and our final question, and that's the one that we're going to use our motivating question for the beginning of the conversation at least Congress should guarantee broadband access for all gee-gee agree. Chris I think that the question is how. I tend to generally agree, but for example states have been very active in the space I want to credit the things that they're doing this room through a lot of different actors, but does Congress have very constructive role in Congress doing more? Yes, but guarantee is too strong a word. Would you say I think so? You know there's a lot of the central services that we have and the idea of a guarantee means that if I were choose to move on top of a mountain. Very far away from everything else. I'm entitled to ask the Government to provide service, no matter what the cost at certain levels and With a number of alternatives, there's examples where we have to make trade offs, and by saying the government is obligated to provide every citizen to guarantee every citizen access to internet speeds comparable what you get cities, no matter where they choose to live. Is a choice we can make in society. It's just a very expensive one

Chris Congress Christopher Christopher Georgetown Government Penn Law FCC John Microsoft Professor Kiji Writer
'The Computer Got It Wrong': How Facial Recognition Led To False Arrest Of Black Man

Morning Edition

02:51 min | 1 year ago

'The Computer Got It Wrong': How Facial Recognition Led To False Arrest Of Black Man

"Police in Detroit we're trying to figure out who stole five watches from a show I know watch store and so they pulled security video that had recorded the incident they zoomed in on the grainy footage and ran the suspect to a facial recognition system I hit came back forty two year old Robert Williams of Michigan when I look at the denture of the gallon I just see a big black guy I don't I don't see a resemblance I don't think he looks like me at all in January police in Detroit arrested Williams for the watch theft Williams says he was placed in an interrogation room and police put three photos in front of him and he says so I guess that's not true either so I picked it up into my face when I told him I said I hope you don't think all black people look alike Williams was detained and then released on bail until his hearing that's when prosecutors dropped the charges against him academic and government studies have demonstrated that facial recognition systems misidentified people of color more often than white people what makes this case extraordinary is that police admitted that facial recognition technology prompted the arrest typically the tools used in secret lawyer Phil Maher is with the ACLU of Michigan they never even asked him any questions before arresting him they never asked him if he had an alibi they never asked him where he was that day the ACLU has filed a complaint against the Detroit police department the complaint asked that police stop using the tool in investigations in a statement to NPR the Detroit police department says after the Williams case the department enacted new rules now only still photos not security footage can be used for facial recognition and only in the case of violent crimes according to Georgetown law center on privacy and technology at least a quarter of the country's law enforcement agencies have access to face recognition tools Jamison's feedback is a researcher at the center most of the time people who are arrested using face recognition or not told at face recognition was used to arrest them the government use of facial recognition technology has been banned in half a dozen cities in Michigan Williams says he hopes the case is a wake up call to lawmakers Williams says there should be a nationwide ban let's say that this case wasn't retail for a one of those rape or murder what I got out of jail on a personal bond or but I never come home Williams and his wife Melissa worry about the long term effects the arrest will have on his daughters he was arrested on his front lawn his young daughters cried as her father was taken away in a police car in order to get arrested and that was their first interaction with the police so it's definitely not shape however seem long course man in his complaint Williams and his lawyers say if the police department won't ban the technology out right that leaves his photo should be removed from the database so this doesn't happen

Detroit
'The Computer Got It Wrong': How Facial Recognition Led To False Arrest Of Black Man

Morning Edition

03:05 min | 1 year ago

'The Computer Got It Wrong': How Facial Recognition Led To False Arrest Of Black Man

"Now a man who says he was falsely arrested after a computer algorithm mis identified his face is speaking out as NPR's Bobby Allen reports critics of the technology said case shows how unreliable the tool is police in Detroit we're trying to figure out who stole five watches from a show I know watch store and so they pulled security video that had recorded the incident they zoomed in on the grainy footage and ran the suspect to a facial recognition system I hit came back forty two year old Robert Williams of Michigan when I look at the picture of the guy out I just see a big black I don't at all I don't see a resemblance I don't think he looks like me at all in January police in Detroit arrested Williams for the watch theft Williams says he was placed in an interrogation room and police put three photos in front of him and he says so I guess that's not true either so I picked it up into my face when I told him I said I hope you don't think all black people look alike Williams was detained and then released on bail until his hearing that's when prosecutors dropped the charges against him academic and government studies have demonstrated that facial recognition systems misidentified people of color more often than white people what makes this case extraordinary is that police admitted that facial recognition technology prompted the arrest typically the tools used in secret lawyer Phil Maher is with the ACLU of Michigan they never even asked him any questions before arresting him they never asked him if he had an alibi they never asked him where he was that day the ACLU has filed a complaint against the Detroit police department the complaint asked that police stop using the tool in investigations in a statement to NPR the Detroit police department says after the Williams case the department enacted new rules now only still photos not security footage can be used for facial recognition and only in the case of violent crimes according to Georgetown law center on privacy and technology at least a quarter of the country's law enforcement agencies have access to face recognition tools Jamison Spivak is a researcher at the center most of the time people who are arrested using face recognition or not told at face recognition was used to arrest them the government use of facial recognition technology has been banned in half a dozen cities in Michigan Williams says he hopes the case is a wake up call lawmakers Williams says there should be a nationwide ban let's say that this case wasn't retail for a one of those rape or murder what I got out of jail on a personal bond or but I never come home Williams and his wife Melissa worry about the long term effects the arrest will have on his daughters he was arrested on his front lawn his young daughters cried as her father was taken away in a police car in order to get arrested that was our first interaction with the police so it's definitely not shape how they perceive law enforcement in his complaint Williams and his lawyers say if the police department won't ban the technology out right that leaves his photo should be removed from the database so this doesn't happen

What it means to defund police

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:20 min | 1 year ago

What it means to defund police

"Conversation that we're having in this country right now about systemic economic racism. Turns today on three words, De Fund, the police. In Minneapolis where George Floyd was killed by police. A Super Majority of the city council there says it wants to dismantle its police force, and in part because that defined the police has become kind of a catch phrase for a really complicated problem, so marketplace's Kimberly. Adams spent her day today, talking to people about what it might mean, concepts like defunding or dismantling or even abolishing the police are a bit more nuance to then may come across a protest. Chant Christy Lopez is co director of the innovative policing program at Georgetown Law and used to work at the Department of Justice Investigating police departments. She says when people talk about defunding police. It doesn't mean that you route budgets for public safety. It may mean that you decrease. Get rid of the police department per se, but you might still have something like an office of public safety. So, what would it do? Ron Surpass spent thirty years in law. Enforcement Police chief in New Orleans in Nashville, chief of the Washington State Patrol, and in all that time about ninety percent of all the police department calls that I've looked at in my life. have nothing to do with a major uniform crime. Crime has nothing to do right murder robbery burglary assault theft auto, nothing surpass now teaches at Loyola University in New Orleans. He says cop spend most of their time. Responding to auto accidents, noise complaints, lots of calls about people dealing with substance abuse. And when someone is having a mental health crisis, we often are sending out the police. Sue Abdur Holden runs the Minnesota branch of the National Alliance on mental illness she. She says the state has mobile mental health crisis teams that can respond. Unfortunately, they're not fully funded so that they can respond twenty four seven to every call that comes in which means the police legally have to says Jim Birch President of the National Police Foundation. The bottom line is who else would you call on a Saturday afternoon or in the middle of the night on a Friday night to come and respond. Respond to help address a dispute or disagreement. There literally is no one else to

National Police Foundation Enforcement Police Sue Abdur Holden Christy Lopez Georgetown Law Ron Surpass New Orleans De Fund George Floyd Minneapolis Jim Birch Washington State Patrol Department Of Justice Adams Loyola University President Trump Director National Alliance Nashville Murder
"georgetown law" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"georgetown law" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Randy Barnett Georgetown law school he's been on my radio show before was outstanding clear thinking plain spoken takes complicated concepts makes them quite easy he was he was terrific and I hope many of you got to watch live or at least DVR let me take a couple calls before we move on here people been waiting choice Syracuse New York X. M. satellite go Hey mark so we have a friend who emigrated from Poland he told us was the way that the government they're paying for everyone's free education is once you're done with school and you go to work yeah basically working for the government because they take your pay that's how they pay for education well what happened one day should be president either of this country or Russia I will happen down the road is you'll get free education it'll turn into propaganda indoctrination and you'll get to contribute to society with a hammer and the sickle building things the government wants you to build and digging things the government what should but it's really a fantastic way to live yes everybody lives happy times income by moments never seen anything like this before you have doubts you know I know trump all the way my husband and my family trump all the way all right then you have doubts about Bernie thank you for your call the answer is yes we have Taos course let us go to rob Jersey city New Jersey the great W. A. B. C. go you're not spoken a couple times in a long time ago by the seventeenth amendment and I want to ask a question about the electoral college and that is that if you look toward college was abolished would that mean that now the Senate would be restructured so that Montana.

Georgetown law school Poland president Russia Bernie New Jersey W. A. B. C. Senate Montana Randy Barnett Syracuse York Taos
"georgetown law" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"georgetown law" Discussed on KTOK

"In Georgetown law school and again his latest is treasure template Templars **** and the holy grail David Brody welcome back to coast to coast AM how are you I'm doing great thank you for having me tonight so let's start off with a rather important definition of the knights Templar who were they they were basically the army of the medieval church from the early parts of the eleven hundreds to the early parts of the thirteen hundreds and they became probably the most powerful force in all of Europe during that time period they acquire the amazing amounts of welfare as I said the army of the church they fought in the crusades they were gifted a lot of land by nobility something that they discovered in Jerusalem when they're over the Middle East made an incredibly powerful we're not quite sure what that was some kind of treasure or secret and then just as quickly they were outlawed by the church and that's a whole nother story will get to that I'm sure as we go along right so these the theory is that perhaps allegedly they discovered vast fortunes gold and other treasures beneath the remnants of Solomon's temple is that the idea wait a critical yes that city they discovered something that would nine nights went over there and then almost instantly they came back to Europe and became incredibly powerful so I mean that's one of the questions that no one really knows the answer to what did they find when they are activating under king Solomon's temple was it gold and silver and treasure possibly was the ancient secrets of Christianity that they at the church didn't want to be revealed and so that the Templar knights use that to leverage themselves into a position of power did they find religious artifacts such as the holy grail of the ark of the covenant did they fine.

Georgetown law school Europe Jerusalem Middle East Solomon David Brody
"georgetown law" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

09:28 min | 1 year ago

"georgetown law" Discussed on WTVN

"In Georgetown law school and again his latest is treasure template Templars **** and the holy grail David Brody welcome back to coast to coast AM how are you I'm doing great thank you for having me tonight so let's start off with a rather important definition of the knights Templar who were they they were basically the army of the medieval church from the early parts of the eleven hundreds to the early parts of the thirteen hundreds and they became probably the most powerful force in all of Europe during that time period they quiet amazing amounts of welfare as I said the army of the church they fought in the crusades they were gifted a lot of land by nobility something that they discovered in Jerusalem when they were over the Middle East made an incredibly powerful we're not quite sure what that was some kind of treasure or secret and then just as quickly they were outlawed by the church and that's a whole nother story will get to that I'm sure as we go along right so these the theory is that perhaps allegedly they discovered vast fortunes gold and other treasures beneath the remnants of Solomon's temple is that the idea wait a critical yes that city they discovered something that would nine nights went over there and then almost instantly they came back to Europe and became incredibly powerful so I mean that's one of the questions that no one really knows the answer to what did they find when they are activating under king Solomon's temple was it gold and silver and treasure possibly what is the ancient secrets of Christianity that they that the church didn't want to be revealed and so that the Templar knights use that to leverage themselves into a position of power did they find religious artifacts such as the holy grail of the ark of the covenant did they find each knowledge and then lost during the dark ages and it could be any one of those things but whatever it was something they them incredibly powerful and so that question one the question too is what happened two hundred years later they were butting heads with the church over over something that that they learned or something that they did and the church cut them down what was that second what would cause that that's mystery number two and then of course Mr number three is this treasure that they had what happened to it and those are the three questions that I delve into in this series of books right this is a quick aside didn't the Templars because of their because of their gold holdings did they really aren't they credited with starting the banking system as we know it yes basically they they can put a system whereby travelers in medieval times of course traveling was very very dangerous and very difficult travelers could basically by what we now call travelers checks they could deposit their money say in Paris at temple are headquarters and and we've given that a chip coded **** in return and then they could turn that **** in when they got to Jerusalem or Madrid or ever they happen to be traveling well wherever they were going in turn that in and cash it in and that allow them to travel without having to carry gold cash with that and so that that was sort of the beginning of the banking system and from that the Templars became lenders financiers really a multinational corporations as I said earlier that became incredibly wealthy incredibly powerful and this is by my count I bill I believe your night in this series on Templars in America do I have that right you are correct yes and as we speak you're you're hammering away on number ten I am I mean that's a long series on one topic what is it about this that has you so I don't use the word obsessed but I mean wow it's kind of taken over your literary career you can use the word Seth and it's funny because I had no background whatsoever in the knights Templar when I first started I was writing legal thrillers and we have a local legend in the town that I lived in for over to well over twenty years over two decades Westford Massachusetts the legend of the Westford night filled with the K. and that legend is that Scottish explore some of the remnants of the outlawed knights Templar came over to to New England in the late thirteen hundred a hundred years before Columbus one of their party died one of the nights died and the cards in after G. into the rock ledge to memorialize his death and so that's the legend we have in my hometown western Massachusetts and I sort of said well my my one my daughters came from school one day elementary school with with this story and so that's a fun story that might be a fun thing to weave into one of my legal thrillers and I started doing the research on and I went down that rabbit hole maybe fifteen years ago and I'm still ferreting around the dusty corners of temple artistry a decade and a half later nine books later in desperate need of a shower and a change of clothes this turns out that there are there are so many aspects of this mystery there's so many things about the Templar order because they were a secret order things we don't know about me think about having you know the United States today for the past say a hundred years has been the most powerful country on earth let's say that the United States everything about it was secret and historians six hundred years from now trying to figure that out but it was all seek imagine imagine how many mysteries there would be if that's what it was like with the Templars they were incredibly powerful but they were secret and we don't really know what happened what they believe what they did what got them to become powerful or what got them to become a loss so there's just so much to do to learn about and it's it's that you would use the word obsessed Richard I think that's fair I I am in the sucky thing up at night well let's suppose that they did come to America before Columbus and I think most of us now have slowly come around to the idea that Columbus wasn't first he was probably last so if the templates the knights Templars a came to North America in the thirteen hundreds more than a hundred years before Columbus so what what's the implication here right there really isn't it so that earth shattering a concept other than we just have this line in the sand you know fourteen hundred ninety two Columbus sailed the ocean blue it's not that big a deal we know that the Norse came across at least as far as America and Canada hundred years before that so what would be the big deal with the Templars came it really wouldn't change that much the thing that does change history is why did they come you know get there are alot of thirteen oh seven it stands to reason that they they saw the writing on the wall one of the reasons they would've com would have been to create for themselves a safe haven a place to secrete their treasures and their valuables and so if they did calm which I think they did the question then is is their treasure still here or if not what happened to it it's not whether they came in on it's why did they come with a coming for religious reasons because they believe the version of Christianity which differ from the orthodoxy of the church and if so what was that difference and what does that mean about the church itself so those are the questions that I think is a really interesting things whether they came or not I mean you can't live quite clearly I think they did I think it would be more surprising if nobody came between the time of Leif Eriksson in the early eleventh century and Columbus like why wouldn't people come back and forth it's part of the human condition to as they say in Star Trek to seek out new life and new civilizations matches that's what humans do I got to be more surprising if five hundred years passed without somebody else crossing the Atlantic but as I said the important question the interesting question is why were they here and what were they doing and if if they did find these amazingly important Christian artifacts the holy grail the crown of thorns the one true cross the spear of destiny who knows what else the ark of the covenant if they brought those with them that means they're here somewhere in North America are they in oak island are they buried somewhere in the Ozarks or Washington DC and and they're they're they're out there waiting to be discovered right so that's the sixty four thousand or five sixty four million dollar question where are they you know where they were they brought over here and then read later retrieved and brought back to Europe and perhaps there was one chapel in in in Stalin's where they brought over here and then just lost where they put where they treasures and brought over here in liquidated to pay for the American revolution I mean is also to do the possibilities and there's evidence of supports all three of those things I just mentioned by the way and it's also possible that that we just haven't found it yet it is still being there that they were that they were hidden and and they're still being hit in and kept hidden by certain groups here and and to be released at some future time so that's the fourth possibility and yet but this is fertile.

Georgetown law school David Brody hundred years five sixty four million dollar five hundred years six hundred years two hundred years fifteen years twenty years two decades one day
"georgetown law" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

13:52 min | 1 year ago

"georgetown law" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"In Georgetown law school and again his latest is treasure template Templars **** and the holy grail David Brody welcome back to coast to coast AM how are you I'm doing great thank you for having me tonight so let's start off with a rather important definition of the knights Templar who were they they were basically the army of the medieval church from the early parts of the eleven hundreds to the early parts of the thirteen hundreds and they became probably the most powerful force in all of Europe during that time period they acquired amazing amounts of wealth there as I said the army of the church they fought in the crusades they were gifted a lot of land by nobility something that they discovered in Jerusalem when they were over the Middle East made an incredibly powerful we're not quite sure what that was some kind of treasure or secret and then just as quickly they were outlawed by the church and that's a whole nother story will get to that I'm sure as we go along right so these the theory is that perhaps allegedly they discovered vast fortunes gold and other treasures beneath the remnants of Solomon's temple is at the idea wait a critical yes that city they discovered something that would nine nights went over there and then almost instantly they came back to Europe and became incredibly powerful so I mean that's one of the questions that no one really knows the answer to what did they find when they are activating under king Solomon's temple was it gold and silver and treasure possibly was the ancient secrets of Christianity that they at the church didn't want to be revealed and so that the Templar knights use that to leverage themselves into a position of power did they find religious artifacts such as the holy grail of the ark of the covenant did they find each knowledge and then watched during the dark ages and it could be any one of those things but whatever it was something made them incredibly powerful and so that question one the question too is what happened two hundred years later they were butting heads with the church over over something that that they learn or something that they did and the church cut them down what was that second what would cause that that's mystery number two and then of course Mr number three is this treasure that they had what happened to it and those are the three questions that I delve into in this series of books right this is a quick aside didn't the Templars because of their because of their gold holdings did they really aren't they credited with starting the banking system as we know it yes basically they they can put a system whereby travelers in medieval times of course traveling was very very dangerous and very difficult trap was could basically by what we now call travelers checks they could deposit their money say in Paris at temple are headquarters and and we've given it a door ever they happen to be traveling well wherever they were going in turn that in and catch it in and that allow them to travel without having to carry gold cash with them and so that that was sort of the beginning of the banking system and from that the Templars became lenders financiers really a multinational corporation as I said earlier that became incredibly wealthy incredibly powerful and this is by my count I better I believe you're nines in this series on Templars in America do I have that right you are correct yes and as we speak you're you're hammering away on number ten I am I mean that's a long series on one topic what is it about this that has you so I don't use the word obsessed but I mean wow it's kind of taken over your literary career you can use the word Seth and it's funny because I had no background whatsoever in the knights Templar when I first started I was writing legal thrillers and we have a local legend in the town that I lived in for over to well over twenty years over two decades Westford Massachusetts the legend of the Westford night filled with the K. and that legend is that Scottish explore some of the remnants of the outlawed knights Templar came over to to New England in the late thirteen hundred a hundred years before Columbus one of their party died one of the nights died and the cards in effigy into the rock ledge to memorialize his death and so that's the legend we have in my home town western Massachusetts and I sort of said well my my one my daughters came from school one day elementary school with with this story and so that's a fun story that might be a fun thing to weave into one of my legal thrillers and I started doing the research on that went down that rabbit hole maybe fifteen years ago and I'm still carrying around the dusty corners of temple artistry a decade and a half later nine books later in desperate need of a shower and a change of clothes this turns out that there are there are so many aspects to this mystery there's so many things about the Templar order because they were a secret order things we don't know about me think about having you know the United States today for the past say a hundred years has been the most powerful country on earth let's say that the United States everything about it was secret and historians six hundred years from now we're trying to figure that out but it was all secret imagine imagine how many mysteries there would be and that's what it was like with the Templars they were incredibly powerful but they were secret and we don't really know what happened what they believe well they did what got them to become powerful or what got them to become a loss so there's just so much to to to learn about and it's it's that you would use the word obsessed Richard I think that's fair I I am in the sucky thing up at night well let's suppose that they did come to America before Columbus and I think most of his now have slowly come around to the idea that Columbus wasn't first he was probably last so if the Templars the knights Templars a came to North America in the thirteen hundreds more than a hundred years before Columbus so what what's the implication here right there really isn't if earth shattering a concept other then we just have this line in the sand you know fourteen hundred ninety two Columbus sailed the ocean blue it's not that big a deal we know that the Norse came across at least as far as maritime Canada hundred years before that so what would be the big deal with the Templars came it really wouldn't change that much the thing that does change history is why did they come you know get their outlined in thirteen oh seven it stands to reason that they they saw the writing on the wall one of the reasons they would've com would have been to create for themselves a safe haven a place to secrete their treasures and their valuables and so if they did calm which I think they did the question then is is their treasure still here or if not what happened to it it's not whether they came in on it's why did they come with a coming for religious reasons because they believe the version of Christianity which differs from the orthodoxy of the church and if so what was that difference and what does that mean about the church itself so those are the questions that I think is a really interesting thing whether they came or not I mean who cares I think quite clearly I think they did I think it would be more surprising if nobody came between the time at least barracks in in the early eleventh century and Columbus like why wouldn't people come back and forth it's part of the human condition to as they say in Star Trek to seek out new life and new civilizations matches that's what humans do I got to be more surprising if five hundred years passed without somebody else crossing the Atlantic but as I said the important question the interesting question is why were they here and what were they doing and if if they did find these amazingly important Christian artifacts the holy grail the crown of thorns the one true cross the spear of destiny who knows what else the ark of the covenant if they brought those with them that means they're here somewhere in North America are they in oak island are they buried somewhere in the Ozarks or Washington DC and and they're they're they're out there waiting to be discovered right so that's the sixty four thousand or at sixty four million dollar question where are they you know where they were they brought over here and then read later retrieved and brought back to Europe and perhaps their laws when chapel in in in Stalin where they brought over here and then just lost where they put where they treasures and brought over here in liquidated to pay for the American revolution I mean is also to do the possibilities and there's evidence that supports all three of those things I just mentioned by the way and it's also possible that that we just haven't found it that they're still being there that they were that they were hit in and and they're still being hit in and kept hidden by certain groups here and and to be released at some future time left before possibility and yet but this is fertile ground for fiction and and I think beyond just the sectional interests I think people who are interested in history have a real fascination with this as well exemplary Templars **** and the holy grail again it's a piece of fiction but it is is deeply rooted in historical fact in it centers around a medieval painting cold the Gant altar piece tell me about with this painting looks like so again it's it's it's a huge painting is about the size of a barn door and comprised of sixteen separate painting separate panels it was painted by the van Eyck brothers Hubert neon van like in the late fourteen twenties early fourteen thirty is a fascinating it was it was quite a spectacle when it was first painted the van Eyck's came up with a with a really cutting edge technology to create right vibrant colors I mean there there was those colored paint of course back then but they added linseed oil to the pigments to really create a vibrant product picture for example going from black and white television for high definition color that's basically what these eyes did not just with the caller but they painted with such detail every single hair on the horse's back you can identify they really change the way painting was done and so when this painting came out not only what was it was it important painting for religious purposes with will get to but just the the quality itself was quite a quite a remarkable thing during that time NPR recently called most important painting in history and in addition to being important it's also the most stolen anything after it's been someone six or seven times but again starts back in the early parts of the fourteen hundreds in dance a city in Belgium and a D. the the depiction on one panel in particular is is really of primary importance to the story correct right and I and I believe these these images are up on on because because website if it was just one take a look but the central image of something called the attic adoration of the mystic lamb and what that is essentially is a picture of of a land which symbolizes jesus' being pierced with a lance everyone knows that story and the blood flowing from the land into a chalice and everybody is watching all the important figures in both the old and the New Testament the angels of profits everyone's watching this happen and first of all the course of the holy grail also watching this from a separate panel are a group of knights Templar knights of Christ on horseback who they're watching which is strange because this panel this painting was kept in and I in a Catholic cathedral same bobble cathedral and again the temple I've had been outlawed see you would think that you wouldn't want to have an outlaw group watching your your solemn ceremony but they're they're not curious and then watching the Templars watch this scene are another group of of contemporary figures the called the job judges will get back to the just said later they become very point of the story but since it's a story the central panel is the story of of the lambs leading into a chalice in other words the blood into the holy grail as you mentioned it when the most stolen paintings in in history the the grand altar piece and this is a somewhat reminiscent of that George Clooney I think Bill Murray was also when I called the monuments men wear this this group of soldiers their mission was to recover stolen art art pieces in a priceless art pieces that were stolen by the **** during the second World War also Matt Damon I have to give a shout out to my boss and I met Damon also was in that movie at the two thousand fourteen feature film and and the if the if your listeners are familiar with the movie that first scene is is a scene where the **** come in and steal a painting out of the church and it is against altarpiece painting and that's one of the most important things that they stole one eventually recovered all except that centerpiece sense.

Georgetown law school David Brody hundred years sixty four million dollar five hundred years six hundred years two hundred years fifteen years twenty years two decades one day
"georgetown law" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"georgetown law" Discussed on KTOK

"In Georgetown law school and again his latest is treasure template Templars **** and the holy grail David Brody welcome back to coast to coast AM how are you I'm doing great thank you for having me tonight so let's start off with a rather important definition of the knights Templar who were day they were basically the army of the medieval church from the early parts of the eleven hundreds to the early parts of the thirteen hundreds and they became probably the most powerful force in all of Europe during that time period they acquire the amazing amounts of welfare as I said the army of the church they fought in the crusades they were gifted a lot of land by nobility something that they discovered in Jerusalem when they're over the Middle East made an incredibly powerful we're not quite sure what that was some kind of treasure or secret and then just as quickly they were outlawed by the church and that's a whole nother story will get to that I'm sure as we go along right so these the theory is that perhaps allegedly they discovered vast fortunes gold and other treasures beneath the remnants of Solomon's temple is at the idea a critical yes that city they discovered something that would nine nights went over there and then almost instantly they came back to Europe and became incredibly powerful so I mean that's one of the questions that no one really knows the answer to what did they find when they were excavating under king Solomon's temple was it gold and silver and treasure possibly was the ancient secrets of Christianity that they at the church didn't want to be revealed and so that the Templar knights use that to leverage themselves into a position of power did they find religious artifacts such as the holy grail of the ark of the covenant did they find.

Georgetown law school Europe Jerusalem Middle East Solomon David Brody
"georgetown law" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:07 min | 2 years ago

"georgetown law" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And I can't even begin to read read you his curriculum vitae in the army for two years goes to Georgetown law school graduates in nineteen sixty one he is the assistant to Senator Edmund Muskie before he is appointed US attorney for the district in Maine by president Carter. He served as a federal judge principal architect of number of peace treaties in Northern Ireland in the Middle East in baseball. He was also chairman of the Walt Disney company Senator George Mitchell. Welcome to Bloomberg. Thanks for having me. So you have a story background. But I have to go back at least to the ba-. Beginning of your legal career, you graduated Georgetown law in nineteen sixty one you practice law for about a dozen years what what sort of legal practice. Did you have I began with the department of Justice served there for a couple of years, then I was hired by Senator Muskie to be on his staff here in the US Senate in Washington. From there. I left to join the law firm in Maine in nineteen sixty five practice there for about a dozen years. Like everything else in life. The practice of law was much different than it is now far less specialization. So I did a wide range of things including began increasingly to become involved as a trial lawyer and I participated also as an assistant. Local what we call county attorney. So I tried dozens and dozens of cases civil everything mostly criminal. Okay. I did do some civil war. And then I became the US attorney, and they are I tried a very large number of criminal cases. Well, you appointed by Jim Jimmy Carter you serve as US attorney for a couple of years somewhere in there. I recall reading a brief stint as a federal judge is that right? That's right. I was appointed a federal judge when the congress enacted legislation to increase the number of federal judges in Maine. We had had since the state's creation in eighteen twenty only one federal judge. Wow. And that was double to two, and I became the second federal judge only the twelfth in the whole history of the state, and then there's a midterm opening in the Senate, and you're appointed to the US Senate by governor Joseph Brennan in nineteen eighty and you run for election in one thousand nine hundred and when by a pretty substantial margin, I did. Win by a substantial margin. But for most of the race. I was behind by a substantial really very deeply etched in my memory is may one thousand nine hundred eighty one a little over a year before the election. When the headline news daily newspaper was that. I was trailing my opponent by thirty six percentage points in the general election, and at that time I was threatened with a primary election and I was behind that race by twenty five percent. Okay. So the come come from behind kid, how how did you end up closing that giant gap? What were you just less known to the voters, or what was the big disparity? It was a combination of factors. I the primary challenge never materialized. So I ended up getting a nomination without a contest. And then it was a head to head race for over a year. We had a lot of public appearances. Together. We had six televised debates dates. Barely do that anymore. No. That's right. Well, it was my opponent who challenged me to the debates, and as the incumbent I accepted them and gradually over time. I think I became better known and the tide slowly changed in my favorite Andhra pointing by comfortable margin. So sixty one percent of the vote. So you get elected and fairly quickly. You rise to the role of Senate majority leader how how did that happen? I was very fortunate. I was named the chairman of the Democratic Senate campaign committee for the one thousand nine hundred ninety six elections. That's a position that each party. Has you help candidates running for office? So there's some influence in some power that go out there is if you do well, and we were very fortunate in euro, though, President Reagan was then in his second term it really at the peak of his popularity in the election of nineteen Eighty-six. We gained eleven seats and went from being a minority party to the majority party midterm elections often helps the party out of power will come back to that in a bit. So we were talking about elections. We're talking about how things have changed the modern era of of social media and little bubbles that people are in. How does that affect politics today? It's Saturday dramatic effect really liked the rest of life in general. You can't think of politics or something separate from the rest of our lives because it's affected by the same influences, casual work, our family, all of our lives are and as we've seen the dramatic changes in human life brought about through the technological advances of recent years. The creation of social media, the beginning of the cable news services, increasing polarization of the media itself, which both influences and is influenced by those attitudes and public so serving in public office now is much different than it was when I was there running for public office is even more different coming up. We continue.

Senator Edmund Muskie US Senate Maine US attorney Senator George Mitchell Jim Jimmy Carter Georgetown law school Senate Walt Disney company Bloomberg Democratic Senate attorney President Reagan governor Joseph Brennan army president department of Justice principal architect congress
"georgetown law" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"georgetown law" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Georgetown law professor, Paul Butler and Stephen Brown from the urban institute, and we're taking your calls as well. Rochelle, Riley, I want to come back to you and just actually, I want to get you all to sort of comment what we heard before the break run a former police officer from. Mm, southeast Michigan, I think he said. Where he did a study in found that the majority of non emergency calls actually came from people in his district from from people of color. So does this suggest that this is a wider an even wider problem? Not the. Racially motivated calls isn't a huge problem, but is this, does this suggest an even wider problem? What do you think we're show? Well, I think that the scholars on the program right that these are all vestiges of a of a time when this country lived in segregation and there are people that still wish for it, and there are people who try to make it happen by either staying away from people or making it impossible for people to be around them. The idea that you don't want someone in a pool or you don't want a little girl selling water. It wasn't about the water. It was about not being comfortable with those people being in that space. I think that what we have to do is get to a point in this country where we decide that we don't wanna live with the color line anymore. When WBZ boys said that color would be the color line would be the problem of the twentieth century. I'm sure he had no idea that it would be the problem of the twenty-first and we have to do something before it's the problem of the twenty second. I think. One of the challenges here and Paul Butler. Let me come to you with this is is when these things happen for obvious reasons, they mean different things to different people. So I want to read a comment from our website from Brian four thousand who writes, I have to be honest most of these cases except for a couple don't look racially motivated. It seems like now, anytime a white person calls the police on a black person person, racism is simply assumed. This is not a recipe for a stable society. I think no one is taking time to evaluate each case before the social media mob ruins people's lives. Respond to that pole. So learn some history, my friend, there's a whole history year. So in the antebellum cells, when a white person made a false accusation against an African American, she was lynched. Lack people weren't even allowed to offer testimony in court against light folks. And yes, we've come a ways since then, but if we look at how our criminal legal process works, it still very focused on people of color and especially black men. So we have more black people in the criminal Justice system now than there were slaves in eighteen fifty. And so a lot of the starts with that nine one one call which isn't colorblind. Again often it's it's all about race. People say, well, what do you want. The police to do. So if we look at some of these instances, the four of black women who were moving luggage out of an Airbnb. The police are called that doesn't happen to life folks who at least life folks don't know about it because the police does role by I'm former prosecutor, I know how much discretion police have in. So Darren, the young man who was moving into the apartment in New York City. Again, the police showed up and they saw a young black man moving, but they still put you through the process you're force by armed officers of the government to justify your presence. What's your name? Show some idea. What are you doing here? Do you have your lease? All of that doesn't happen to why people anywhere near the rate. It happens to folks of color, Stephen Brown..

Paul Butler Stephen Brown Riley Michigan Georgetown urban institute Rochelle Airbnb officer professor Brian prosecutor New York City Darren twenty second
"georgetown law" Discussed on The No Limits Selling Podcast

The No Limits Selling Podcast

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"georgetown law" Discussed on The No Limits Selling Podcast

"During the day went to georgetown law school at night had two kids at the same time then got a job with venable the largest law firm at the time probably still is the largest law firm in baltimore he went to work there he eventually led the tax department he represented some of the largest corporations in baltimore and he was the most low key individual you've ever met he never bragged about his clients is business while he also didn't talk about anything when he was with me or my brothers sister or my mom it was only about us and nothing to do with his business wasn't thinking about business he wasn't taking calls he it was just about us he had that ability to focus on us i mean as a kid growing up i remember he used to come home have dinner with us them most nights then he would hang out with us play ball outback whatever and then we'd had upstairs take showers and dad would head back downtown to work and you know what i have no idea what time he came home but he was always there for breakfast the next morning so he ran a the the tax department at the largest law firm in baltimore he had three kids he really was had lots of student loans and he had time for everybody he also helped many members of our family.

baltimore georgetown law school
"georgetown law" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:04 min | 3 years ago

"georgetown law" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"To go to college he joined a taxi at georgetown law he drove a taxi to put himself through law school i think he can relate to people who don't come from these exclusively ivy league backgrounds and have an understanding of what most people have to put up with on a day to day basis and struggled through and to me that that's a lot more important to to a judge having empathy for the human condition than than a lot of things so kevin is more likely to be kind of in a non bluecollar bubble i think i think exclusively ivy league educated shoot that that despite the president again seeming opposition to the elites he went strictly elite georgetown prep yale yale says that he's gone with the super league i think and that's and by the way i think that's bad for the supreme court in general the supreme if barrett or hardiman had been selected they would be the first judges of this group that did not go to an ivy league school i everyone else on the supreme court presently in most of them are harvard but have gone to ivy league law schools i i don't think that's necessarily healthy and it's certainly not diverse is most people would look at diversity all right if you are not able to listen to this entire to basically to our segment either you have to leave during the second half for you missed the first few minutes you can always hear the whole thing on the jay talking podcast i can be pretty sure this'll be podcast i recommend it to you it's available anytime pretty much anywhere and if you sign up for you it's called subscribing although it's free you get them all all right we had a good question we'll take another one six one seven two five four ten thirty six one seven two five four ten thirty or triple eight nine two nine ten thirty is the toll free just call up speak right on the phone and say hello ask you a question wbz newsradio ten thirty cbs news special report president trump announces his nominee for the supreme court judge brett cavanaugh the fiftythreeyearold now faces a confirmation hearing in the senate i will tell each senator that i revere the constitution vice president mike pence will escort cavenaugh to the senate tuesday cbs news legal analysts thane rosenbaum on the hearings senator mcconnell told the president he said hey you pick cavanaugh as going to going to be a much tougher confirmation hearing because we're gonna there's going to be people pouring through all of those opinions that he's written trying to find those little things to challenge him nasa chusetts democratic senator elizabeth warren was one of several politicians at a demonstration at the supreme court held to protest the nomination conservatives no he would overturn roe versus wade hearings are expected to take place in the.

georgetown
"georgetown law" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:07 min | 3 years ago

"georgetown law" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Media monitoring programs etc on the other hand state surveillance is a kind of a different thing in and of itself and i think in that sense i'm not sure that europe is so much ahead of the united states in terms of protecting the privacy of people visavis police an intelligence agencies where because the conception of the state over there has always been much more benevolent than in the united states and i think that the protections are quite limited and i think it's hard to compare apples and oranges but i wouldn't say that they're necessarily better than the us in that particular respect given all this technology pfizer and wondering how this is all reshaped the nypd's workforce because basic police work no longer needs to take place by walking the bead or or a sticking out sticking out a criminal well i mean i think there's two things going on over here one thing is as john mentioned earlier which is the cost of surveillance police departments has plummeted right they don't have to spend resources to survey people because they can do a lot of it online strategies being employed at the same time you know john you argue i think this is on on five point here you argue one of the effects technology has on law enforcement is to is to render its actions less visible you would notice if a policeman took took photos of every part karn pedestrian on your street but an pr's automatic number plate recognition embody worn cameras body cams let officers do that as an unnoticed matter of course that makes speaking up about privacy concerns more important not less yeah i think that that is that is absolutely true that we don't that that surveillance used to carry a much greater cost both in terms of manpower and financially for police departments than than it does now i think that a corollary to that is that there's a lot more incidental surveillance that is if the police say deploy stingray of fake cell phone tower to catch a certain suspect that terrible hoover up data from everyone else in that same region and the same is true of of automatic numberplates readers the automatic numberplates that they take in data that that is not targeted just sort of as a matter of course georgetown law center released this terrifying paper that found that over half.

europe united states nypd john georgetown law center
"georgetown law" Discussed on News Talk 710 KNUS

News Talk 710 KNUS

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"georgetown law" Discussed on News Talk 710 KNUS

"To relax cow award stories kicked around current events co west enters today he is prominent lawyer but he does double duty in the colorado house she's also a father and it's got to be a wife and a mother who might be listening they frankie co west welcome to seven ten kenya's hey craig it's great to be with you i have a team of paralegals lined up waiting to bring you virtually anything he might desire what could they bring you co west so craig given this a lot of thought and in our conversations kind of took me back to my law school years i went to law school at georgetown university in washington dc and georgetown law school is up on capitol hill so i lived about three or four blocks from the capitol one of my favorite places to go and one of the things i loved about it was it was cheap and it was a dive but it it's called the tune in and sure been thinking about a cheeseburger and a beer natural bohemian from the tap from the tune in maybe some mozzarella sticks without pickles i hate pickles yeah you know probably not probably know pickles but great watch the name of the playoffs again it's called the tune in t you and i i n n and i'd like to the tune in from about nineteen eighty nine would be good they have two thousand eleven so the older version of the tune in would be great we can do that anything is possible with my paralegals i'm like a part of the cheeseburgers i've worked up an appetite sorry to delay your one call satire conversation made them think about it guess what i do it's kind of.

kenya georgetown university georgetown law school colorado craig washington
"georgetown law" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"georgetown law" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Police in the us have been using facial recognition software for years usually after a suspect is caught on camera during a crime now real time facial recognition is on the horizon in china authorities are touting in new system's ability to spot people as they're walking down the street similar software is being tried by police in russia in india of even the united kingdom so when might it reach american streets npr's law enforcement correspondent martin kosti went to find out this is connect id it's a convention for the biometrics industry that's held in washington and the vendors exhibit hall is just what you'd expect everywhere you look there are big screens with live views of your face as you go buy as computers track you and categorize you by age and sex they're connected to the right database they could also guess your name terry hartmann is at the booth for a german company called cognitive and what's new he says is how good these systems are getting at recognizing faces in real world conditions you can feel these matches are different poses the people aren't facing the camera straight on you've got people with clauses you've got the lady looking down she's matched looking in a different direction link that to a national photo database and it's pretty much the end of anonymity in public places that's clearly the appeal and autocratic societies like china but these systems are also being pitched a western governments police in the united kingdom are now scanning crowds for known troublemakers are wanted criminals and the the same tech is being offered to american police says claire garvey she tracks this issue for the center on privacy and technology at georgetown law.

russia india united kingdom martin kosti washington terry hartmann china claire garvey georgetown law npr
"georgetown law" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"georgetown law" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"It's a great story you know i was going to georgetown law school i'd been the first week there i lived in a big group house ten guys you know kagan the of the whole deal one of my roommates no idea what you're talking donnellan with president obama's security advisor and tom was working at that point for hamilton jordan lived in the house he says you don't want to work on the campaign is only about a week in the law school and i said i'd love to do it so i got a scholarship to call my mother and said i'm leaving jerusalem she cried because this was the real at carter didn't didn't look like he could win that an easy deal and she started to cry said you're throwing your life away throw your scour trial that don't worry man and i ended up going to work it on the campaign ended up going to geez i bet you forty states mccain syracuse i didn't travel at all you know we never left syracuse and great experience for me i ended up raising the most amount of money in the primary so the general they've made me the national finance director for the president's campaign so do you mow udall wrote a great book after that experience to be president but most people forget that udall ranch jimmy carter farther than anyone else and talk at seventy six seventy six that's right ted kennedy seventy sixers mo udall right but he was all kennedy in the met and we have left i want you to talk about where you think the democratic party is and how big a split you think there is between those who are either nominally centrist democrats are wannabe be centrist democrats and the more progressive wing it's pulling them in the other direction it's a good question i get asked this a lot and what i try to say you know look at my record as governor virginia record amount of jobs record amount investment record investment in k twelve education however i have the most progressive record of any governor virginia history restored more voting rights to films than any governor in the history of the united states of america i leaned in on environment issues i kept our women's clinics open i defeated the horrible each be to antigay legislation i think that day the party has to be about economic opportunity and.

democratic party virginia sixers ted kennedy udall mccain kagan georgetown law school united states obama president finance director syracuse carter jerusalem hamilton jordan
"georgetown law" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"georgetown law" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"So now when you know that the gold standard has the skews when you see something like ninety seven point three five percent accuracy we've made a major breakthrough you start to get a better understanding of exactly which faces rain this breakthrough applies to and which ones might not be included at it's a reflection of people who are in positions of power to mold artificial intelligence and that's a very limited group right now across the us police departments are starting to use facial recognition software in their crimefighting arsenal georgetown law published a report showing that wine into adults in the u s that's one hundred and seventeen million people had their faces in facial recognition networks police departments can currently look at these networks unregulated using algorithms that have not been audited for accuracy yacht we know facial recognition is not fail proof and labelling faces consistently remains a challenge you might have seen this on facebook my friends and i lap all the time when we see other people mislabeled in our photos but miss identifying a suspected criminal is no laughing matter nor is breaching civil liberties law enforcement is also starting to use machine learn any for predictive policing some judges use machine generated risk course to determine how long an individual is going to spend in prison so we really have to think about these decisions are they fair and we've seen that i'll arithmetic bias doesn't necessarily always leaps of fair outcomes.

artificial intelligence us facebook law enforcement three five percent
"georgetown law" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"georgetown law" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"To turn on us right and so that's i guess that's the thing so like in chicago in illinois are in illinois and in texas they have very strict like biometric laws of sort of like you cannot give up like your fingerprints are ice scans or face scans unwittingly and without knowing like how it's going to be used so if you're in those states you can actually use these apps uh a wait a minute you just burn up a very good point i unlock my phone with my fingerprint via so that means they have my fingerprint will apple will sail will that information is being sent to us that stored at locally in your phone but if somebody should suddenly take charge of apple yeah that wants to use my fingerprint thumbs up there is a way to probably access that information remotely for it has to be it in there yet they are reading it it's going to the cloud and i'm lacking my phone because acting when it's crazy to because they already say i think uh what was this this show scaring the hell out of me yet i mean not to mention my iphone i have to look into to unlock now so now they have your face so now that my face but there's a report already that georgetown law centre on privacy technology found that more than one hundred and seventeen million american adults are captured in a virtual perpetual lineup which means law enforcement offices across a us can scan their photos and use unregulated software to track lawabiding citizens in government data sets so there's a very good chance are saying it nearly over half of americans faces are already in a database read that oh and that our phones a recording us whenever the anti to be restored yes i think that the gia on or off exactly and if you have an amazon echo now who knows you already broadcasting to the cia whatever power whatever conspiracy yeah the voice voice recognition yet it really well thank god we can trust the people in charge yet now of not to change the law for their benefit all know you mark zuckerberg mark zuckerberg oil figure it out for us here my phone makes me tell it my deepest darkest secret before two boeing lockett yeah but has to be a new one ever and i.

chicago illinois texas iphone georgetown law centre cia voice recognition apple law enforcement amazon mark zuckerberg
"georgetown law" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:21 min | 4 years ago

"georgetown law" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This week at georgetown law school it is only one prediction it entirely safe about the upcoming tear and daddy's it will be momentous in addition to cases involving wedding cakes and voting maps there will be fights over worker class action lawsuits cell phone privacy and of course donald trump's travel ban with us to talk more about this momentous term in perhaps makes them not to save predictions is great gar he is a partner at least i mean watkins here in washington informally the us general under president george w bush greg thanks for joining us let's see how many of these cases we can get to tell us a little bit about the very first cates case the courts down here involving the rights of workers to press class action lawsuits even though they've signed arbitration agreements thanks for having me on to the very first case to the term presents an opportunity for the court to revisit in area that put the judge home m line and that of course ability of employees or chretien agreement and in this case the court the question is whether or not employer employer employeremployee agreement through goal workrelated through individual arbitration violate the federal labour laws so in that in a specific case employees their employer in court for wage and over time violations on a class basis put in one problem they'd already agreed to resolve any employer related claimed through arbitration on an individual basis the employers them sawtooth force that agreement and kicked a court at which point the employees argued that they had a right under the national labor relations asked to bring now sort of class litigation under provisions grant to employers the right to engage in quote concerted action as for the purpose of collective bargaining or other mutual aid or protection they rely not tradition to claim that the individual arbitration agreement signed are unenforceable under federal law and so this case really presents a clash between the national labor relations and if it arbitrage an act which the court has recognized in a series of cases presents a strong presumption and fever open for soon arbitration agreement the employees of ten or to.

georgetown law school donald trump travel ban watkins washington us president federal law george w bush cates chretien fever
"georgetown law" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"georgetown law" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Well along with seven other uh different uh groups and organisations we filed a formal challenge uh through this merger and the transfer of life and visit the fcc um so so that legal challenge with thought to consider sinclair will be responding to that in the next couple of weeks we've also uh filed a lawsuit in federal court uh with our partners at georgetown law school challenging the efc's decision to change this rule uh as we would argue to benefit sinclair and a handful of these companies so i think that uh that's on the legal side where pushing an and we are really urging people if they're concerned about this to contact the federal communications commission uh there they're supposed to work for you if you don't think your local station should be taken over you should let them know and you should let your members of congress no uh we we heard a lot of concern from folks on the phone about what was being put into their news cast and without disclosure and i i think if people call talk talk about their personal stories uh very local experiences that really matters in a process like this and as it makes its way through the legal system as well let's go now to rob who is on the line some dayton ohio rob you're on on point thanks for calling hello sinclair different from the national media collaborating uh day talking points provided by the democratic party or they different from the russia they donald media bought the try to reach social media people they're all trying to vie for faith in the media area and it's all free speech you just don't know who's good opinion is third that they're trying to push for them and it'd be nice if everyone would disclose what their pointed of had that doesn't happen with the national media when they all ask the same question.

sinclair georgetown law school efc congress democratic party russia fcc dayton ohio donald media social media