35 Burst results for "George Washington University"

George Washington University to drop 'Colonials' moniker

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

George Washington University to drop 'Colonials' moniker

"George Washington University is dropping its colonials moniker The school located not far from The White House says it can no longer serve its purpose as a name that unifies George Washington University has used the name colonials since 1926 a special committee looked into the name and determined opponent saw it as referring to colonizers who stole land and resources from indigenous groups killed or exiled native peoples and introduced slavery into the colonies and supporters of colonials viewed it as referring to those who lived in American colonies especially those who fought for independence and democracy GW will keep using colonials until a new name is introduced Ed Donahue Washington

George Washington University White House Ed Donahue Washington
"george washington university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:36 min | 2 months ago

"george washington university" Discussed on WTOP

"Also 85 and Silver Spring our temperatures heading to the low 90s WTO at 1241 And this just into WTO P George Washington University will no longer use the colonials as its nickname The university says the name will be retired before the 2023 24 academic year when a new name will be introduced The university's board of trustees voted to retire the moniker because of division in the school community over the name The nickname was intended to honor George Washington but has long been a criticized as a term that glorifies colonialism The name change process started back in 2019 when the board formed a task force on naming Now GW says it will hire an outside firm and create a special committee to begin the process of finding a new nickname Meantime it was an emotional public hearing hosted by the fairfax city council last night as residents spoke out about potentially renaming more than a dozen streets that have ties to slavery and the confederacy It's unbelievable to me For some speakers like Raheem mostafavi it was personal He yelled at the council saying there's no reason the names shouldn't be changed It seems that people are claiming I live in this neighborhood named after a confederate military man but my road is simply unassociated Are you kidding me Others like Dorothy storms said changing names is unnecessary and a hassle for homeowners I never looked at the names as memorializing for honoring or promoting the confederacy The council is considering.

WTO George Washington University fairfax city council board of trustees George Washington Raheem mostafavi Dorothy storms
How KT McFarland Became the Person She Is Today

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:38 min | 5 months ago

How KT McFarland Became the Person She Is Today

"KT McFarland's with me today. I can't been waiting for this one for a while. Got to run into her cpac with the crazy part about it is through all of our travels. We have been on TV together multiple times on interviews, but never in the same place. It seems like at the same time, especially with the last few years going. And so it was so good to be in the same room, not on the same convention center, but there with you in Orlando. It is great to have you on the podcast today. Well, I agree. I mean, I feel like I really know you well because I've been on television with you. We've talked to each other, but we've never actually met in person. And so here we are yet again, not in person, but it's good to be with you. It is. But it works out, great. Well, you know, one of the things is and especially the way life goes these days is we all have our backgrounds and where we come from. And people see us and make judgments, basically, you know, we're on TV or we're on the interviews, one podcast that was kind of like, one of the things I love to do with this podcast has been great to be able to do is sort of people see how we became, you know, you or how you became me and it gives people that background so that when they see you, they say, hey, I know where she came from. I know what was going on. So tell us a little bit about how you became you in a lot of sense. Gosh, that's so nice. Well, I started out as a freshman in college in 1969. I was from Madison, Wisconsin from a working class family, but I got a scholarship to go to George Washington University. But I needed a job. So I was a really fast typist. And through a series of accidents, got a job as the nighttime secretary in The White House situation, freshman in college. And I was working for Henry Kissinger in the Nixon administration. So I went to college during the day, majored in Chinese Chinese studies, wrote my bicycle, went to The White House situation room every afternoon, and then typed the first draft from what was then called the president's daily brief and is still called the president's daily brief. And that was the classified items briefing items that would be on the president of the United States is desk in the Oval Office every morning at 7 a.m.. So I typed the rough draft at night, somebody finished it off in the morning. And I did that all through college, through part of graduate school. And all of a sudden I got promoted after chain. And I was Henry Kissinger's research assistant. At a very young age, and so saw firsthand to some of the most extraordinary periods of American foreign policy. It was the opening to China, the end of the Vietnam War, the Paris peace accords. The detente with the Soviet Union, Middle East peace negotiations. So as a very young person in my late teens, early 20s, was exposed to people and events.

Kt Mcfarland Nixon Administration Orlando Henry Kissinger White House George Washington University Madison Wisconsin Oval Office United States Vietnam China Paris Soviet Union Middle East
Who is K.T. McFarland, Trump's Former Deputy National Security Advisor?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:17 min | 1 year ago

Who is K.T. McFarland, Trump's Former Deputy National Security Advisor?

"We have so much to discuss with regards to the disasters occurring in central asia in the last two weeks. But let's start by those who may have just accidentally happened on this channel. Found us on rumble. Downloaded this podcast. Tell them a little bit about who. Kt mcfarland is when she started to get involved in national security issues. And then you'll climb to the heights of power in the white house under the trump administration starting in nineteen seventy. I was a freshman in college at george washington university and got partial scholarship and had to pay the rest of my way through school. So i got a part time typing job in the west wing of the white house and the white house situation room. Working for guy wasn't very well known at the time by the name of henry kissinger and he was richard nixon's national security advisor. So i started working part time in the nighttime typing pool for henry kissinger In the west wing and then worked in the nixon administration. The ford administration went to graduate school during the carter administration went to oxford university and then. Mit where i studied and taught nuclear weapons Then joined the reagan administration when we won the cold war Was part of the pentagon team Did one help win. The cold war got the pentagon's highest civilian award for that service. And then i retired. We'd want our cold war. My war was one done. And so i married. Had five. kids was living the good life in new york and long island and then september eleventh happened and it convinced me to get back into government because i had such a pretty extensive experience. I point so. I did And i ran for the. Us senate against hillary clinton the organ lost. Predictably but i did Get back involved in a lot of issues. And then he came. The fox news national security analysts for over a decade until i joined the trump administration Which i did at the beginning and so here. I am out of the trump administration of back on talking to import. People like you about issues. I care deeply about what your national security

Kt Mcfarland White House Henry Kissinger Richard Nixon George Washington University Ford Administration Pentagon Asia Carter Administration Reagan Administration Oxford University Long Island Hillary Clinton New York Senate United States
University of Maryland mulls mandating Covid vaccinations for students

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

University of Maryland mulls mandating Covid vaccinations for students

"Are debating whether to require students to get a Corona virus vaccine before fall semester starts. Rutgers in New Jersey is the first major university to announce that all students must be vaccinated for the coronavirus before arriving for classes and we might see that happen at local colleges and universities as well, A spokesperson for the University of Maryland College Park told wt O p. They are considering it. The school made a request to the university system of Maryland and the attorney general's office to allow for mandatory vaccinations. American University and George Washington University said they're still coming up with a plan for the upcoming year. Rutgers does have an exemption for students for religious and medical reasons. Battery Bank

University Of Maryland College Rutgers New Jersey Maryland American University George Washington University Battery Bank
Construction contract awarded for new St. Elizabeths Hospital in Washington DC

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Construction contract awarded for new St. Elizabeths Hospital in Washington DC

"D. C is closer to reality. The district and United Health Services have awarded a construction contract for what will be a state of the art facility in Ward eight. Turner Construction company and emcee and build will handle. The $375 Million Project Hospital will be run by UnitedHealth and George Washington University at ST Elizabeth's East. Expected to create about 2000 jobs, and it's set to be finished in 2024 5 42.

United Health Services Turner Construction Company Million Project Hospital Ward St Elizabeth Unitedhealth George Washington University
Is This Ancient Biblical Forgery Actually Real?

Kottke Ride Home

05:48 min | 1 year ago

Is This Ancient Biblical Forgery Actually Real?

"So close to a century and a half ago. A man named moses wilhelm shapira found fifteen manuscript fragments in a cave near the dead sea. They were written in an ancient hebrew script and contained. What shapiro claimed was the original book of deuteronomy blitz despite interest from the british museum to the tune of a million pounds. The manuscripts were found to be forged. Shapiro was disgraced and the documents disappeared but now a scholar named don dershowitz is questioning. If those documents might have been real all along so while the british museum was examining the manuscript fragments for authenticity themselves. Back in the nineteen th century. A few of the fragments were also on display to the public already attracting tons of visitors. The news of the possibly oldest ever discovered biblical manuscript had made headlines around the world. While awaiting the museum's official decree of authenticity. Someone else decided to take matters into their own hands. Charles simone clermont. Is you know who the times describes as a swashbuckling french archaeologist and longtime nemesis of shapiro's end quote examined the fragments for a few minutes and immediately went to the press to say that they were fake. The risk he played on his cursory examination paid off when the british museum experts agreed. Shapiro was humiliated by this and ended up. Tragically dying by suicide a few months later. The documents were sold at auction for a fraction of what they were originally expected to sell for. And most people soon forgot about the whole thing now. Dershowitz from the university of potsdam germany has published a new paper and companion book making the case that the manuscript was real all along quoting the new york times but dershowitz makes an even more dramatic claim the text which he is reconstructed from nineteenth century transcriptions and drawings is not a reworking of deuteronomy. He argues but a precursor to its dating to the period of the first temple before the babylonian exile that would make it the oldest biblical manuscript by far and an unprecedented window into the origins and evolution of the bible and biblical religion dershowitz. His research closely guarded until now has yet to get broad. Scrutiny scholars previewed his findings at a closed-door seminar at harvard in two thousand nineteen are divided. A taste of fierce debates likely to come but of dershowitz is correct. Some experts say it will be the most consequential bible related discovery since the dead sea scrolls in nineteen forty seven and quotes the times. Sagely points out that it's much tougher to prove something authentic than it is to prove. It's fake but there's an additional hurdle to be jumped. In this case the physical fragments themselves may no longer exist so back in eighteen eighty three there was a mad rush at the time to find biblical artifacts that would prove or disprove various points of contention emerging in biblical scholarship moseley around the documentary hypothesis. The idea that the first five books of the bible or the pentateuch were actually written by various authors. Not just one traditionally thought to be moses. It was in this climate of aggressive archaeology that shapiro. I established himself as an antiquities dealer in jerusalem and during which time he and clermont no became enemies. After camacho correctly denounced a collection of pottery. That shapira had sold to the german government. It's also important to note that shapiro was a convert to christianity having been raised jewish in russia so he was viewed with some skepticism from the other biblical scholars and archaeologists and also faced intense antisemitism after the deuteronomy manuscript was denounced. Fast forward to now. Dershowitz says one of the main reasons he thinks the fragments could have been real is because their contents differs quite a bit from the deuteronomy in the bible and many of those differences lineup with discoveries that were only made when the dead sea scrolls were found in nineteen forty seven sixty four years. After chapitoulas discovery of the fragments dershowitz also investigated. Some of shapiro's personal notes archived at the berlin state library and found three. Handwritten pages of shapiro trying to decipher the fragments. Filled with question marks and transcription errors. Dershowitz said quote if he forged them or was part of a conspiracy. It makes no sense that he'd be sitting there trying to guess what the text is and making mistakes while he did it end quote while some scholars of the evolution of biblical text or undershoots side cautiously believing the deuteronomy fragments may be genuine. Most pig refers people who study inscriptions are the ones that usually authenticate documents. Most of them aren't convinced they say the original fragments bear the hallmarks of modern forgery. That they agree with the notes made by the experts who examined them at the time and since no one has the fragments to examine physically now. It's a closed case and as for the content being impressions christopher rolston leading pig refer at george washington university said quote. Forgers are pretty clever with regard to content and they've been very clever for twenty five hundred years and quotes despite dershowitz his published paper and companion book. The jury is still out and who knows if it will ever truly be born ounce. It would have some pretty huge complications. If it does due to some of its key differences for example. It's missing all of the laws of the deuteronomy were familiar with in the bible. Ones upon which traditions and entire libraries have been founded. It would also bolster the theory that are tons more stories and traditions out there than just the ones that have been preserved in the hebrew bible.

Shapiro Dershowitz Moses Wilhelm Shapira Don Dershowitz Charles Simone Clermont University Of Potsdam British Museum German Government Sagely Chapitoulas The New York Times Berlin State Library Moseley Shapira Camacho Germany Harvard Clermont
Faketinas

Locatora Radio

05:02 min | 1 year ago

Faketinas

"Get started with. I think this person or this story broke during the summer. it's kinda hard to tell now with the pandemic. what time is like but one other prominent ones that i remember seeing that wino- was flooding. Our timeline was the story of jessica. Craig aka or formerly known as jess la. Barletta cringe already awesome early known formerly known best. I'm about that. Let's get started. Let's talk about her. Yes so this woman has allegedly and apparently apparently been taking on different like black and afro sport identities throughout her life. She's an a professor or was a professor and academic where george washington university and university teaching. You know black studies are afrikaner studies and publishing books but at some point she were shifting from being in a north african to being african american and then being afro latin next sand after boaty gua was i think the final landing place for her her official forum her final warm so jessica. Krog just aka justifiable maleta hers combination of black fishing and being a fake tina at the same time and She got called out basically rightfully so rightfully so by a group of professors who are after latina's who had issues with her they were witness to or on the receiving end of like aggression from her and like prejudice and bad behavior while she was masquerading as after let nine different contexts. Apparently being super like belligerent towards black women in my on cool and really I think overcompensating and so trying to be an ex sorted extreme caricature of like this south bronx like her. Allegedly her mother was like a drug addicts prostitutes like this narrative that should created about herself so black women in the academy you know began talking about these different experiences and came forward and said This is not right. Yeah she was definitely performing like whoa kness being extreme radical like it was very performative. She was a published academic author and she also received a ton of accolades rice. She received she was a finalist. For the twenty twenty frederick douglass prize book prize presented by yale's gilder lehrman center the study of slavery resistance and abolition. She also was nominated or a finalist for the twenty thousand nine. Harriet tubman book prize and just received a ton of accolades has really been propelled or was propelled forward and questionably hired because of not solely for her identity. But because of the work she was doing and also the way. She positioned herself as offer latino or body gua and it's very cringe to think about all of the opportunities she stole from actual author. Latinas boras caribbean women. That are doing if not the same work or better work you know. And so it's that was probably one of the first ones that we saw. And then i think it kind of just opened up the floodgates for a lot of others than i don't know about you ma. But in my chicano studies department at uc santa barbara. There were a couple of fake denies that i will not name. They were not. They weren't anyone that i took like. I didn't take any classes with them but they were around. People talked about them. People knew like this person is very white claims this this cheek. Ghana mohican identity. You know is wide. Skin blue is performing she gun. You know some kind of ghana identity wearing that. I had because with the free that carlo ecstatic the whole thing right and it's like you like i they weren't. They were my peers. I was a student right. But i have friends that were graduate students. And they would tell me about these. Things happen. And in their cohort or in their in their seminars. And so you know. I think if if you've been in academia right. I haven't been to grad school. But i was an undergrad but i've i've definitely seen the fake tina's around so they definitely exists and i think this one opened the floodgates for a ton of

Craig Aka Jess La Boaty Gua Krog Jessica Barletta Yale's Gilder Lehrman Center George Washington University South Bronx Tina Latinas Boras Frederick Douglass Harriet Tubman Ghana Caribbean Santa Barbara Carlo Academia
Vermont Sen. Patrick Leahy returns home after hospital visit

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Vermont Sen. Patrick Leahy returns home after hospital visit

"For months senator Patrick Leahy has been released from a Washington hospital expenses the eighty year old senator Patrick Leahy is looking forward to getting back to work after a brief visit to George Washington University hospital Lahey reported not feeling well at the capitol in was sent to the hospital as a precaution and for testing earlier Tuesday he'd been presiding over the Senate as president pro temp at this time I will administer the oath of the senators in the chamber swearing in colleagues ahead of next month's impeachment trial for Donald Trump Leahy is the longest serving member of the U. S. Senate he was elected to Congress in nineteen seventy four Jackie Quinn Washington

Senator Patrick Leahy Lahey George Washington University Washington Senate Donald Trump Leahy Congress Jackie Quinn
Letting the economy run hot

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:48 min | 1 year ago

Letting the economy run hot

"Begin today with some of the cross-currents swirling around in this economy right now. The pandemic of course a relief bill or not the labor market and jobs and what in a very macro sense the prescriptions to fix that have been from people whose job it is to fix that we talked about it a little bit last friday with from the washington post. There's been a sea change in washington. Trump was part of it so the federal reserve and believing that we should run the economy hat so running. Connie hot means that we're pushing up against the boundaries of what we call full employment running a hot economy. Means people have jobs at poly economics at new college in florida. The people who benefit most from hough economy are folks that the low end of the wage distribution where it sounds like the direction one would want to be headed and in fact is what fed chair. Jerome powell says all the time however comma concern is that good. Economic environment for individuals comes at a cost in terms of higher inflation. Terrorists and cleared teaches economics. George washington university. The thing is that worry about inflation just isn't happening even as hot as this economy was running before the pandemic with unemployment last january at a relatively microscopic three point six percent no inflation to speak of at all so we've learned that we can have potentially a much lower unemployment rate than what people had thought would bring on inflation. Which is why running the economy hot is kind of a change in perspective. Jay powell i'm sure we'll talk about that idea if not use the actual words tomorrow as he wraps up the feds two day

Jerome Powell Washington Post Donald Trump Federal Reserve Connie Hough Washington George Washington University Florida Jay Powell
"george washington university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"george washington university" Discussed on WTOP

"Yet to be approved by regulators. That CBS News correspondent Jim Chris Hula CBS News confirming the president Biden is bringing aboard his longtime doctor who will serve now is the new White House physician, Dr Kevin O'Connor was also Mr Biden's position while he was vice president. O'Connor then became the founding director of executive medicine at George Washington University. He has served 22 years in the Army. Two German shepherds are settling in at the White House this morning. Both champ and major arrived yesterday champ joined the Biden family back in late 2008 just before Joe and Jill Biden moved into the official residence of the vice president. He came from a breeder of two years ago. The Bidens then adopted major through the Delaware Humane Association. President John F. Kennedy and his wife, Jackie, also had a pair of German shepherds when they were in the White House. Well, that brings us to w. T. O P s PET of the week. Our pet of the week is sponsored by the Rocky Gorge Animal Hospital Resort and Spa. Danny Rizzo is joining us live now on Skype from the Humane Rescue alliance. You've got a little bit of work to do here to top the new White House pumps. Tell us about belladonna who was looking for a new home. We sure do of belladonna. I think of anyone could do it. She is super sweet. She's about three years old. She's a boxer mix, and she's got those huge super cute ears that everyone in our staff just loves. She's really playful, energetic. She's about £51. So she's a pretty big girl. But she's super Smart already knows a lot of commands and really is a wonderful dog. Is belladonna, a good dog or a very good dog. She's a very good dog She loves treats, loves playing fetch. And really, she is most happy when she could drape herself over you on your lap and just snuggle up on the couch rates. How did belladonna come to the shelter? She actually came to us from a local transport from Montgomery County. So she's a local girl, so we'd love to find her a local home here. She's really sweet. How do folks get in touch with you guys so that they can take a look at belladonna and maybe take her home? Absolutely so they can set up a virtual me angry and learn more about her at humane rescue. Lyons dot warg. Thank you, Danny. We appreciated Danny Rizzo with you Humane Rescue Alliance and you can.

White House vice president Danny Rizzo Dr Kevin O'Connor Humane Rescue alliance Jill Biden President John F. Kennedy Delaware Humane Association Rocky Gorge Animal Hospital Re president CBS News Joe CBS Jim Chris Hula Army George Washington University founding director Montgomery County Skype Jackie
Biden announces mask mandate for interstate travel

Here & Now

05:25 min | 1 year ago

Biden announces mask mandate for interstate travel

"And we're getting our first look at the Biden administration's national strategy to fight the Corona virus pandemic. One of the president's first priorities is to expand testing and vaccine production. And our next guest applauds the president's plan but wants to see more done. Dr. Lena Wen is a professor of public health at George Washington University and an ER physician. She's on Skype. And Dr Wen Biden's goal is 100 million vaccine doses in his 1st 100 days in office in the Washington Post. You call this a disappointingly low goal. Why First of all I do want to point out that we were yesterday, one day into his presidency, and he's already put forth a plan that we've been missing from the Trump Administration for a year. And this plan is comprehensive and addresses so many components that we've all been asking from the Trump administration testing PPE travel masking its very comprehensive and I couldn't help but think how different things would have been if we had this type of plan in place months ago. The thing is, though, we do need bold action at this point that is befitting of what? President Biden Call's This wartime effort. 100 Million Vaccines. Sounds like a lot. But, frankly, 100 million vaccines that 100 days is actually the pace that we're at. Now we are at about 900,000 million vaccinations a dame, and so if that's what President Biden call's a dismal failure they continuing at that pace isn't particularly inspiring. The other thing, too, is at this rate. We're not going to be able to reach herd immunity. For a two does vaccine until June of 2022. So a lot more needs to be done. And it's possible then maybe their supply issues that the new administration is uncovering. But if that's the case, they should tell us and set the expectation because right now, this is not the kind of aspirational moon shot that we need. Something else. Biden also signed executive orders requiring masks and federal buildings and on public transit between states. You want to know why he's not issuing a national mask mandate. You also suggested he could withhold federal funds from states that don't require masks. But we've been talking so much about state's rights to make their own decisions. Couldn't a national mandate actually create a huge backlash? You know, this is a very difficult trade off that we have to be making at this point about what is an individual liberty versus what is the public Good. In this case, I would equate wearing masks similar to what we do with seat belts and specifically with not allowing drunk driving. This is not about your own right or about a state, right. This is also something that affect the entire country. If there is a hot spot in one part of the country, it's going to end up spreading to other parts of the country as well. And so again. I applaud President Biden's action in issuing this Last mandate that protects federal workers who are in federal buildings. I just think that bolder action would also set the right tone. We also know that what is driving the infection in many parts of the country are indoor gatherings, extended family and friends. It really breaks my heart to see little kids not be in school. But then there are birthday parties and play dates that are occurring. It breaks my heart to see restaurants and retail businesses not be able to open but people are getting together indoors for dinner parties and game nights. Now I completely realize that pandemic fatigue is real, and that people want to see their loved ones. But I also think that there is a hard truth that we depend on President Biden to convey, which is that if we want for schools and businesses to open then what are we as individuals willing to give up? Huh? President Biden has predicted that the death toll will top 500,000 next month. But then there is the slight dip in the number of cases recently. In some states. How do you interpret these numbers? And what do you expect? We'll see in the coming weeks. I'm not sure at this point that we can understand the recent decrease in hospitalizations and infections as a trend yet I want to be optimistic. But I'm also concerned because it's possible that we haven't seen the full effects off the holidays just yet. In addition, we have these new variants. The CDC is projecting. That the UK variant may well become the dominant variant here in the U. S by March, and this is a very intense, more contagious and as a result, it will result in more deaths. And so I am not cautiously optimistic. I'm looking at the next several weeks as some of the most difficult that we will have faced as a country and things may still deteriorate from there. We need to get vaccines into arms as quickly as we can. And in the meantime, we have to reduce the spray. Head of this virus and again, I think that's a message that all of us is public health experts but also, as politicians and leaders of the community need to help to convey that this battle is far from being over. That's Dr Lena When Professor of public health at George Washington University and an emergency room physician as always, thank you so much for joining us. Thank you.

President Biden Biden Administration Dr. Lena Wen Dr Wen Biden Trump Administration President Biden Call George Washington University Washington Post Skype Biden CDC U. UK Dr Lena
Security tight around Capitol in Washington, DC as extremist threat remains high

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Security tight around Capitol in Washington, DC as extremist threat remains high

"Social media tips and personal videos to find suspects in the January 6th attack on the U. S. Capitol, CBS News Chief Justice and Homeland Security correspondent Jeff The case with that security is still tighten. Washington It is the new normal More than 10,000. Members of the National Guard are expected to remain in the nation's capital for now, U. S. Officials believe the threat from domestic extremists remains high. Still it large the person or people involved in the death of Officer Brian Sick, Nick. Many of the suspects are heavily armed, so authorities are not taking any chances so far more than 125 people are facing federal charges, according to George Washington University, more than 10% of those charged in the attack on the Capitol, have links to the U. S. Military. By the way, no suspects so far

U. S. Capitol Justice And Homeland Security Jeff The Cbs News Brian Sick National Guard U. Washington Nick George Washington University U. S. Military
How vaccinated grandparents should approach visiting loved ones

KOGO's Evening News

01:15 min | 1 year ago

How vaccinated grandparents should approach visiting loved ones

"Knew. Now the people are getting vaccinated. Grand parents are anxious to see their grandkids. But there are still many questions. A Marilyn Hider with today's coronavirus update, a doctor at George Washington University School of Public Health says even though there could be some immunity after one dose of Fizer or Madonna's vaccine, you should get both doses. Recipients are told the vaccine is 98% effective, so there's still a chance someone who has received it could get Cove in 19, and it's not known if people that were vaccinated could still be carriers of the virus. Even if they don't get sick. That would mean you could still be a carrier and could spread it to those who aren't vaccinated. But getting the vaccine is so worth it because it greatly reduces your chance of getting the virus and getting severely ill. But when it comes to visiting grandkids or anyone, the guidelines are pretty much the same. You can still see them outside and physically distance or if you really want to have a good time everyone needs to quarantine for at least 10 days and lower their risk during that time. So still a lot of unknowns. But the good news is more vaccine is rolling out and more people will be eligible to get vaccine soon Form or go to Cobra. Com Keyword VIRUS. Maryland Haider

Marilyn Hider George Washington University S Fizer Madonna Maryland Haider
US Help Gulf States Agree to Ease Relations With Qatar

All Things Considered

02:32 min | 1 year ago

US Help Gulf States Agree to Ease Relations With Qatar

"Deal between two important but feuding allies Saudi Arabia and Qatar. Jared Kushner, president Trump's son in law and adviser, was on hand for a signing ceremony in the Saudi kingdom. It marks the end to a three year rift that threatened to undermine U. S strategy in the Gulf region. NPR's Jackie Northam reports. They were warm hugs and handshakes, all while wearing masks as Saudi Arabia is Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman created Cutter shake Tommen bin Hamad al family ahead of today's signing. Seen belied the deep animosity between the two countries since mid 2017 when Saudi Arabia announced the diplomatic trade and travel blockade against his tiny rich neighbor. Frederick Wary is with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. The Saudis wanted to bring contact to its knees. The Saudis made at least a dozen demands of cutter and none of them to my knowledge were, you know fulfilled for asthma. Assad with George Washington University's Elliott School for International Affairs, says the Saudi Crown prince realized it was time to move on, especially with an incoming Biden administration that is promised to get tough with Saudi Arabia, Arabia. Clearly this is Part in parcel of turning the page. They are setting the table, so to speak for better relations with the incoming Bud Administration, But it was the Trump Administration that's been pushing to resolve the spat. Saudi Arabia and Qatar. Our allies in the U. S has a large military base in Qatar. The administration also wants to create a bulwark against Iran. Carnegie's wary doesn't buy it to say that the Gulf is going to be united against Iran that there's going to be this Impenetrable Gulf Sunni bloc now against Iran, because suddenly Qatar has been brought into the fold is just pure fantasy. I mean, the gulf has always been this united in terms of its outreach and policies toward Iran, and many of the issues that started the feud are still there. Hotter still has relations with Iran. Look sad with the Elliott School says it's not a sure thing. Today's deal will stick. The reporting is that the deal almost fell apart on Sunday in the U. S. Had to Jared Kushner personally had to intervene and work the phone lines. I think it's a testimony to have fragile it is even if tenuous, MCs odds, says the deal is a step in the right direction and will be welcomed in D. C. Jackie Northam. NPR news

Saudi Arabia Jared Kushner Qatar Saudi Kingdom Jackie Northam Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salm Tommen Bin Hamad Al Frederick Wary Elliott School For Internation U. Biden Administration Gulf Region Iran Bud Administration Carnegie Endowment For Interna Trump Administration Donald Trump NPR Assad George Washington University
Doctor on coronavirus testing after holiday travel

Here & Now

04:01 min | 1 year ago

Doctor on coronavirus testing after holiday travel

"As we officially entered the holiday season public health officials are warning of a new crisis in the pandemic the centers for disease control tens of thousands of new deaths in the weeks before christmas as people. Return home from ill-advised thanksgiving travel. Let's bring in lena when she's an er doctor and visiting professor at george washington university school of public health. Dr win. it's nice to have you back and thank you for making time for us on a holiday weekend of course. Happy to join you in. What's your prediction for. What's ahead after we saw so many people traveling and gathering over this holiday weekend. We have an impending calamity on our hand because we know that. Kobe is already everywhere and out of control. And now we're facing a surge upon a surge we already had surge in cases of coping nineteen and we also know that every time people come together over the holidays we even saw this over memorial day fourth of july labor dame that there was a surge after that and of course we have unprecedented in numbers of people travelling when we already have a very high baseline level of infection. And all of this. I think is just so incredibly tragic because we are not that far from the finish line here. We do have things that are on the horizon and. I really hope that everyone would just help us to hang in there for bit longer term because our hospitals are already getting overwhelmed. Where already to the point that we could see our healthcare systems collapsing. And we really need to hang in there and get through this very very challenging winter. The cdc is projecting the by december nineteenth the number of americans dead from covid nineteen will total more than three hundred twenty thousand. That's before christmas with this surge upon surge as you say do you think the death toll is about to jump dramatically. Yes i hate to say this. But this is what happens because death is a lagging indicator. Meaning that i. We're going to see an increased level of infections. Then we're going to increase hospitalizations even more than we currently have been. Icu's getting more overwhelmed and then after that death will spike and not only deaths from kobe. Nineteen but when hospitals become so full that physicians and nurses are unable to provide optimal care. Then we also have other patients. Patients come in with heart attacks strokes for cancer care for car accidents who are not able to get ideal care as well and we're going to see mortality increase from these other causes. Well now. i just hope that people will keep in mind. None of this at this point is inevitable. They are things that are in our power. I know ultimately this failure of our federal policy and the administration should have done a much better job but there are things that we as individuals can do and that includes continuing to wear masks continuing to avoid indoor gatherings and really doing our best through this challenging period. Again it's not full forever. But we have to get through this. Winter will in fact there's one projection from the university of washington that says we could save forty thousand lives over the next two months. If ninety five percent of people wore masks and yet we're still seeing cases for example this week governor mark gordon of wyoming tested positive for the coronavirus. After months of resisting a statewide mask mandate. What's not clicking for people here. I mean i think for us in public health. It's really challenging to see this when something that is a basic public. Health measure is being politicized end fact as a partisan symbol a cultural touch point for many people and we need to enlist credible messengers. In many cases prominent republican leaders business leaders pastors religious leaders We know in public health at the messenger is often even more important than the message and so the more people can help us out with. That message is absolutely central.

George Washington University S Lena Kobe CDC ICU Heart Attacks Cancer Mark Gordon University Of Washington Wyoming
Dr. Leana Wen (with Rock the Boat)

Model Majority Podcast

06:02 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Leana Wen (with Rock the Boat)

"I'm happy to join you today. I am dr lena. I'm emergency physician and public health professor george washington university. I also previously served as the health commissioner for the city of baltimore into it wouldn't be a complete introduction here without mentioning that i am a chinese american immigrant. My parents and i came to the us. Just before. i turned eight. And i'm also the you mother of two. I have a son who just turned three and a baby daughter who is five months old. My gosh congratulations. I also noticed that you are from shanghai. As am i so. I don't know if that you still speak shanghainese at all at home. I actually never did. Because i was raised primarily with my grandparents on my father's side whom did not come from shanghai and so i understand shanghainese but actually never spoke. We will not do a practice here. team that don't come late rayo he say you're gonna understand it and kerley speak it. It's always great to connect with somebody from my hometown. We always love to start with an origin story. Lena and you just have such an incredible ordinance story. And you've talked about it in your ted talks and everything but i'm kind of curious like what little was like thinking about this because i look at my son and someone told me prior to you having kids and i didn't really understand this. They said your son or your your children will have all of your best characteristics but also all of your worst characteristics whereas you as parents or adults are able to filter out to end can elise temper your worst. Tendencies your wounded just wash. Show you on your worst using so. I'm thinking about that as i'm answer your question because when i see my son i think is a lot of the same of the worst tendencies up. I think i was very opinionated. Child if you who's who as adults don't find surprising at all. I don't know if i threw a lot of tantrums by son deafening does so i. I'm not sure if it from me or my husband but you know because my parents and i came. When i was pretty young and i think like many immigrant families. We went through a lot of hardships. When we first came to the us we came to utah. Which is another kind of a strange story. Because what shanghai china has in common with. Logan utah is really not very much. Yeah but my mother had actually spoken to a professor of hers back in shanghai and she had gotten into to university so we came because like might. My mother was a graduate student. Here and got into universities one was utah state university in logan utah and the other was university of illinois in chicago and her professor said to her. Oh utah that is. The place to be your. In retrospect your leg. Chicago's way more like shanghai than utah. I think it's just a reminder of how much of our lives are determined by circumstances like that and so we ended up in utah and then we were in la and you know. My parents always worked for jobs just to make ends meet. And so i think so much of what shapes be early on. Were the struggles. Have my parents went through. I mean these things that people referred to as entitlements me. My mother depend on wake when she was pregnant with my sister here in the us we depend on food stamps stamp in. We depend on a medicaid in children's health insurance program and i went to public school all the way throughout including college. Those were not entitlements for us. Those were our lifeline. I can really relate to that so my parents moved to toledo ohio after shanghai as well and when we first arrived in ohio rolling. There's nobody here and just like snow on the ground. There's like nothing around. And i think just the impression of what america is back then is is is just so different and dissimilar to to your family. My mom worked many different jobs like she's worked as a grocer. She's worked at a karaoke bar at some point and so i can totally relate. And it's such a quintessential immigrant story for so many of us. Did your parents ever want you to be anything as you were growing up. It's a good question. It's hard to separate it at this point. Because i am one of those knowing people who always knew that i wanted to be a doctor and so i don't know whether it was something that could be influenced by my parents impossibly but they also knew that it was something that had wanted to do and so encouraged it and so it's kind of hard to tell i will say that i think a lot of immigrants may be able to relate to this too in the us we didn't have any connections. It's not as if we knew doctors right. And so i knew my pediatrician. But i wasn't exactly someone that you could just go to become a doctor in so it was actually really challenged him even in college. I didn't know how to be a doctor. I mean i just didn't have the networks of people who could tell me you need to be taking this m cap prep cores and you need to be volunteering at hospitals in how here's how you get a shadowing experience and These are the types of activities that you should be involved in an and i think that's what's made me want to be in medical education also because i think there are so many people who have that passion for medicine or for whatever other fueled before just never given the opportunity and it's one thing for us to talk about we should have programs to recruit underrepresented minorities and to encourage people who otherwise didn't know about different fields before but for so many people that there's just so much in that experience that's not at all we could imagine including the levels of loans that you have to go through in order to get educated so i think all that is an important component to.

Shanghai Utah Dr Lena Rayo University Of Illinois Kerley George Washington United States Lena Baltimore Utah State University Ohio Logan China Toledo Chicago LA
Washington DC police and businesses prepare for possible Election Day unrest

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:18 min | 1 year ago

Washington DC police and businesses prepare for possible Election Day unrest

"Is the deadline for early in person voting in both D C. And in Maryland, DC officials are urging residents to vote this weekend because of the possibility of protest on Election Day. Ah, collection of groups led by black lives matter and shut down These plan, an eight hour event at Black Lives matter, Plaza one block from the White House. It will include a giant screen showing election results. VJs and performances by bands playing Washington's signature Gogo music Police chief Peter Newsom says his entire department will be working on Election Day. You may have seen that some downtown businesses have been boarding up their windows in anticipation of the possible election day and rest. George Washington University is also preparing for that possibility. It sounds like preparations for a blizzard or hurricane because of the possibility of unrest following the election, the university is asking students who live on or near campus to stock up on a week. Worth of food, supplies and medicine Before Tuesday, faculty and staff who have on campus research project may want to take them home for several days. She W. Is also offering safety tips for students who want to exercise their First Amendment rights over the election results either in protest or celebration. And while the university says it does not anticipate access restrictions around the foggy bottom campus, the goal is to help the G W community planned for any potential disruption.

George Washington University Black Lives Maryland Peter Newsom Washington DC Hurricane White House G W Community
Finally, a Room-Temperature Superconductor

Techmeme Ride Home

04:03 min | 1 year ago

Finally, a Room-Temperature Superconductor

"Not Exactly, the revolution that would result if we achieved cold fusion, but it is notable that room temperature superconductivity has been achieved for the first time quoting MIT technology review room temperature superconductors, materials that conduct electricity zero resistance without needing special cooling are the sort of technological miracle that could up end daily life. They could revolutionize the electric grid and enable levitating trains among many other potential applications but until now, superconductors have had to be cool to extremely. Low temperatures which has restricted them to use as a niche technology. I'll be an important one for decades. It seemed that room temperature superconductivity might be out of reach forever. But in the last five years, a few research groups around the world have been engaged in a race to attain it in the lab and one of them just one in a paper published today in nature researchers report achieving real temperature supercar activity in a compound containing hydrogen sulfur. And Carbon at temperatures as high as fifty eight degrees Fahrenheit thirteen point three Celsius or two, hundred, Eighty, seven, point seven Kelvin the previous highest temperature had been two hundred and Sixty Kelvin or degrees Fahrenheit that she'd by a rival group at George Washington University and the Carnegie Institution in Washington DC and twenty eighteen another group at the Planck Institute for Chemistry, in Germany, achieved two hundred and fifty degrees Kelvin or negative nine point seven degrees Fahrenheit at. Around the same time like the previous records, the new record was attained under extremely high pressures roughly two and a half million times greater than that of the air we breathe. It's a landmark says Jose Flora's leave us a computational physicist at the sappy Enza University of Rome who creates models that explain high temperature superconductivity and was not directly involved in the work. The ways in which electric is generated transmitted and distributed could be fundamentally transformed by cheap and. Effective temperature superconductors bigger than a few millions of a meter about five percent of the electricity generated in the United States is lost in transmission and distribution according to the Energy Information Administration, eliminating this loss would for starters, save billions of dollars and have a significant climate impact. But room temperature superconductors wouldn't just change the system we have. They enable a whole new system transformers which are crucial to the electric grid could be made smaller cheaper and more. Efficient. So to could electric motors and generators superconducting energy storage is currently used to smooth out short term fluctuations in the electric grid but it's still remains relatively niche because it takes a lot of energy to keep superconductors cold room temperature superconductors. Especially, if they could be engineered to stand strong magnetic fields might serve as very efficient ways to store large amounts of energy for longer periods of time making renewable but intermittent energy sources like wind turbines or. Solar cells more effective, and because flowing electricity crates, magnetic fields superconductors can also be used to create powerful magnets for applications as diverse as MRI machines and levitating trains. Superconductors are of great potential importance to the nascent field of quantum computing as well. Superconducting cubits are already the basis of some of the world's most powerful quantum computers being able to make such. Cubans without having to cool them down would not only make computers simpler smaller and cheaper but. Could lead to more rapid progress in creating systems of many cubits depending on the exact properties of the superconductors that are created it remains to be seen whether scientists can devise stable compounds that are superconducting not only at ambient temperature, but also at ambient pressure. But the researchers are optimistic. They conclude their paper with this tantalizing claim quote, a robust resume temperature superconducting material that will transform the energy economy quantum information processing, and sensing may be achievable and quote.

Energy Information Administrat Mit Technology Kelvin Enza University Of Rome George Washington University Washington Jose Flora United States Planck Institute For Chemistry Physicist Carnegie Institution Germany
Veteran Washington, D.C. principal abruptly leaves School Without Walls

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

Veteran Washington, D.C. principal abruptly leaves School Without Walls

"A longtime principle of a DC high school is abruptly left that school is the city prepares to have some students return to classrooms soon. Richard Tro Gish was the principal of school without Walls, which is located on the campus of George Washington University and was also the principal of school without walls at Francis Stevens for element Three in middle school students. It's not clear whether concerns about schools being ready for the return of some students in the coming way. Weeks was linked to his leaving, but he had been vocal in calling for protecting the health and safety of students.

Richard Tro Gish Principal Francis Stevens George Washington University
"george washington university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"george washington university" Discussed on WTOP

"The George Washington University Hospital. Physicians are not employees or agents of this hospital. 10 35 go to the polls and watch carefully. That's what President Trump urged people to do during Tuesday's debate with Joe Biden in his continuing efforts to undermine confidence in this year's election process. So how are local election boards planning to respond, Particularly in the case of voter intimidation? The head of the Montgomery County Board of Elections was asked that question at a county council meeting once we get any indication of improprieties or intimidation We will send staff they had to see if it could be resolved. If not, it will become a police matter. Board President Jim Shell ICC We're not gonna tolerate any intimidation, wrongdoing. Interference with our vote. Zero tolerance, he says. County police are adjusting their patrols to keep an eye on early voting centers when they open October 26th as well as ballot drop boxes. Michelle Bash w T O P News, an audio recording of grand jury proceedings that ended with no criminal charges against police officers in the deadly shooting of Briana Taylor. That audio recording is scheduled to be released at noon today. It comes after Kentucky's attorney general Daniel Cameron, whose office led the investigation was going Nted a two day extension in order to redact personal information. Cameron says to officers who fired their guns killing Taylor were justified because Taylor's boyfriend had fired on them. First. The boyfriend has said that he thought someone was breaking in. Up ahead the first couple of the White House in isolation after a positive cove..

Briana Taylor Joe Biden Montgomery County Board of Ele Daniel Cameron George Washington University H President Jim Shell President Michelle Bash White House Trump Kentucky Nted attorney
"george washington university" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"george washington university" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"I'm just telling you there's no way these charges stick when it was in the operating manual for the guy to do it. Some look in this story. White professor admits she pretended to be black. I absolutely cancel myself. George Washington University historian Jessica Krug. Or maybe it's crude. Whatever revealed in a medium post That she's lived under various assumed identities within a blackness. That I had no right to claim. This is like that Rachel Dole's all again She has Vince's quote. I have lived under quote various assumed identities within a blackness. That I had no writing. What does that mean? Says that this is a George Washington University professor has been pretending to be a black woman. Throughout her career. I have a skewed my lived experience as a white Jewish child in suburban Kansas City. Under various assumed identities within a blackness that I had no right to claim First North American blackness than us rooted blackness, then Caribbean rooted Bronx blackness. She confessed on a post on medium I am not a culture vulture. I am a culture leech, she wrote, saying she's been battling unaddressed mental health demons for her entire life. She said mental health issues could never explain or justify neither condone nor excuse her false identity. I should absolutely be canceled, she added. No, I don't write in the passive voice. Ever because I believe we must name power. So you should absolutely cancel me and I am absolutely can't canceling myself. I'm telling these people these people are flip in crazy. Writer Robert Jones Jr tweeted about the post early this afternoon, saying he's in a state of complete and utter shock and sadness. He also referred to Kruger as Jeff La Bomba era, calling her an activist, he had often differed, too, and stepped aside of online. And so I'm seeing a picture of her. And you know who she looks like. You remember that crazy woman on B s N B C. There was a professor. Wake Forest. What was her name? That had sort of a list. I can't remember that Chick's name now. But she was no blacker than I am. And you know, she always she. She did her hair and a black thing. But, you know, I always suspected that this girl looks like her. She looks like her. George Washington University has yet to confirm Krug six identity, but her faculty page Lister is a Lister is a specialist in African American history. Oh, she was the full Monty, didn't she? Although the biography has since changed business insider reporter Gram star surface, they cashed version describing Krug as An unrepentant and UN reformed child of the hood. The childhood. She recently published a story for essence named on Puerto Rico Blackness and being when nations aren't enough. Which was reposted by care being news. And culture site REPEATING islands on August 29, according to Duke University Press..

George Washington University Puerto Rico Blackness Jessica Krug professor Chick Monty Duke University Press Rachel Dole Robert Jones Jr Caribbean Kansas City Wake Forest Kruger reporter UN Writer Jeff La Bomba Vince
"george washington university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"george washington university" Discussed on WTOP

"You. The George Washington University Hospital Physicians are not employees or agents of this hospital. 3 48 traffic and weather. Here's Dave Deal Line between oats and in Vienna. That big, tall plume of smoke is dissipating. Fairfax County Fire rescue Getting the truck fire under control eastbound on I 66. Traffic was held for about 10 minutes between 1 23 and Nutley street beginning to move single file to the left past. Remains of that truck. Fire eastbound on 66 westbound rubbernecking but less smoke to rubberneck North Arlington Glebe Road, staying block between military road of 1 23 for ongoing water main repairs from 1 23 you could go to and come from chain Bridge through Springfield. Slow South bound on I 3 95 and 95 but a mile south of the Beltway. The pavement condition is rough and milled. Halfway through a paving project. It's a bumpy ride, and that is why traffic is so slow leaving the Beltway in Springfield. Go south, but with all lanes open and passable Maryland Beltway interlude. Routine volume delays to 79 95 north of four corners. North Found coal Spill Road 29. You're burnt mill is a pedestrian was struck getting by the remaining police response. At least in one late, if not 2 to 70 North found brief delay past 1 21 No incidents reported between Rockville and Interstate 70 Dave Tilden. W T o p traffic Amelia Draper. It is so hot. I mean, looking at the temperature south of town. They're a couple of hundreds popping and that's putting our heat indices Hillary right now in the triple digits, feeling about 100 degrees.

George Washington University H Springfield Fairfax County Dave Tilden Amelia Draper chain Bridge Vienna Hillary Maryland Rockville
"george washington university" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

14:58 min | 2 years ago

"george washington university" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Glued one of the corona virus is an engineered by weapon to that it was the CIA the cooked up this virus because China is now an economic rival to the United States and three blaming Bill Gates as the mastermind behind this and I'm pretty sure that Bill Gates is a bit busy hold up an island somewhere reading doesn't books today but you get the point and while you arrive may easily dismissed these narratives as foolish or even ask ourselves how can anyone believe this the fact is that many audiences around the world do you believe these lies for some it reinforces their views of the west and for others it shape these views and if these false narratives are unchallenged and repeated over months and years it may become increasingly difficult for example for U. S. public diplomacy efforts to force where they are most needed for US policy to get properly executed and for US businesses to operate in certain places and for fax base narratives information to be a bass line for this for decision making this is our challenge at the G. C. it's a challenge that were eager and poised to meet and most importantly it's challenge that we're grateful to have partners from the academic community of civil society and from governments that are with us in this fight today by far the G. C. has a strong its mandates the largest staff in a larger budget didn't ever has before in that regard I'd like to share with you are five key lines of efforts the first is to lead the U. S. at regency and coordinating integrating and synchronizing this efforts the second is the do the same with our international partners the third is to leverage the private sector civil society including academia through engagements such as these and then as well as the tech industry and the media as well the fourth is to assess and just I think to be effective in information space we must constantly be asking yourself what is working what isn't working and refined as necessary and the fifth and last line of effort is to strengthen the Gee Cees a work force and process sees darshan version of the state department and all five of these efforts we've made tremendous progress especially in the last year the G. C. is hard to work on a range of efforts both big and small to build the silo resilience reduce for abilities exposes information and ultimately I get to the point we can be more effective in deterring our adversaries from attacking us and our partners through the information space of course we can't do it alone and it will take all of us and that's not something that I put in here just because it sounds good remarks I say because it's a practical perspective very true from the US government's national allies academia civil society to help protect these democratic values from the rose to the facts of this information and propaganda so I'll stop there for now is when say thank you and we look forward to discussion George Washington University is hosting this discussion live coverage on C. span radio we're experiencing some difficulty with our signal and will work to fix the problem until then here is an update on Michael Bloomberg and a debate ahead tonight this is the headline and politico dot com Mike Bloomberg just made the debate can he keep his cool and joining us on the phone is Christopher catalogo as you point out he now faces a challenge immune to his fortune what we expected tomorrow night so Mike Bloomberg and his campaign a really expecting the other candidates to key and also some part of this is because since I got into the race in late November he really hasn't been part of the mix he hasn't had to mix it up with them the previous eight debates like they have you haven't had to do public town halls you know there have been televised largely been able to sit behind this four hundred million dollar ad campaign that's been running across the whole country and when he has been asked tough questions they've been by a few reporters here and there at various events they they haven't been sort of under the bright lights of the debate that we're all watching and all tension too at the same time and that's a lot of the the focus a lot of the boomer campaign and and Burke is preparing for these moments where people call him out on his record and really try to get under your skin is there concern within the Bloomberg campaign that some of this could rattle him they could really stop the momentum that he's had over the last couple of weeks with the millions he spent in his race so far yes in part of the reason there is a concern as they've always acknowledge that this day was going to calm that this this debate was finally gonna come and he would have to participate what they weren't sure about happening would be that it would be in the state of Nevada before the Nevada caucuses and even before the South Carolina primary no he's not competing in either those elections and so he's going into super Tuesday now with this debate looming over his head and with the performance that everyone will see and he won't be able to come in just off the ads to stop the campaign campaigning he's doing and that the thought is that you know he had he has to project sort of strange in that he that that he's the candidate to take on Donald Trump and that's not always easy to do when you're the target of everybody else and it is been a three month campaign for Mike Bloomberg clearly as you just pointed out a moment ago he's been preparing for this and his staff so this did not come out of the blue when he reached the benchmark the the polling threshold to qualify for tomorrow night no I think over the last month over the last month and a half and even even earlier than that they knew this would come eight they knew the possibility of that was at least there he's been working sort of furiously to release these policy papers that he has is part of the campaign things that he can talk about and talk about his record in a new light and a lot of their seeing a lot of things come at him one of the fire that will come at him will be based on his record as mayor his time and his company there's been a number of lawsuits that women a file there about the culture of the company and discrimination open and a number of things out there and so a lot of the the policy positions have been men and things that he could talk about and stay at this debate in a proactive way in showing that there you know there's contrition merriment he's changed and and back back in large part part of this practice well the debate airing live tomorrow evening on MSNBC based on who you're talking to what is the biggest concern of Michael Bloomberg where is his biggest weakness a lot of it is just how he comes off we we wrote a lot about how it's not so much the details of these answers it's how he looks doing it because we get your exceed it does it look like he doesn't want to be there and you know this is something that's below him and the fact that this is a process that he he shouldn't have to be part of that all of those sorts of things I think are among the biggest concerns they have and I think the other part of it would also be this idea that he looks strong and then he can come off as someone that that trump wouldn't easily be able to push around on the debate stage and you know that those two things I think are are are among their top concerns Christopher catalogo his reporting available at politico dot com on the Bloomberg campaign we thank you for being with us thank you so much that interview from C. span radios Washington today program that was our Tuesday a version with our host Steve Scully talking about tonight's democratic presidential candidates debate also tonight president trump will be holding a rally in Arizona we'll have live coverage of his rally at nine PM eastern on C. span television and here on C. span radio well now we've worked out our technical difficulties at George Washington University we take you back there now as they are hosting along with royal United services institute and the state department discussion about combating propaganda and disinformation campaigns for from the communities but also as much being gained from public awareness campaigns which encourage members of the public to come full Griffis stations to be able to survive actual intelligence two weeks lead operations Alastair Reid noticed checking posing with the rise of lane actor attacks with Linux actors is often little communications insight will not work in isolation to infiltrate and often you're off the mouth of an attack when the investigation happens almost invariably it turns out somebody stole something somebody knew something but they didn't importance of loving you over tonight he to tell one of the challenges how can we have awareness campaigns to educate the public to be able to report things that we see in a way to law enforcement which provides an intelligence be able to get a Ford and prevent attacks from happening I am this way successful awareness campaigns can help those counteract the cycle by star and sex we move on to look at the attack which provides a border security and protection of critical infrastructure and public spaces there's been a long history of vigilance campaigns particularly on public transport such as the if you see something say something campaign for the New York police of the see it see it say it sold to campaign but a British transport police these versions campaigns I've been largely a focus on public transport and structure losing focus on preventing imminent attacks with focused on trying to get the public to be able to report unintended luggage my may carry it carry one explosive voice etcetera however there is much skate full visions campaigns which gave further down the planning cycle and such as I'm because the materials which you use an explosive reading exposed vice visions campaigns are targeted at supply chain so the people who work in the supply chains of because materials will be able to spot what is a suspicious transaction what is suspicious amounts of particular chemical what is the special combination of chemicals wasn't up most of the components they use an explosive us have coke perfectly legitimate uses a free people and a valuable how can we educate people working in the industry to be able to spot things and as many of the areas where we can work further up the planning cycle and have targeted visions campaigns specific audiences hello sign another estimate the which communication declined to act isn't the Terrans it's one thing to be able to protect you critical infrastructure is no things to be able to communicate the protection offered to university in such a way that you should not behave in such a way that they realize that this challenge of successful attack is very limited so they think it had one of the reasons why it is being decrease in terrorist hijackings is because of the security infrastructure changes we've had course and it's not just a faint instruction put in to prevent is also Terroso where of it so even try it because the night is much harder to be able to do you move on to her hello which is going to save lives Jeez home and a recovery quickly in the event of a terrorist attack essentially what can we do in the aftermath see what Jesus impact in a recovery this is perhaps the most underdeveloped the most under the bed hello from the communications specter's now terrorism is not just violence it is a communication the violence terrorists carrying attack against infrastructure individuals over here to have a communications sector of individuals of a to be able to terrorize them to be able to and so I can agree with Yvette supporting that ultimately the impact or terrorist attack depends on how it's is communications and this prevents uses a window of opportunity to be able to help shape how an attack is on the side and deceived and oftentimes we gave the prices of public sensemaking we understand prices look now this what terrorists off the time no we have a communication campaign to help shape the narrative around us now governments need to be able to be had to have at least insist communication strategy in place surveillance surrender the communications place terrorists and and surrender the narrative to it but can help shape it shaped interpretation of the and that way Jeez the social impact of the but it's not just terrorists who carried out the attack which operational in this communication space often attack we see many other align act is taking place such as other extremist groups exploiting the situation of the Janice attacks we often see far right groups piggy backing on the track and exploiting it for the reading the gender using it to drive polarization leading to reprisal attacks leading to a surgeon hate crimes after taxes normally always a surgeon hate crimes afterwards saying by accident so by design within minutes or hours of the terrorist attacks we often see conspiracy theories developing on misinformation was to man CERN shape how things on to the to and also potentially when the most disturbing is we seeing hostile state actors the operational in this place instant studies the help manipulate the communications field amplifies the facts to drive her to race relations in order to proceed I am a gender so critically is states are not prepared to be operational in this post instant phrase this rending into other actors so we need.

CIA China United States Bill Gates
"george washington university" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

07:44 min | 2 years ago

"george washington university" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Heart radio out talking about tolerance or lack there of in a reference the other calls for termination calls for I guess a calling for him to resign referring to professor Jonathan Turley from his George Washington University position because he had the audacity to analyze factors and reach a different conclusion than some he did so with an abundance of of politeness and respect and professionalism and and skilled frankly none the less it was a conclusion that some people can't tolerate so they want I'm gone now look to the world of sports Sam Cisco forty Niners radio analyst Tim Ryan has been suspended for comments about Lamar Jackson this goes to Sunday's gaffe forty Niners Baltimore raiders game a Baltimore Ravens game rather where Sam Cisco foreigners analyst Tim Ryan was suspended one game by the team for comments he made about Baltimore Ravens quarterback Lamar Jackson on a radio show in San Francisco on Monday speaking on the air what do you think he says of the horrible some nasty you draw your own conclusion he said that that Jackson was really good at that fake Lamar Jackson but when you consider his dark skin color with a dark football in a dark uniform you because you could not see that thing I mean you literally could not see when he was in and out of the match point and if you're a half step slow on them in terms of your vision forget about it he's out of the gate well does what what's bad about that it would if you just limited his observations to the color of Jackson's Jersey and then invoke his says skin pigment would that be okay well if there's something wrong about observing the color of a person of their skin that would suggest that there's something inherently wrong about somebody who has a dark complexion who believes that racist fools morons I I think that would said the classic example of gross intolerance maybe even more so than the latter now they're they're they're both I think objectionable didn't nothing wrong nothing in the world wrong with with good people having differences of opinion in terms of how they reach conclusions with the same data the same information and there's nothing in the world wrong with the person being black nothing wrong with that if you suggest that by pointing out the fact that a black man has dark skin you said something bad about him I submit that did the person who reaches that conclusion is the person with the problem to get your calls nine one six ninety one fifteen thirty eight hundred eight three four fifteen thirty let's check in with rob in Rocklin rob good afternoon welcome to the conversation thank you for holding on yes thank you you bet I had a comment about that professor only one comment about Barry at front I it was clearly scripted I mean that was that was written long before she went in a cast I choose what I meant yeah I think that's for them in recognition genius for apology which I suspect that might have been also pre prepared thank your ride and then right at right right away to invoke the are to turn I should say the responsibility to somebody else yeah okay but I apologize but he did bad things to is this so it just weakens the apology I I do think that the the kids of the president's way with some exceptions of they're involved in in misconduct I think that's fair game to point that out of if any the trump kids are involved in criminal activity or they get arrested or they're and they're they're behaving badly same thing's true with any other public figure that that's fair game well you had on a thirteen year old kid it bringing his name into it to put it to British even invoke his name in a conversation which is says centered on the effort to remove his father from office that's the third rail I think it ought not be touched and I think had she apologized for what she had said in a dollar just a raw egg not was the wrongfulness of that full stop okay even though I agree with you on a percent it was absolutely pre scripted and again that in the name of the president's son has nothing to do with the the matter at hand I agree with your robin I appreciate the call very much Sir let's check in with Eric in citrus heights Eric good afternoon welcome to the conversation thank you for holding on are you done what I find intolerable is the blatant hypocrisy you turn your radio down oh sorry about that with the which yeah well mine Intel lose the blade in hip hop hypocrisy I was I was reading the other day where AG Barr had said that communities that did not respect cops would not do sure Sir or other cops not service areas but when you look on when you look at this administration and what the end is still acting in denouncing this today may today F. B. I. into R. C. I. AT and and top law enforcement agencies what excuses where is the respect and that and it also you know is this whole process and everything it just seems that he's being he's gonna be arbitrarily exonerated by proxy of his executive privilege what what what do you civil what do you suppose he meant when he said that because I I have a feeling as to what he meant when he said it and I can I can give you an illustration of where it's true what what do you suppose it is thoughts were when he said that people who who show no respect for the law enforcement walls eventually not have that law enforcement yeah well what would you think you know you go to well I think he means that if we're not gonna be respectful to law enforcement that in times of situations where a person will actually need law enforcement to provide them service that is not going to be there but I don't think that that would be the case though because I think there are the issues that would still probably law enforcement too so let me give an example given example right here in this region of the city of Sacramento second placed problems a fine organization leadership within the department is very very good but the city of Sacramento has not been supportive of their police department a council the mayor not supportive so what has happened in recent months people are leaving that organization in enormous numbers many of them are going right across the street to the sheriff's department summer going to other agencies in the foothills another suburban law enforcement agencies they're leaving in droves so in a having a difficult time replacing them even offered a five thousand dollar bonus to officers that would move into the city move their families into the the city of Sacramento I don't think many people took him up on it so if when you treat your your law enforcement service purveyors Chablis they've got choices they can go work elsewhere in you can find yourself with the dearth of law enforcement read resources one that wanted that it's really needed so I don't know that that was an improper statement to make I don't know exactly what he intended to express out of that but that's what I took away from it and I think there's a factual analysis there that tends to support is there a church call very much I'm gonna drag brake for other business we're coming right back after this don't go away building a better Sacramento news ninety three point one K. F. B. K. on fifteen thirty et al and your radio app I've been thinking lately life is good my husband has a great job and so do I the kids are on track for college I love our house but what if something happens to one of us the kids college tuition would go away the house would go away everything we've worked for just goes away how would we pick up the.

professor Jonathan Turley George Washington University five thousand dollar thirteen year one K
"george washington university" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

05:35 min | 2 years ago

"george washington university" Discussed on KTRH

"Air National Guard Ehrman our very own robberies better seller yes when questioning the results of the election was so bad they said troops to lose indeed he won't say he will bow down and kiss Hillary's ring that'll blow to democracy into flux and bad things are gonna happen troll has to say before the vote did he's gonna lose and then he's going to support Hillary he has to do it otherwise democracies in danger well speaking at George Washington University what are we three years after the election let it go lady such bitterness such chomping on the better route Hillary shopping all the better route she's still finding excuses do you remember all the excuses first it was your damn women you women let your man tell you had a low number that then it was the Democrats because they're all socialists remember she said when forty five percent of Iowa Democrats supported Bernie Sanders instead of me that tells you what I was up against so you got the women you got the socialists she's always blame the blacks there's a seasoning hatred by Hillary for the blacks and I can tell you that Barack winning in two thousand eight I bet you when she got good tanked up on that Chardonnay who about three o'clock when she was two bottles in with some of her girlfriends just better white women they said the staff away locked the doors and just scream at the top of their lungs it does black people especially black man they want to presidency from her and then by the time she ran she was so old fable she had to be we should flop over that have to roll over into the back of a van poor thing I actually feel sorry for she went as bad as Joe Biden is for twenty twenty it's going to be terrible to watch bad bite is going to end up being like report better gives birth and I'm not joking is gonna win the nomination and then we're gonna have these think pieces if Biden dies before the election if Biden dies before the inauguration what would be the constitutional procedure our guest now is Alan Dershowitz to discuss this eventuality here's Hillary at George Washington University chop it on that bitter root now I was the first person who ran for president in more than fifty years without the protection of the voting rights act and let me just say it makes a difference we saw that once again during the twenty eighteen mid term affections which were a case study in voter suppression voters faced intimidation and harassment that echoed some of the worst chapters in our nation's history voter ID requirements amounted to a modern day poll tax voter ID requirements which were literally made up for the purpose of preventing certain people from actually being able to cast a vote that would be counted we saw you are voting place for this long lines and malfunctioning equipment again in certain places in North Dakota we saw sweeping efforts to prevent people from voting particularly native Americans living on reservations in North Carolina Republican operatives illegally collected absentee ballots fill them in and bail them from post offices near voters homes and don't you find it interesting all of the politicians who have argued for years for stricter IDE rules and limits on early voting are curiously quiet about these proven abuses that is no accident it is in service to their larger political goals of obtaining and keeping power you know when someone loses a presidential race that's when you learn a lot about their metal that swing you learn whether they would have been a good president or not and Hillary is reminding us good grief she got so close she would have been a terrible precedent that nagging way that whining that she lost that excuse making that never taking personal responsibility for terrible campaign the thing about it is she's approximately three percent as the retaining list with can you use let me just say it makes a difference we show linear at the village of Rockville opening in fall twenty twenty is rifles newest senior living destination nestled in a quiet neighborhood when there is designed for individuals want more choice.

Ehrman forty five percent three percent fifty years three years
"george washington university" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

07:50 min | 3 years ago

"george washington university" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Season news haven't talked about her for awhile Alexandria case you Cortez Democrat congresswoman New York. so she's firing back at another congressman this is Steve came from Iowa Republicans so it's a Sievers is Steve king. this is late last night after he tweeted a video of himself drinking water from one of those sink slash drinking fountains slash toilet devices. that are under detention centers that were installed during the Obama years. you know the ones that a see visit in and she I guess was so confused. she somehow thought that you're drinking from a toilet I mean she made her fault she let her followers believe. that migrants are actually drinking water from a toilet now it's possible that the migrants could have been totally confused and I I don't mean to sound like a smart aleck here but I'm serious a lot of these people coming up from Central America. have never seen it too I have never used a toilet their life she realize that don't you they've never used the toilet. they they don't know what plumbing is they don't know what indoor plumbing it's they've never they've never had the opportunity to use it. so it's very possible that they could have been mistaken but I'm looking at this unit there is there's the toilet. complete with just his seat ball the whole deal. and then back where the with the take would be it's it's an elongated tank and on the top of the take there is a saying. with the hot water cold water just a handle and then a faucet end with the push of a button there's a drinking fountain so to me this is a really whoever invented this is like okay we need an all purpose plumbing device that is easily placed within a facility cost as little as possible as little plumbing is necessary as possible so the cost efficient this is it. this is it A. O. C. sees this I guess she can't figure it out she said they're drinking from toilets no they're not right so Steve king tweets video of himself drinking water from the sink which is attached attached to the toilet at the migrant detention center. and he actually says Hey. I took a drink it actually was pretty good. Hey sees sees this and she goes ballistic. and she said he said she said regarding speaking they're so anti immigrant to they risk they risk pinkeye to show off that they don't do the reading I don't know she's referring to but somehow she thinks that by drinking from a water fountain adjacent a sink that's right next to a toilet you're gonna get pinkeye. somebody should let all of the inmates in our for our jails and prisons system know that then because a lot of them use the think about the toilet because it's a very similar set up to watch close brush teeth and what not so they have the similar type set ups and prisons yes okay yeah it's good it's it's. active yeah it's efficient it saves space we don't have much of it okay and again you know you would think some of these immigrants are set while the Zytek if there's anything like this is my life goal. but a seagoing were AOC loves to go now can we talk about this please yes we can mascot madness. so college mask out to college mascots a colleges around the country are in the cross hairs. the one that I just think it's hilarious this is George Washington University. Washington DC George Washington University. V. the George Washington sports teams are known as the colonials the colonials beat out like the colonists the colonials George Washington was a colonist. and the mascot is actually a George Washington like character. he's called the colonial. and because this mascot has a quote unquote deep connection to colonization. university. is looking to remove the colonial mascot as their mascot. let's just erase history shall we as students are saying that they must remove the mascot because the mascot called glorifies the act of systemic oppression. well then I think we better rename Washington DC I think you better go out to the the left coast and renamed the state of Washington uhhuh. veteran name the at Washington Redskins the whole black hole organizations gotta go double boiler plate out issue wow now we've also got the mascot name Denver boot Denver but now people have heard of Daniel Boone he was a real person. Daniel Boone if the university of Denver they've got Denver Boone Denver phone. and of course this is become controversy as well because Denver bone is the mascot for the university of Denver pioneers. and the word pioneer. is also well deem to be racist. next Long Beach state university who are California State University Long Beach long standing prospector Pete. well if you remember he was relieved of his duties last year because he represented the California Gold Rush. where's university president put it was a time in history with the indigenous peoples of California and George subjugation violence and threats of genocide so if they're get rid of pike prospector Pete. who is who is a forty niner you know forty nine R. the eighteen for the gold rush then when they get a move to talk to the NFL about the San Francisco forty writers and what's that little mascot's name with our Sam sourdough Sam. prospector paid sourdough Sam forty niner. get it is about a little bread discriminatory to I'm you know what all the whole wheat breads that yes our breads white that's pretty yeah yeah micrographs it I think it's so the entire state of Maine is placed an outright ban on any mascot the quote depicts or refers to a native American tribe. they say such mascots are a source of pain and anguish for native American communities and you know what every time we've ever talked about this in case of off and on over the years we get native Americans calling is I have no problem with this in fact you know calling them the Braves or the warriors is kind of in in building right yeah empowering it's it's speaks not of wimps but a brave people yeah the war is going to change their name with the right right now there you go the warriors absolutely. we've got James hers in our guy from Hollywood coming up in the next half hour plus Katie's gonna get you up to date on that situation on interstate eighty with the chick peas the chick and try out the fire the back of state too hi it's Jamie progresses employee of the month to month in a row leave a message at the hi Jamie me Danny I just had a new idea for our song what the name your price tool so when it's like tell us what you want to pay. from bone was what wine you say will be found coverage options to fit your budget then we just all the finger snaps will acquire goes he was coming after they've come at Jeff yes no maybe anyway see a practice tonight I.

George Washington University Washington Denver George Washington university of Denver California State University Lo Daniel Boone Washington Redskins Obama Steve king California Steve Steve king. congressman New York. America. Jamie Iowa Pete.
"george washington university" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

03:19 min | 3 years ago

"george washington university" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"I will tell you everyone's education, and then I will tell you how they processed that statement. So Kamala Harris went to Howard University with a political science and economics degree, and a law degree from the university of California. So that's a highly educated person Bernie Sanders university of Chicago political science, and he was he was a teacher's well, at for again, these are academe in this world. Cory Booker went to Stanford for political science, and he has a masters in sociology Rhode scholarship to Oxford in US history and a law degree from Yale. So anyone should know how to interpret a statement at say these three are good at that these guys are coal miners? They, they've done a lot of listening, a lot of lecture halls a lot of studying, a lot of ingesting other people. Words, Elizabeth Warren. She was at George Washington University for two years. And then she wanted to be a teacher, and she ended up at the university of Houston with a pathology and on. Let's say on what is that word audio audio? I didn't even know that where audio ideology, our audio quality. Van audiology. She has a law degree from Rutgers, and she taught at the university of Pennsylvania. She taught at. Yale or search she taught at. Where was sorry? Where was that didn't? She teach at Harvard. Oh, yeah. She taught at Harvard. Okay. Very candid. Okay. She's very everyone's super educated. Bernie Sanders is probably the least, but everyone else's four year plus degrees. And then plus so they know how to interpret a statement. Well, let's, let's, let's here's my little thought experiment experiment. These four are all just sitting in a lecture hall, as students with the steno pad, and Joe Biden is the professor and Joe Biden makes that statement in front of them, and then Joe Biden leaves the room. And then we ask each one of them. What was your professor saying? What was getting schist? What was the thesis match? Is there more or I'm making it up. So he says we didn't agree much anything. We got things done. We got it finished. But today, you look at the other side in your the enemy, not the opposition, the enemy, we don't. Talk to each other anymore, and he talks about the new left. 'cause fashioned the new nine with just start at the top. I'm sorry, one more time just for the short beginning. So picture, we're all sitting in the study hall, are these four sitting in the study hall, and he starts the statement with I was in a cockpit with James Eastland. He never called me. Boy, he always called me son. In the event says one of the meanest guys, I ever knew according to the report, we'll guess what one of the meanest guys ever knew. Okay. We'll guess what at least there was some civility, we got things done. We didn't agree on much of anything. We got things done. We got it finished. Okay. We didn't agree on anything. Sky. But we got things done. Okay..

Elizabeth Warren Joe Biden Bernie Sanders university of C Bernie Sanders Cory Booker Howard University Kamala Harris university of California George Washington University university of Houston Rhode Harvard James Eastland US university of Pennsylvania Stanford Van audiology professor Oxford
"george washington university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:28 min | 3 years ago

"george washington university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"DC special counsel, Robert Mueller's four hundred page report has finally been published. Mr. Mueller's report says he found no criminal conspiracy between Mr. Trump's campaign and Russia, but could not reach a concrete legal conclusion on whether Donald Trump tried to obstruct the investigation itself it details. Ten instances where investigators looked into whether President Trump has tried to criminally obstruct the probe, but it does not come to a conclusion I talked to Jonathan Turley professor of public interest law at George Washington University in Washington DC, what really comes out of the record is this very detailed. And in some cases disturbing picture from the White House. The president alternately was saved from himself by his staff. You know, the president clearly wanted to fire. The special counsel that would have amounted for many people to an act of obstruction. But you have this amazing scene where the president ordered his White House counsel to fire the special counsel and the White House counsel refused. Refused. A direct order of a sitting president. And it's for that reason that this president was able to get through this scandal, very likely without a serious criminal despite himself. It seems. That's right. I mean, it's not easy to obstruct something that's not a crime. But the president made a determined effort. I mean, he almost did that. So there's no criminal charges. But the report does highlight that he did try to do it. Well, he certainly did try to know whether that constitutes obstruction certainly be debated. But it does leave the sort of odd zen like question if the president or. Ordered an act considered obstruction, and nobody listened is it still an active obstruction? And the fact is he didn't fire the special counsel. He didn't destroy any evidence. He didn't force the investigation to a premature ending. So if you separate his rhetoric the records, not that bad, but he clearly had an intent to be obstructive. At least on that issue. There is an interesting part in the report where the president is quoted as using. An exploitive word, and he says, oh my God. This is a quote. Oh my God. This is terrible. This is the end of my presidency. I am dot dot dot what does that tell us about the state of mind of the president? Because as you say he does feel vindicated now after the report was published. He says I'm having a good day. It doesn't seem that. He was that easy going as the investigation was announced. Well in fairness to the president the special counsel does say that he believes that the president. Was primarily concerned about. How how this was going to affect his administration as opposed to ending the investigation. Especial council does say that he fired James call me, the former FBI director not because he wanted to stop the investigation. But because he was upset that Komi wooden say publicly what Komi was saying cravenly that the president was not actually a target of the investigation. What will the Democrats do now? Well, the Democrats themselves are in a bit of a bind the leadership never wanted to impeach Trump. But they ran on teaching Trump to regain pow control the house, but it was never very plausible that they wanted to actually remove Trump. Why would they should bring about a pensive ministration? So the Democrats always wanted to wound but not kill Trump leave him in office Nemec state. Well, they've succeeded in doing that and continue to play up this report investigate Trump. But there's not any real indication. They're moving towards an impeachment. Looking forward though, does this report in hinder his possible reelection, actually, I think the report strengthened his reelection in a couple of respects collusion really was negated as a theory in this report. That's what started all of this. Also, most of those people who were convicted were convicted of. Unrelated crimes, there never was a serious collusion case made against anyone except the Russians who did the hacking, but that wasn't for collusion that was for the effort to disrupt the election. So I think in the end the president is strengthened by the report in that he can say with justification that they did not find some crying connected to collusion. But these stories come out of the report will be played back. The problem is that Trump is this 'nigma, you know, he's not a more president in the way he conducts himself and that frill thumb and then a polls others, but that's not a change. That was professor Jonathan Turley at professor public interest law at George Washington University. Newsday from the BBC World.

president Donald Trump special counsel White House Jonathan Turley George Washington University Robert Mueller professor Washington DC Russia BBC Komi FBI director James
"george washington university" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"george washington university" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"The Joe pags show. Coming your way on a Thursday. Thanks a lot going on lots of people want to be heard next hour. It'll be campus reform at the bottom of the hour. We've got a guy on named Eduardo narrow and he goes to school university of Florida. We have set out Carrie because you know, I'm a hurricane. Yeah. So university of floor. We talk about that. We talk about the report is a reaction on campus. We talk about how there is no inequality in in educational no zone equality men over women. There's actually a lot of inequality women over men, and we'll talk about that as well. Because the narrative it's out there is just completely untrue and George Washington University decided to get rid of their mascot here about this. Mascot was the colonial where the colonialist. Now. It is you can't you can't be a colonialist. The kit. You can't believe in collies and what I bring this up with him. But it's always surprising to me is that these young dufuses don't seem to understand that. What was the what were the colonies? It's where we are. Now. You know what I mean? It's like. So we shouldn't have a country now because you don't like the fact that there were colonies of people building what eventually became vis the free is the most wonderful most liberated nation in earth's history. So you're mad at vis a country that allows you to say whatever you want, even if it's against the country. You'd rather have what Brunei we'll talk about the story about what they do to gay people talking about that as well. So you've got to hear these stories because it's gonna make your face hurt gonna make you want to go to campus reform, and and find out more of what they do campus reform dot org. We've got a lot going on. Let me tell you about Omaha Steaks stakes is where I go. Omaha Steaks used order online and it shows up at your front doorstep in an ice cooler. This is this is wonderful fresh meat and at the end of the day tastes incredible. And.

Omaha Steaks Joe pags Eduardo narrow George Washington University Brunei Carrie school university of Florida
"george washington university" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

10:20 min | 3 years ago

"george washington university" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Hi, scott. How are you? I'm doing. Okay. Thanks for having me. Are you guys? You guys are based in Maryland. Yeah. Our officers are just outside of Washington DC in Silver, Spring, Maryland right outside of the nation's capital. So what is your background? And how did you end up being the new executive director of this organization? Well, I I played college golf at George Washington University, and then moved quickly into becoming the coach at GW while I was working for my PJ membership from there. I got involved with the first team program, then became the executive director of the I t of Washington DC left DC forbid and went up to Penn and coached the men's and women's team got a little more involved in fundraising and development there, and then I came back, and I've been back with the I was back with George Washington for four or five years doing development in the department as well as managing some of the regional alumni groups, so that sort of combination I think of being a PJ off professional with experience teaching experience coaching, but also having the nonprofit management skills with the I t and. Some fundraising development skills with with GW. I think is what made me a good candidate for those guys. And I started the beginning of February. Yeah. All of those things prepared you for your new role with the salute military Golf Association. Tell us about that the SIM G A and how long it's been around. And I just kinda briefly glossed over the mission. I know what goes a lot deeper than what I said that tell us about that. That's and she was founded in two thousand six by on a geneticist who's a PJ off professional engineer Winslow who also played college golf at George Washington University, and their their college friend or their high school friend the mission is to impact the lives of post nine eleven combat injured and their families. So there's basically two ways that we do that through we a warrior golf clinics that take place e one of our chapters or here at our our home location in the DC area or through the American golfer program. And our our chapters are located we've got six chapters. In addition to our chapter here on the golf park in in Maryland, we have joint base mcchord at which works at chambers. Bay outside of Seattle in Washington state. We have programming at Camp Lejeune at Fort Bragg in North Carolina. We have a large chapter in New England that does programming at eight or nine locations at that. We also use the Canadian bay in Hawaii fort drum New York, but I think you guys are probably aware. Fort Carson and Cheyenne shadows out of Colorado Springs with Paul Sirnak. Who does a great job working with other wounded veterans out in your part of the world. Yeah. We've had Paul on the show a couple of times good, buddy. We need to get him back on. He does do a tremendous job. And it's nice. I appreciate the plug there. But also, Scott, I was kind of wondering what would a wounded warrior comes to you. What can they expect to as far as their participation? Exactly that was your. That's the perfect segue for me if they're close to one of our chapters. We're going to direct them to someone like call at giant shadows and have them work with Paul. But even if they're not at close to one of our chapters. We put them into what we call our American golfer program where they can identify a local PJ professional who's able to work with them will be able to pay that professional for instruction. They'll get an initial package of golf lessons will end with a fitting that sitting will help us get out of the measurements. We need to work with our sponsors are taylormade. Adidas and get them some equipment to get started. Which again is all covered by us here at the end. And then once they've gone to that initial program they can get sustaining lessons every couple of lessons a year to keep that the game sharp. We have tournament opportunities whether their local charity events that we can we opportunities to get our guys into or whether they're the more significant terminology -tunities, we also have sort of. Call me experiences as we get a chance to get some of our guys and and ladies into the Monday after the masters tournament that Darius Rucker hosts we have people who can play in the the Wilson events, which is out of chambers day. We have the Kurland jammed in Charleston and our sponsors. I Del Monte help us with those events as well as the Caisley even some international trips. We've been able to send guys to to Ireland to South Africa's to play with Gary Player. So, you know, just once you become a member in American golfer program, we try to work with you to help help you use the game. Because that's really what we're trying to do is. You know, the the this kind of equipment is nice. And the playing opportunities is great. But I think especially for wounded veterans in our our veterans with PTSD or traumatic brain injury to are also included in, you know, in in our, you know, our work the impacted the game has on their lives of your ability to help them have a passionate hobby and a lot of our veterans where. We're at athletes in one sport or another and maybe now because of their injuries are not able to play that sport going forward that they can get into a game like golf, and they're able to find a sport that they can they can work with. And you got play the game. We all know that it's sorted addicted. Whether you're trying to break seventy or trying to break hundred and twenty you're always working hard to play better the next day and you played the previous day. So the guy something to really really work at and and get involved with as well as the social interaction a lot of our our chapter programming. You know invites families that give the guys an opportunity to interact with other veterans who were in similar situations to build relationships Bill confronts shit. So that social aspect of golf can also be really key in the recovery for some of our veterans who are dealing with you know, with with some pretty serious injury. Absolutely. I think that's one of the neatest things about golf the way. It lends itself to something like rehabilitation, not just for wounded warriors. But for anybody. And it is a lifetime smart. Yeah. Oakland. Sorry. Just going to ask you when you like conducted tournament is broken down into categories based on the the injuries that the veterans have suffered or do you just kind of lump everybody together? Yeah. Well, we don't we don't run tournaments aren't are ended our relationship with other organizations. Sometimes get our guys in there. There are competitive events as well as charity fundraising event. Now are are these veterans coming to you are you actively going out and finding them? How does how do you guys come together? They mostly come to us and it's word of mouth. I mean, we work closely, you know, appear for example in the Maryland area, we work closely with the folks in Walter Reed hospital to work with it. That's where recovering from various injuries. That's how the program began. You got a chance to meet some of those guys at Walter Reed. Back in two thousand six and was really impressed by their their spirit, and their dedication and their their will their interest to want to get involved in something and stay active. So that you know, that passionate those guys really kinda he? He appreciated that and it helped him get that program going. So we do have some of our chapters that are very close to hospitals, and such why they work with them. And they're able to work with with the men and women who are who are at facilities and steer them toward our program. But a lot of it's just word of mouth, you know, that had a good experience, and they tell their their fellow veterans and the men and women who've served end up getting involved. Paul Sunni has told me stories of how initially some of these veterans were reluctant to get involved in reluctant. They didn't think they you know, they could do with the injuries. They had or with limbs they had lost things like that. They didn't think they could actually do rehab using golf, and he sort of had to twist their arms or whatever to get him do it. But let's say got involved, they just they just devoured it. They just really got into it. So I that's got to be such a rewarding thing. And that's that's part of your mission. Isn't it? Yeah. I mean, if you come to our clinics, and you see and every every one of our, you know, our veterans is dealing with with something different. Whether it's a physical injury. Whether it's a mental injury with you know with PTSD or traumatic brain injury. They're all facing something something personal, and they're all able to find a way. That's that's what the adaptive golf the training. We work with they're all able to find a way to to overcome their injuries to you know, to improve their golf game. And again, I ask you know, what you know, you sort of get involved. We've got you go on our website. You can see some pictures of up Sean Lewis who is he's a model for our logo who has one leg. And he's able to hit it to sixty to seventy he makes us shoulder. Turn that would that would impress anybody with with all their their limbs were able to find ways to get all of our our veterans to, you know, overcome the obstacle, but they're dealing with physically or mentally to improve their gaining. And and again, whether they're trying to break one hundred twenty whether they're trying to break eighty you get involved, and you get you give them something. To get involved with something you get hooked on it that they tried to get better. And they try to recover does. He give lessons for people who have two arms and ten legs. Like me. I can't. I'm sure you would. Yeah. Your job as executive director. You're the big boss now little I'm sure there's fundraising. There's some public relations. There's. It's just a myriad of things. Isn't it? Yeah. I think the fundraising is is obviously one of the reasons that they hired me. I'm certain we have great sponsors right now with Allen Hamilton voodoo tournaments around the country for us, and we work closely with teed up for the troops. And we're sending guys down to the direct classic in New Orleans next month. And obviously taylormade. Adidas are great with us in terms of writing a discounted equipment for the men and women we work with as well as help us with stuff, but we're always looking to to to grow those relationships. Love. I worked a lot of different profits. And you I talk about time talent and treasure you need to find folks who can help you it all of those categories. We're looking for people who can help us give it to give us their time. Who can volunteer at our clinic who can help, you know, help with registration help check people and help, you know, processing things.

golf Maryland executive director George Washington University taylormade Adidas PTSD scott Paul Washington salute military Golf Associati George Washington Darius Rucker PJ Hawaii fort drum New York Allen Hamilton New Orleans DC Penn Seattle
"george washington university" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:34 min | 3 years ago

"george washington university" Discussed on KCRW

"With the program on extremism at George Washington University. Governor of Connecticut is proposing the first statewide tax on sugar, sweetened drinks to raise money and to fight obesity. Several cities have already enacted such as soda taxes, and as new evidence this week suggesting that they do work, but sometimes not as well as hoped NPR's, Dan, Charles has the story the way Chris Madsen sees it sugary drinks are a menace to society, she teaches public health at the university of California Berkeley, it's a pretty high bar for public health to be able to say something is causing a major epidemic. We can do that for sugar sweetened beverages. Berkeley was the first city to tax those drinks and Manson is leading a team of researchers. That's trying to see how it's working. We think going out to the same neighborhoods every year for the last five years, and we've been asking people the same questions like how often do you drink sugar, sweetened drinks? They did this before the soda tax went into effect three years ago and every year since focusing on low income neigh-. Neighborhoods and we saw a fifty two percent decline in consumption over the first three years. Fifty two percent. Yes. This has a huge impact. Her study appears this week in the American journal of public health. Now a couple of cautious people's memories aren't totally reliable. And maybe people in Berkeley, just don't want admit, they're still drinking, lots of soda other. Researchers who are studying soda taxes are not relying on people's memories. They're looking at sales data from stores, Anna Tuchman at Northwestern University is part of a group studying Philadelphia's soda tax Philadelphia is taxing more. Drake's both sugar sweetened and diet versions because its main goals raising more money for schools and playgrounds Tuchman says sales of those drinks in Philadelphia have dropped since the tax went into effect by a lot more than forty percent. But there's a catch. We find very large increase in sales of soda and other taxed products at stores that are located zero to four miles outside of the city. It seems. A lot of people in Philadelphia are driving to stores right outside the city to buy their beverages, especially the sugary drinks not so much the diet soda when you take that into account sales in and around the city dropped by about twenty percent. Not forty percent and sales of sugar sweetened drinks fell even less. It's like people are able to maintain their sugar and calorie intake and the city is falling short in their ability to raise tax revenues Tuchman. And her colleagues are still revising their paper. It hasn't been formally reviewed by other scientists yet right now though, it does show some of the difficulties that cities face with their soda taxes. There are political obstacles to the soda industries been fighting back arguing that sodas taxes are unfair to consumers and won't really make people healthier. But more places have implemented them Oakland. San francisco. Seattle and soda tax advocates say there's a simple way to keep people from avoiding the tax going outside the city have attacks that covers an entire state or country. Dan, Charles, NPR news. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. I'm Josh barrow host of KCRW's left right and center, we couldn't fit all the lawsuits in our show. So we've added a new one L RC presents all the president's lawyers a weekly examination of law liability and.

Anna Tuchman Philadelphia Berkeley Dan university of California Berke George Washington University American journal of public hea Charles Connecticut NPR Josh barrow Chris Madsen Seattle KCRW Northwestern University San francisco
"george washington university" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:08 min | 3 years ago

"george washington university" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"He's with the program on extremism at George Washington University. The governor of Connecticut is proposing the first statewide tax on sugar, sweetened drinks to raise money and to fight obesity. Several cities have already enacted such as soda taxes. And there's new evidence this week suggesting that they do work, but sometimes not as well as hoped NPR's, Dan, Charles has the story the way Chris Madsen sees it sugary drinks are a menace to society, she teaches public health at the university of California Berkeley, it's a pretty high bar for public health to the able to say something is causing a major epidemic. We can do that for sugar sweetened beverages. Berkeley was the first city to tax those drinks and Madison is leading a team of researchers. That's trying to see how it's working. We think going out to the same neighborhoods every year for the last five years, and we've been asking people the same questions like how often do you drink sugar, sweetened drinks? They did this before the soda tax went into effect three years ago and every year since focusing on low income neigh-. Neighborhoods and we saw a fifty two percent decline in consumption over the first three years. Fifty two percent. Yes. This has a huge impact. Her study appears this week in the American journal of public health. Now a couple of cautions people's memories aren't totally reliable, and maybe people in Berkeley, just don't want to admit, they're still drinking lots of soda other. Researchers who are studying soda taxes are not relying on people's memories. They're looking at sales data from stores, Anna Tuchman at Northwestern University is part of a group studying Philadelphia's so tax Philadelphia is taxing more. Drake's both sugar sweetened and diet versions because its main goals raising more money for schools and playgrounds Tuchman says sales of those drinks in Philadelphia have dropped since the tax went into effect by a lot more than forty percent. But there's a catch. We find very large increase in sales of soda and other taxed products at stores that are located zero to four miles outside of the city. It seems that. A lot of people in Philadelphia are driving to stores right outside the city to buy their beverages, especially the sugary drinks not so much the diet soda when you take that into account sales in and around the city dropped by about twenty percent. Not forty percent and sales of sugar sweetened drinks fell even less. It's like people are able to maintain their sugar and calorie intake and the city is falling short in their ability to raise tax revenues Tuchman. And her colleagues are still revising their paper. It hasn't been formally reviewed by other scientists yet right now though, it does show some of the difficulties that cities face with their soda taxes. There are political obstacles to the soda industry has been fighting back arguing that soda taxes are unfair to consumers and won't really make people healthier. But more places have implemented them Oakland. San francisco. Seattle and soda tax advocates say there's a simple way to keep people from voiding the tax by going outside the city have attacks that covers an entire state or country. Dan, Charles, NPR news..

Anna Tuchman Philadelphia Berkeley George Washington University Dan American journal of public hea Connecticut university of California Berke Charles San francisco Seattle NPR Chris Madsen Northwestern University Oakland Madison Drake
"george washington university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:17 min | 3 years ago

"george washington university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"He's with the program on extremism at George Washington University. The governor of Connecticut is proposing the first statewide tax on sugar, sweetened drinks to raise money and to fight obesity. Several cities have already enacted such soda taxes. And there's new evidence this week suggesting that they do work, but sometimes not as well as hoped NPR's. Dan, Charles has the story the way Chris Madsen sees it sugary drinks are a menace to society, she teaches public health at the university of California Berkeley, it's a pretty high bar for public health to the able to say something is causing a major epidemic. We can do that for sugar sweetened beverages. Berkeley was the first city to tax those drinks and Manson is leading a team of researchers. That's trying to see how it's working. We've been going out to the same neighborhoods every year for the last five years, and we've been asking people the same questions like how often do you drink sugar sweetened drinks? They did this before the soda tax went into effect three years ago and every year since focusing on low income. Neighborhoods and we saw a fifty two percent decline in consumption over the first three years. Fifty two Ben. Yes, this has a huge impact. Her study appears this week in the American journal of public health. Now a couple of cautions people's memories aren't totally reliable, and maybe people in Berkeley, just don't want to admit, they're still drinking lots of soda other. Researchers who are studying sodas taxes are not relying on people's memories. They're looking at sales data from stores and Tuchman at Northwestern University is part of a group studying Philadelphia's soda tax Philadelphia is taxing more. Drake's both sugar sweetened and diet versions because its main goals raising more money for schools and playgrounds Tuchman says sales of those drinks in Philadelphia have dropped since the tax went into effect by a lot more than forty percent. But there's a catch. We find a very large increase in sales of soda and other taxed products at stores that are located zero to four miles outside of the city. It seems that a lot of people in Philadelphia are driving to stores right outside the city to buy their beverages, especially the sugary drinks, not so much the diet soda when you take that into account sales in and around the city dropped by about twenty percent. Not forty percent and sales of sugar sweetened drinks fell even less. It's like people are able to maintain their sugar and calorie intake and the city is falling short in their ability to raise tax revenues Tuchman. And her colleagues are still revising their paper. It hasn't been formally reviewed by other scientists yet right now though, it does show some of the difficulties that cities face with their soda taxes. There are political obstacles to the soda industry's been fighting back arguing that soda taxes are unfair to consumers and won't really make people healthier. But more places have implemented them Oakland. San francisco. Seattle and soda tax advocates say there's a simple way to keep people from voiding the tax by going outside the city have attacks a covers an entire state or country. Dan, Charles, NPR news..

Tuchman Philadelphia Berkeley Dan George Washington University American journal of public hea Connecticut university of California Berke Charles NPR San francisco Seattle Chris Madsen Northwestern University Oakland Manson Drake
"george washington university" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

03:09 min | 3 years ago

"george washington university" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"You. So now we celebrate the losers. So that would be me. I lost. Choose. Your news comes up at the end of every hour of three o'clock. We pitch your stories for o'clock we reveal the winner and two four o'clock the walk of shame a real shame. So you've heard of them a woman, they Monica wit. She's a former United States Air Force intelligence specialist, and she's accused of committing espionage on on behalf of the country of Iran. So what led the heretical ization, but we don't know for sure, but there is an incredibly interesting trail of bread gum. Rub breadcrumbs starts with. Douglas wise is a former deputy director of the Defense Intelligence Agency. He ruled out monetary motive he said, she wasn't in it for the money wasn't a fee for task thing. Some point she took an ideological left turn to become aligned with the Persians in Paul Mironov at powerline blog points to that. Now, there's some other indicators the New York Times says that some of the shift in her mindset took place when she was in the military, then she became disillusioned by drone strikes what she considered extrajudicial killings and atrocities against children her considerations. But the times also says that her radicalization accelerated when she was in graduate school at George Washington University. And this is a fascinating thing in light of all the talk about Russian involvement in our elections. What better way to sway elections? Then this way opinions and some of the people are working government. I questioned the wisdom of what George Washington University's doing. They're taking one hundred million dollars in gifts from countries that don't have our best interests at heart. Saudi Arabia Kuwait United Arab Emirates, they're not the only ones involving themselves with these countries far from it. But a question the wisdom of that. It's also true that the guy who runs the program back there for folks are going to be in the the State Department Nathan Brown directs the Middle East. Studies program is the defender of the Muslim Brotherhood. It's his right. He says that they don't want violent ends he compared than the boy scouts gets right to do that academic freedom. But I questioned the wisdom of a university so influential or any university that influential taking monies from countries that don't ever best interest. This is heart. Just as a question the Confucius institutes giving so much money to US universities. What radicalized you don't know? But we know that these things. Probably had played some role in that even the New York Times point stat out. It's an interesting story. And I'll tweet it out. If you wanna take a look at that coming up next hour on the candy, Mike and Todd show. The candy bought will continue to rule and in Arizona man claimed he was with ISIS speaking of terrace, and he went to attack a police officer the opposite happened here where our officers showed some incredible patients, and they did not shoot a guy that probably could have been shot. Our cops are now carrying non lethal guns nonlethal ammo, and it's a change that I support and this is perfect for my friend taught faking candy bots, so we'll get to that as we continue now, Tracy Taylor. We'll check traffic.

Monica wit New York Times George Washington University Douglas wise Defense Intelligence Agency Muslim Brotherhood Arizona Saudi Arabia Paul Mironov Tracy Taylor Middle East ISIS US deputy director State Department Arab Emirates Iran Mike Nathan Brown officer