35 Burst results for "George W Bush"

Walter Mondale, Carter's vice president, dies at 93

First Morning News

00:37 sec | 2 weeks ago

Walter Mondale, Carter's vice president, dies at 93

"The country is remembering Walter Mondale, the former vice president died at the age of 93 1976. Mondale became a national figure in the Democratic presidential nominee, Jimmy Carter asked him to join the ticket as his running mate, The Carter Mondale, take it lost the White House in 1982, Ronald Reagan, George Bush. 1984 bundles choice for a running mate Rock the election. New York Congresswoman Geraldine Ferraro, the first woman on the presidential ticket, but the campaign struggled to overcome a double digit deficit in the polls. Mondale served his country for more than 50 years. Karen Travers, ABC News Washington

Walter Mondale Carter Mondale Mondale Jimmy Carter Ronald Reagan George Bush Geraldine Ferraro White House New York Karen Travers Abc News Washington
Federal officials relax guidance on nursing home visits

Bob Sirott

00:26 sec | 2 months ago

Federal officials relax guidance on nursing home visits

"But participants are still encouraged to wear masks and wash hands frequently. Deaths among nursing home residents have dropped dramatically. In recent weeks, His vaccinations have sped up nearly four million nursing home residents and staffs of miss staff members have been vaccinated. America's former presidents and first ladies have banded together to urge Americans to get the covert vaccine. Former presidents Barack Obama, Bill Clinton, George Bush and Jimmy

America Barack Obama Bill Clinton George Bush Jimmy
The Mystery Of The Pennhurst Asylum

Haunted Places

04:47 min | 2 months ago

The Mystery Of The Pennhurst Asylum

"The eastern pennsylvania institution for the feeble minded and epileptic later called pinehurst asylum was originally established as a facility for the disabled opened in nineteen o eight. The property contained in array of buildings all scattered around large tracts of farmland in chester county. Thirty miles outside of philadelphia though it might sound like it was designed for care and comfort. The reality was anything. But the institute was first created to house intellectually and developmentally disabled people alongside those who suffered from epilepsy but this strategy was unwise as such patients had very different needs. What's worse is that. Many of the institutions goals were based on the nineteenth century eugenics movement proponents of the movement believed that the human gene pool should be protected and anyone deemed. Genetically inferior. Should be prevented from reproducing by forced sterilization or segregation from the rest of society. For this reason. People with certain kinds of disabilities whose families could not care for them were sent to penn hearst. Most of them came as infants or children. Girls and boys are separated into different buildings. So there wouldn't be any sexual mixing in the decades since the institution closed a slew of modern day rumors claim that penn hurst carried out forced sterilizations on its patients. But while sterilization did occur at similar institutions in the united states. There was actually no record of it at pinehurst. Rumors of the institute's horrific procedures ran rampant. The last perhaps this is because the hospital was shrouded in an era of mystery it operated almost completely independently of the outside world. It had its own power plant and produced its own. Food and supplies were brought in by a special rail. Line pen hurts was designed so that no one from the outside could get in but more importantly so that no one on the inside could ever get out. Georgie was carrying a stack of folded sheets toward the finish piles. When he noticed a girl arguing with an orderly. George stopped in his tracks. She had long shiny hair and was pointing a finger directly at him confidently shouting and screaming. He was instantly captivated and continued to watch her but eventually to more orderlies came over to give her a shot. And take away georgie side. Good things never lasted. Long at penn harris georgia's mother had left him there when he was only three. He never knew why not what he done or where she'd gone he'd been stuck in this place for twelve years and he knew it like the back of his hand. He knew that when the girl got taken away it was the last he'd see of her or so he thought The next day georgy walked into the laundry building at his heart nearly stopped there. She was if he someone else. He could've tapped on her shoulder and introduced himself but as it was he could barely manage breathing and walking at the same time. Georgie said down in front of his pile of sheets and started cursing himself for being so shy and that was when someone tapped him on the shoulder turned. The girl was standing behind him. A fitted sheet in her hand. She has georgie how to fold it. Her name was kerry. No one was happy to be. A pen harassed. But carrie was indignant about it. She said she didn't belong there. That was why she'd been fighting with the orderly. There was no way she was going to spend the day slaving over an ironing board if she wasn't getting paid the orderly at said that barbital injection might change her mind but it obviously didn't soon george bush love. He used to find laundry duty tedious. But now it was the only thing. He looked forward to because laundry. Duty meant seeing carry a few weeks. After they first met george carey was sitting on a low stone wall outside the laundry carried. Turn to him with a frown. She asked to launch. She was a burden after her parents died. Her guardianship went to her uncle.

Eastern Pennsylvania Instituti Penn Hearst Penn Hurst Chester County Georgie Epilepsy Penn Harris Philadelphia Georgy United States George Georgia Kerry Carrie George Carey George Bush
Rate of guns seized at airport checkpoints jumped in 2020

Mark Blazor

00:39 sec | 3 months ago

Rate of guns seized at airport checkpoints jumped in 2020

"Have been nearly empty a times last year during the pandemic, but it was a banner year for people trying to bring guns in their carry on bags or fewer people flew in 2020. But the T S a says it caught mortgage guns going through airport security checkpoints than ever before in its 19 year history, and in fact compared to 2019 for every one million passengers, a firearm Catch rate doubled in 2020 T Essa officers finding over 3200 guns and carry on bags, even though there were 500 million fewer travelers in 2020. The airports with the most guns found Hartsfield Jackson in Atlanta, Dallas Fort Worth, Houston, George Bush and Phoenix Sky Harbor.

Hartsfield Jackson Atlanta Fort Worth Dallas Houston George Bush Phoenix Sky Harbor
'The King of Talk': Remembering Larry King

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:03 min | 3 months ago

'The King of Talk': Remembering Larry King

"Larry King has died. He was 87 in a career that spanned 60 years. Larry King interviewed just about everybody. Reporter Jeff Lunden has this appreciation. With his trademark suspenders and his deep baritone voice tinged with a Brooklyn accent. Larry King spoke with Presidents George Bush is our honored guest for the full hour. Next on Larry King Live World leaders Moammar Qaddafi. The leader of the nation of Libya, celebrities, the brilliant Barbra Streisand, authors, scientists, comedians, athletes and on and on and on. I'm always engrossed in the guest. Larry King spoke with Jesse Thorn on the turnaround podcast in 2017. I'm always listening to the answer. I'm always learning, So I guess I'm better every day at learning. The Brooklyn born King actually was an indifferent student, but said he always had an innate curiosity when we would go to dodge it. All my friends wanted autographs at the injury. I never asked for an autograph, but I would walk with the players is they're going to their cars asking questions. Why'd you bunt? Why they do this in the third inning. My curiosity is still insatiable. King began his career is a DJ in Miami, and it's where he got his name is well. When a station manager told him his given surname, Zeiger was too ethnic. He chose King from a liquor ad in a newspaper. By the late 19 seventies, King had an overnight talk show on national radio. Then the 1985 Ted Turner hired him for his new network, CNN. Media commentator and author. Bill Carter, who's a CNN contributor, says the timing was perfect. Picking up something like Larry King may love sense because he had Establish himself kind of as a guy who could get big guests. They could have big names and promoted and became sort of the linchpin of their prime time lineup, and King stayed there for 25 years. Some critics complained that he was too chummy with celebrities and lob softball questions. It is guests. His strategy was I'm never gonna make the guests uncomfortable. And that means not only will they come back, but they'll tell their friends. He won't ask you about that ugly divorce of yours. You know, he'll ask you about your favorite movie, so he didn't challenge people, But he did get information. He was pretty good at that, like when he talked with ex President Richard Nixon. Well, I don't want to dwell in the Watergate thing that's been covered so well. But some personal things when you drive by Those collections of buildings. The hotel the two apartment houses the office building, You feel weird, funny. No, I never give it a thought. Never given a thought. Never given a thought. That's one place where you just don't look back. As far as Watergate is. I know you don't look up at the buildings themselves. Not at all. Not a matter of fact, I've never been in the Watergate. Larry King famously didn't do a lot of preparation before his interviews, the less I know. Better Now, That sounds strange to people. Like If you wrote a book. I wouldn't read the book for interview do because I would then know too much about the book and I'm in the same boat as the audience. They haven't read the book, but King knew the national zeitgeist. He covered the first O. J. Simpson trial every night, says Bill Carter. He basically started the cable monomania move. We're going to just cover this story. That's it In a way. It was perfect for life because it was celebrity oriented. It was in the news, but it was not political. Ultimately, CNN canceled King show because it wasn't political competition from Fox and MSNBC took its toll on the ratings. But King was a survivor. He was married eight times and had Quinn couple bypass surgery after a massive heart attack, and King took his talk show to streaming video and kept on working for NPR news. I'm Jeff Lunden in New York.

Larry King Jeff Lunden Moammar Qaddafi Jesse Thorn King Brooklyn Zeiger CNN Bill Carter Barbra Streisand George Bush Libya Ted Turner Miami Softball Richard Nixon O. J. Simpson Msnbc FOX Quinn
US 'Safe Harbor' Day Reinforces Biden’s Electoral Victory

The Takeaway

05:51 min | 5 months ago

US 'Safe Harbor' Day Reinforces Biden’s Electoral Victory

"This week marked the so-called safe harbor deadline when states have certified the results for the us presidential election typically by the harvard deadline lection related challenges at the state level or all wrapped up but president trump is continuing to claim without proof that the results in many of the states that voted for joe biden are fraudulent and should be tossed out a lawsuit filed by the state attorney general of texas and supported by the president as well as seventeen republican. State's attorney general and over one hundred. Republican members of the house is asking the supreme court to overturn the results of the election in four states carried by biden. Pennsylvania georgia wisconsin and michigan. That would bring biden below the two hundred seventy electoral college votes. He would need to be the president-elect elect so how can an election certified and contested helping us to make sense of it. All is our friend. Barbara perry the presidential studies director at the university of virginia's miller center she begins by explaining who the electors are and what the electoral college actually does elect doors. One might need them as delegates to this thing called the electoral college. Actually have a t shirt that says property of the athletic department of the electoral college. Which i love that. The politics department at uva gave all of the graduate students at one point. But it's not really a place it's a is it. Is this group of electors. They are chosen typically by a method that is determined by the state legislatures in each and that concept spelled out in the constitution that the legislatures of the states get to choose the manner in which these electoral college delegates or electors will be chosen and that can be through a primary system much as the presidential. Candidates are selected. It can be through a convention of the party in a state but typically these are people who are party leaders. One might call them. Party regulars party activists the only thing that they cannot be is a federal office holder so for example a senator member's house representatives. A member of the cabinet could not participate as an elector but typically it is determined the methodist election by the state legislatures and then really turning it over to the party organizations in each state to choose. This will call it a slate of electors. So then let's walk through what happens. We have the election. We have as we've seen especially this year the states. Sometimes it takes a little longer than some states. Take a little longer than others to certify the results and then we have something known as safe harbor day which happened this week on tuesday december. Eighth can you explain what that is. Yes i in legal terms particularly as it's used in this context of an election. Is that once. This date is set as this is the safe harbor. And once you state certifies your election results you by that date. Then get to be in the safe harbor where your determination and your certification of that election should not be prone to any more of the storm in the seas and the roiling that could come from those who might be questioning the election and its results and so that's where we are now so help us understand this barbara. Because we've passed the safe harbor day we know that every state has certified its electors and yet the texas attorney general is filing a lawsuit or has filed a lawsuit asking the supreme court to block the electors from four states. How can this be possible given that the safe harbor. Data's already passed. I agree with you on asking that question and my answer to that would be what an irony think. Back to two thousand. Think back to the bush. V gore controversy which was much closer because remember that the florida recount that was being requested by al gore Because he was just a few votes behind probably about three to five hundred votes behind. George bush in that popular vote count in florida and whichever person was going to be certified and deemed. The winner of florida was going to exactly end up with two hundred two hundred seventy votes necessary to win the electoral college. So that's how razor send those margins were so understandably al gore was going to keep pressing. But here's the historical irony that republicans were saying on behalf of george bush. Oh safe harbor day is approaching so we really must wrap up and stop this recount in florida and the. Us supreme court accepted that argument by the bush side and said we cannot violate this concept of the safe harbor. Florida must certify its vote and indeed the recount stop. Florida certified their votes which showed that bush had won by sort of three to five hundred votes. That was it and that was it for gore. so by view is isn't an irony that the republican party. This time round led by at this point that commander in chief himself but the attorney general of texas joined by what sixteen seventeen other attorneys general. Republicans in states are now completely violating that concept of. Let's really pay attention to and follow the safe harbor rule right i think many constitutional scholars would also argue that. It's unlikely the supreme court is even going to take this case nonetheless rule on it but the fact is we do know at this point that every single state has certified. It's election correct. That is correct.

President Trump Electoral College Barbara Perry Miller Center Biden Department Of The Electoral Co Supreme Court Joe Biden Texas University Of Virginia Harvard Wisconsin Pennsylvania Georgia Florida Michigan Al Gore Cabinet George Bush House
US presidential election: A turbulent transfer of power

The Takeaway

05:49 min | 6 months ago

US presidential election: A turbulent transfer of power

"Peaceful. Transfer of power is a cornerstone of american democracy. Right now president. Trump is not only refusing to concede this election. He's also denying the incoming biden administration access to key documents funding information. They need to ensure a safe and smooth transition now. The formal transition process is actually a pretty new thing. Congress passed the presidential transition act just over fifty years ago. Em things proceeded from there with relatively little drama or problems until two thousand versus the mission of george. Bush is not up for me to accept or reject the legal process. You know. let's just watch this happen. It'll be over soon. We'll be ready for transition. It wasn't until weeks after that. Bill clinton cabinet meeting december twelve thirty five days after the election that george w bush was officially declared the winner that gave then president elect bush just over a month to plan for and staff his administration course nine months later the september eleventh terrorist attacks happened catching the nation and a relatively new president off guard when the nine eleven commission report came out in two thousand four. It pointed to this truncated transition as a weakness and recommended a more formalized process katherine dunn tempests at senior fellow at the university of virginia's miller center the senior research director at the white house transition project so laws were passed in the two thousands or spin sort of three sets of laws that have been passed to kinda they keep refining it and keep refining it but what they did primarily is that they enable the winning candidates to receive funding to start their transitions after they were formerly so that meant that once biden was the democratic nominee. He was eight. He was provided with all space some funding for salaries and the ability to start planning ahead. Talked to us a little bit. About how worried you are or how worried we should be as americans about this as you pointed out the attacks on nine eleven happened not that long after president bush took office. If something happens january or february of this coming year would the biden administration be potentially a unable to respond because they just simply didn't have the staffing and they didn't have the time to ramp up and be ready. Let me back up. Just a bit to point out that There are basically two important phases of the transition. The i i pointed out was after the nominee has been formally nominated by the party and they received some resources the next big transfer resources comes after the head of the gsa has ascertained the next president united states and they use that verbiage. Esser that verb. I'm not really sure why but And that's the point at which the president the incoming president can start to have access to classified material that can start to be part of the president's daily brief with Tells them all the national security issues. It enables the biden transition team to have access to all of these individuals civil servants and political appointees at the various agencies so that they can interview them. So what's happening now. Is they are preventing the biden from moving to the next phase. And what i would argue is the most important phase at the transition. It's critically important that the biden staff members be able to go to the department of justice francis and to be able to interview. Fbi director the head of the criminal division the head of the national security division to try to get a sense since of. What's the lay of the land where the priorities. What are the crises. That might be boiling over by the time we get here. And that's what they're being denied so. I think there should be a lot of concern about this. The the inability to advance to the next stage of the transition. It's not to say that it's going to necessarily result in some sort of crises that but we want a country that's prepared so it strikes me as were basically just sort of harming ourselves for no apparent reason and were inhibiting our ability to be in the best possible situation. We can be on january twentieth. And there's no reason for that. We have the resources we have the capacity. So why so. Let's talk about the. Why and and the who so. Emily murphy is a name that most of us probably weren't familiar with until now she is a person who is at the head of the. Gsa can you talk a little bit about how her role what her role is. And how much leeway. She has to continue to refuse to release these funds or to allow the biden team to start integrating with the outgoing trump administration. So emily murphy is the administrator of the gsa. It's a political appointment in the gsa. It's office is largely responsible for all the government real estate so they helped provide office space and oversee office space You know in in most situations would never even hear of the essay in this particular case because the legislation housed it in the gsa. She has the capacity to release the funding and the resources to the party. Nominees and then eventually to the president-elect by law she is the one that has to ascertain the election so there will be no funding going out until she does it. So what's tying our hands. I mean she is a by president trump. She must be a republican. Who has some loyalty to this administration and is unwilling to buck the advice. She's getting probably for mark meadows. Probably the chief-of-staff sues weighing on her.

Biden Nine Eleven Commission Katherine Dunn University Of Virginia's Mille Biden Administration George W Bush Bush GSA Donald Trump Bill Clinton Emily Murphy National Security Division Esser Congress White House George
Reasons Everyone Should Visit Houston

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:35 min | 6 months ago

Reasons Everyone Should Visit Houston

"Should someone come to houston. texas acetate. don't really think about houston all about when they hear houston is a space center. Houston actually has i think. It's supposedly had the most restaurants per capita so there's a lot of food here. It has a really good population mix because of his proximity to mexico. You get what's called tex-mex which is a kind of mikla. Mr for mexican in texas food i guess or american footprint is quite good and there's also other large ethnic populations here so you'll find Didn't population here and there is actually some folks from other african dies poorer. That's here as well. There's really lot more to do than people think plus is all the major sports teams are here so there is quite a bit to do that. They just don't think about and all day but think about it's a space center but that's just one thing that you can do houston. I cannot verify the top ten restaurants per capita in the. Us list does not seem to have. Although strangely enough it does hit my hometown of san jose california issue. San francisco is being number one which i believe. 'cause nobody there cooks but guess. What would you recommend that somebody do when they come to houston. I actually have a huge list of things that people can do. I was bored one day and came up with. I think about forty five three things that you can do in houston for different free things. Yes no shortage of things to do in houston itself. Museum district is actually very large. Most people that come to houston they are here for oil because those are the Ahead of his hair they also come down for the medical center and when united was based here it might have been the largest employer at the time but i don't case anymore so there is a slew of museums at least eighteen or sally's eighteen free ones. Anyway we also have a lot of parks like any large city and because there's so much oil. Many in houston is a lot of people giving money to the parks into the parks action. A very well developed than really. Well kept. Well as i told you ahead of time. I'm gonna get you into more specifics. So okay where should we start all right. So can we talk about transportations. Says the airline guy. Alan guy right. He said has to year. Boy says a hobby airport. Which up until a few. I guess last week was dominated by south west but then southwest is now going to have flight sida houston intercontinental airport and in the continent airports named after george bush. Not the son but the father although the bush's actually live here in houston so transportation wise And they are actually connected to the city but by buses. Everybody drives in. Houston if you come the best thing for you to do if you really want to get around the city. I guess efficiently is to rent a car. There is a local bus service that it was like one or two that comes from it takes about him and only cost dollar twenty five cents to get from houston intercontinental downtown houston and then there is the eighty eight. I think it is now that goes from houston hobby into downtown houston and methodology and a quarter. But i would recommend getting a car because it's so easy to city is very large and getting a car is probably the best way to get around and then we're going to start. We can actually start downtown so once you get your car. You're jumping forty five and you head south into into downtown as you're driving into downtown you can see the city if you want. You can stay out by the airports airports Tells around there but if you come into houston you might as well come. Stay in the city center. You can stay downtown. Houston they have all all the major chains they here. There is actually a myriad married which has the pool in the shape of texas. So yeah i haven't gone there yet but it's actually quite cool. I've seen pictures of it and there's also the hilton which is across georgia. Lebron's convention thinkers houston is a big convention city when they have cooled show which these things anymore but when they used to have the show. You could not find a hotel room in houston and the city is about. I think we're up to seven and a half million people in houston. It is the fourth largest city in the union. So i would actually get downtown. i once. you're downtown There is discovery green and discovered green is actually a park. And it's right by the georgia brown Any literally sits between the myra one side and the hilton on the other side and off to the left of that is the minute maid park which is where the baseball team. The houston astros place. Now if one thing about maid park is if you're into trains and says very old city if you go to most of us cities you'll find a union station right right and most of them are still being used as stations while the one in houston is not it is now where when you go to the astros. That is the hall big hall that you normally have for stations. Dave turned that into the entrance to the ballpark.

Houston Texas Sida Houston Intercontinental San Jose Mexico San Francisco Sally George Bush California Alan Southwest Bush United States Georgia Lebron Astros Hilton Baseball
Trump is stonewalling Biden's transition. Here's why it matters

The Takeaway

08:50 min | 6 months ago

Trump is stonewalling Biden's transition. Here's why it matters

"Amy Walter from the takeaway were well underway and the ability for Theo administration in any way by failure recognizes this our wind. Does not change the dynamic at all. What radio peaceful transfer of power is a cornerstone of American democracy. Right now. President Trump is not only refusing to concede this election. He's also denying the incoming Biden administration access to keep documents funding an information they need to ensure a safe and smooth transition. Now the formal transition process is actually a pretty new thing. Congress passed the Presidential transition act just over 50 years ago. Him. Things proceeded from there with relatively little drama or problems until 2000 President George Florida's certification of George Bush is the winner. It's not up for me to accept or reject. There's a legal process here, you know, let's just watch this happen. It'll be over soon and we'll be ready for the transition. It wasn't until weeks after that. Bill Clinton Cabinet meeting December 12 35 days after the election that George W. Bush was officially declared the winner. That gave then President elect Bush just over a month to plan for and staff his administration. Course. Nine months later, the September 11th terrorist attacks happened catching the nation and relatively new president off guard. When the 9 11 Commission report came out in 2004, it pointed to this truncated transition. Is a weakness and recommended a more formalized process. Catherine Don Tempus is it senior fellow at the University of Virginia's Miller Center. She's also the senior research director at the White House Transition Project. So laws were passed in the 2000. There's been sort of three sets of laws that have been passed to kind of they keep refining it and keep refining it. But what they did primarily is that they enabled the winning candidates to receive funding to start their transitions after they were formally nominated. So that meant that once Biden was the Democratic nominee, he was he was provided with office space. Some funding for salaries. And the ability to start planning ahead. Talk to us a little bit about how worried you are or how worried we should be as Americans about this, As you pointed out, the attacks on 9 11 happened. No, not that long after President Bush took office. If something happens January or February of this coming year, would the Biden Administration be potentially unable to respond because they just simply didn't have the staffing and they didn't have the time to ramp up and be ready. We'll let me back up just a bit to point out that there are basically two important phases of the transition. The first I pointed out was after the the nominee. Has been formally nominated by the party and they receive some resource is the next big transfer resource is comes after the head of the G s A has ascertained the next President, United States and they use that Burbage ascertain that bird. I'm not really sure why, but And that's the point at which The president, the incoming president can start to have access to classified material. They can start to be part of the president's daily brief with which is the tells them all of the national security issues. It enables the Biden transition team to have access to all of these individuals, civil servants and political appointees at the various agencies so that they can interview them. So what's happening now is they are preventing the Biden from moving to the next phase, and what I would argue is the most important phase of the transition. It's critically important that the Biden staff members be able to go to the Department of Justice, for instance, and to be able to interview the FBI director, the head of the Criminal Division, the head of the National Security Division. Try to get a sense of sense of what's the lay of the land where the priorities what the crises that might be boiling over by the time we get here, and that's what they're being denied. So I think there should be a lot of concern about this. The inability to advance to this next stage of the transition. It's not to say that it's going to necessarily result in some sort of crisis. I don't know that, but We want a country that's prepared so it strikes me as we're basically just sort of harming ourselves for no apparent reason, and we're inhibiting our ability. To be in the best possible situation. We can be on January 20th, and there's no reason for that. We have the resources. We have the capacity. So why? So let's talk about the why. And the who? So Emily Murphy is a name that most of us Probably weren't familiar with until now. She is a person who is at the head of the G s A. Can you talk a little bit about How her role what her role is and how much leeway she has to continue to refuse to release these funds or to allow The Biden team to start integrating with the outgoing Trump administration. So Emily Murphy is the administrator of the G S. A. It's a political appointment in the GSC itself is largely responsible for all the government real estate, so they help provide office space and oversee office space. Um, you know, and in most situations you would never even hear of the G s a in this particular case because all the transition funding the legislation housed it in the G s a She has the capacity to release the funding in the resource is to the party nominees and then eventually to the president elect by law. She is the one that has to ascertain the election, so there will be no funding going out until she does it. So what's tying our hands? I mean, she is appointed by President Trump. She must be a Republican who has some Loyalty to this administration and is unwilling to buck the advice. She's getting probably from Mark Meadows, probably the chief of staff who is weighing on her. So what happens? The electors meet in mid December, and they certify the results of this election. Is that the time in which you could argue that There just is no formal or legal option for the president to continue to It's sort of obstructed this process. Right? I think the meeting of the electoral college and the electors casting their ballots. And if if the numbers show that you know Biden exceeds 2 70 as he as they appear to now it strikes me that there is she has no justification. To deny the Biden campaign or president elect by and hit the resource is, however. This is a norm, shattering president and we've never had a president who has not conceded. He's lost the election. So normally, I would say yes. You know, that is clearly a decisive moment in American history when the electors cast their vote, And if Biden exceeds 2 70. He is the president. At the same time. I honestly don't know what to expect in this administration. It's very hard to predict many of his political appointees have been loyal to the core. You use the word norm shit or term norm shattering, and I'm wondering how close we are to instead of norm, shattering. Actual democracy damaging, I mean, really, fundamentally undermining the integrity. Of our government and the things on which it is built. I would contend that President Trump along with many senators, who are Denying the facts of the election results and are upholding sort of Trump's Baseless claims of fraud and stealing the election that they are undermining the very tenants of American democracy. In order to have a healthy democracy, the citizenry has to believe in the institutions. They have to believe that the elections that they voted are free and fair. And by actively perpetuating this notion that there has been fraud and some sort of stealing of votes. You are undermining the important tenets of American democracy. And that has long term implications and we are already at important and I would say high level of turmoil in this country. Pandemic has wrecked havoc on the account economy. Various incidents across the country have heightened racial tensions in this country. This is not a moment where we then need to undermine yet another important aspect of American democracy. How

Biden Amy Walter Theo Administration President George Florida Emily Murphy Catherine Don Tempus George Bush University Of Virginia's Mille White House Transition Project Biden Administration Criminal Division National Security Division Donald Trump President Trump Burbage Bill Clinton Trump Administration
Who Gets To Vote In Florida?

Planet Money

04:10 min | 6 months ago

Who Gets To Vote In Florida?

"This is planet money from NPR. In two thousand at the age of seventeen. Angel. Sanchez gets his first real job. It's in the Law Library at the Soto Correctional Institution in southwest Florida where Angel is an inmate mark first day at work. I walk in and they told me this is your desk. and. Had A desk I've never in my life had a desk before that moment right away. Angel loves this place. There are no guards there's no fighting they even have their own coffee pot and it was a sense of liberation homeless for out of prison. In that moment, Angel had lived a hard life. The first time police put him in handcuffs. He was in the third grade in the principal's office by age fourteen, Angel Traded Sixty Bucks in his Super Nintendo for his first gun he ran away from home he joined a gang. And at Seventeen, he was sentenced to thirty years in prison for armed robbery and gang related shootings, and it's in his first year in prison that he gets that job in the library and as he begins to study the law there, he starts to feel something that he's never really felt before like maybe he has plans I liked it because it allowed me to challenge the system in a legal way I. always there was never a challenge. The police stopped me I can't do. Nothing about that. They slap me a candle nothing about that and the law gave me an avenue that says, no, you could challenge it. Angel starts working on a paralegal certificate and as he's studying, he starts to think wait this is dot as hard. As I thought, it would be learning the laws like how what lawyers charge so much. It doesn't take much to learn to do this and most of the forms are refilled. What is going on here I thought it was a scam. This esoteric thing that I thought only geniuses knew I could get it. Either genius or they're not and I said Madiba ever got how could I be a lawyer but then he thinks Oh wait with even let me be a lawyer with a felony conviction. He looks into it and the answer in Florida is probably not or at least it would be very hard I. He'd have to beg the governor for clemency, which is almost never granted and then angel learns he's also lost a bunch of other rights. Because of his felony learned that in Florida, you're voting rights you're right to sit on during your rights rump up public office for life. It's losing the right to vote that really stinks for Angel. He's like hold up I can't vote ever like, I'm seventeen years old I've never even had the right to vote, and now you're telling me that for the rest of my life I, just get no say as a citizen of this democracy. Which is true. Of course, not just for Angel. There are about one point, four, million people with felony convictions in Florida one in ten adults with a felony conviction more than one in five African Americans. They what? But that's something that will come from some other countries like my family they come from Venezuela and Cuba there you see the government trying to imprison people and then use the law to take away people's political power but not in the United States. Hello, and welcome to planet money I'm Karen Defend taking away the political power of one point four million people is. A big deal anywhere. But especially in Florida Florida is a state that can swing presidential elections like the one happening just next week and elections in Florida usually come down too much less than even a million People Hillary Clinton lost Florida in two thousand, sixteen by one hundred, twelve, thousand votes in two thousand George Bush won by just five, hundred and thirty seven. Today on the show Angel Sanchez sets out to get the right to vote back for himself and for the one point, four million others like him in Florida. Which works? Until the fight stopped being about voting rights and started to become about money.

Angel Sanchez Florida Florida Florida Angel Law Library NPR Soto Correctional Institution Hillary Clinton Madiba Nintendo George Bush Principal Karen Defend United States Venezuela Cuba
Southwest Airlines to Challenge Rivals at O'Hare and in Houston

Hugh Hewitt

00:38 sec | 7 months ago

Southwest Airlines to Challenge Rivals at O'Hare and in Houston

"Southwest Airlines taking aim at competitors in a couple of major markets. Southwest will expand in Houston and Chicago by starting flights to those cities largest airports, stepping up its head to head competition against bigger airlines. Southwest already serve smaller airports in both cities Hobby in Houston and Midway in Chicago. The airline says it expects to return to Houston George Bush Intercontinental, where United is the dominant carrier. And launch service in Chicago's O'Hare International Airport, where both United and American Airlines have major operations in the first half of next year. The move comes is the airline's struggles with a steep drop in travel during the Corona virus

Southwest Airlines Chicago Southwest Houston George Bush Interconti Houston American Airlines O'hare International Airport United
Southwest Airlines to expand in Houston, Chicago in 2021

America First

00:38 sec | 7 months ago

Southwest Airlines to expand in Houston, Chicago in 2021

"Airlines is taking aimed at competitors have big airports in Houston in Chicago, Southwest will expand in Houston and Chicago by starting flights to those cities Largest airports. Stepping up its head to head competition against bigger airlines. Southwest already serve smaller airports in both cities Hobby in Houston and Midway in Chicago Airline says it expects to return to Houston George Bush Intercontinental, where United is the dominant carrier. And launch service at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport, where both United and American Airlines have major operations in the first half of next year. The move comes is the airline's struggles with a steep drop in travel during the Corona virus pandemic.

Houston Chicago Airline Chicago Houston George Bush Interconti American Airlines Southwest O'hare International Airport United
TSA officers at Houston’s George Bush Intercontinental Airport find 8 guns over one-week period

Sean Hannity

00:30 sec | 7 months ago

TSA officers at Houston’s George Bush Intercontinental Airport find 8 guns over one-week period

"Security Agency detail at Bush Intercontinental Airport is real, reporting the discovery of eight guns inside luggage in just one week, six of the eight handguns were loaded. The eight guns are among 92 that have been found at the airport. This here. Juan Sanchez, federal security director at Bush says most of the people who had guns in their carry on bags Hey, They forgot they were there, he says. That's no excuse Firearms on Ly allowed on flights if they're unloaded inside checked bags and declared at check in.

Bush Intercontinental Airport Bush Juan Sanchez LY Director
Ep. 008: Hedrick Smith talks grassroots democratic reform & reclaiming the American Dream - burst 02

Citizen Reformers

02:00 min | 10 months ago

Ep. 008: Hedrick Smith talks grassroots democratic reform & reclaiming the American Dream - burst 02

"Edrich. How did we get here? Well you know I have to tell him like eleven following American Politics American economics for about five decades and I really watched both the political system and the economic system victory over that time in economics, the things really began to change in the eighties early eighties. From World War Two until the end of the seventies. When the economy grew the middle class standard of living rose with it. You can see him almost move in tandem all levels of society moved up together but then we started to get what they call shareholder capitalism maximum return to shareholders. Wages tended to get frozen. They got stagnant. The middle class of living deteriorated wealth got concentrated. The top one percents the top point went percents top point zero, zero, one percent, and then you had a bunch that happened in the economy partly because of shareholder capitalism, we can talk about that. But also because of the way the tax system was changed huge tax cuts. Under Ronald Reagan under George Bush on Donald Trump for the wealthy added about five trillion dollars five trillion dollars to the wealth of the people at the top end added to the insecurity of the middle class people not knowing whether or not. They could afford their retirement, send their kids to college of for their homes, make it from month to month, and at the same time that was happening a lot of that money was spilling into the political system. So you had the increase. Influence of mega donors, corporate money, and billionaire money particularly since the Citizens United Decision in January twenty ten by the Supreme Court which has given just a free pass to unlimited amounts of money and you've seen the amount of money skyrocket wing go into that. and. That's really affected the political system and the other thing is the party differences have hardened.

Ronald Reagan Supreme Court Donald Trump George Bush
Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

Between The Lines

28:17 min | 10 months ago

Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

"Tom Switzer, he and welcome to another episode off between the lines now today on the program will be commemorating the twenty fifth anniversary of Europe's worst massacre since the Holocaust in ninety, ninety, five more than eight thousand people died in Shrimp Nitsa. The town was supposed to be a U N protected safe haven in the vicious civil war that tore Yugoslav apart instead the civilians ended up being massacred by Bosnian Serbs. Were lightning fast with their superior weapons. They easily overran the lightly. I'm Bosnian government troops and the token full civilian peacekeepers. The UN's Valley to protect the civilians inspired Washington to launch unilateral action against Serbia and end the civil war. Would things be the same today now? That's later in the program, but first defense. Last week the Morrison. Government launched a defence strategy and force structure review now the move signals a major shift away from the strategy outlined in the last defence white paper. Remember that just four years ago in two thousand sixteen. It plotted out Australia's strategic costs for the next decade. But that White Paper has as we know been rapidly overtaken by Vince covert China or that now the new review has promised two hundred and seventy billion dollars over the next decade to enhance Australia's defence capabilities with renewed focus on areas like Saba and spice capabilities and the possible development of hop sonic weapons will be fitting aircraft with long-range anti-ship missiles, increasing underwater surveillance and boosting fuel ammunitions reserves. Now, underscoring the seriousness of the shift, the Prime Minister even drew comparisons to the nineteen thirties and the lead up to world. War Two that period of the nineteen thirties. Is Been Something I've been revisiting on a very regular basis and when you connect by the economic challenges and the global uncertainty. It can be very haunting, but is the money too much or not enough is going to all the right places, and we'll do enough to safeguard Australia from China's increasing assertiveness and is rapidly growing military capabilities. What's the role of Australia's diplomacy? And all of this will joining me to discuss this at three distinguished guests. By skill is professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University Holiday Bites. Thank you good to be here Melissa Conley. Tar is a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. Hi There Melissa could to speak again Tom. And Pay. The Jennings is executive director of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute. Tom No. Can you talk us through the top of scenarios and potential conflicts that the defense review is preparing us for the scenario that the review is focusing on is one involving a high end conventional conflict, so I've gone to the days of stabilization operations in t more Counterterrorism operations in Afghanistan This document is preparing foresight on onsite conflict. Involving countries that have sophisticated military forces. And, of course, the document doesn't say. I don't think it would be reasonable to expect it to say. That China is the problem. But let me tell you China is the problem that is the now neoplasia competitive that way of thinking about when we think about what's adequate in terms of the topic of military capability we need to have. and to does reflect to change. From past years Tom I recall when I started by defense career, we were thinking much more about the risks presented by Indonesia, and the so called low level in cushions in the northwest. Of course, that's no longer features in anyone's strategic thinking. Really it's about China and the risks that the People's Republic is presenting to all of its neighbors in abroad since in the Indo Pacific region and beyond I cabinet crudely putting it some sites laying the groundwork for fortress Australia US sign. This is preparing us to join a potential use LID. Containment slash war against China for example to protect Taiwan Peter Jennings. I think that is it covers a spectrum of possibilities. One possibility which I think is Epson you were in terms of language of the document is that we might conceivably end up having to face military conflict without being able to rely on the direct combat support of the United States, and that's what leads to discussions around extra stockpiling munitions and fuel insightful. But I think in general terms. Yes, the expectation is that Australia. Through its history has been a country that forms coalitions usually have like minded partners, the share the same types of objectives. And the the plan will design the Defense Force. Really gives us the capacity to do that with Rachel Ellis lecture, example, Japan but also with our traditional ally the United States okay bates skill. You've recently completed a review of China's defense capabilities and its recent military modernization, specifically looking at the implications for Australia Wind you expect the Peo- The People's Liberation Army and its navy. When do you expect them to have the capability to project power as far as Australia annual Pacific knives, well in many respects Tom, they already can I mean they have the long range missile capabilities to do that? Know as a from a standoff position launched from their own from their own homeland against hours. But what I think, the the new strategy is looking at is really the development of capability over the next ten fifteen twenty years, and that's by the Chinese own own acknowledged calendar that they would be able to by that time of mass, a large enough capability, both in terms of its long range strike, you know striking from their own homeland, but also bill to project. Project Power passed the so-called first and second island change and being a position to more directly threatened through those platforms Australian security. So you know we're talking ten or fifteen year window here and I think given the time it does take to try and respond to develop the the deterrent and defense capabilities for Australia. That's that's you know that's in some ways a short window. for Australia to be mobilizing in reaction Melissa Tali. What's the role of a strong diplomacy and all these well I think it needs to be growl. And one of the concerns when we look at the deteriorating strategic environment is we think all that's a defense problem? And so when the prime minister launches the strategic update with those comparisons with the nineteen thirties. It pushes US toward seeing in purely military terms but we don't just want to say things in that security lands, we want to think about all of the parts about national power projection, so that's diplomacy and development as well as defense I think if if people thought about it I think what we invest in all three strongly, but that's not where it is if you look at federal budget fifty. Fifty nine billion to defense and less than seven billion to diplomacy and development together the lowest point with ahead in our history and I think we missing that opportunity. If we don't take US seriously, the way that diplomacy and development can shape things in the world so I was struck. Today was a defendant looking at the latest poll on what are the major concerns that Australians have at the moment of the top threats in the world and the first five, a role nontraditional that drought, environment, disaster, climate change, pandemics, and downtown, global economy, and those places where you know military spending isn't going to help shape that environment. So we need to have an effect on those. We need to be thinking much more about what we can do in the diplomacy and development to mind Peter Jennings. What would you say in to Melissa's observations? Because they reflect a certain mindset that that perhaps we should be focused more on non state actors rather than say China for instance well, I think all of these you know threats that have to be taken seriously. I'm and simply because we're living in the middle of a pandemic for example, doesn't the climate change is gone away in this no longer going to present a problem to us. I guess what I'd say. Is that the you know the five things Melissa listed? That were in the featured in the low e Poland terms of popular concerns. Are also the things which could. In different ways late to the risks of conflict escalating in the Indo Pacific region generally so You know my my view, please while I would like to see spending on diplomacy increased. While I. Say Development Assistance is being something which is effectively the United soft in of Australian power, and the military is the hot end of Australian power. I think. The message against all of these areas is that we have just been underinvesting for decades underinvesting for decades, so we're we're all. High fiving ourselves at just reaching about two percent of gross national product, being spent on defense, but that is compared to what we spending in cold or years, which was sometimes between three and a half percent in four percent of rustic product. So what we have grown used to Tom I would say is. Free written on the United. States code tiles of security for for decades. We've dramatically under. Invested in the things that we need to do to strengthen Australia's position, not just militarily, but also diplomat. A now. We're rather surprised to hear the news that Gosh the bill is a lot more expensive than we really thought. It was only if you've got that confidence in the US. and. In fact, the whole trump stories, the story of the Americans really big being fed up with the rest of the world, thinking that the US can fund the bill for their security, so we're going to have to do more and I think we're going to have to do it against multiplicity of areas not. Justin sought the defense organization. We'll some scholars such as you want and James Current from the University of Sydney. They say that this document sounds a lot like an acknowledgement that the US might not always be there to help us out. By are we starting to plan for more independent Australian defense posture I think it would be a wise move to keep that option open when you think of the capabilities that the Chinese developing in which do have a direct pose a direct threat to Australia or could do so. In many respects, the I think the types of threats that you might not expect an immediate or even timely response on the part of the United States what I'm thinking here. Cyber capabilities is a huge priority for the Chinese. We already know what they see the sort of capability. They can wield against Australia and that's not the sort of thing you can expect a kind of cavalry to. Lead the charge from from Washington to come to Australia's defence slowly long range strike capability on the part of the Chinese capability. They already have in which are going to continue to develop. which could threaten Australia down the road now? These are capabilities that I think that Australia's going to have to develop their own defenses for. They can certainly do that with United States, but again it's not necessarily the sort of threat that we would expect some sort of traditional ally joint response not to make it well. Some of are in listeners will email me and they'll say that if Uncle Sam struggles to police. It's own CDs. Melissa. How on Earth Can Uncle Sam Police? The Asia Pacific region in the face of a rising China. What's your sense about us staying power in the next decade or two in look? It's difficult One of the things that strategic update looks at is more threats to the global rules order, and unfortunately the you know, the US is part of that. the US is not along with the strategies interest on things like global trading system, and a number of international issues like global health where we would say you need to be supporting. A Global Response that said I don't think the strategic update will be read negatively in. Washington, it's my guess. it very clearly couched in terms that I think the US will lock about Australia contributing more and having more self. that could be seen as a statement that we think that the US might not have outback, but can also be seen as something that the US has been for for a long time. I particularly liked a few elements of the update things like making sure that we have. You know material ammunition You know that aren't going to be disrupted. Buckle supply trying having more capability eight industrial cut suffering capability here antiques fuel reserves, which is not as long sane as an issue for us, so I mean those are things that are worth investing in. Regardless of US resolve because as we've seen from COVID, we know that supply chain can be disrupted very quickly and easily, and it's worth having eligibilities. Cepeda Jennings bite skill and Melissa Conley Toilet and Melissa. The Pacific step up last year. That realigned Australia's development budget to deal with some of the strategic challenges posed by China in the Pacific Do you think it goes far enough? The step up was followed recently by strategies new International Development Policy Partnerships for recovery, and that's made it very clear that strategies focus should be on the Pacific and also southeast. Asia including. Indonesia and team August. I think that has a very clear statement about what we want. In the region of being entrusted trusted development partner and influencing those societies that we think positive for four region. Again you're going to. You're going to say you. Hear this from me all the time, but again the problem is that we not really making much invasive lunch, so partnerships for recovery head no new money it talked about the massive challenges that covered as as creating for for the for the Pacific, and for for our region broadly, and the only funding announcement was that we're going to repurpose the money. We would have spent on sending Australian. Volunteers in scholarship holders. And we're GONNA use that so I I suppose I. Feel a little bit with all the areas, not actually include district update in that as well that what we've seen through the foreign policy, White Paper and International Development Policy through to to the defense. Strategic Updike is. We talk about how. how? What a time! These these frosty leaving a contested difficult awful environment that we've now got to leave in and the Dow L. Easy Times over, and then we say, and we're not gonNA. Give any new money so I mean the defense announcement is essentially just that we're going to continue to you know, extrapolate out the money that was planned to be spent in the twenty twenty six, and we're going to extrapolate that out to twenty thirty terabytes skill. Do we risk getting into a bidding war for influence in the Pacific? I don't know if it's a risk. If it is a risk worth worth taking. I mean obviously the Pacific region is so extremely important Australia's future. Both for for defense reasons for regional engagement for diplomatic reasons, developing reasons and the like. so It's quite possible that we're entering in a more competitive phase with China in this. SITES WRIST BYTES I'm talking about more the budgetary concerns he because in the wake of the Corona Virus Crosses. There'll be serious limits on how we can spend on these things scholley. Yes, there is and party left to be be developed for that, but you know when you're talking about your own backyard. I mean I I. I don't think it's the kind of country that can simply. Pretended it's by itself getting back pay to Jennings to the region, generally in the rise of what. Angus Campbell is of the Defence Force he's talked about the rise of political warfare, the idea of grey zone warfare things like cyber attacks, economic coercion influence operations that fall below the traditional threshold of war. He says we need a whole of government response to it. I, you seeing that whole of government approach happening in Campbell, or is this Manley focus on defense and the spy agency so far Peter Jennings. It probably is focused on the national security agency's Tom. That's not too surprising because you'd expect them to sort of pick up on the risks I. But General Campbell is right. It does need to be all government is. There's a whole lot of things happening there that simply cannot and should not be done by defense organizations. and. I think that realization is slowly dawning. Along as both of the speakers have said that actually ladyship comes with cost of infrastructure is going to play that role, but you know, give you a small example of this we. We have lost the ability to broadcast into the South Pacific and Southeast Asia. In a way that we used to very successfully over over decades to give us the capacity to do that. We're probably talking about you know that. He million a year forty million a year, which sounds a lot of defend. It's nothing if you're in the Defense Department. Let me tell you. But you need to be able to do things like that. To be the truth teller in the region to actually tell the region that there are alternatives to Chinese Communist Party authoritarianism I think that's what's needed with responding to this grey zone on threat. Is Actually to be the truth teller. In this part of the will and getting our system in Cambridge used to that reality to understanding what needs to be done. To starting at different type of conversation with our region. With our own people for that matter that that is a sort of a psychological change which I can see happening, but we're not quite yet. There's a bit of work still to be done to get to that point Melissa. Conley Tyler. Is, just responding on that. I agree entirely with what pitcher saying on on broadcasting. It's a small investment, such a an increasing influence. It should be Brian and I hope that did that's being seen. I think having defense voices. I will help a lot in a banks, seriously I'm but just went. When you ask Tom Balaton host government and what's happening there? There are some really good examples, so for example win. This Pacific step pop started an office of the Pacific was established in that apartment and tried and each job. He's to be that coordinating body, and it's bringing together the. The defense, the development and the diplomacy in a way that he's gone to maximize our influence. and I've noticed this a lot more discussion about that that three. How do you bring defense development diplomacy communities together? I'm involved in initiate the Pacific. Four Day and I think a lot of people not talking about what more we can do for that that joined up coordination to make the most about national instruments by skill. You're an expert on China. The elephant in the room of course is China doing need to be careful not to overestimate China's military strength. What about the weaknesses? Exactly right I mean you have to know your enemy's weakness as well as their strengths in the case of China, they are undertaking enormous reforming organization effort. They're pouring billions of dollars into new capabilities, but there's a lot of things we need to recognize I. Mean One is that the Chinese have not fought a shooting war and more than forty years. They are have no. They have zero experience in high end combat against a serious. Adversary, scenario, so that's not to downplay them, but to understand that they've got enormous obstacles to overcome that day. Themselves acknowledge that they themselves. No, they have to overcome, and that's why we had this window that we've been talking about. A fifteen to twenty years. to try and develop capabilities to get in front of the kinds of things that the Chinese want to bring to bear around. Around, twenty thirty or twenty, thirty, five, twenty, forty, paid-up Melissa to be continued. Thanks so much for being on our in. Thank you, tell my pleasure. Thank you, Tom. That was paid jennings. He's executive director of the Australian strategic pulsing suit by skill professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University and Melissa Commonly Tyler. She's a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. These between the lines with Tom Switzer. Coming next, we're going to replay a version of a segment from between the lines. I 'cause commemorating the massacre of Bosnian Muslims at shredded Nitsa on the eleventh of July nodding ninety. Five twenty five years ago this week. More than eight thousand people were killed by Serb forces. It was the worst massacre. Europe had seen since the Holocaust. Serve softening up Trevor Nature for the army's final push into the town. Town of course was supposed to be a safe haven protected by the United Nations, but the civilians ended up being sitting ducks as I woke Larry. Hollingsworth Remembers I. Myself Feel Devastated and ashamed I was there with them? When we told them that it was a safe haven I watched. Many of these people walk in with the minimal possessions into shreds, knowing that it was a safe haven, and now they're fleeing out because we've let them down, let them down to the extent that within dies. About Twenty three thousand women and children were deported, and about eight thousand Muslim men and boys left behind where executed and buried in mass graves. Now, reports from the time described, frightening scenes stiffen overawed from medicines on frontier. Speaking he. Loading some of the children and women into buses, but there's no indication as to where it was buses, going with seen some horrifying streaming, going on women and children going into the buses being taken away from their family This was going on with a lot of crying a lot of panicking. The slaughter had been planned carefully and executed with precision. All the wall Dutch. Pace is literally stood by, and did nothing indeed even when the Serb assault on Srebrenica was imminent. in-command is still rejected Kohl's racetracks. Positions. Pope John Paul. The second declared ribbon Nitsa a defeat for civilization as media reports begins to reveal the scale of the unfolding tragedy. The UN says nine hundred thousand people are still unaccounted for. About some became clear as government soldiers emerging from the forest in central Bosnia, told of horrific massacres at the hands of the Serbs one young. People executing them on spot, but this didn't come out of the blue. By the time this massacre took place the civil war that tore the former Yugoslavia. Repot was heading into its fourth year. More than a million people have been displaced, and the world became familiar with a new term ethnic cleansing. So? Who is to blame for these well? Let's start with the United. Nations from ninety two to ninety, five shrivel Nitsa was the world's first union declared civilian syphon. It was supposed to to her aggression. It was supposed to aggression and set the scene for political negotiations to end hostilities between the Bosnian Serbs, and Muslims, but the UN soldiers in the SIPHONS. They were bedeviled by problems. If you declare an area safe haven in the name of the United Nations. Nations if you tell the people if they are safe in the name of the United Nations you have got to put the troops on the ground, and it's no good for politicians say yes, we go for safe havens, but we're not gonNA put the troops meanwhile the Europeans vacillated and equivocated failing miserably to cope with across at its own back door. America was also reluctant to get involved as then President George Bush senior explained in Nani Nani to. I? Something because I learned something from Vietnam. I am not going to commit US forces until I know what the mission is to the military. Tell me that it can be completed until I know how they can come out. You have ancient rivalries that have cropped up as as Yugoslavia's dissolved or getting dissolved, and it isn't going to be solved by sending in the eighty second airborne, and although on the campaign trail that Ye Bill Clinton pledged to reverse the appeasement of that bushes of Belgrade as President Clinton allowed the Balkans to bleed for three more years. French President Jacques Chirac was moved to declare quote, the position of the leader of the free world vacant. Trinite Sur changed all that having done nothing the before during the mass killings in Rwanda Clinton was galvanized into action, and crucially he cut the United Nations out of the Decision Chine on August thirty Washington led a night bombing campaign against the Serbs the NATO action began early this morning. The harsh light of fires and explosions coloring the night sky. Some people watched the bombardment from their houses, but after more than ten thousand deaths here in the last three years, most Sarajevans had given up any hope of outside intervention. Last night it came on a scale which could yet change the course of this war by the end of not ninety five sixty thousand nine hundred troops, including twenty thousand Americans were on the ground in Bosnia. Pace was declared. The BOEKEN's wars ended only because the US finally acted. He's President Clinton in November ninety five my fellow Americans in this new era there are still times when America and America alone can and should make the difference for peace. The terrible war in Bosnia is such a case nowhere. Today is the need for American leadership. More stark are more immediate than in. In Bosnia in the years since the Mexica Europe inaction was heavily criticised, and the US was held up for its global leadership in particular for its unilateral humanitarian intervention. This is when the US secretary. Of State. Madeleine Albright said America was the indispensable nation, and that idea would fade into the justification of the Iraq invasion in two thousand and three as a war of liberation, but he's a question with the US intervene. If the shrivel Nitsa massacre happened today from the standpoint of twenty twenty, we might ask if the era of US unilateral humanitarian intervention is well and truly over. Well, that's it for this week. Show remember if you'd like to hear the episode again or download segments since two thousand fourteen. Just go to ABC. Dot Net dot US slash aren and follow the prompts to between the lines, or you can listen via the ABC. Listen APP, or wherever you get your podcast. You can even subscribe, so you never miss an episode. I'm Tom Switzer continue next week.

Australia China United States Melissa Peter Jennings Pacific Tom Switzer Washington TOM Bosnia UN United Nations Prime Minister Europe Melissa Conley Professor Of Asia Pacific Secu Indonesia Asia Institute
A Conversation With Country Star Mickey Guyton

1A

05:39 min | 11 months ago

A Conversation With Country Star Mickey Guyton

"Star Mickey gotten about the state of the genre, and her new single black like me. So, Mickey, we have this tweet from Ric Ward, Who says, I think the lines of country music get blurred. What makes it country I thought the little Naz Exxon Old Town Road was country, but it was kicked off the country charts and before you answer, let me just remind listeners. The old town road Song was a major hit, and it debuted on Billboard's Hot 100 chart and the Hot Countries Songs chart. But then Billboard removed Old Town Road from the list of hot country songs and informed Columbia Records. That's laws Exes label that his Inclusion in that list was a mistake. What do you make of that battle over what is and what is not country music like an answer you that question right now, the whole over the last Eight years I have been hearing Trot beats an army melodies and country music and I've seen men wearing flat billed hats and Timberlands. And Doing a lot of what black culture does. So that is where the lines have gotten blurred and It has been Kind of frustrating for me because As a black woman who has grown up on that music. It was just very odd to me that they would call Little Naz Exxon, not country, but everything else is country. From other men, and that was a huge Dilemma for me. I had a really hard time. Writing songs myself because What was considered country for some people wasn't considered country for me. And that's where the lines have been drawn are blurred. Do you think that line has been drawn based on race that if a white artist had done old town road, it would have stayed in the country charts. I am. Because it wasn't an artist. I don't want to say absolutely. Yes, but I think that would have been a huge factor. Yes. This is something that you have without naming names. You have called out others in your industry for and I again want to go back to this interview that you did You said. I've been called the n word within this industry on DH. If you don't say something, it's saying that you don't care about me that I don't belong. Here is what that says to me. Yeah. What? What do you want your fellow artists in country music to say, I want them to say that they support black lives. Period. Saying you support black lives isn't saying you don't support Blue lives. It's not saying that you don't support all lives. When you don't say that there are black people. There are very few black people within this industry that air trying to find their footing within this industry. And if you're saying your acceptance of us You're not. And you're not saying that. That's how I feel. And I was very nervous when blackout Tuesday happened. I was terrified. I didn't know. If anybody was goingto say they support black lives because I understand that it's scary, especially with in country music because we don't typically express Our opinions on anything. And at that moment, it was more important. To rock the boat and say that you support black lives to let people know within the industry that we matter. Because there's been so many times that we haven't There's been times where I've been at a concert in Sol Confederate flags. Flown waving in my face. And I felt very alone in those moments. And this was a moment and a chance in a time for them to show that racism is not accepted within the country Community period. This is something that you have been grappling with. For most of your life. It seems like you grew up in mostly white neighborhoods in Texas. Yeah, why did you end up going to private school? I went to private school because I grew up and lived in Crawford, Texas. And where I lived in Crawford, Texas. Former Gore governor at the time was Governor George Bush's ranch was right next to my subdivision. And the school that I was supposed to go out there didn't want black kids to go to that school. So my parents had to work to put me in private schools and even in private schools, I still experience racism. There was a time I remember the map of Africa was pulled down and one of my private schools Trinity Lutheran. And two little white kids were saying In a different way. And I remember looking at my teacher and I still don't even understand what that meant. But I knew it was a word that we're not supposed to say. And the teacher didn't chastise them. She just said it's actually pronounced and that was it. Yeah, that's a lot. Luke Tweets. Keep doing you, Mickey. Music is beautiful, and so are you. You're just adding to that beauty of it. Don't stop. Don't ever

Mickey Governor George Bush Texas Ric Ward Crawford Trot Columbia Records Luke Tweets Blue Africa Gore Trinity Lutheran
Trump campaign blames protesters and media for disappointing turnout

Ken Broo

01:14 min | 11 months ago

Trump campaign blames protesters and media for disappointing turnout

"Breaking now president trump held his first campaign rally in three months in Tulsa yesterday to a smaller crowd of supporters and expected most breaking the CDC guidelines packed together without masks in the city with the recent spike of the deadly disease caused a lot of worry A. B. C.'s tie at hen Hernandez reports the president also took aim at the presumptive democratic nominee Joe Biden and the supreme court's decision overturning trump's actions on daca something president still considered a victory basically said you want what you have to come back and re do it it's almost like she come on back your paper work was no good but we're gonna be refiling Saturday's rally wasn't as heavily attended as the trump campaign had promised for the past few weeks the trump campaign blamed lower turnout on radical protesters and the media okay then did get hit with a cease and desist order for using the song I won't back down by Tom Petty at the rally the family said in a statement last night saying that petty who died two and a half years ago I would never want a song of his use for campaign of hate before he died petty said cease and desist orders to president George bush and senator John McCain to stop that song from being used

Donald Trump Tulsa A. B. C. President Trump Joe Biden Tom Petty George Bush John Mccain CDC Hen Hernandez Senator
Bush: 'It is time for America to examine our tragic failures'

Chris Krok

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Bush: 'It is time for America to examine our tragic failures'

"Former president George Bush has issued a statement in regards to the state of the country surrounding the killing of George Floyd while in Minneapolis police custody bush says he and his wife Laura have chosen to remain silent this long because quote this is not the time for us to lecture it is time for us to listen it is time for America to examine our truck examine our tragic failures as we do we will also see some of our redeeming strengths in the statement bush commands those peacefully protesting over the death of George Floyd and racial injustice while also criticizing those to

George Bush George Floyd Laura America President Trump Minneapolis
"george w bush" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

First Class Fatherhood

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"george w bush" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

"But really I mean, I just IMF assize in in some of the athletes I had a chance to play with that eventually played in major league baseball. They played every every sport under the sun. So I'm just incur. Urging them to to try a little bit of everything. Very cool. All right, George, please take a minute here. Just to hit my listeners a little bit about your background, and what you do. Absolutely. So of my name is George people. A lot of people know me as the the grandson of George H W Bush or nephew, George W Bush or the son Jeb Bush, but really on my own man, and and the privilege service Texas land Commissioner here in the state of Texas. So we deal with everything from veterans affairs, a military veteran we deal with school funding by managing the state's assets. And we also take care of the wonders history of our state, including the Alamo. So I think like many politicians I've got a a really difficult schedule. But what I try to do is spend as much time on the home front as possible because I think it's important for the voices. Either. Dad, more often than not. Yeah. Very well said thank you for your service. How old were you? When you became a father, George and how. To becoming a dad kind of change your perspective on life, though. I'm I'm about to turn forty three my wife, and I've been married for coming up on fifteen years, and we really had kids a little bit later in life. I was thirty eight when we first had Prescott part of that was because of my military service, my wife, and I we're just it would it was just challenging to try to have children in the middle of military mobilizations. And so after my last levels ation to Afghanistan and twenty seven when I came back, my wife, and I decided we would take that next step and take on the commitment of of Parenthoods. And so, you know, so if you ask for to just a few years back with press, gone, jackets, it's really changed my life, and and such an incredible way forced me to be humble and hungry to know that you know, other lives, depend on me. But it allows me to. To shape their future, and and to be a mentor, which you know, I've enjoyed as a big brother over the years, but I I'm enjoying on a much much more closer level as the father. And it's it's tested me. I think any father can speak to that. It's certainly tests your patience, but I've become so much better of a person through this process. And I just look forward to the next few years. Well said yeah, it is definitely an on the job type of training here. With a lot of girls for sure did the experience of growing up in the Bush family and being in the public eye that have any influence on the way that you choose to raise your kids. It absolutely did because you know, again of the rigorous schedule, and I talked about this when my grandfather, George H W Bush recently passed and Houston, Texas, and I I gave a eulogy, and I gave it really from the perspective as his oldest grandson. And that here he was the leader of the free world. But yet he took time to write. Personally and written notes. He always invited me to baseball games. Made sure that we carried on traditions like throwing horse shoes and enjoying Tex Mex and barbecue at his place. And so I I've always tried.

George H W Bush baseball Texas Jeb Bush IMF Bush Afghanistan Prescott Commissioner Parenthoods Houston fifteen years
"george w bush" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

12:23 min | 2 years ago

"george w bush" Discussed on 710 WOR

"That was George W Bush at the at the service of his father, George H W Bush, very touching moment. Watch the whole thing. And I thought it went off perfectly, and it was just you you look into somebody. So how do you want to be viewed after you're gone? What do you want to be remembered for we talked to Rhonda Santa's governor of the great state of Florida? How are you, sir? Welcome aboard. What were your interactions with the bushes like? Well, it's interesting, Sean, I was the captain of the Yale baseball team in two thousand and one and that was the three hundredth anniversary of the university. And so they had a big jubilee. And the main speaker was Bush forty one who was writing the only Yale undergrad ever be elected president or one of the few. And so he asked to come out to baseball practice to beat the team. And he just wanted to wish us well wanted to see how we're doing. So I got to introduce them to the rest of the team. I coach pulled me aside before and said, listen, the president's gonna come tell all these knuckleheads don't drop any ass bombs in front of him be respectful. And I'm like, of course, and but he was a very humble guy. And was just interested in how we were doing and really loved his time playing baseball, really loved the sport. And so I never really even met anyone that was famous at that point in my life. And and it was you know, I was like, man. Yeah. This is a good guy. And I've always just thought he was a really good guy. And. When you think about his life when he the most famous picture and yellow flags history is H W Bush has the captain in nineteen forty eight receiving bay Bruce autobiography from the ban beano babe was gonna die six months later. But you have this epic picture of them at Yale field with thousands of people there, and there's this this handoff. And so at that point in in Bush, forty one slice he's playing college baseball. But he already fought in World War Two he joined when he was eighteen. So he was already a bona fide American hero. And it already lived a lot of life by the time. He was playing college baseball. So just a really first class individual. You know, I've known the family of interviewed all of them many many times including Barbara and h w and forty-three many times jab and other extended family members over the years. So I know them very very well. They are what they seem that. They are. They're really good. Honorable hardworking decent people that, you know, have this sense is calling for service, and obviously you have it as well because you're part of the freedom caucus. Now. You're the governor elect to Florida when you get sworn in January eighth. And so from that day forward shot I'm going to be pestered you to move the studio down to Naples. Taxes? So just be ready for that. I wore warned you that during the whole campaign. It's going to happen because I think I I it is the greatest story because all these companies if you read the star ledger at a good piece a while back about this. And there's been other articles written about how there are massive amounts of money wealth, leaving states, like New York and states like Illinois and California and New Jersey, and they're leaving because of the horrific economic environment, the high taxes burdensome regulation. I mean, we saw it out in California recently these horrific fires, and then we find out. Well, there's one hundred and thirty million dead trees that people aren't allowed to cut down that the state is not allow allowing people the even remove the kindling brush when it gets dry. I mean that stuff's flying all over the place, especially if you have a high wind or Santa Ana wind people does no more. For timber industry. They destroyed that to protect whatever species of whatever and what they have done. Now is created an environment where you can't put these fires out anymore and now people are dying. I mean bad government policies. So you see the migration of states like Florida. I really think had Florida gone in the other direction, and you would have elected the mayor of Tallahassee where the worst economic record the worst crime record in his city. I think it would have been a disaster for Florida Cousy was talking about a forty percent corporate tax. And I think you would have seen businesses leaving on a fairly regular basis. Oh, yeah. I mean, I had people who said they were gonna leave out of Florida. I go elsewhere in that and that does happen from time to time. Sometimes people will come to Florida, and sometimes they will move to like North Carolina after they retired or something like that. Now that doesn't happen as much, but there's there's reasons for that. But that would have accelerated I mean, you would have seen a lot of people flee all the people who are looking at potentially coming down here. These businesses would have thought twice and probably would have decided not to do it. So we're in a really good spot because we have a good record of success. I'm gonna continue good policies and can even build off those. I'm gonna get to a point on my first day in office three supreme court justices here in Florida, one of the problems we've had with Florida government for generation has been an activist liberal majority on our supreme court. Well, I get sworn in. I signees judicial appointments and judicial activism is done in Florida. That's going to be good for freedoms. But it's also good for having a good economic. Environment because they would strike down things that the legislature would pass like tort reform because they were siding with basically the liberal interest. And so it was a very political cord, and that's coming to an end very soon. I've got to ask you in light of it's now eighteen years since two thousand and the course, the the recount that took place would swinging in pimple than dimpled and hanging in and perforated chads, and whether that's a voter meant to be abode and over vote and under vote, and you know, here we are almost eleven almost every election year, we have problems in Broward, and Palm Beach counties, and it seems to me that for whatever reason nobody's just stepped in to fix it. Will you have as governor the authority to get a system of voting in Florida that will work where people couldn't? You know, be up to shenanigans are no good. Oh, yeah. So there'd be thing I can do unilaterally, but then they'll probably be an election reform package that we passed in the legislative session, making sure I'm really concerned about what's going on in California with this ballot harvesting, I think that that's prone to fraud. So we wanna make sure that the absentee votes through the mail in Florida have integrity. We wanna make sure those are documented when they come in. Because what Broward was doing supposedly? They would get these ballots in during early voting and some absentee ballots, and they just never even logged at these things are coming in. And then all of a sudden forty eight hours after the election. They start counting that seventy five eight thousand votes that is unacceptable that causes people to lose confidence in the in the resolve I I don't think I I don't think I'm a big fan of, you know, month long voting either. Because I think that lends itself to some type of corruption at some point unless you're going to have a Representative from every party stand watch over the. Ballots twenty four hours a day. And the thing is to Sean with some of this the way, we do the early and absentee, and I'm not sure we're gonna necessarily move away from vote by mail in Florida because it's a lot of people like to do it. I imagine we're going to continue to have some level early voting. But the thing is some of these states you start voting and like the beginning of October my first debate with my opponent and the governor's race wasn't until October twenty first people were already voting before we even had a debate. And so I think that the more you spread out the voting, obviously, you have different issues with administration potential potential for fraud and different areas. But then it's like are we making like one Chris decision as an electorate, and you don't really do that anymore. It's kind of like a rolling process and not all voters have access to the same information when they choose to cast their ballots. So it's just a little different. All right last question. And then we'll let you go. So the three governors that I got to know best in New York were Rick Scott who's now going to be Senator Rick Perry of Texas and. Bobby Jindal when he was the governor of Louisiana. These three governors came up to New York. And I I couldn't believe there were up all the time. And I was always ask them, why are you here? And I thought what are you taking free New York vacations? It was never the case. They were all competing successfully to get an entice and talk to big businesses in New York with their high taxes, burdensome regulation, horrible winners and enticing them to states like Florida where they're going to get a better style lifestyle, and and be able to produce more of their product at a cheaper rate and get much better deals for homes and everything else in between. And so many people have moved down there. I'm probably one of the reasons to those three states don't have a state income tax. Yeah. Exactly. And so what's going to happen? I'll continue that. But I think we can even do it at a greater level because this spring is the first year where people are going to have to sell out there. Tax returns and not be able to deduct state tax state income taxes. And so that's gonna hit a lot of people in New York. It's gonna hit you Sean big time. It's gonna hit people in New Jersey, Connecticut, I lived down there, six months and a day. I can officially be a Florida resident that's right and the amount of money you'll save I mean, you could buy a new house down there. You know, you give a lot of money to charity. You're talking probably getting billions more dollars to charity. I mean, it would be better off for Florida's economy. But I think the money would be better rather than wasted. You know, I'm looking at my host that my whole staff is looking at me. Hey stupid. Why don't you make the move stupid? Telling me what there is right now. John makes them move. You could pay to relocate your stab, you could probably pay for them to have new homes, and you'd still say. One hundred percent. I mean, and that's why the only thing that worries me is you got people from these high tax northeast states, New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, it's happening. People have been leaving states like Michigan and drove, but Illinois, California, they can move to Florida, Texas, but they can't they can't bring their liberal views with them. They've already helped destroy one St.. You don't go down. And and ruined the next state that you're living in I can tell you this from the people that I'm particularly in the mid west the people that moved down from the mid west of Florida. They are really really a strong for us usually Republicans. I mean, we register a lot of transplanted Midwesterners 'cause they tend to go to the southwest part of Florida Naples Fort Myers. Sarasota. And you know, a lot of people from New York kingdom seem to gravitate towards. Oh, yeah. Yeah. But these people get it. And I think that we've had a lot of success with folks coming down from from particularly the midwest, listen, you take away the panhandle, and boy, they came out in huge numbers for you. And you take away southwest Florida. And you got a blue state in Florida. Especially southeast Florida. I four corridor is always up for grabs. That's always a tough spot. Right. Yeah. So, you know, and I actually I did better than most Republicans do in southeast Florida in terms of lowering the margins and we did do good in the panhandle. Now, the the place that got hit by the hurricane. They did come out and vote, you know, pretty good numbers. But they're increase wasn't quite what some of these other counties were and I think the hurricane had a lot to do with it. But and then we held our own in central Florida, south west, Florida where you came for Sean was huge. And then you up in north west Florida forest to those are two huge areas for Republicans, and they came in big for us. All right. Ronda Santa's congrats on being governor. And we're looking forward to every time you're in New York come stop by. And I have no problem with offering better deals for people..

Florida New York California Sean New Jersey George W Bush baseball George H W Bush Yale Florida Naples Fort Myers Broward college baseball Rhonda Santa president Santa Ana Yale field Illinois Naples Bobby Jindal
"george w bush" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

05:25 min | 2 years ago

"george w bush" Discussed on 600 WREC

"About the life and the presidency of George H W Bush to end this segment really wanted to replay. What are other former President George W Bush his son had to say about his father? He spoke about his deep capacity for kindness. How he became a father figure to other leaders in the country. He was sharing a lot of jokes. There was some laughs. And then deep emotion at the end you can hear George Bush breaking up talking about his father at the end. So we'll end with part of the eulogy that George W Bush gave for his father. He had an enormous capacity to give himself. Many person would tell you the dad became a mentor and a father figure in their life. He listened any. He consoled. He was their friend. I think Don Roach Taylor Blanton, Jim Nance, Arnold Schwarzenegger, and perhaps the unlikeliest of all the man who defeated him Bill Clinton. My siblings, and I refer to the guys next group. Brothers from other mothers. He taught us that a day. It was not meant to be wasted. He played golf at a legendary pace. I always wonder why insisted on speed golf. He's a good golfer. Well, here's my conclusion, he played fashion. He could move onto the next. Vent. To enjoy the rest of the day to expand his enormous energy delivered all. He was born with just two settings. Full-throttle then sleep. Taught us what it means to be a wonderful, father, grandfather and great-grandfather. He was firm in his principles and supportive as we began to seek her own ways. He encouraged and. But never steered. We tested his patience. But he always responded with the great gift of unconditional love last Friday when I was told he administered live. I called him. The guy answered the phone study. I think he can hear you. But he hasn't said anything for most of the day. I said. Wonderful father. And the last words he would ever say on earth were. I love you too. Josh was close to perfect, but not totally. His short game was lousy. Exactly Fred Astaire on the dance floor. The man couldn't stomach vegetables. Especially broccoli. And by the way, he passed these genetic defects along. Finally every day of a seventy three years of marriage. Dad taught us all what it means to be a great husband. He married a sweetheart. He he laughed and cried what's her? He was dedicated to her totally. In his old age. Dad enjoyed watching police show reruns. The volume on high. All the while moms hand. After mom died. Dad was strong. But all he really wanted to do was hold moms hand again. Of course, dad taught me no special lesson. He showed me what it means to be a president who served with integrity leaves with courage and with love in his heart for the citizens of our country. When they history books are written. They will say that George H W Bush was a great president of the United States. A diplomat of unmasks Gill. A commander in chief up formidable accomplishment and a gentleman who actually created to do these his office with dignity and honor. In his inaugural address to forty first tresident of the United States said this. We cannot hope only to leave our children a bigger car a bigger Bank account. We must hope to give them a sense of what it means to be a loyal friend, a loving parent a citizen who leaves his home his neighborhood and town better than he found it. What do we want the men and women who work with us to say when we are no longer there? That we're more driven to succeed than anyone around us. Or that we stopped to ask a child had gotten better and state a moment there to trade trader word of friendship. Well, dad, we're gonna remember you for exactly that and much more. And we're gonna miss you your decency. Sincerity and console will stay with us forever. So who are tiers of let us know the blessings of knowing and loving. You are great and noble, man. The best father asserting her daughter..

President George W Bush Dad Bill Clinton United States speed golf Fred Astaire president Don Roach Taylor Blanton unmasks Gill Arnold Schwarzenegger Josh Jim Nance seventy three years
"george w bush" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"george w bush" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"And some of the some of the eulogists, including his own son. Did that as well? So some of that came back, but it was kind of gentle humor, not not cutting humor, and sort of spoke to the way that he was a while accomplished and formidable in many ways was very approachable person. Jerry as many people reflect on the life and legacy of former president, George H W. Bush. Could you share some of your own reflections on how you think he'll be remembered? Well, as I said, I think he is steadily rising in the estimate of both average Americans in historians as time goes on, you know, he lost reelection in large part because voters decided that he hadn't sufficiently tended to the domestic economy. I mean, I he ran for reelection at a time when unemployment was seven percent and above for the entire year. He was running for reelection. And that's a pretty tough road to hoe. And he was blamed for that in retrospect, you know, the economy was rapidly improving. He had made a tough decision to raise taxes, which balance the budget which helped reassure the markets which in turn helped drive. What was what turned out to be both a period of reasonably good economic growth. Economists going at almost four percent when he lost the election. People just didn't feel it yet and a balanced budget. A few years later his record on national security issues is. Is really outstanding. And you know, he put up with both the crisis and TNN square in China, and the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait and extraordinarily unsettled time in the Soviet Union, the Soviet bloc and all those things were handled from the American point of view, successfully. But I think the greatest achievement will entire over time be seen as overseeing the demise of the Soviet Union without a shot being fired. And that was not a foregone conclusion by any stretch of the imagination didn't have to turn out that way of could've been calamitous in. It was peaceful. And I think that's due in large part to George Hw Bush, Jerry as we look ahead and consider the current political climate any final thoughts. One of the interesting things hanging over the ceremony over the crowd. That was there was whether George H W Bush has to be seen as the last of his breed or whether the kind of governance that he tried to execute could be continued which. Just to say we live in a much rougher tougher. More abrasive time, politically, and he tried to stand at least for kind of more civil and unifying dialogue. There was plenty of debate. And you got criticized for saying some potentially divisive things, but by and large it was a more civil time. And he tried to be a more unifying leader who talked about a kinder and gentler country and the question that hung over at all is was he the last of that kind of leader. Or can we go back in that direction again? And who knows we may or may not be able to. But I think his passing at least put that question in the minds of a lot of people Wall Street Journal, executive Washington editor Jerry cyb joining us with his reflections on the life and legacy of the late. Former President George Hw Bush, Jerry, thank you so much for joining us, live pleasure. And that's what's news. I'm Anne Marie for totally in New York for the Wall Street Journal enjoy the what's news podcast. Then try the what's news newsletter. Sign up. Up at WSJ dot com slash newsletters. That's WSJ dot com slash newsletters..

George H W. Bush Jerry cyb President George Hw Bush Soviet Union Wall Street Journal president Anne Marie New York China Kuwait executive editor Washington seven percent four percent
"george w bush" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"george w bush" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"The nation paid tribute to former President George Hw Bush on Wednesday with President Trump declaring a national day of mourning for his funeral services. The forty first president was eulogized by among others, his son. Former President George W Bush course, dad taught me a no special lesson. He showed me what it means to be a president who served with integrity leaves with courage and with love in his heart for the citizens of our country. When they history books are written. They will say that George H W Bush was a great president of the United States. A diplomat of unmasks killed a commander in chief of formidable accomplishment and a gentleman who executed to do these of his office with dignity and honour Wall Street Journal executive Washington editor Jerry Cy who covered the late president's term in office attended his funeral services on Wednesday. He joins us now to reflect on the life and legacy of former president, George H W Bush, Jerry, thank you so much for joining us. And for those of us who watched the ceremonies at home or at work on Wednesday. I wonder if you can start by just giving us a sense of what it was like to be there at the Washington National cathedral to witness this in person. Well, it was first of all a remarkable crowd that gathered there, you know, you have to remember George H W Bush left office. Quarter century ago twenty more than a quarter century ago in yet you had representatives from all across the world and all across American life there, which I think spoke of the kind of place that he holes in the American memory now, he's he's appreciated more. Now, I think it's fair to say, then he was when he left office, and that's true around the world you had Brian Mulroney. The former prime minister of Canada was eulogised because they became great friends. You had the Prince Charles of the United Kingdom there. You had the king of Jordan. You had the current German prime minister, and you had a whole assemblage of Americans of of significance in substance over the last thirty or forty years all gathered there, so I guess the first thing that struck me was there's only one man who could have brought this crowd together. And that's probably George H W Bush. The second thing that struck me was, you know, George Bush forty first president came to the Oval Office with maybe the best resume anybody's every carried into the Oval Office. He was vice president he was head of the CIA. Use UN ambassador. He was on voided China. He was a member of congress. He had run the Republican party. He was a successful businessman, and he had by most accounts an extraordinarily successful presidency. Lease on the foreign policy front. He oversaw the end of the Cold War, the unification of Germany and a successful Persian Gulf war, yet almost all the conversation. And almost all the eulogizing was about the kind of guy. He was in this word that former President George W Bush used in the clip we heard at the outset here decency. You kept hearing it over and over again his decency at his civility. And I thought it was striking that at a time. When people think a lot of that has been lost in the political debate. That's the thing that people kept coming back to when talking about George H W Bush and for you having covered his presidency. Were there any other particular moments during the ceremonies that resonated with you? I think it was it was that that he was an easy person to cover. For in the sense that he was approachable and really was kind of an open book, which you saw is what you got. Also, what struck me was the loyalty of the people who worked for him. I mean, all kinds of people that I hadn't seen in years and years made it back for this occasion. Which says something about the the way they felt about him. You know, there were a lot of jokes about things we used to joke about because, you know, reporters who I was White House reporter that. And there are pretty cynical lot. Usually we talked a lot about how he wasn't exactly silver-tongued. He was not the world's greatest public speaker. He would Bank lists words and use malapropisms frequently and we all joked about that and made fun of him for that..

President George Hw Bush President George W Bush president Jerry Cy President Trump prime minister Washington National cathedral Oval Office Republican party Wall Street Journal Brian Mulroney Prince Charles congress United States China United Kingdom Canada UN
"george w bush" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

12:21 min | 2 years ago

"george w bush" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"That was George W Bush at the at the service of his father, George H W Bush, very touching moment. Watch the whole thing. And I thought it went off perfectly, and it was just you look into somebody. So how do you want to be viewed after you're gone? What do you want to be remembered for we talked to Rhonda Santa's governor of the great state of Florida? How are you, sir? Welcome aboard. What were your interactions with the bushes like? Was interesting, Sean, I was the captain of the Yale baseball team in two thousand and one and that was the three hundredth anniversary of the university. And so they had a big jubilee. And the main speaker was Bush forty one who was writing the only Yale undergrad to ever be elected president or one of the few. And so he asked to come out to baseball practice to beat the team. And he just wanted to wish us well wanted to see how we were doing. So I got to introduce them to the rest of the team. I coach pulled me aside before and said, listen, the president's gonna come tell all these knuckleheads don't drop any ass bombs in front of him be respectful. And I'm like, of course, and but he was a very humble guy. And was just interested in how we were doing and really loved his time playing baseball, really loved the sport. And so I had never really even met anyone that was famous at that point in my life. And and it was you know, I was like man, this is a good guy. And I've always thought he was a really good guy. And then when you. Think about his life. When he the most famous picture in yellow flags history is it H W Bush as the captain in nineteen forty eight receiving bay Bruce autobiography from the Bambino babe was gonna die six months later. But you have this epic picture of them at Yale field with thousands of people there, and there's this this handoff. And so at that point in in Bush fly he's playing college baseball, but he already fought in World War Two he joined when he was eighteen. So he was already a bona fide American hero had already lived a lot of life by the time. He was playing college baseball. So just a really first class individual. You know, I've known the family of interviewed all of them many many times including Barbara and h w and forty-three many times and Jabeen and other extended family members over the years. So I know them very very well. They are what they seem that. They are. They're really good. Honorable hardworking decent people that have this sense is calling for service. And obviously you have it as well because you're part of the freedom caucus. Now. You're the governor elect to Florida when you get sworn in January eighth. And so from that day forward shot I'm going to be pestering you to move the studio down to Naples. Taxes? So just be ready for that. I wore warned you that during the whole campaign. It's going to happen because I think I I it is the greatest story because all these companies if you read the star ledger at a good piece awhile back about this. And there's been other articles written about how there are massive amounts of money wealth, leaving states, like New York and states like Illinois and California and New Jersey, and they're leaving because of the horrific economic environment, the high taxes burdensome regulation. I mean, we saw it out in California, recently, you know, these horrific fires, and then we find out. Well, there's one hundred thirty million dead trees that people aren't allowed to cut down that the state is not allow allowing people the even remove the kindling brush when it gets dry. I mean that stuff's flying all over the place, especially if you have a high wind or Santa Ana wind people, there's no more. Timber industry. They destroyed that to protect whatever species of whatever and what they have done. Now is created an environment where you can't put these fires out anymore and now people are dying. I mean bad government policies. So you see the migration of states like Florida. I really think had Florida gone in the other direction, and you would have elected the mayor of Tallahassee where the worst economic record the worst crime record in his city. I think it would have been a disaster for Florida Cousy was talking about a forty percent corporate tax. And I think you would have seen businesses leaving on a fairly regular basis. Oh, yeah. People who said they were gonna leave out of Florida and go elsewhere in that and that does happen from time to time. Sometimes people will come to Florida, and sometimes they will move to like North Carolina after they retired or something like that. And I've doesn't happen as much, but there's there's reasons for that. But that would accelerate it I mean, you would have seen a lot of people flee all the people who are looking at potentially coming down here. These businesses would have thought twice and probably would have decided not to do it. So we're in a really good spot because we have a good record of success. I'm gonna continue good policies and can even build off those. I'm gonna get to a point on my first day in office three supreme court justices here in Florida, one of the problems we've had with Florida government for generation has been an activist liberal majority on our supreme court. Well, I get sworn in. I signees judicial appointments and judicial activism is done in Florida. That's going to be good for freedoms. But it's also good for having a good economic environment because they would strike. Right down things at the legislature would pass like tort reform because they were siding with basically the liberal interests. And so it was a very political cord, and that's coming to an end very soon. I've got to ask you in light of it's now eighteen years since two thousand and of course, the the recount that took place would swinging and pimple than dimpled and hanging in and perforated chads, and whether that's a voter meant to be a vote and over boat and under vote, and you know, here we are almost eleven almost every election year. We have problems in Broward, and Tom beach counties, and it seems to me that for whatever reason nobody's just stepped in to fix it. Will you have as governor the authority to get a system of voting in Florida that will work where people couldn't? You know, be up to shenanigans are no good. Oh, yes. It'd be things I can do unilaterally, but then they'll probably be an election reform package that we passed in the legislative session, making sure I'm really concerned about what's going on in California with this ballot harvesting, I think that that's prone to fraud. So we wanna make sure that the absentee votes through the mail in Florida have integrity. We wanna make sure those are documented when they come in. Because what Broward was doing supposedly? They would get these ballots in during early voting absentee ballots, and they just never even logged at these things are coming in. And then all of a sudden forty eight hours after the election. They start counting the seventy five thousand votes that is unacceptable that causes people to lose confidence in the in the resolve. I don't think I I don't think I'm a big fan of, you know, month long voting either. Because I think that lends itself to some type of corruption at some point unless you're going to have a Representative from every party stand watch over the ballots twenty four hours a day. And the thing is to Sean with some of this the way, we do the early and absentee, and I'm not sure we're going to necessarily move away from vote by mail in Florida 'cause it's a lot of people like to do it. I mean, we're going to continue to have some level early. But the thing is some of these states you start voting and like the beginning of October my first debate with my opponent and the governor's race wasn't until October twenty first people were already voting before we even had a debate. And so I think that the more you spread out the voting, obviously, you have different issues with administration potential potential for fraud in different areas. But then it's like are we making like one Chris decision as an electorate, and you don't really do that anymore. It's kind of like a rolling process and not all voters have the access to the same information when they choose to cast their ballots. So it's just a little different. All right last question. And then we'll let you go. So the three governors that I got to know best in New York were Rick Scott who's now going to be Senator Rick Perry of Texas and Bobby. Jindo when he was the governor of Louisiana. The these three governors came up to New York. And I I couldn't believe there were up all the time. And I was always asked him. Why are you here? And I thought what are you taking free New York vacations? It was never the case. They were all competing successfully to get an entice and talk to big businesses in New York with their high taxes, burdensome regulation, horrible winners and enticing them to states like Florida where they're going to get a better lifestyle, and and be able to produce more of their product at a cheaper rate and get much better deals for homes and everything else in between. And so many people have moved down there that I'm probably one of the reasons to those three states don't have a state income tax. Yeah. Exactly. And so what's going to happen? I'll continue that. But I think we can even do it at a greater level because this spring is the first year where people are going to have to fill out their tax return. And not be able to deduct the state tax state income taxes. And so that's gonna hit a lot of people in New York. It's gonna hit you Sean big time. It's gonna hit people in New Jersey, Connecticut. I live down there. Six months and a day. I can officially be a Florida resident that's right and the amount of money you'll save I mean, you could buy a new house down there. Yeah. I know you give a lot of money to charity. I'm you're talking probably getting billions more dollars to charity. I mean, it would be better off for Florida's economy. But I think the money would be better rather than wasted. You know, I'm not getting my host that my whole staff is looking at me. Hey stupid. Why don't you make the move stupid? That's telling me what there is right now. John make the move you could pay to relocate your stab, you could probably pay for them to have new homes and you'd still save. One hundred percent. I mean, and that's why the only thing that worries me is you got people from these high tax northeast states, New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, it's happening. People have been leaving states like Michigan and drove, but Illinois, California, they can move to Florida, Texas, but they can't they can't bring their liberal views with them. They've already helped destroy one St. don't go down. And and ruined the next state that you're living in I can tell you this from the people that I'm particularly in the midwest. The people that moved down from the mid west of Florida, they are really really a strong for us. Usually at is Republicans. I mean, we register a lot of transplanted Midwesterners because they tend to go to the southwest part of Florida Naples Fort Myers. Sarasota, and you know, with a lot of people from New York Chinden seem to gravitate toward. Oh, yeah. Yeah. But these people get it. And I think that we've had a lot of success with folks coming down from from particularly the midwest, listen, you take away the panhandle, and boy, they came out in huge numbers for you. And you take away southwest Florida. And you got a blue state in Florida, especially southeast Florida. I four corridor is always up for grabs. That's always a tough spot. Right. Yeah. So, you know, and I actually I did better than most Republicans do in southeast Florida in terms of lowering the margins and we did do good in the panhandle. Now the place that got hit by the hurricane. They did come out and vote, you know, pretty good numbers. But they're increase wasn't quite what some of these other counties war. And I think the hurricane had a lot to do with it. But and then we held our own in central Florida, south west, Florida where you came for Sean was huge. And then you up in north west Florida for us to those are two huge areas for Republicans, and they came in big for us. All right. Ronda Santa's congrats on being governor. And we're looking forward to every time you're in New York come stop by. And I have no problem with you offering better deals for people. That's the free market.

Florida New York Sean George H W Bush New Jersey baseball California George W Bush Yale Florida Naples Fort Myers fraud Broward Rhonda Santa college baseball president Santa Ana Yale field Illinois Naples
"george w bush" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

The Andrew Klavan Show

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"george w bush" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

"So you know, you can say, and you would be right that Donald Trump would never have that. Grace to somebody who had criticized them, but you also have to say that the people making fun of Trump, and who have been making fun of George W Bush and making fun of Mitt Romney didn't have that grace either. Their humor was a lot meaner and more even more one-sided than SNL has been all these years and comedy has been all these years back in those days. They actually told jokes about the Democrats as well, which no longer happens. But the thing is after George Bush came Clinton, his son, George W Bush's the only present besides John Adams whose son became President Obama. And now Trump which I think you can say the character. It was not the same of of those men. I think only George W Bush had a really good character a character that one could admire and George W Bush became better in office, and he had gone through a period where he was not such a great character. But the thing is these were not people who would face the challenges that the greatest generation faced. I mean after all generations is defined not because it's people are any better. Than anybody else. It's defined by its challenges and the things that happened to it. And what what how it shaped, by the way, it meets those challenges the challenges of our generation my generation. And as I frequently say, I wish the boomer generation could die without taking me with it. But I think the the challenges of our generation when the challenges of prosperity the challenges of the success that the greatest generation one force, and those are the times that's the time when nations decay that's when nations decay at their pinnacle of success. If you look at the Republic of Rome, it was after they beat Carthage after they rose to a pinnacle of success that they rapidly. I mean with dizzying speed descended into civil war and violence, and ultimately the Republic fell. But so I just wanna talk about that death smile, and how it kind of comes out of George after George H W Bush just a second. But I it is your last week to get the Genucel sunspot corrector for free. This is for. Sunspots age spots, even read inflamed patches, this could be yours for free with the purchase of genocidal, the brand new Genucel sunspot corrector boasts outstanding reviews. People love it. They put it on. It makes the sunspots dimsum makes them harder to see makes obviously your skin look younger. And this is.

George W Bush Donald Trump George H W Bush George Mitt Romney SNL Grace Republic of Rome Carthage President Obama John Adams Clinton
"george w bush" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"george w bush" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"My favorite story about all. That is. I just got sworn in. And Andy card said why don't you go down the oval and see what it feels like as president? And I said, okay. So went down shitting down there and just kind of take it at all. And and in walk, STAN. So Andy told dad that I was down or anyone Mr President. Welcome. Thank you, Mr President and pretty much all that was said for while. And it was a very profound moment for me. Joining us. Now, former chief of staff or President, George W Bush and assistant to the president and deputy chief of staff or president George H W Bush Andy card what a legacy and Washington bureau chief for USA today, Susan page, her new book, the matriarch Barbara Bush and the making of an American done. Stay comes out in April right to have you all to talk about the like, H W Bush Andy card, you said he was humbling to be with can you talk more about that. President George W Bush is the finest person I've ever met. He really is a role model for life. And it was a great citizen not just of the United States a great citizen of the world. So I was very privileged to work with him. And I met him in the nineteen seventies and would drive Marrone, Massachusetts, New Hampshire little reg Chevy chevette and people actually I knew people who spelled his name be US, h they thought it was the beer company guy, but been remarkable life that he lived it's a life of love. And I saw that love for his wife or his children for his grandchildren. Great grandchildren for extended family is just a life of love. And it was contagious. He was most compassionate. But he also had the courage to do the hard work of getting things done. It took a lot of hard work, but him to be as successful as it was the president, and he was much more successful than most people realized both in the foreign policy front where people to talk about that. But on the domestic side where he got things. Done with a Democratic Congress because he had the courage to work hard and to pull people into agreement rather than push them away. Jon meacham. Have a question for Susan has been spending so much time, pondering MRs Bush and her life and legacy. What's your view of? Would there have been a president George H W Bush without a Barbara Pierce Bush? You know, that was a question I've asked more than one hundred people I've interviewed for this this book because I think it's such an interesting question, and I'll tell you where I come down. I think they were indispensable partners. I think they each made the other bigger and better it was in some ways just such a perfect match. They had different strengths. They had different shortcomings. And the the the sharper edge that Barbara Bush had was sometimes used the longer political memory for slights and. Was it was something that was sometimes helpful to George Bush, and George Bush softer side was also sometimes I think helpful to Barbara Bush, so in that way, man, marriage of seventy three years to what extrordinary services such great transit. Also, some tragedies as every family faces political defeat personal tragedies that death of a daughter. They were they were a couple. They were fortunate to have met one another at that Kayce school Christmas dance in Greenwich. Connecticut. Susan, I I wanna talk about loss being defined defining moments for this couple even for the presidency. But for this couple of specially in I'm going to read from your piece, and I know I'm going to have trouble getting through this. So Peggy I'll I'll send it to you. After I read from Susan's piece in which she writes when Robin with being treated at New York Sloan Kettering Memorial Hospital, Barbara Bush, set one rule, no crying in her room..

President George W Bush Barbara Pierce Bush George H W Bush president Mr President Susan Andy card assistant to the president United States Jon meacham chief of staff Congress Washington bureau chief Chevy Kayce school Christmas New York Sloan Kettering Memor Peggy deputy chief of staff Marrone Greenwich
"george w bush" Discussed on AM Joy

AM Joy

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"george w bush" Discussed on AM Joy

"I literally said, well, where would I stay? To the goes. Well, stay right here on the house. And we we did George Bush von, you know, embraced it and had a great sense humor about it. All these years. Karen, there there were serious things about the George H W Bush presidency. There was a war. There was a recession. And they were as we you. And I discussed they were deficits and tax increases data Carvey and the president they sort of helped soften his reputation a little bit. Hey did. And the reason that I think Dana Carvey was so funny was he really put his finger on kind of the paradox. That was George Bush. I mean here was a man he was a graceful gifted athlete. He was educated at Yale. He comes from the genteel background. But he just sometimes couldn't get that out in his words. I mean, he was prone to Maui props. He got very which we found out from his son. I guess is genetic. And he he especially got. Comfortable when it came time to talk about himself. He he seemed almost incapable of taking credit for things. And that was what was so funny about Dana Carvey because he was able to get to this side of him. And you know, how incongruous it was with everything else that Americans knew about in their president. Say that also, you know, Bush had moved to Texas, and he was always trying to show that he was you know, with the people of the south west. And so he talked about how much you love country music. I'm sure he did. But the eight pork rinds and Dana Carvey made a lot of fun of that. But also putting his finger on on. What was the essence of the Bush presidency? When he had that line wouldn't be prudent. You know, and that was the essence of Bush prudence stability you no decency. Stewardship of the office all the things that were lacking. Now where at the core of Bush. Let's talk about stewardship. Let's talk about the thousand points of light. Karen, it is another side of George H W Bush one that history has to test of time history remembers is inaugural speech. And where he spoke about it. Let's let's let's just listen to that again. We we'll we'll bring that back. But that was an important part of the president legacy where he talked about volunteer organizations and clubs and groups and he wanted not only Merrick's to be involved. But he wanted members of his own administration to be involved. Let's play it. Now. This is America, a brilliant. Diversity spread like stars? Like a thousand points of light and abroad, and peaceful sky. Some criticized him for that being a replacement of the government's role in taking care of people. But others have since seen this as a his illustration of what healthy civil society looks like that that those Americans with abilities to share with others do. So he yeah. And you know, as just a few months ago, President Trump was mocking this this concept, but I think it goes to fundamental conservatism, George W Bush was not, you know, completely opposed to the government helping people out especially people who were needy people who were helpless. He passed the Americans with Disabilities Act, but there is a fundamental conservatism to the idea that the sorts of activities should come bottom up and not top down not be imposed on people by the government. And it has been, you know, a lasting part of his leg..

George Bush Dana Carvey George H W Bush George W Bush president Bush Karen Merrick President Trump Yale Texas America
"george w bush" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

NPR Politics Podcast

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"george w bush" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

"Shared progress. I know what he would say quote nonsense. It's your duty to get that America back. And I thought that was very fitting that is. So let's end on this note, obviously when you are the son of a Senator and the father of a president and a governor your family's a big part of your story. Right. But it seemed sincere that that the Bush family that George W Bush was incredibly close with all of his family, not just Jordan, Jeb. But also a daughter who died at a young age of leukemia has other children. There was a nice moment on. A weekend edition this morning where Linda Wertheimer who covered Bush and covered the nineteen eighty eight presidential election was talking to Scott Simon about a moment in the final days of that one thousand nine hundred eight campaign where she was flying across the country with Bush and and got into a reflective conversation with him. This is a guy, you know, he he he loved speed. He loved taking chances jumping out of airplane all that stuff. But what the thing that just amazed me was I was sitting there with him, and he was very relaxed, and he sort of leaned back in the chair. And he said I said to him. This must be the best time of your life. The path to the presidency was just straight ahead of him. He was going to beat Michael Dukakis. No question. He said, no. And I said, well, then what was it? And he said well when I came back from the war bar, and I were married. Georgia was already born. We went to New Haven got. Little apartment, and I went back to college. And he said I remember this day sitting in the library and the sun was kind of slanting in and I was sitting there and thinking that bar and Georgie that's what he called his wife bar that bar Georgie. We're back in our little apartment, and he said, I was the happiest I've ever been. Oh, that's a beautiful story. Why he was he was a beautiful, man. A beautiful. You know, maybe it didn't agree with his politics all the time that you could never ever regret. Knowing him. That's such a striking image of this young family starting their lives, especially knowing that that two of the three people are going to one day end up as president. I think those are really nice story. We spoke earlier about his pension for writing notes and letters and keeping people close to him that way, he left a note as he left the Oval Office in one thousand nine hundred three addressed to his successor Bill Clinton. Dear Bill when I walked into this office. Just now I felt the same sense of wonder in respect that I felt for years ago. I know you will feel that too. I wish you great happiness here. I never felt the loneliness some presidents have described there will be very tough times made even more difficult by criticism. You may not think is fair. I'm not a very good one to give advice, but just don't let the critics discourage you or push you off course you. Will be our president. When you read this note..

George W Bush Michael Dukakis president Linda Wertheimer Bill Clinton Senator America Oval Office leukemia Georgie Scott Simon New Haven Jordan Georgia one day
"george w bush" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

NPR Politics Podcast

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"george w bush" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

"Bush lost three way race in the ninety two election with just thirty eight percent of the vote more than two decades later, George W Bush who experienced his own roller coaster ride in the polls wrote an affectionate portrait of his father, titled forty one. I want people to. Better. Appreciate George Bush as not only a great person. But a very successful. President the elder Bush was also the Lynch pin of a political dynasty that. Now, spans four generations, whatever his political shortcomings hindsight has cast his presidency in a kinder, gentler light guy. That was a really good piece in it gave us a really comprehensive view of of what the man's life was like, well, thanks very much hat tip to our colleagues, Marcus Rosenbaum who did a lot of the research and David green and Arnie Saipem who interviewed George W Bush Scott on the point of the story ended on the fact that he's being reassessed, you know, every president likes to say history will vindicate me. Right. But if you if you start at nine hundred ninety two Bush gets blown out by Bill Clinton, he's a one term president the last one term president we've had up to this point. But really over the years. He's been looked at more and more favorably is that just nostalgia. Or were his accomplishments really just not recognized. At the time. I think in the case of the tax hike that cost him so dearly with Republicans that set the stage for what would eventually become the balanced budget of the late nineties, and you know, a very long economic expansion his caution in not moving onto Baghdad at the end of the first Gulf war looks prescient after the debacle of the second Gulf war. And the the morass in Iraq that followed that and I think his management of the collapse of the Soviet Union and the aftermath of the Cold War, which maybe didn't seem like such an achievement at the time. Looks particularly good in the wake of something like the Arab spring where we find that. You know, the changing of an old autocratic order doesn't necessarily have to happen peacefully. One of my earliest political memories. And I guess I'm dating myself. Very clearly here, it is the first Gulf war. You know? I remember a friend's. A father who was a marine who fought there. It was just a very simple quick and clean. Warren's it seem we were in and out right away. It was a war that had a lot of international agreement. There's a lot of consensus there. And I think many folks look to that and said, this is the way you fight a war. Right. You build on bring up these international allies, you're in you're out. I think that with the questions arise is that? Even though it was very swiftly fought some of the decisions he made ultimately to leave the country very quickly led to a situation which really began our country's entanglements in the Middle East. I mean, I think many of us now grow up where we think of the Middle East is kind of this crisis epicenter, and I would say for much of my life. We as a nation have been fighting wars or involved in wars to some degree throughout the Middle East. But that really began with the first Gulf war. I mean prior to that the country's main foreign policy focus was the Cold War. But Ron, I guess there's a flip side to that too. Right. Like, you could say that this action set up twenty years of bad decision making by the United States. It's in that region. But you could also the flip argument is it was a restrained action..

George W Bush Bill Clinton George W Bush Scott Middle East President Warren president Soviet Union Baghdad Arnie Saipem Iraq Marcus Rosenbaum United States Ron David green thirty eight percent twenty years
"george w bush" Discussed on KSRO

KSRO

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"george w bush" Discussed on KSRO

"And once they're in there, do what you said, you would do don't tell me give you the the house, and they knew nothing don't tell me give me the Senate and do nothing don't tell me give you the presidency do nothing because they're going to be voted out. If you don't do something. Up until two thousand six. George W Bush had the house and Senate. He was getting some good things done. The Democrats somehow were able to get the house and Senate stopped him from doing anything for the last two years of his presidency. Obama had the house and Senate and the first two years, and then the the the house goes in two thousand ten to the Republicans, and they still didn't stop anything. The Senate goes, and he says I got a cell phone got a pen. Go around them. And he did. He went around him. Lied cheated stole do whatever you had to do to get his agenda across that's impressive. That's really big deal. Why can't Republicans? Learn what they do something. Why can't they step up? It drives me nuts. Eight eight eight nine four one eight eight nine four one seven two four seven. If you're not on my Facebook page, you've got gotta go there and visited frequently Goto joepags dot com. J O dot COM click on Facebook page sent me a message to be signed up for these daily messages. I sent another one out just a little while ago at the bottom of the hour. Just updating you on I did a Facebook live, I sink to the video of it. I I did we're going to talk to protect Gabrielle coming up. I just sent you a message letting you know that if you wanted to talk to me during the show on the brakes, I'll check out Twitter. Good at Joe talk show, their Instagram more for personal stuff. Pictures of the the dogs, family, whatever. So you can go check that out as well. The bottom line is the Republicans have shown look Lindsey Graham was great yesterday. Today's like, well, we'll just do what they say do really. How about this? This is my suggestion before we go to break. Voting in today to the full Senate have the vote Monday to vote on them. Let the Republicans who are threatening to vote against them. And then how fast faster voted out think about that? Let the Republicans who are threatening to vote against him do so make them take the vote and hang their hat on what they said. Now, I can't vote for him. Why not? There wasn't a full investigation. Or what did you want to investigate? She doesn't know where went who. Ran a hi how many she doesn't know anything? What did you want to get it get out of Senate that enough already? It's time to really challenge these wishy washy Republicans it's time to really challenge them and say either you're gonna do what you said you would do or go to exposure right now, they're running this interference now for flake who's leaving for Collins from Cousy. They're running interference for them to save their positions. Screw it. Let them go. Let them go. The Democrats already the minority are acting like they run the joint. Why have the Republican numbers? If you're not gonna do. Anything makes no sense. It's an edit eight nine four one pags joepags dot com. They're right here..

Senate Facebook Obama George W Bush Lindsey Graham Gabrielle Twitter Instagram Cousy Joe Collins two years
"george w bush" Discussed on The Finding My Psych Podcast

The Finding My Psych Podcast

13:28 min | 2 years ago

"george w bush" Discussed on The Finding My Psych Podcast

"It's been noted as a crisis will continue to be a crisis because I don't see the government taking any swift action There are some government movements in here in BC but also just quite shallow and the housing minister. That is over. This name is Selena. Roberson Roberts Robertson or Selena Roberts. Actually she just seems completely in able. This is a portfolio that she just can't manage sees a rookie and I would say the end EP. Premier should've never given a rookie this most important portfolio. Okay so anyway you can see that it's obligatory this series political at some level so but it's how it affects us in our in our psychology and. I don't know how it was when you grew up but when I was growing up I'm forty six years old. You know when I was growing up. That was the dream. Is everyone own their own home or have their own property? That's just not now. It's like literally. Just forget that as a dream. It's impossible okay. Boy Number two now. We can't have an obligatory episode without talking about Donald Trump. He has been in office now going on two years. The midterm elections are coming up here in November. And of course the dream the hope by so many people is that. Democrats are going to really seriously kick some serious ass in the midterms and this of course threatens everything that trump's all about you have a system we have this psychotic person in office. Who LACKS ALL MORAL? Proclivity at all moral guidance. Moral Compass is basically jerking off the religious. Right they know that he isn't for them but they that's given them a voice again which is Super Sad. And all they're crazy homophobic antiabortion and etcetera etcetera ways of thinking and agendas and the Republicans are sitting on the side loving it keeping enough distance from trump saying that. They're not about all that but using him to get there very conservative agenda acrossed. I can tell you the truth. I am not very left leftist kind of person I. There are lots of things about the Republican Party that I like and I think prior to this drama with them Kind of buddying up with trump to get their agenda needs met. I had some basic respect for the Republican Party. I was I certainly disagree with a lot of what they say. But I see them. Now being so much more machiavellian than I ever thought they would be. Okay so how does this relate to our mission at finding my psych? How does this relate to our general kind of consciousness at our emotional wellbeing as well as you can imagine? I'm a Canadian. I also from the United States spent the better part of my childhood in the United States. I started my career there so I have experience in both worlds. But I'm a proud Canadian now and I'm a Canadian now. First and foremost and it is very interesting to me kind of watching from the outside looking at the United States from above and just kinda going. Oh Wow I don't know that I could have mentally. Psychologically survived the United States during these years. I remember how hard it was because I was living in the states during nine eleven and the post nine eleven era you know with George Bush and all the people that really didn't feel like the time George Bush was even running things. It was just all of the the hawks around him that were running the show back then. We thought it was so horrible and we were so glad to see him go but now. George W Bush just seems like an absolute saint and George W Bush seems like someone we really liked to have back and when I see videos of Ham especially with him and his wife and he's painting now is doing all this artistic stuff. When I see videos I think you just want to hug the guy. He's nothing compared to the craziness that we see right now when friends and I talking about trump which I try not to do too often because it's just way too frustrating and overwhelming because it's just hard to believe this is actually happening. I think that's the crazy thing of it. All I really try to say out loud to myself into the person talking to that okay. So trump's in there he's just horrible person etc but the real issue here isn't trump. I think the more I think about it. The real issue is the half of Americans that actually voted for him. And I don't mean that they're bad people I think. Hillary made a massive bad mistake when she dissed on the what she called them. The deplorables and I don't think she meant to everybody that voted for trump would vote for trump but I do think what she's she was trying to get out very poorly. Very poor. Choice of words is is that trump really did try to stir hate that trump and still does by the way right we all accept that and trump really did try to Use Divisive Politics to get people pissed off to use populism To become what he is today president of the United States. I don't know the heave and believed it was going to actually happen but there it is. It did but all of that stirring shit up and all of that. You know people kind of wandering day to day what's going to happen next. People have fears in the back of their mind about how bad can really really get even those who voted for him. Lots of them are backing away. We should always remember that. Half of Americans voted for him. Half of Americans were that pissed off about something I think they thought I think they thought that trump if I made the mistake and saying Bush here trump if they thought that trump was going to make them rich there that was just never ever going to happen and maybe now after two years they are starting to realize that. That's the case. That trump isn't making anybody rich but himself right. So there is this broader issue of the psychological impact of this that the the people that voted for him their general disappointment in realizing that had their lives aren't any better and then the other part of the voting block that never voted for trump. And now they're sitting around going. How bad can this really really get? I honestly don't have an answer for that. I thought we would have well past that by now I think we would have with all of the horrible things that he says that he does what. We've never would have allowed an by anybody else. Anybody else in that position. He's rotted the integrity of the job that he holds in terms of what it means. And I mean there's no honor. There's no there's no standards lease the Bar Super Low for those standards and I. I just don't know that I would have ever thought we'd still be sitting here. Two years later with him doing what he's doing rebublican besides John McCain. No don't don't stand up against him because they're worried about their own butts. They were worried about you. Know being kicked out of politics altogether. I don't know the psychological impact though is huge and I think it leaves People Feeling Uneasy. It causes a sense of generalized anxiety. It makes us into these. Very LIMBIC LIMBIC driven LIMBIC system driven animals. Where we're just excited to see. What the next headline is almost chuckle. But at the same time chuckling in fear is that healthy. That's not healthy and should never have to say that's a rhetorical thing it's just not healthy. It's scary and it's where we have landed with that. Let's move onto the third topic. The third topic that I think impacts our general sense of wellbeing mental health and all of this is Canadian marijuana. Now it's not as heavy as the first few topics housing affordability and of course we all wishing that George W. Bush was back in trump wasn't in Canadian marijuana's a very fascinating thing that federally Canada's leading the World in creating federally legalizing marijuana. That's that is total wild shit right there. We like to say Vancouver as Vance or Damn we've had we've had dispensaries in Vancouver for years and in the last couple years leading up to legalization they've just exploded and police haven't done anything about it. I can walk right now. Just four blocks down the street and there's dozens of them all over the city dozens more than dozens. I couldn't just walk in and say yeah having Zayed's and they go great. Yeah no problem semi whatever I want so this is wild so we call it Van. Damme by the way for years and years. I think it may still be the policy. That marijuana actually isn't even legal in Holland in Amsterdam. But it's something that the country turns a blind eye to because the drug problem the drug trafficking problem. It's a hub for a major drug trafficking throughout all of northern and Western Europe. They just overlook marijuana. Because I think it's a waste of money and I think that makes sense. Well we're taking it. The whole next level in Canada federally not just locally federally. We are legalizing marijuana. I think it's going to happen. October seventeenth seventeenth. Check that date. But it'll be very very interesting and I guess the question becomes you know how. How do I view this as a as a clinician as someone who works in leadership Managing portfolio of programs that. You know Within substance misuse and mental health How do I view marijuana legalization and I guess I have a lot of thoughts about it? I don't know how I'm going to be able to articulate the more here but certainly one one of them is just that okay well. I'm just glad that we're not spending financial resources on this anymore on The the Kind of The policing part of marijuana etcetera that God you know. Take the take the lot of it. This is ridiculous. Pot is certainly benign. I think and it's not worth the policing hours that we've put into it but jillions of them across North America so then God for that But do I think that legalisation means in my view that marijuana is benign substance totally a benign substance? It should be viewed or equated to having a beer in the evening. When you get home from work no I don't think it is. I don't think it's benign. I think it's well. Above Benign. I think marijuana has some unique side effects especially when us on a daily basis that that get in our way we all know about a motivational syndrome. We all know about some of the weight gain that can happen. How can increase appetite etcetera? But I think it causes. I think just a general sense overall. If you do it daily it causes a general sense of just being depressed. I think it can make you depressed for some people like myself. Attends me make me? Freaky as paranoid. So of course has no motivation to take the stuff but Do in other words does legalisation mean marijuana's all that in a bag of chips and that's all great stuff. No it just really means that we're now able to regulate it to such a degree that we'll be able to really put a dent in the black market And I think that is really the most important thing to remember but does that mean that you know people that in my in my position. Princeton that work in mental health and addictions that we actually believe that. It's benign no. I don't think it's benign. I think that'd be like Saint Beers benign beer's not the least bit benign alcohol. Thought Benign too much of it to regularly Of course or even a little bit to regularly that has an effect. Of course. I'm not hopeful person. I see I try to always try to see the good in everybody. I see the potential more importantly in people I love to see people maximize their potential and be something way greater than they thought they were ever going to be. I think marijuana is one of the things that just gets in the way of that it. It isn't one of the things that enhances performance. Some people like to say it does. Is this whole running community morente right? So there's this whole running community that's kind of pro marijuana like really hands performance. No I would just get fucking freaked out if I got that. One hundred trail allows stone and running got lost like that would just that would be the most horrid experience right. The other side of this other part of this may be is just that I also very frustrated as a clinician for people that like to talk about..

Donald Trump marijuana George W. Bush United States Republican Party Selena Canada Selena Roberts BC Roberson Roberts Robertson John McCain North America hawks Hillary Princeton Zayed Damme Vancouver Van
"george w bush" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"george w bush" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We have given to us we are the we are the recipients proud recipients of a heritage of ideals about how we deal with our disagreements not that we are not going to disagree but how we deal with those disagreements what form of government we actually have what premises and standards and processes we agree to you know we don't have a government in which people who run for office and become candidates of one party say i'm gonna lock up my opponent that is not what we have had in the past that we cannot be tolerance with regard that that kind of language remember the two thousand election you remember how close that was and how bitter and angry people were after the supreme court basically came out for george w bush can you imagine if george w bush had said or found gore had said i dispute the legitimacy of this election and i'm going to lock up my opponent or and i feel like americans should rise up and take back the well our democracy is fragile we depend upon people in leadership positions upholding and advancing the institutions and the integrity of those institutions rather than to meaning them or utilizing them for their own selfish needs and i think we have got to stand up as a country and say this is wrong we're not going to tolerate this this what i read your book it felt a little bit like a manifesto right like your call to arms or your appeal to this country is that how you see it is something that you've always wanted to write or.

gore george w bush
"george w bush" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"george w bush" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"Since which let me be clear i think george w bush did but you know i don't know if i know the way a different way forward like i don't know how to pull us out of that how to say you know this is not the best approach lied to amplify the people on the edges of every issuer every party an eye on you know i'm available fan i think he did a better job of this than most of saying like i am not your savior this is not the approach we're gonna take like there is a way to singer our cells insider perspective that is not driven by the loudest voices in the room i think he was good at that but then you come out of his presidency two terms of his presidency with an election that was just a nightmare it was a nightmare but again that's just that's that's assuming that the president or the presidency is the biggest influence on our elections which i don't think it is but it is certainly an interesting sort of lands through which to see them i was thinking about john mccain when he first talked about moral authority and wanting to discuss it i was as excited about john mccain as many people were about barack obama because i thought perhaps we would have a centrist republican i as the president and and then perhaps i could see like do the things that i believe about the country work and practice because i just felt like we hadn't had that um you know as best specially because i you know the bush presidency went south in such a dramatic end and sad and longlasting glee consequential way i hope that john mccain would be an opportunity to change the direction of the party and i was so excited about him and for a brief moment when he chose sarah palin i was excited about her because i thought here's a governor is a woman it's kind of a and a new voice in the ticket within it.

president john mccain barack obama george w bush sarah palin
"george w bush" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"george w bush" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Recent dad again correct yes at all going it's going very well praise be to god when wonderful blessing has you know if uh if rich sent sleepy or uh sort of just haggard it'll be because he's not getting a whole lot of sleep this is your second kid correct it is it is yeah that's the force multiplier right because the second one wakes up the first one that i got to to deal with the ah we all understand exactly but are older one loves the younger ones hoods his serve very very sweet to see and out what are they both boys are both grow older girl and a younger boy perfect you're done now bright had done all right i'll undergo sheet this idea you don't have to have my wife on to take take this up we're open to that so we saw yesterday rich these these two speeches given in different settings by former president george w bush and former president obama mr obama's campaign gene four the a democratic candidate for governor in in virginia a doctor north them and president bush was speaking i think at the other at his own library where was that allison is in new york and he had george w bush institute the george w bush institute are a very well and both of them seemed to have somewhat similar messages let's listen to a little what they each had to say seen our discourse be graded by casual cruelty at a time when our politics stress seem so divided and so angry and so nasty argument charged easily in the animosity disagreement escalates into dehumanisation look out folks who are deliberately trying to make paul saying demonize people at times it could seem like the forces pulling her supporter stronger than the forces binding us together so we assure you that it was as mr lowry told us the george w bush institute where former president bush was speaking but the sound the quality there's made it sound as though he was speaking from among coup beneath the core of the crust of the earth uh rich should we imagine is it even conceivable that the two former presidents were in touch and kind of agreed to speak in similar ways on the.

mr obama virginia president bush allison new york george w bush institute paul mr lowry george w bush
"george w bush" Discussed on CNN's The Daily DC

CNN's The Daily DC

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"george w bush" Discussed on CNN's The Daily DC

"Everyone this is david chaldean the cnn political director and this is the daily d c thanks so much for listening today on the podcast bush forty three kind of an extraordinary day in american politics as you all know a big political joke is that you are listening to this broadcast a george w bush has largely receded from the public stage he ever since he left office on january 20th two thousand nine um he removed himself largely from politics he did the traditional book writing and therefore media tour the goes along with that he does some speaking gigs we've seen him from time to time obviously we saw him on the campaign trail in south carolina with his brother jeb in his failed presidential run but for the most part george w bush really hasn't been doing a ton of fundraising for the party and not a injecting himself in the to and fro of american politics that change today in a pretty significant way he was in new york city today and he gave a speech to his institute the george w bush institute which does not mentioned donald trump by name at all does not mention the 45th president does not talk about the current occupant of the white house there's no direct attribution of george w bush his thoughts to donald trump or donald trump's actions that being said george w bush gave a speech about donald trump's america today and there's no debating that there's no doubt that that is what was in his mind and i'm gonna play you some portions of the speech but.

political director south carolina jeb george w bush new york city george w bush institute president donald trump america david cnn