17 Burst results for "George Ryan"

"george ryan" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

01:42 min | 10 months ago

"george ryan" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Was before anything was on television. And that would have been 1950s. Kentucky has had some teams in the late 70s that were really elite. They've had one great year with J claiborne, what 84? But I mean, I just don't remember and, you know, I'll be in full disclosure. This is not a great weekend in college football. But it's still a one versus 11 matchup. Yeah. That's worth paying attention. And honestly, I think Kentucky because her when they're talking about because you schedule a home come a weekend, whatever. I think they're 11 because they're Kentucky. Yeah. I think if they weren't Kentucky, they would be 7 or 8. But they hire. But because they're Kentucky, and there's always that. It's not fair. I mean, think about it. They beaten LA shoe in Florida. That should get you like fourth in the country. And in a normal year, and you're 6 O and a year where everyone in the top ten is losing games. Everyone in the top 20 files losing games. But there's still that. This should be one versus 5. Yeah, I'm all for that. So to answer your question, when was the last time they played in the biggest game of the weekend? The answer is never. Yeah. Certainly not in the television era. I'm going to call coach Bryant's son and ask him if he remembers. What happened in the 30s? Yeah. Because there was the beat Oklahoma, it was a historian. Imagine though for a second, so Bear Bryant is coaching at Kentucky. If you want more, go to the library. He defeats Oklahoma. Can we just keep talking about this during the break? Do we decimal system?.

Kentucky football LA Florida Bryant Oklahoma Bear Bryant
"george ryan" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

05:35 min | 10 months ago

"george ryan" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Live in Athens on an absolutely gorgeous Friday afternoon homecoming here. At UGA, we talked a lot with Tim Tebow about what happens next for the university of Alabama. And that's exactly what we are going to try to figure out Katie George. Joining us on the call for the Alabama Mississippi, Katie, I don't I know it's never all that challenging to come up with a great storyline for big SEC games or any other kind of games on Saturday, but this one seems like it may be easier than the normal. Good afternoon and how's everything going? Things are good, Paul good to be with you. I've got more concrete information than the last time I drew. For embrace young and Will Rogers will both be the starters for Alabama Mississippi state, but to your point, the storylines are pretty easy for this one. It's a bounce back game for Alabama, from everything that I've heard and the players that I've talked to from Bryce young, you know, to others, they feel good about where they're at the work that they put in in terms of responding. Certainly the feeling in the locker room on Saturday was bleak. You know, I had people tell me they lost their appetite. Jordan battle said, he lost sleep for a couple days, but you had to turn the page and refocus. And Nick Saban's message to them on Wednesday night after practice was look, one lost does not define you. Remember how you felt, allow that to motivate you moving forward into the season? And let's go finish what we started here. Our goals are still very attainable. Now, they got to come out and write the wrong against Mississippi Saturday night. Yeah. And Katie, we both were trying to figure out, I think it was a couple of weeks ago. I think I can't remember, was it was a coach? Oh, that was not telling us. For the auburn gave yeah. It worked out for them, didn't it? It did holding it close to the vest as long as they did. Well, Katie, Katie, let me ask you about my colleague because naturally everything has been obsessive about Alabama this week, but he is a coach that has done extraordinarily well in big moments. He beats the number one team in the country at Texas tech he had great success in spots at Washington state. What are you learning from him this week? Well, I think that they're excited for the challenge. They feel like they were a couple plays away from possibly being 5 O, but they can't think about that now. Obviously, they're really excited for Bama to come to town and I thought it was interesting from the different players and Mike leach, you know, the conversations we had was just because we beat Texas a and M and then Texas a and M went and the Bama, you know, that has no bearing on what's going to happen Saturday night. That's a trap mindset to get into. They just hope that hate is air raid offense, where's on the front 7 on the defensive side, as well as the secondary Alabama as good as they are in as good as their players are. They're not used to seeing this many passes over and over and over again. And will Rodgers has had a really good season. I don't know if he gets necessarily the credit that he deserves or is big a name right now because he's a sophomore, but he's done some great things. He's improved a great amount. You know, he started 6 games last season, that really got his feet wet, and then he carried over getting to have a spring season and a summer season with his teammates in the coaching staff. Unlike a season ago with COVID-19, you know, he put in a great work and you know, they feel confident going into this game, but obviously they're respectful of their opponent. And they know that fam is going to come to town. Obviously, looking for revenge after what happened in College Station. Hey, let me ask you about a part of this game that we haven't really talked much about or at all. And that's the defensive side of mister B state. A lot of the analysts really are high on them. We saw what they did a week and a half ago in almost two weeks ago in Kyle feel. What are you hearing from that side of the ball? They're really excited to showcase their talents. You know, so often when you face Alabama, the conversation stands that way, right? Because they're usually one of the top, if not, the number one team in the country. Well, these are guys who feel like they can hang with the offense. That is still trying to find their identity, right? I think we can all agree that Alabama is still trying to figure out exactly who they are on the offensive side. You know, Emmanuel Forbes, Martin Emerson, these are two safety cornerbacks and secondary members that are best friends and they're really good and talented at what they do. They think they can cover every single wide receiver that Alabama is going to trot out there. So I think that these guys, obviously, feel good about where they're at as a team. But there's that competitive edge of, hey, I want to go between those lines and I want to show that I'm just as good as these guys. I might not have been recruited to that place, but I feel good about my talents and I can measure up against anyone. Katie George be part of the call tomorrow night in store for Katie, always great to have you on. Thank you so much for the time. Me too. Thanks, have a great day. You bet Katie George and starkville. And let's get to some college here before we continue with the guest fest. How about JD up next? Hello, JD. Hey, Paul. How are you doing? We're doing well. Thanks so much for the call. Hey, I know a lot of benefits and they are saying how albums done and they're not going to make the play off and all that. But Paul, do they really need to panic?.

Alabama Katie Katie George Mississippi Bryce young Jordan battle UGA Tim Tebow university of Alabama Will Rogers Nick Saban Athens SEC Mike leach Texas Texas tech Bama auburn Paul Rodgers
"george ryan" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

04:58 min | 10 months ago

"george ryan" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Play action passes specifically windell Robinson because he's one of the fastest guys in the SEC. Talking to Tim Tebow, Tim, we talked a lot over these four or 5 weeks about Texas a and M quarterback situation. And I know you're the right guy to ask how a player who has struggled can suddenly be lifted up and played the game of his life, but how did that come out? I think first of all, it starts with Jimbo Fisher having a really good game plan. And I think a good thing or a bad thing, depending how you look at it. I think they were preparing for Alabama for an entire year. And I really do think that they didn't probably put in the same focus against Mississippi state. And against Arkansas that they did against Alabama, but I think when you talk about Zach calzada, the difference from Arkansas, mister B state to Alabama, just I mean it's crazy. He's a completely different player. And I give Jimbo a lot of credit, I think he supported him enough through the week where he was able to play with confidence. And I think the first drive of the game changed the whole game. When he was able to drive down, score a touchdown against Bama, I think there's something that clicked in him that said I can do this. And for the rest of the game, for the most part, he was very efficient. And I also think the way that Jimbo design plays, you didn't see him necessarily going one, two, three, four. You would see him kind of go to a side. It would be one to two and getting rid of the ball. And I think the offense created a lot of confidence. I think success early created a lot of confidence and you could see what Jimbo's been talking about. He has talent, but the rest of the piece is just weren't around him, and he didn't necessarily have it in him before that. I think with confidence, but you could see the confidence build throughout the game and confidence changes any player. And it seems like everyone fed off of that because you have an offensive line that has some really good players, but all of a sudden they were playing at a level that I haven't seen them play. Oh, there were so much better than against Mississippi state in Arkansas. The offensive line was being able to pick up blitzes was working together. And did a really good job. There was not a lot of pressure on Zack, the entire night. And I think that also tells me that I think there was just more effort, more critical thinking, more focus put in by a and M into that game. And I also think it helps they were at home. I think they've been preparing for it for a long time. I think Jimbo knows how to coach in some of those big games. And I actually think I trust zimbo more and some of the biggest games than some of the ones that he's probably supposed to win. And you know, so when you really look at it, you want to give a and M a lot of credit, but I think it was also shocking how they were able to turn it so drastically in a week. Well, I've sat with you countless weeks and you've talked about I remember a couple weeks ago a game that they lost and before the game, you said, I think Jimbo will do. And of course I'm an apology down the road. It's a it didn't happen, but it did happen this time because he is that good. Conversely, let me ask you about Alabama. You didn't come off of many losses in your career in college and neither has Alabama. They usually come back really well. They will. I think I don't think it really changes much for college football. I really don't. I think it changes a lot for a and M, I think Alabama still besides these guys, I think Alabama still the best team if not the second best team in college football behind Georgia. I mean, you're going to tell me that teams in front of them. Iowa Cincinnati or Oklahoma is better than Alabama. We all know if they played on a neutral field. They're just not going to beat them. And they're not as good. And I think Alabama will show up. They have too many playmakers. It was a perfect storm at a hostile environment where most of the plays went a and M's way. And everything went against Bama. And I also think they just showed up and kind of thought you know what? They say an empty just got killed by Mississippi they're not that good. And that affects especially 18 to 22 year olds. It absolutely can change the things. I mean, you know, I know in my own career when we didn't show up with the same focus, but then you would go to a Death Valley and you knew, hey, we got to be prepared. And it's different. And so I think for Alabama, you're going to see, I think they awoke a sleeping giant. Tim Tebow, we appreciate, as always, you're coming by on Friday. Thanks so much, Dan. Of course, Betty. Great conversation. We are back. We're live. It's a year of university of Georgia. You are listening to the Paul finebaum show podcast. We welcome you back. We're live in Athens on an absolutely gorgeous Friday afternoon homecoming here. At UGA,.

Jimbo Alabama windell Robinson Arkansas Zach calzada Jimbo Fisher Mississippi Tim Tebow zimbo SEC Tim Texas Zack football Cincinnati Oklahoma Iowa Georgia Death Valley Paul finebaum
"george ryan" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

02:51 min | 10 months ago

"george ryan" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"They can get off the field last year they couldn't stop anybody consistently. And there could be a big test. I mean, we had to test the more, and I know Kirby doesn't want me. We got to get through this game and Florida's very capable team. I mean, you know, going down the swap, they got, I mean, excuse me to Tiger stadium. They got a big advantage. When you could play there at 11 o'clock instead of 8 o'clock, I mean, there's a lot of juice goes in between 8 and 11 and I've been into that stadium about 5 30 at night and you go in there and all those people are moaning you and giving you the finger and all of them. It's pretty tough. So, you know, they're going to their backs are against the wall. They got to make something happen to me. And they're going to throw caution to the wind and their team too. This had a lot of injuries. I mean, you know, and by the way, I don't know anything other than what they say, but it is interesting though coach about LSU with things not going well all of a sudden some of their biggest stars are right. They plan without bouting. They have two corners. And then, you know, just like their left tackle starting for Kentucky this year. I mean, those are kind of things that add up for you and transfer portal is huge. I think going in from here on, it's going to be a big part of everybody's program. And for us, we got a really good corner in getting the kid from clips and coming in here. And then we had two other transfers. It hadn't had a chance to play at all. Gilbert and Smith, unfortunately, Smith got hurt this week, but transferred portals big. Final thought on Kirby smart. I know how you were as coach. He's been a close friend of yours and somebody that you lean on a lot. Yeah, here's the thing about Kirby that I really feel like that's good. He surrounds himself with good coaches. He's able to bring in will must champion has really been a great addition to it. But the thing about it in Spain is 6 years. You're looking at facilities that they've built here. Along with our athletic director and certainly doctor moorhead, they've been very supportive. Josh Brooks our new athlete director. But the thing about Kirby is give them a chance to get his guys in here. That's what he's done. You know, fortunately, that first year we didn't do that great, unfortunately, but second, you're close. But I think it's pretty much the signals being sent all across the nation. This football team's here and there recruiting is just lights out. And I'm telling you, I got some guys coming in here tomorrow that are visiting that I would like to decide this don't even go in there and visit. Just put your uniform on come out and play for us tomorrow. I mean, I say this every time I'm here, but when you spend some time on this campus, it's hard to understand how you can say no. This is an incredible place to.

Kirby Tiger stadium Kirby smart LSU Smith Florida Josh Brooks Kentucky Gilbert moorhead Spain football
"george ryan" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"george ryan" Discussed on WCPT 820

"If that was truly his desire to hike into the Yukon and and and leave his family. He could have done that without killing them. I mean, so It just It's not a strong motive, and it would not. It was a very peculiar way. If you wanted to do this, if you if you wanted to act like she had killed everybody and then shot you in the leg, and it was would have been. It was a very difficult bank shot of a of a conspiracy on his part of that. I mean, there's there. As you pointed, there's so many other ways to do that. I'm talking shot twice. He was shot twice. Not once, but twice. Well, I'm talking. I'm talking to Bill Clutter, who is the lead private investigator in the Christopher von case? Working for the defense and the Christopher von case, and they're trying to, uh, attorneys for Christopher Von are trying to reopen his conviction on the on the murder of his of his wife of Crystal, Vaughn's wife and Children, fairly high profile case in June of 2007. When Kimberly Vaughn in her three young Children were shot to death inside the family's car, they were on their way to a water park. And they pulled over and, uh And then the next thing we know they people are passing by. Passersby are seeing Christopher von with the boat wound in his leg. And he's saying he doesn't remember what happened and the trial went very The jury deliberations went very quickly. Do you think that he was He was represented? Well at trial. Well, no, I I I don't hold that opinion. And, you know, part of the problem is, you know I got I got appointed because when Governor George Ryan declared a moratorium on the death penalty once the flaws of the cases like Rolando Cruz and Alejandro Hernandez came to light, um they provided resources to prevent the conviction of innocent person facing the death public. Well, you know, I had worked as the fact investigator for four years, absorbing off the details of this case and trying to figure out how Chris's blood, warmed up on his wife's seat belt and never could figure that out. But we got discharged as a defense team wants the death penalty was abolished. And you know you credited my work, among others, as as having contributed that, but to the detriment of Chris Bond, he lost those resources and so In about a little more than a year after we were dismissed from the case he goes to trial was a new team of attorneys who are trying to get up to speed. But, you know, you know we have been Absorbing the details and nuances of the case for four years. And, you know, I don't think he got the the the resources he deserved. None of the experts that we have developed were called particularly the thing that really convinced me that this was a murder suicide was a year after this happened, the FDA recommended a black box warning for Topamax. One of the medications Kimberly was taken because she was Developing stress induced migraine headaches. The other medication was nor Tripoli, which also has the side effect of potential suicide. But in this case, the adverse offense reporting and in clinical trials showed that there was a statistically significant increase of suicidal thoughts and behaviors of people taking Topamax and you know, it's not like Chris would have had to, you know, but he couldn't have envisioned the future to plan this as part of his scheme. I mean, this was a year after it happened and and and mortality was when we finally Develop the ballistic evidence. One of the shots was clearly fired from the passenger seat as the and the angles of all the other shots were consistent with that. But we actually had a trajectory, which is now available on our website, www. Investigating innocence dot org and people can see for themselves the evidence that this was a Indeed, a murder suicide. Now this see this podcast is hosted by Loren Bray Pacheco and you are A frequent contributor. You're she interviews you? She talks to you. She calls you and and and, uh and and one of the things that happens during this during this podcast and again. The last episode is at one point. She she calls you up at the in the last episode, and she says, I just got Copy of a letter that that Christopher von is sent to his family. And I'm going to read it to you. Are you sitting down? Because this is new information in this case, and I'm going to ask you to reveal what was in that letter and talk about it and why it is so important, but first, let's take a break. I'm Eric Zorn sitting in for Patti Vasquez on W C P T A M. Safe money radio. Risky investments should be retirement tools mostly used for the young or the extremely wealthy. It's too often they are used for those who are in or approaching retirement that cannot afford to lose their money. Also, just because your broker tells you it's safe doesn't make it true..

Rolando Cruz Alejandro Hernandez Loren Bray Pacheco Bill Clutter Patti Vasquez Kimberly Vaughn June of 2007 Chris Bond Eric Zorn Kimberly Chris Christopher Von four years FDA Yukon once first one Governor George Ryan One
"george ryan" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"george ryan" Discussed on WGN Radio

"This isn't gonna be government by Twitter. Uh, it's going to be a much more Lower key kind of way that were used to not waking up in the morning and seeing your social media has been blown up and as well as the stock market to you said there are going to be leaks and I've heard that from others today, But the fact is all these names. Word leaked. I mean, they did float them out there, so there wasn't a surprise announced today. No, no, no. But that was that was by themselves. If it was the transition committee that was all kind of pre approved, I mean, the way we all knew that announcements were coming on Tuesday, and they Basically released the list. Yesterday. I watched Run plane on the Sunday shows say, Yeah, they're coming up on Tuesday and then is Ajene Sachi. I forgot your first name, saying another Sunday show. Well, I can't tell you what? Yeah. Right, Right, Right. Yeah. I mean, yes, there's a leaks. There will always be leaks and government but it won't be to the extent of it will be back What you write Border war. People are unless I mean, and frankly, there's already some back fighting going on. There's some Biden people who were saying we were there with him from the beginning of this campaign. And we're seeing appointments being made that don't recognize those people who were there and that they were just being passed over by Obama. People the most striking, I remember being where we're when, when, when George Ryan, one for governor and all the cops and people. I remember being it Ryan celebration that night in the Thompson. People filled the hall on that happened a little bit, but what I want to get to John Kerry because John Kerry to me that that's kind of a remarkable story that people are talking about. Here is a guy who was a former secretary of state and beyond that. He was the former presidential candidate for the Democratic Party, and now he's turning over his shoulder as sort of a junior officer. I mean, he's going to be on the National Security Council, but he's gonna be overlooking climate change and talking to The secretary of state designate, who will be essentially over him talking to Joe Biden. I don't know that we've ever had a former nominee. Serve at that level in the cabinet to can you think of? No and and well and truly It's not even really a Cabinet position. Kind of a counselor position on Dad. Yeah, I'm kind of Stunned by it, too, because, uh, you know certain Certainly it's they recognition just by having a counselor on climate by fighting to recognize Something that progressives have. You know, Long felt was missing from the national discourse was a coordinated effort on climate change, but but when you look at, you know, having him come back and take that spot I don't I really don't know what to think about it. I don't know what that says to me. It says that he really wants to do the job. You know that he's essentially walking down a couple rungs on the ladder to take the job. I? Yeah, I'm going to see. Oh, well, no part of me also looks like it Does. You know I'm John Kerry. Don't forget me. Okay. I mean, It's not like he needs a job. So we're saying the same thing. But for different motivations. That's why I mean, I, you know, certainly, I hope you know, and obviously he would believe in the job, but I also think It's kind of that political ego factor that's out there too. You know you don't forget me. I've been talking to you for over 20 years, And whenever I found that we disagree on some sort of politics. You're usually right. So I'm willing to No no, no, I'm just but it's truly I was kind of stunned by him taking that I just thought He's kind of analogy he has, you know, Elder statesman status on the outside. And now you're coming in, and you're right at a junior level kind of position, but junior level in what way? Because anytime John Kerry is gonna talk, he's going to get coverage. Pearson, who gets coverage as well, the Chicago Tribune thanks for making things a little clearer for us today. Hey, Thanks, Steve. Any time have a great Thanksgiving to you and all the listeners be Thanksgiving. Let's say yo Hawkes. Yes, Yes. Wait. Rick Pearson from the Tribune. Okay. John Williams talked earlier today to the mayor of Rockford. They're doing a really cool thing with kids there who get a B average or higher in Rockford Public high schools will revisit that coming up, but first to.

John Kerry Joe Biden Long George Ryan Twitter Ajene Sachi Obama Democratic Party Rick Pearson John Williams yo Hawkes Rockford Public the Tribune Cabinet Chicago Tribune
"george ryan" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"george ryan" Discussed on WGN Radio

"We're going to shift to an important topic now. And joining me is one of the former governors of Illinois. So you all remember former Governor George Ryan, and you should also remember that he was a staunch advocate for changing the death penalty policies here in the state, and he's written a book about it. It's called until I could be sure. How I stop the death penalty in Illinois. Yes, it does. Deal with his own time in prison for four different had nothing to do with that book or that topic that sent him there will ask him about it. And you can also join the conversation at 312981 72 100. If you never had a chance to talk directly to The former governor of Illinois. Here is your opportunity to do it and I'll start by welcoming former Governor George Ryan Governor Ryan Welcome to the radio station and my show. Thank you. But thanks for thanks for tuning man. I'm glad to have you have very well appreciated. And of course, you were kind enough to join me on my TV show for W G in TV political report, but that being said You know a lot of people. If you wrote a book, they would have expected you to write about your time in prison and dealing with those issues. But you chose to dedicate pretty much the entire book to the death penalty issue and how you dealt with it. Why was that issue so important for you that it get more realized in a book, which obviously will be a critical part of your legacy? Well, Polly. I guess it's kind of a long story, but I was not concerned with it. When I heard about how many people have been exonerated, they were on death row and then released by the courts or buy some some reason that they were really not guilty but had been found guilty and put on death row. And my concern was that we read the several people that were almost killed innocent people. And I thought maybe we'd better look. ATT depend death penalty in Try to correct it. And that was my original goal was to try the corrected the lesson. The possibility of an innocent person being executed. But just by the way, governor to put this in time and space if we could go back to the late 18 to the late 19 seventies, and people may not remember you were actually in the Legislature before you became governor. You voted for the death penalty. You were a guy that said, Yeah. Do it. Well, That's right. I wasn't I was a supporter of the death penalty. Paul pretty much who very much preferred part of my career in government. When I went to spring you from hell, and I spent 10 years in Illinois House where I became minority leader in speaker. I had a good good lesson about a lot of things in government. But one of them was the death penalty and I was an advocate of the death penalty thought it was the proper punishment for certain transcribes. And it was an advocate of it that I can recall when in 19. I think with 1977 now we join news nation already in progress. Boats, But some people in the Republican party around the country and even some around the world didn't need those 20 days to assume that Joe Biden is the president elect,.

Governor George Ryan Illinois Joe Biden Republican party Polly Legislature Paul
"george ryan" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"george ryan" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"He was sentenced to seven years in prison with five years of probation. Following his release. George Ryan, a Republican governor from 1999 to 2003, was convicted of corruption in 2006 related to his time in Illinois secretary of State when commercial driver's licenses were issued unqualified truckers in exchange for bribes And one of the truckers was involved in a crash that killed six Children. In this case the same in this case, the same governor who prosecuted the first guy I talked about was the same guy who defended this particular governor and then Rod Blood Goya vich, which some may remember his name. He's the most recent one. Who's gone to prison. He was governor from 2003 to 2009. He was impeached and removed from office by the Illinois General Assembly in a unanimous vote in in January of 2009 after being tied to multiple pay to play schemes, including attempting to sell the former Senate seat of then President elect Barack Obama. In August of 2010. He was convicted of lying to the FBI in connection with the investigation. But the jury deadlocked on 23 other charges. He was retired on 20 counts from his 2010 trial and On June 27th of 2011 local blood Goya. Vich was convicted of 17 counts of fraud, acquitted on one count and the jury was hung on to in December of that year. He was sentenced to 14 years in prison in February of 2020 Blagojevich sentence was commuted to time served by Donald Trump. So corruption is rampant in Illinois is sound like or at least they're good at catching corruption because I imagine the corruptions pretty rampant everywhere. God, yes, Illinois at least, seems tohave a better. Better chess. At least they want you to think they're doing something about it. Governors in prison That's a step in the right direction. At the very least, it could be that you know, it's because they you know what it's like. They flew too close to the science to via son. Three of those governors were Democrats won was a Republican, so that their corruption was just so egregious and outrageous for that time right today, all that stuff that they do. I'm sure you even mayor, local mayors and stuff do that They just had to be arrested. Well, let's go to the phones. We got Ingrid calling from Maryland. Ingrid, you're on free talk live. Hey, Hey, what's on your mind? Yeah, Yeah, one tart with a crisp camel case like I want to call in a howling balls. Does it at the time, Okay. Chris Cantwell, the former host here on free talk live. We had to fire him because he became a racist. Sadly, then he ultimately went down kind of a dark path because of that, now ended up I'm just kind of giving. I know. You know, I'm just giving our listeners a brief as brief of a recap as he can having been a friend of his for the last Decade. Basically, hey, he went down a dark path towards racism, which led him to the Charlottesville protests in 2017, where he was arrested for what he says was self defense. In that particular case, he ended up taking a guilty plea was sentenced to believe time served, but what banished from the state of Virginia for at least five years. Then returned to New Hampshire, where a couple years after that he kind of laid low for a couple of years. And then the FBI raided his home in January of this year at about three in the morning where they tossed his entire apartment looking for. Well, whatever it was that they were they were looking for. Ah Ah, and they charged him with the so called crimes. Of, you know, not actually, like doing anything violent, or, you know, hurting anybody but saying something mean to another racist on the telegram chat application that by the way, the other racist apparently didn't actually report to the police. It was the police the FBI who had infiltrated A racist chat room or check group for the so called Bull Patrol, which is like an extreme racist, sick sicko group that named themselves after a shooter. Lincoln asked Murder. Yeah. Ah, Dylann roof, And so he was. He was having an argument with one of these scumbags, and so basically you have two a holes. Arguing with one another on the Internet. The federal government decided that they were going to charge Chris with interstate threatening and interstate extortion for which he now faces something like 25 years in prison after being convicted. I think last month or September of thieves so called crime, So basically he is a political prisoner. Go ahead with what you wanted to say. Yeah. So just you think that I'm the one that people might not really know about is those people not done with the photo. We'll start the ball patrol, as does this group that worships still roof and at the time, you know, because, you know, you know, you know you got in trouble trying to roll and he's all like you every trendy You know? Yeah, And it's not the stuff that he became involved the ball patrol, But the thing is That really caused mostly by that, like in October of that map, right? I think was in those 19. I really sure Like when they have the Sea of life Synagogue shoot on crust on his show announced Dead, which was with 11 Jews had died. And Chris was like telling fans. You don't don't do this. Don't kill Jews. Don't do those. And that was that the boat patrol off and that's why they started harassing him. So they turned against him at that at that point, Yeah. Okay. Like, yeah, You know, like, you know, crushed like this. Like he just says whatever you want to know, like Chris, you can't. He couldn't let it go if you want. Hang on. I know you had a problem. You're trying to drive out here and.

Chris Cantwell FBI Illinois Rod Blood Goya Ingrid George Ryan Illinois General Assembly Vich Charlottesville Donald Trump Barack Obama New Hampshire Senate Virginia Blagojevich Bull Patrol Sea of life Synagogue Maryland federal government
"george ryan" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"george ryan" Discussed on WGN Radio

"You know, it's one of those things I still think about. You know, he did some bad stuff, but and I'm sure he's probably was guilty. We would have never executed him. You know, I know that the anti death penalty folks are mean they're very loud. You heard them. You know that you have no right to do this and on and on. But when I think about the cases that you had to deal with you also had the families of the victims, right? And in many cases, I'm sure those family members wanted to see the death penalty used that you write about the story. It's actually one of your neighbors. A guy named Steve Small who was buried alive and and killed a suffix e ated from that, so I'm just curious. What was your answer when you had the family members of victims who said governor This person should be executed. Well, I couldn't set that We had several people like that. We wanted to make sure that we had we had. Ah, make sure that whoever Bennett, sentenced to death is guilty. However, I thought that the whole system was so fraught with there that there was any possible way that you could be absolutely sure. That that somebody was guilty or innocent because of the way the air that's possible in that situation. But I was still kind of a supporter of the death penalty and kind of a long story I won't go into, but I formed a commission to improve the death penalty to make it Less likely that an innocent person could be executed. And I had a commission that I appointed that made some recommendations. 85 recommendations to the General Assembly to do just that. It makes some changes. I thought and men in the commission did, too. That would be less likely to kill an innocent person. And that it was an election year and, of course, the members of the General Assembly when you run into public up, But you always want to look like you're tough on crime, and they didn't want to do too much. So out of the 85 recommendations that the commission made His General Assembly passed 11 and I think it was in Madigan's chamber in the House. And It was to make sure that the videotape confessions for especially capital crimes anybody says Yes, I may I I committed the crime and and you know you did that they had Take those confessions and the and I don't. I think it's still on those. I think it's still the law, but it was the only one that passed. And then the rest of the recommendations at my commission made were sent into a committee basically just killed him, and I never we never heard from him again. So once again, let me remind people I'm talking to former Governor George Ryan, former governor of Illinois on about his new book until I could Be sure he's the guy that instituted the moratorium on the death penalty was back on January 31st of 2000 governor But that wasn't that wasn't the end of what you did, because beyond that, you also decided to commute the sentences of everybody who was on who's on death row because the truth was even though you you entered the moratorium. That didn't mean death penalty trials didn't stop right. I mean the list of people on that death row it continue to grow. The sentence just couldn't be carried out. Yeah, That's right. I just the moratorium just meant that I wasn't going to sign the death warrant sent over from the attorney general. I have to tell the governor I do. The attorney General shuns the death warrant. I have to sign before they can execute anybody. I just said I'm not signing any more of these until we get the same straightened up. All right. Stick with me Governor because there's so much more to talk about on we do want to talk about some of your own personal experiences with the system. Once again, listeners can call in and talk to former Governor George Ryan 312981 72 100 will be back after these words. You're listening to 7 20 w GM. Is your old sports memorabilia, trash or treasure? Find out between 8:39 a.m. and don't throw anything out yet Rise and wine with US five until 19..

Governor George Ryan His General Assembly US General Steve Small Bennett GM Illinois attorney Madigan
"george ryan" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"george ryan" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"He would be sort of the last one all Between the speaker If the allegations are true, if, if McClain folded, there would be an easier route to the speaker's office. It reminds me of. I know McLane was reached by think, perhaps be easy or somebody, a Tribune reporter, and he said. I'm never going to offer up any evidence to the feds. But that's what Scott Farewell said about George Ryan until they took him on a little ride a little ride. Out to South Dakota and back and then that was it. He rolled over on Ryan. So is McLane considered to be the linchpin to get Man again. I'm putting very bluntly. But if he goes, do you think Madigan goes I think that's the only way It would happen right? He he could be the start of the blocker for format again. But the difference, he says he's not. Going to flip. But the tribute is also reported that his bones have been wiretapped. So I saw in the Tribune they had verbatim. So obviously have they have verbatim. The feds have The wiretaps of some sort of very copious notes. One of the other we're talking to the Chicago Tribune reporter Stacy ST Claire, The governor's walking a delicate line on this is well. John Dempsey. Yes, they see. The governor talked about this after the comet plea agreement when Madigan was implicated. And he was asked about the appropriateness of Carrie Solesky heading the Illinois Commerce Commission, which regulates com. Ed, so I want to play you his soundbite and get your reaction. Let me just say that she has served as a public servant. For the state of Illinois for many years Now, there has not been any allegation against her, I think would be unfair for us to hold.

Madigan McLane Tribune reporter Scott Farewell Chicago Tribune George Ryan McClain Illinois Commerce Commission South Dakota Illinois Carrie Solesky Ed Stacy ST Claire John Dempsey
"george ryan" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

06:27 min | 2 years ago

"george ryan" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"WNBC, Rob Kendall Abdul in for the Chicks on the Right plane, the rock show my friend anything, anything for you, My friend. And this has been been so much fun this week. We will not be in tomorrow I will be in for the morning show. And you will be with me for part of that as well. But chicks and write off tomorrow and then they'll be back on Monday. And by the way, Ah, no weekend show for me this weekend because we're running racing. Congratulations getting paid in. Working on coming up next segment, by the way, make sure you stick around. We'll have the gun guy Guy. Relford is going to be with us, and we're going to talk about what rights homeowners have in the state of Indiana. Obviously this event in Missouri in which these folks defended their their home their lives from their lawn brandishing a weapon, not not using it on anyone. But what sort of rights do you have here? Do you have the same rights that those folks did to defend yourself and your property's coming up next segment? Pick. Another big question to that will have with guy Relford is sort of the reasonable standard off the stand your ground kind of law that Indiana has. And if somebody is fleeing your house does that mean you can shoot them in the back like, um Not really. But we'll have the discussion with guy Relford. Okay, that's coming up next segment. But first of all I did. I did have a question for you because You hang around all the politicians, you know all of these. There's a black question. This's a politics question. And I have to ask you because all those people hate me so they don't invite me to things anymore. Trump and Biden had their fundraising numbers out. And to me, it is incredible. How much money both of these two race, I think Trump raised slightly over 131 million Biden racing like 141 million And to me, it is staggering the amount of money these two guys who seemingly half of the country can't stand both of them and the amount of money they bring in, and my question is because I have never I have given. I think two times in my life to political campaigns. They were below the the reporting threshold and was to a local candidate who I personally knew. Who are these people who give to these politicians and why look at the condition our countries and whatever side you're on. It's a week ago. Government's going really well right now. Who are these people that given? Why do they give all the money? Well, people give for a number of different reasons, but I worked for the government back in the The late nineties. Early two thousand's. I gave my boss my boss was the attorney general. I believe in this cause your job for his cause. I don't really I mean, I know I believed in this cause because I believe it was a good guy. They pressure or they like it like they passed like the plate around like a TTE. The church. You know some for the honorarium. How much have you contributed of duel? No, Not really. Really, You know, I mean, ah. George Ryan did, and George Ryan went to jail and former governor of Illinois to ungovernable and gel tend to go hand in hand most of time these days. You know, I work for the Illinois attorney General, I gave like 250 bucks was like for his fundraiser campaign. I have always been floored, though, that these people because what is that? These are federal candidates. So the order of 27 or $2800 for primary and in the same for the general that's a lot of money. I mean, even if you're a rich person Millionaire, whatever. Even if you're even if you're rich, that's still I would hate to lose $2700. And I know how these campaigns waste money. I've seen it firsthand. Nobody gives that amount of money and that's let's face it. If you're raising 141 $131 million that you're not getting it 20 bucks at a time, you know? No. No offense. Well, sometimes you are sometimes if you have a lot of smaller grassroots stoners. You can pull like, you know, 20 bucks here. No. 50 bucks here and it all starts adding up, And you certainly don't know what you're talking about. Real money, Which is one of things that Elizabeth Warren used to do in Bernie Sanders. Like, Hey, we got no doughnuts from a total of $50 here from Biscay. Read them. Read them on us Online Web feed. Yeah, exactly like like the of the public broadcasting give $50 he'll receive a CD and hear your name on the radio, which actually do that too. So Go figure. Yeah, but But I think the bigger thing is is is when you say like a okay who is giving money to campaign since it's easiest people who want access I mean, and that's you of those. You're bigger. You're bigger donors and you're in your big organizations. You're not buying votes because that's illegal. What you're buying is your buying access. Okay. I gave no $30,000 Rob's campaign. So when I have an issue I can call Rob and I know I'll get my eye. No. Hit my voice. Sure. I mean, I get what I want, but least I'll be her insider baseball question. Like, Let's Let's say Governor Holcomb. Does he know? Is he actually aware of who the big I mean, the big donors are like with the late Krystle Luhan gave him like $50,000. He's got to be aware of that right now. Like this is one of your big donors. The guy who owns the Motor Speedway gave $100,000 Penske. He's got to be aware of like Roger Penske's on line one. And, uh, yeah, he owns the track, but he also gave you 100 grand like I mean, he's got you have to be aware of that, right? And usually end event like a like a political fundraiser event, which has been a little difficult, tricky to do these days because of Kobe, 19 and social distancing, then the whole nine yards, I think I think what you have is of the government of event. Ah, he'll give the speech like a lot of people will know because I've given this campaign's before, But usually it would be like V. You'll have somebody there in your ear. This is Rob Kendall. He's from all around, burn, and he gave bubble, okay? I've sent some things to the governor. It wasn't money, though. But, yeah, I kind of figured that much They because they always look at brought concerts like Let's say you go to the Rolling Stones concert or whatever they have people who go to all their concerts, and they always somehow magically end up in like the fifth row, and they may not know that person's name, but they recognize him like you'll see him point at him or whatever politicians they start to, like. Recognize. These has always felt that with with Mike Pence like he would see people and I like his work. Informant center, I'd realized He doesn't know that person's name, but he recognizes their faith knows they should know their name. And so it's a little song and dance of him trying to figure out who in the world are you and why do I know you That's got to go on with politicians, and usually like that usually got a NATO.

guy Relford Illinois attorney Indiana Rob Kendall Abdul Trump George Ryan Biden Rob Kendall Roger Penske Mike Pence Missouri Penske Governor Holcomb Rolling Stones Elizabeth Warren baseball Rob NATO Bernie Sanders
"george ryan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"george ryan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Don't know him very well I've got a couple of guys use on for a short while the apprentice years ago like a very nice person don't know says he doesn't know about it this mentions that he was on trump's TV show the apprentice what is bill going which is relationship with trump well I mean if you know anyone who's watched that show they might remember that it was strum who fired will go a bit from that program so I mean they they did go back back in twenty ten Donald Trump did an interview with with Howard Stern about rob local election even back then trump was expressing you know dissatisfaction that that boy which was in trouble and he called in a fighter at that point and that's really kind of continued and it really really started picking up once trump again as president and in twenty eighteen aboard Air Force One in late may I mean he really kind of went on a rampage about how unfair the boy which had been treated and of course the common threads for that many of the people that were involved in the the Russia probe of trump were also involved in the prosecution of brokerage and so that that's where trump is gone with this you know it was pointed out on Twitter that it has been many many years now since there was not an Illinois governor in prison you could also look at that and say in Illinois used to be no one was above the law yeah I mean I think that's really at the heart of this fourteen year sentence that was handed down by former judge James able here in Chicago I mean I think you know we were coming out of an era where the garbage is predecessor George Ryan a Republican had had his own fundraising scandal that resulted in federal prison term for him zig was trying to send a message here a deterrent that the public corruption has consequences and I think you know in a state like Illinois where we have corruption probes all over the place you're going on now the the message that this sense I think is causing a lot of people in the law enforcement community to really kind of wonder what in the world is the president thinking here you know basically giving an ex governor who was was really caught on tape talk about a lot of bad things giving him a get out of jail free card does us in the right message a lot of people here don't don't think it sends the right message that is Dave McKinney who is state politics reporter for W. be easy in Chicago and host of the podcast.

trump Donald Trump Howard Stern president Twitter Illinois Chicago George Ryan Dave McKinney reporter W. Russia James zig
"george ryan" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

11:22 min | 3 years ago

"george ryan" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Motivational, creative innovative and just plain interesting people from all walks of life. Here's Bill Hobson. It's that time of year when we start to pay attention to things like the tax deadline in spending in our own personal budgets, and how well we estimated what we needed to send into to the IRS and our friends in the federal government, those public servants that are always looking out for all of us. Of course, that's one of the reasons that I'm so excited to introduce to all of you, the CEO and founder of open the books. These folks are doing yeoman's work in keeping an eye on how our tax dollars are spent in many cases misspent and with that introduction. Let me welcome in Adam nj ski from open the books, Adam. How are you? Great to be on the program. Thanks for your interest in our work. Will you know, your work is one of those areas of life that we tend to pay attention to only during certain seasons. It seems like that would be of course, tax time, maybe when budgets are being kicked about and you start to see some of the things that are being tacked onto major spending initiatives before we get into a lot of the specifics Phyllis it a little bit on the background of open the books. How did you come to found it? So the mission that opened the book is to capture everytime that's taxed and spent at every level of government across the entire country. So Bill that includes the federal level the state level and the local level. I found it open the books dot com because I live in Illinois, and it is the Super Bowl of corruption. And so I got my start in business as an entrepreneur back in nineteen Ninety-seven. My brother nine we went from accompany that we started from our apartments to twenty million dollars of sales over a ten year period. And it was a brutal battle like a, you know, at at the end of three years, we nearly lost the company at the end of five years we were still making a little bit in putting it back into the company to help it grow. And finally at the end of six years, we earned our employees at the end of ten years an overnight success. And this is, you know, this is the story the American dream, and and but for another dimes worth of taxes regulations and fees. We'd have been gone that doesn't would've never survived years three. So I've Oude after I sold shares in that business. I've Oude that spend the rest of my life, making sure government spending is a fishing and affective and honest and that leads us to this initiative. Open the books dot com to capture everything and show it all American people. So you can follow the tax dollar was there, a the straw that broke the camel's back moment where you said, I I'm fed up. I've had it up to here, and I'm going to begin investigating how all of this happens. So that that moment that's a very good question. That moment was for me was in the second grade and the fourth grade, my father is a conservative democrat decided to run against the corrupt Republican political machine of our home county of not and you'll you'll recognize the politicians name that he ran against for back in the day for, you know, low level state Representative office that guy's name was George. Ryan, George Ryan would eventually become governor of Illinois, and then go to jail for public corruption as many of you. It's almost part of their campaign platform in Illinois for some reason. Always had four out of nine actually end up in jail. And we've had George Ryan Republican who's in jail at the same time as riboflavin that democrat while while while so at least no party has a corner on the market. They can't come out and proclaim to be white glove clean as compared to their opponent. Because it's an equal opportunity state for corruption. Apparently. Well, it is, you know, it's it's both Republicans and Democrats eating off the same trough, you know, feeding on taxpayer money. So we came up with this idea of aggressive transparency followed up by aggressive forensic auditing. And that that leads us where we are today. It open the bookstop com we've actually built the world's largest private database of government spending. So he's captured nearly all federal. Spending since your two thousand and one in the in the local units government, we've captured twenty two million public employees salary and pension records. It's nearly every single public employees at every level of government across the entire country in the state of Michigan or is very very deep in this regard. And then in forty eight out of fifty states, we have at least one year their checkbook spending most oftentimes we go back twelve years. Okay. So let's talk mechanics here a little bit. How on earth do you? Gather all of this data when we are no exaggeration. We're talking about trillions and trillions of dollars a concept. I really can't wrap my bald head around. Well, you know, the federal government nowadays spends about four trillion dollars a year our national debt is twenty two trillion. But let's put that in perspective. So that what that means your fear that in mind, every man woman and child in this country owes sixty five thousand dollars is our share the national debt if you are a family of four to parents to kids your share of the national debt is two hundred sixty thousand dollars. So tell me this is a crisis. It's a crisis of an amazing in proportions are Honore chairman is a former legendary Senator. From Oklahoma, Dr Tom Coburn. He wrote the book on the debt bomb it, you know, as a threat facing national security and also Obama's former Brock Obama is former chairman of the joint Jesus staff, Mike Mullen, he said that the nation's greatest threat is our national debt people on the left, right and center can all agree that this is a big problem in the also appear to all agree. Not to do anything about it. Well, you're exactly right. And I think that leads us to our latest oversight report, we took a look at the last four years worth of the final month of the school year the year end spending it's called use it or lose it spending where the federal agencies spend down their budgets, so they get at least as much if not more next year from congress. So they're afraid if they don't spend it all congress won't continue to appropriate them money. So they do all kinds of crazy expenditures to to blow out their budget right at the end of the year. And what we have found is that last year under President Donald Trump executive agencies spent one hundred billion dollars on contracts in the last month of the year in September. Wow. And I want to get into that here. The moments ahead before we do I wonder if you can help give us a bit of econ one one primer that answers a very basic question. Okay. And I'm asking this on behalf of our listeners. Why does the national debt matter to whom do we owe? And what are they gonna do come repossess our state? You know that kind of thing why does it matter? So it matters because by the year twenty twenty five years just a in an easy story to show why it matters the amount of interest that will be paying on our national debt will exceed our military budget. So right now, we spend about the president is submitted a budget today for seven hundred fifty billion dollars for the department of defense by twenty twenty. Five the interest, and our national debt alone will exceed the amount of money that we that we budget for our military needs into whom are we paying this debt? Well, about forty percent of it is owed to foreigners and about sixty percent is owed to you know, to domestic entities. And so we, you know, forty percent of the interest goes to hope bondholders out of the country and sixty percent of the interest close right back to on holders in our country. Most of us with families with family budgets, you know, with incomes that are derived from job, we we have some very simple calculations to do when money gets tight in a family setting. We need to curtail purchases and or go and generate more revenue. Maybe that's taking on a better job or a second job or whatever. There's definitely though he required change in personal habits. Once you realize the reality of the financial pinch that you may be as a family. I have long wondered how that mindset seems to leave otherwise reasonable and educated people when they take some level of power, whether it's a Washington, or whether it's in my state capital or your township halls man, it seems like the answer's always to keep in. Increasing spending. Why I agree with you? When when our honorary chairman, Dr Tom Coburn was in congress, and in the US Senate in marveled at the lack of fiscal constraints, like all of his colleagues, they want to spend your money because they Cockburn felt those people feel that it's their tickets are reelection and political power in, you know, and it will continue to be until the American people make these things voting issues. You know, the American people we need to raise our voice when you hear about things that we're going to talk about next on. How your taxpayer dollars were spent you need to raise your voice, calling your member of congress and make sure that they feel the heat. So.

congress Illinois Bill Hobson chairman Dr Tom Coburn president Adam nj George Ryan yeoman IRS George Ryan Republican Obama Adam CEO Michigan Phyllis state Representative Oklahoma US Senate
"george ryan" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:42 min | 3 years ago

"george ryan" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Steve. I was not speeding. I ran a red light. That's different worse. It's not good. It's not good. Was Dan blah, blue Jaguars fault. Was Meiring that vehicle is he went through the yellow light. And the next thing. I know I was not well and moving violations are a little bit more. You have to think while you're driving. It's also the parking stall most not fair. And didn't go that far. But it is a split-second decision. Sometimes so some sometimes you catch a little yellow. Yeah. Well, if you catch a little yellow and a little red it's yellow if you catch a red to Red Eye caught the red, by the way, producer L if the news click yesterday wgnradiOcom we ask you daily web poll question we want your answer to it yesterday. The news click question was first and foremost, here's what I say about bears kicker, Cody parkey, and we gave you four emotional options. If you will the one that got fifty percent of the votes was he didn't lose the game. The team did. In fact, only nine percent of you said Cody parkey lost the game for us. Thirty five percent said it was a tragic loss. But what a great season and six percent and probably including our own. Kevin Powell said, I'm sorry. I can't talk about this right now fifty percent said he did lose the game for us the team. Did we have a new news? Click question here, it is producer ELF. Are you ready? Yes, or no. She says, no, we'll pick up a couple of phone lines. Let's go to John on line three, John you're on WGN. Hi. Pardon me. Joe you're on WGN. Hi, joe. We're backwards here. Our saying John that maybe everybody seemed fine. But you can't afford to pay the fine. You can work it out with public service. Makes it better. I you the people who can't afford it. But I also wanted to say you staring at that car was distracted writing. I know that's that's the new drunk driving distracted driving. That's the worst kind of person. Isn't it? Exactly. Yeah. Well. A busted. Thank you for the call. Joe John on line one, you're on WGN. Hi, john. You're on the air. John. Good. Mad about a year ago, traveling from Hammond Indiana through Midlothian about four in the morning. Gonna meet a buddy to go to work doing fifty nine hundred thirty. Big-time rate. I get pulled over again pool overseas. I get pulled over the cop comes up to me. Takes my license. I give my stuff I figure I'm gonna tickets. He comes up to the car. He tells me to get out of the car. I said it wasn't going to work as a car. He puts his head towards your car, which I dealt James down your badge. I don't know. What's happening? Santos on going to jail. He says there's a long annoying now since two thousand eleven called aggravated speeding. Go to jail if you're over a certain amount of miles of the speed limit. Yeah. Over twenty six I think it was twenty six something like that. Yeah. He took me with local station. He was he took my mug shot. He took prints. I didn't go to jail because it cost me seven hundred fifty dollars to get my car back out. Four dollars court costs. Every new about that law and do you still speed? People. Do learn the lessons financially, but I don't know what you make. But boy that sounds like a lot of money to me, and that probably was real bite in your life. Wasn't it? Well. Fifty bucks an hour. It was a bite 'cause the biggest bite was home. My wife yelled at me. I'll care about the money. Getting reprimanded by ladies worse yet. Wait till your wife finds out that was the. The one we want to go home. I'm gonna get my feet. Thanks for the call. Imagine if the fine was even less than that wouldn't hurt even as much, you know, I mean, you don't learn your lesson unless hopefully the finances are hurting little bit. I think they should hurt a little bit. I think it should be. But, but it doesn't hurt a three three hundred dollar ticket doesn't hurt a person making one hundred thousand dollars as much as it does somebody making fifteen dollars an hour or somebody making five hundred thousand dollars, and then you have all of those car sharing the same space, but defines are the same for all of them. And I don't think they should be by the way about the last call the aggravated speeding or excessive speeding law. I didn't tell the previous caller Joe about this. But. John's law that salon Illinois because of this radio show. Thank you several years ago. I was in a neighborhood in a car was speeding by so fast. I said that should be attempted murder. If that guy who speeding through my neighborhood. I don't remember exactly what street. It was. I was living in the Grange park at the time. Matt Kubala who hosts the show here on weekends was my producer. And I said if if there had been a child or another car bicycle there's a number of instances, but sometimes we all speed. But if you're speeding so fast in a neighborhood, you could kill somebody. And you're just getting away with it because you're lucky if we catch you it's not a speeding ticket. It should be attempted murder. I think I told Lou Lang this and whoever the Representative was he said, I've got a point. He didn't think it should be attempted murder. But he said we'll have an excessive or aggravated speeding fine, and it will be greater and at the signing. Governor George Ryan sat in his office downtown Chicago, Andrea darlas went there to cover it for the radio station. Matt. Ball. And I were there at the signing. We all look thrilled George Ryan did not. I don't know why he just didn't seem to appreciate our company. Maybe heard my show. So that was signed into law because of what we talked about here on this radio station, which I thought was a great example of democracy. Right. It wasn't a real power play. By me. I'd like to think anybody could do that you call. Your Representative say I've got a point here they convince legislators it's just like I'm just a Bill from schoolhouse rock that happened. However, the last caller had to pay the price of that. Sorry about that Stanford WGN radio news. Oh, and by the way, before we get done with the show today. We'll visit with the university of Chicago researcher who was part of the people talking about that new plan planet they've discovered which may have water on it. And if they have water on it, then they've probably got a Starbucks will talk to her about that before the show is over. We'll also preview the president's speech tonight into the. WGN radio newsroom now with Steve Bertrand Sears is getting another reprieve from liquidation after its chairman and largest shareholder revised his bid to save the iconic brand. The retailer says it is accepted Eddie Lampert bid through an affiliate of ESL. Hedge fund that could keep four hundred twenty five stores open and save tens of thousands of workers their jobs, a Russian lawyer who became a focal point of the investigation into whether there was collusion between the Russians and President Trump's campaign has been criminally charged in an unrelated case, the Talia veselnitskaya was charged with obstruction of Justice in an indictment unsealed in New York. It's thought that she's already in Russia and Chicago police woman with a gun and a concealed carry permit shot and killed the teeny tried to Robert gunpoint point this morning in the Fernwood neighbourhood happened around five forty in the five hundred block of west two hundred and third. We'll check your money sports, traffic and weather next on WGN since.

Joe John WGN Governor George Ryan producer Cody parkey Chicago Matt Kubala Representative Dan blah Kevin Powell Steve. Eddie Lampert Red Eye Starbucks blue Jaguars university of Chicago Russia ELF
"george ryan" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

04:36 min | 3 years ago

"george ryan" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"For the thing up your right, pending. This is L S AM aid ninety pretty good. Pretty good Jude. Well, done John. How was a Jennifer Keiper alongside six thirty seven. We'll take until seven o'clock. And it's the great one the marklevinshow here on WLS. What are you bringing me? Oh, thank you. Thank you, a long list of corrupt Illinois politicians. Yes. This is this is a stack. We'll have to read all of it again tonight rolled out onto the floor. That's there's a long list of local state and even federal politicians that have gone away for finger painting and weightlifting courtesy of us here in Illinois that brings us to our next guest early in his career. Patrick Collins served for twelve years as an assistant US attorney here in Chicago, including four years as deputy chief of the public corruption section. He's spearheaded the eight year operation. Rhode investigation. You remember that remember the the break? Licenses. There's former secretary of state George Ryan, right? Former US attorney and now he works at Cayenne s he's a partners there. And he led the prosecution in these six month trial and conviction of former Illinois Governor, George Ryan is his watched a lot of it here in our fair city for a long time. We welcome to wwl's Patrick Collins. Patrick, are you surprised are you shocked? Well, look, I it does explain their aggressive actions with the search warrants and as again as someone who's been on both sides of these sorts of actions. I I was frankly, hoping that the government had some significant evidence because I think by doing a search warrants in the way, they did. Certainly impacted Mr. Birks electoral chances, and I wanted to as a citizen I wanted to make sure there was some some bare their if you will. And I think today's today's criminal complaints is that question. Patrick collins. According to the complaint, the FBI won a judge's approval to wiretap alderman Burke, cell phone already recording his causing before the shakedown at the center of the charge began to unfold back in may of seventeen. What does that tell you? Well, look when you're thinking about presenting your case in court, particularly on someone like miss Burke after have evidence, and there's no better evidence than the individual himself incriminating himself and recorded phone conversation. So I mean, whether it's civil case or this number case, the government's best evidence in public corruption cases are the are the words of the alderman himself, and I think recorded conversations provide the government very compelling evidence. Really fortunate to have Patrick Collins here on double DLC surfer twelve years as an assistant US attorney in Chicago four years as deputy chief of public corruption. He was involved in the conviction of former Illinois Governor, George Ryan, remember, what does it tell you, Mr Collins about Chicago? How are we? So why are we so afflicted and burdened by corruption? We seem to be the Petri dish for the entire nation. Well, look if I had an answer that question, I would I would have retired years ago. I, you know, this issue of deterrence with all that's gone before alderman convictions. Governor gubernatorial convictions, you would think that we were in the new age, but what laid out in the criminal complaint. And again, I would want emphasize as as a lawyer in private practice. These are allegations are not proof, but the seems to be the playbook that we've seen time and again that aldermen have important influence. There's fifty city Chicago. They all have a lot of control over their individual wards. And they they have the ability to use that power to benefit themselves personally. And whenever you do that that's a violation of law, and we've seen it, unfortunately time and time again, but guys is shrewd, and I would say as smart as Ed Burke, and Dan Rostenkowski, even even a George Ryan. I mean, how did they get caught up in things like this? I don't I don't understand that hubris. Is it just you get lazy? You get you get to the point where you just wanna make problems go away. And they'll take the shortcut. I don't I don't understand the the mindset of these guys have been in. In the in the business. So long to slip up this family. Very fair question. It's certainly one that I can't answer. Mr Burke, I what is the pricing having read the criminal complaint is you would think that there would be several layers in between Mr Burke and the active.

Patrick Collins alderman Burke George Ryan Illinois Chicago Jennifer Keiper assistant US attorney deputy chief Mr Burke Jude John FBI Rhode US attorney Mr. Birks Cayenne private practice Dan Rostenkowski
"george ryan" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"george ryan" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"In fact, this stuff was occurring, but what the government alleges and what the recorded conversations apparently corroborate is that Mr Burke himself was speaking directly with Dennis Reid is the restaurant executives individuals a and b. In in dealing with them, very directly and making it dropping hints that aren't for the layman are aren't even hence, they seem pretty direct. I read that portion to and I thought gosh, it's like it's right out of the sopranos. No, right. There's there's not a lot of subtlety to it. And I guess to me that's the most surprising thing for who has seen so much. If in fact, the allegations bear out is that he was directly in the line of fire here and in doing it in a not very subtle way. Talking to Patrick Collins who for twelve years was here in town. He helped to put away George Ryan among others personal. And I mentioned this earlier in the program. Mr Collins, my father was a businessman here. I'm sorry. My father-in-law was a businessman for many many years here is now retired in the real estate business curse commercial real estate and had to deal with Edberg on number of occasions in earlier today when I called him, and I said breaking news, Stu breaking news eh. Edberg has been criminally charged. He simply said, the chickens have come home to roost. Well, look, you just you know, as someone who's lived in the city for a long long time. And now I represent individual businesses. I mean, it should not be a cost of doing business in any ward in the city of cargo that you have to pay a tax or you have to pay fealty. You have to do provide some benefit for all dramatic folks doing their job and his as laid out in the complaint. Some cases they didn't even have the authority that they were alleging to have. But yet it just throwing up roadblocks for people trying to conduct business in the city, Chicago, you know, it creates a business environment that is not business friendly. And you know, it creates an environment where you have to know somebody and have to again, pay the tax. They shouldn't have to pay you pay the corruption tax. And it's it's not right. That's not the way that things should work. But unfortunately, it's it's it has been the way that things have worked for a long long time. Mr Collins, can you even reconcile being a public servant in the city of Chicago. And also being part of an. A private business. Who is going to help that private business deal with the city of Chicago. It doesn't seem like those are reconcilable positions. Again. I don't I they aren't they are not reconcilable positions. And you know, people that are petitioning their government for a driveway permit, for example, which you know, we should be in issued by the department of transportation issued by an alderman ward. Again, the idea that that alderman can can sort of get into that process and can can cause the department transportation to Tanada who were permits, for example, that you are otherwise are are qualified to get until you pay the tax. It's just wrong. When you watched Edberg, I don't know if you saw on TV, I watched all of it earlier today, and he was walking to and from the hearing he was worrying that fedora. And he did remind me of George Ryan. Did you get that sense as well? I'm watching. TV today. But I look there's a there's a way that folks, I think is do business that is perhaps ingrained in the culture, and you know, whether that's what happened here. Again, I wanna give Mr Burke his his day in court at the end of the day. This is an attempted extortion in that it did not sort of go to completion. But I do think what the government lays out in in in real significant detail in the words of Mr Burke himself is how this works, and it really is. It's really sort of textbook one. Oh, one extortion is alleged in this in this criminal complaint reminds me of bloggers defense. Well, they never came through with the money. So I didn't commit a crime. But if you attempt to bribe a cop and the cop turns down, the bribe is still a crime, it is I mean, you you're going to get into and again, I don't know what the defense how it will play out here..

Mr Burke Edberg Patrick Collins Chicago George Ryan extortion Dennis Reid department of transportation Tanada twelve years
"george ryan" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

04:09 min | 3 years ago

"george ryan" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Patrick Collins twelve years as an assistant federal prosecutor here in town helped put George Ryan and the club fed. He'll join us at six thirty eight. We'll ask him if he's surprised or shocked by the charges against Hedberg. He's been there. He's got the card punch. We'll talk to Patrick Collins who is now in private practice here in town in just a few minutes about six thirty eight Dan joins us. He's very patient calling from Richmond. There's some sort of body shop up there some hot rod company was at a couple of weeks ago. Dan, welcome to the program. Hey, thanks for taking my call. How are you? Well, thank you. Good. Hey. Just hear me out per minute. And I'll be brief. But what qualifications do all these politicians? They have. I mean, most of them are lawyers, but other than that, do you have any common theme of make what makes them qualified to look out for the people saying that since the beginning of Representative Republic, you know, we had farmers who are citizen patriots and would go to DC and do their civic duty. And then go home. Yeah. You're right. There's a lot of lawyers Gary McCarthy, of course, has been in law enforcement entire life Vallis has run major school systems board. I mean, there's a couple of guys Ryan here. A few people. Few people that are running that are smart enough for this job. There's a lot of pontificators. There's a lot of posers out there who just like to see their name out there who could not do the job. Even if elected, but we've seen that from time to time America deserves the Representative government that they elect. All right. Well, this being said though. Maybe posers, but out of those good politicians that you would qualify as good politicians. How many how many of those good politicians? Do you think make the decisions for the people and make good decisions where the people I it's kind of a loaded question. And I'll get to my real answer. I don't know if there's an answer to that. Well, here's my here's my comment that why not make it like jury duty or a lottery system where you just pick names out of out of the hat like myself. You don't know me from Adam. And I'm not qualified for the job. But you know, what out of ten different questions or ten different problems that come about my way, I might get three out of ten rice. Dan, there's a there's an old anecdote, it's a proper attribution was William F. Buckley, who said at one point that he would rather be rather be led by report. He'd rather lacked or have our point as congress the first five hundred and thirty five names in the Boston phonebook than the crowd. We had there. Then I'm I'm kind of angling the anti. Cto? But you get what I'm saying. I call him a loss works for CNN. She's the entertainment reporter over there. And I saw her earlier today, and claw you took part in something called the Byrd box challenged based on the movie with Sandra Bullock, is it safe for you. Is it safe for the kids khloe? No, first of all, thanks for having me. The movie is territory. Watch it because we couldn't stop hearing about it. I mean, Netflix released a press release, and they rarely ever get numbers. Like over fifty million. People watched it, and it's I you days, which is unprecedented original film, and Sandra Bullock is incredible. And she plays a mother of children, and I'm not gonna take. It's pretty disturbing. Some sort of thriller, obviously, and they wear this blindfold. And now people are because people are people in Darwin still rules. They're putting on blindfolds and are getting themselves hurt. And I noticed on your report on CNN, and this is calling Kohima Las talking to us. I believe from New York this morning this afternoon. My understanding is that parents are using their kids and stunting on social media and putting the kids endanger with the bird box challenge, which essentially means you walk around with a blindfold on right? So it's a valuable challenge right now. The challenge like you said in that have come out and released a statement saying don't do this. It's dangerous. Basically people are went fold. Or? Being themselves doing everyday tasks. Going to the grocery store around moving vehicles in working through the woods. And some people have good something with them..

George Ryan Dan Sandra Bullock Patrick Collins William F. Buckley Hedberg CNN reporter Representative Republic Richmond private practice Gary McCarthy Netflix America Cto Representative Boston