7 Episode results for "George Pompidou"

NPR News: 03-25-2021 6PM ET

NPR News Now

04:40 min | 3 weeks ago

NPR News: 03-25-2021 6PM ET

"Live from npr news. i'm jack speer in a news conference today. President biden said he is open to fillibuster reform. Something many democrats are pushing for more from. Npr's more lion much biden's agenda will not be able to pass the sixty threshold in the senate and many democrats want to overturn the rule that requires a supermajority to break a filibuster biden. Repeated today that he is in favor of a reform that would require senators. Who are filibustering to keep talking on the senate floor as they were required to do in the past. But he said he was also open to other changes if republicans decide to obstruct everything. There's complete lockdown and chaos consequential filibuster. Then we'll have to go beyond what i'm talking about. The president said his main goal was to get things done for the american people in that his years in the senate have given him a good idea of how to get things done in that chamber mara liasson. Npr news after shuttering. His goal of making sure one hundred million covid nineteen. Vaccinations were delivered to americans. In his first one hundred days in office president biden effect is doubling down by saying today he's setting a new goal administering two hundred million shots in his first one hundred days bringing the east room of the white house for his first solo. News conferences. Taking office the president noted he reached his first goal. Forty two days ahead of schedule. The us carried out more than two dozen. Cyber operations abroad protect us elections last year new details on election security emerging at a capitol hill hearing today. Here's npr's greg. Murray the head of us cyber command army general. Paul nakasone worn last year that he'd be taking measures against foreign adversaries to safeguard the november elections. He offered a summary in testimony before the senate services committee. Us cyber command conducted more than two dozen operations to get ahead of foreign threats before the interfered or influenced our elections in twenty twenty. Nakasone did not name. The countries that use cyber warriors acted against however the us intelligence community recently reported that russia and iran both attempted to meddle with the election. Gregory npr news washington. Bad weather is hitting parts of the south today including a small rural community south of birmingham alabama pictures and videos circulating showing damage including in the eagle point neighborhood of hoover alabama more from npr russell. Lewis here in birmingham. It is still windy. There are still bolts of lightening and claps of thunder from this storm system. That has brought this particularly violent tornado into the birmingham metro area. The tornado moved just south of the metro area hitting several neighborhoods in communities. It appears that the hardest hit community is In eagle point that scenario in hoover which is just south of birmingham. Npr's russell lewis on wall street. The dow is up one hundred ninety nine points this is. Npr major french. Hospital says france waited too long as new. Variants of the corona virus surged and now a strict lockdown. Maybe the only way to avoid a major crisis within the hospital system. They're npr's eleanor. Beardsley reports francis. Currently what many people call lockdown light with some businesses in school still open speaking to be. Fm television professor philip juve on from the george pompidou hospital said france had let the situation go. Since mid december without making tough decisions culture over dubrovnik of nip rock of their earlier. You lot now shorter and more efficient. The measure will be he said. Now we've lost time and we have a knife to our throats. I don't see any other solution. But a tough confinement. France has already rescheduled eighty percent of other surgeries to make room for covid nineteen patients. The french government is trying to speed up. Vaccinations by bringing in firefighters and the army to help run mass vaccination centers in sports stadiums across the country. Eleanor beardsley npr news. Paris giving business owners who might qualify a bit more time to apply for forgivable loans under the government's paycheck protection program lawmakers passing a bill. Today that would give applicants to more wants to apply for the federal help. the measure is already cleared. the house and goes to president binds the desk to be signed into law. The deadline will be extended until may thirty first. The loan program was begun last year to help. Businesses survived the coronavirus pandemic. We'll after gaining ground. Yesterday gave some of that back crude oil futures tumbling four point three percent to close at fifty eight fifty six a barrel in new york. I'm jack speer npr news.

npr news jack speer President biden senate biden mara liasson Npr news president biden birmingham us cyber command army Paul nakasone senate services committee Npr Nakasone Gregory npr npr russell Us hoover russell lewis alabama
Thursday 10 January

Monocle 24: The Briefing

31:48 min | 2 years ago

Thursday 10 January

"You're listening to the briefing first broadcast on the tenth of January twenty nineteen on Monaco twenty four. Live from the Dory. House in London. This is the briefing. I'm Ben Ryland coming up US Democrats accused the president of throwing a temper tantrum. He asked speaker Pelosi. Will you agree to my wall? She said, no. And he just got up and said, then we have nothing to discuss. And he just walked down. Again, we saw a temper tantrum Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi aren't backing down north seems is the president will also find out what's making news across the Balkans. And we've got the latest from the world's leading menswear event PD womb. Oh in Florence. That's all ahead on the briefing live from London studying now. Donald Trump has extinguished any possibility of reopening, the US government after Nancy Pelosi reiterated that there would be no funding for a border wall. Fellow senior democrat Chuck Schumer emerged shortly after the meeting appearing quite alarmed at what he called a temper tantrum by the US president. Again, we saw a temper tantrum because he couldn't get his way. And he just walked out of the meeting. I asked him to open up the government that tomorrow, so many people will have trouble paying their mortgages paying their bills dealing with situations when they don't get paid. And I sip just why won't you do that? We'll continue to discuss we're willing to discuss anything. And he said, you if I open up the government, you won't do what I want. That's cruel. That's callous, and that's using millions of innocent people as sort of pawns, and it was wrong. Chuck Schumer speaking outside the White House. Jacob parakeet is on the line hasty deputy head of the US end America's program at Chatham house. Jacob as of this Friday, this shutdown will tie with the longest in US history. Is there any strategy here? Well, I think the Democrats have a strategy which is essentially to hold out because public polling suggests that the public largely blames Trump for the shutdown and that the idea of building a wall across the entirety of the US Mexico border is pretty unpopular. So I don't think that they newly empowered by having taken over the house of representatives just last week. I don't think they feel any particular pressure to concede to Trump. I don't think they think there's much benefit in conceding without getting some significant kind of. Concessions from him Trump? I don't think have strategy. I don't think he has seen these kind of tactics fail quite so spectacularly before. And I don't think he has a backup plan. So the question as it's been for the last few days is what's the off ramp for him who's capable offering him that. And how can he be kind of talked into it? Because of course, what he says he wants one day is not necessarily what he says he wants or indicates otherwise that he wants the next just looking at that footage of Chuck Schumer emerging from the White House. He did seem to be genuinely rattled by the encounter that he had with President Trump, which of course, famously seemed to end with him saying bye bye. Of the I suppose as being characterized by some as a short negotiation, although it didn't really seem to take that sort of frame at all do you think that that the Democrats odd genuinely shocked by just how badly relations have become during the shutdown? I think Schumer's reaction was probably about the the fact of seeing the president of the United States. And obviously I wasn't in the room and characterizations of what happened differ, but the person the United States willing to sort of continue this shutdown doing increasing and compounding damage to the federal government, and everyone who depends on it in exchange for basically not being able to but not be willing to budge at all on this central and frankly, pretty unreasonable to mand for an arbitrary barrier on the US Mexico border. So I don't know that Schumer was shocked by the sort of by the fact of the intransigence as the way of of it's exp. Depression. I think even after two years of the Trump presidency people are still adapting to the fact that this is someone who is fundamentally different in character and approach to the processes of governing than anyone who's occupied the office in living memory. There has been some attempt at making light of the encounter. For example, the Neo post reported that the president had handed out sweets during the short discussion, including skittles and M and M's withhold. But of course, the news is less wait for those people who are actually feeling the effects of the shutdown, particularly those who are employed in some essential roles, of course, food safety inspections, for example of slowed Ryan down there's no guarantee on eve, or of course, when funding might run out thirty eight million Americans at risk of losing, their food stamps and thousands more people who might be housing tenants the face eviction without assistance from the department of housing his any of that kind of thinking as far as you can tell factoring into how the Republic. Tackling this crisis. I think that kind of thing is increasingly pressing on the minds of Republican senators, especially Republican senators from states that might be up for grabs in the twenty twenty presidential and senatorial election people like Susan Collins and Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia have indicated that there they'd be willing to reopen the government or at least vote for a Bill to reopen. The government, of course, you'd need. If Trump threatened to veto it you'd need two thirds of the house and two thirds of the Senate. So a significant number of both Republicans and Democrats willing to pass a Bill over the president's veto. I don't know that many Republicans certainly there are some who are immigration hardliners and support to the hill the president's call for a wall. But I think the this sort of median Republican member of congress probably wants to put this behind them and have some kind of negotiation in the future about a wall. Rather than holding the the the? The increasing sort of number of Americans impacted by this shutdown at ransom in order to provide for it. But willingness to buck the leader of the party, even in the in the immediate wake of a fairly unsuccessful election. I think is still pretty hard to come by just very quickly. And finally on this Jacob shortly after the mid terms there was some people who thought that Trump came out. Okay. That election and others who who thought differently is this proof the haves that. In fact, the Trump presidency is now in quite unfamiliar territory one which that it might not actually know how to navigate. Yeah. I think that's a pretty fair read. I mean, Trump has not done any kind of elected office before he's not being an elected leader is new to him and the entire context that he has for it was a United government under Republican leadership in the house and Senate. So this is a very new set of operating principles for him and the people around him by and large are not people with a huge amount of government experience. Either Mick Mulvaney. The new chief of staff hasn't really worked with a divided government. Well, he he's been a number of Republican House. He's never seen a democratic house as a as a member. So I think there's not necessarily the the kind of experience around Trump that could guide him successfully to what he could claim victory. Jacob kayla's. Thank you for joining us on the briefing. It's eight minutes past twelve here in London. We'll get the latest business news now from Sebastian sale. Like on the line from Bloomberg Sebastian Ford, cutting thousands of jobs in Europe. They are this is part of a bid to return the business to profitability a board restructuring, and it could include closing factories as well said it'd been struggling with an aging model lineup for a while the contracting market in the UK, which is the Ford's biggest market in Europe out, of course, further disruption in store, given Brexit just around the corner. So they wanna call the less profitable models from the lineup review their joint venture in Russia in the US, by the way that already dropping several sedans. So this is something that's affecting the company globally this as the comic is grappling with fundamental technology changes the move to electric vehicle self driving vehicles tougher environmental regulations, especially following the the the diesel scandal started with VW trade tensions as well. Between. In the US and China's a multitude of issues piling onto the historic called make last year. They kicked off eight company-wide eleven billion dollar restructuring. That was after both Europe and Asia Swanson losses on the cost of investing in electric and self driving cars mounting as well. So it's a real turning point four call companies in general at the moment technology changing global pressures Pauline down on them a lot of contend with. And that's really being felt today at Ford we'll moving along to it rather fascinating one about the right to be forgotten. Google seems to have won the latest round on this one. Yeah. That's right. This is the classic tossup between privacy and freedom of speech. If you've go to shady history, and you still have done time for that whatever shoot to be able to have that deleted from Google and the court found the Google shouldn't have this is the the European Court of Justice found the Google shouldn't have to apply this writes globally. This follows an advisory opinion from the court. And usually what happens is off to these opinions. The final ruling comes out and. And they tend to stick to what happens in the opinion was decided in the opinion. This court said search engine operators have to take every measure available to remove access to links to data or information about the person on request and Google has been fighting these efforts as being led by FRANZ has previously watchdog they created this right in a landmark ruling back in twenty fourteen out for a should say Google, currently removing links e you wide since twenty six dean, and they restrict access a few in the EU country the same you country as the person concerned, they restrict access to non eagles sizes coach geo blocking says already afford protection that but they've been inundated with requests, the leagues have had two point nine million websites involved with these requests so fall off to the court first of all effectively put Google in charge of deciding what request to accept. So this question rolls on in this occasion. Google has come up trumps quite a spot is whether the topic that one Sebastian thank you for joining us that was the best and selling at Bloomberg. You're listening to the briefing. Eleven. Minutes past the hour. Let's continue now with some of the top stories from the Boeken's Monaco's correspondent there in Lubiana guide alone. As on the line a guy Macedonia today in the final debate for its name change to north Macedonia a small change as far as the letters are concerned. But rather big in other aspects, isn't it I was very big on its goals. We've had a lot of shenanigans and drama getting to this stage. Ben, not not least with the the referendum, which we had in Macedonia few months ago towards the end of last year when we had a massive majority of those who voted in favor, but not a big enough turn out because the opposition at staged a boycott in an attempt to torpedo the whole thing. But somehow Prime Minister Zoran Zeioiev coupled together, a two-thirds majority in parliament by a combination of some political dealing of which Lyndon B Johnson would have been proud. I think to get this to get this process underway to rename the country, north Macedonia. It's gone through another stage just before Christmas. Right now, we're in the final stage parliamentary debate four amendments, including the crucial one about changing, the country's name to north Macedonia. The debate needs to be finished by the fifteenth of January and more on the second day of the debate of the moment. And once again, a two-thirds majority is needed. You can bet they'll be some serious Alm twisting and sugaring of bitter pills. Absolutely more twists than your average. Soap opera, let's move along. Now to some other news happening in the region guy Kosovo in Serbia a trading. Some other terse words all over tariffs of all the wom- side to trade wool when one side puts up a one hundred percent tariff on the other side doesn't respond. But this is what's happened between Kosovo and Serbia in the NBA Kosovo imposed this one hundred percent tariff on imports from Serbia, it's still, and that's despite just two days ago, the European Union's foreign policy chief federal KOMO Ghedini telling them to stop it. Please once again on this. I dunno. Maybe a dozen times. We've had you officials saying can you please for goodness sake lift this tariff because it doesn't fit in with what Kossovo is aiming to do at wants to join the European Union wants to normalize relations with Serbia in order to do that. And as part of this process of going towards European Union membership. It's a member of the Central European Free trade association, which guarantees Tara free trade. So it's haunt really to see. And I still can't quite see what we'll call surveys long game on this as it's actually succeeding and making Serbia. Look look diplomatic and statesmanlike which is. On a not inconsiderable feet bearing in mind the history between these two indeed. Well, let's stay in Serbia now because there's been some ongoing protests against the president. They they will allow that rather large over the Christmas period. Wouldn't they it's interesting this how do you play this one out as a journalist reporting on the region, we've had crowds of thousands paps, even tens of thousands and deal saying as many as fifty thousand turning out on five successive Saturdays in Belgrade protesting against president Alexander Vujic. And this saying that he has to strong control over the media. And the he's overseen an atmosphere where political opponents are intimidated to the point where one of them bore cost a fan of which was actually beaten up and left unconscious in November. And this is what the protesting against and in some ways, the very valid points. But then you look at what this means in the great scheme of things when does a protest becomes significant. And then you look at the. The opinion polls which put both Mr. Vujic himself in his Progressive Party firmly past fifty percent in the approval ratings and the voting intentions of the Serbian people. So the question is, of course, although only saying not because the media is being manipulated to make them feel that mister Vujic. The only answer I think it's wrong that the opposition is extremely splintered on what Serbia needs, and what these protests is showing. It needs is a United opposition to prevent to present a strong interlocutor of you like to Mr. view does Progressive Party locally, plenty to be keeping you busy guide alone in Lubiana. Thank you for joining us. You're listening to the briefing. Now, a look at what else is making news today. St Louis is foreign minister in Bangkok Canberra considered an asylum application by an eighteen year old Saudi woman who says her family won't kill her RAV Muhammed L Conan is currently at a band called hotel under the care of the United Nations refugee agency. She was initially refused entry to Thailand but late a barricaded himself inside a transit lounge and refused to board a flight back to Saudi Arabia. China has accused Canada of double standards and says the nation is disregarding. It's judicial sovereignty the Chinese ambassadors. Comments came as a diplomatic row continues liver the arrest of while way, executive Ming Wong shoe at the request of the United States and an open letter by the European Union's parliamentary delegation for relations has sharply criticized what it calls the White House's increasingly harmful approach. Coach to transatlantic relations. The fifty eight member delegation is calling on congress to help strengthen and not undermined ties. This is the briefing. It's seventeen minutes past twelve here in London we are off to Florence now pity womb. Oh, the men's with is in full swing Monaco's fashion editor Jimmy waters is there and joins us on the line, Jamie. We'll get to Florence in a moment. But first some news about Paris's upcoming fashion week, which of course, he's studying next week. It seems that some of the brands of feeling a little bit jittery considering all of the protests that have been going on over there. Yes. Hi, ben. Yeah. We've we've received a few sort of grantee emails in the past twenty four hours about consenting brands can you at times that times date runway shows? So this is these these but next week ten and so far feel and the way they which both join brand they have changed. Theo has changed to a day before they've moved type Luay has changed from. I think they wish my in the afternoon on this on the that. And then now showing the morning basically these brands went to avoid showing on Saturday afternoon when she's when a lot of protests have taken place in power. And you know, they said it was a sort of multi in months, you know, usually a couple of months in advance very unusual for brands to change. And you, you know, you're going to get problems. So ready? The why show is now at the same time as another brand, you know, that's gonna. To know the numbers, obviously. So I'm, you know, it's an interesting thing that taught me and always say, the luxury sector has been hit has been really hod by the protests, and you know, some of the LVMH on doors have been vandalizing the protests. And this is something that that was in eighteen about this showing the center of power, they always showing in grand building right in the middle of the city. So you know, they're trying to avoid that. But he's kind of surgency to to these Aimo. So, you know, it's a something. That's no, I don't same full. Absolutely. A one can only imagine the nightmare must be just to just affect during everyone's schedules. But of course, there is all the logistics behind it as well that thankfully of cool still a couple of days to go perhaps they can pull it off about. Of course, let's bring outlines back to Florence because that's where you rut now full PT woma, and it seems the effects of climate change are on the minds of people in the fashion industry as well. Yes. So I mean, it kind of upset about these now bright sunny day at the moment and kind of around that co tarring that coats in the hand, basically what, you know today thinking to a few people about about how young seasonably warm winter especially in easily how it's affected the sales. And basically, I mean for the last couple of years, we've had you know, big brand Brent begins brands like Zara H, how about how warm winters have really to this. I and and some of these Italian brands, I was speaking to a small Italian brand called the JJ. He was basically saying that if they've had it that got a really won't wind saw and basically the men's wear especially men a lot of men by when they need to when they feel when it's getting a bit code dot, then they will buy something. But you you say the in October November. Aw, you save twenty degree days. Sorry. That's just nothing. No need for that. The problems the brands. He's not by December win it. Use the code that is already that. So many CEOs time to sort of you know, you could black Friday at the end of the ball in December. He's you know, a lot of sort of holiday say by then is it in rushing, you know, the Russian club that had it sold anything yet. So it really is. The problem is a lot of brand, and you know, with thing already at PC disease and saying Brent's tried to address that we they knew collection on overseas business, then you we'd to which will come out end up, you know, in like August September this year. But what they do is west west saying less to the really heavy chunky house away. So we did JJ that doing a lot of Larry I have other brands during a lot of Larry King bacon. Stuck to quote sort of fine. Marina paces I-, Rebecca Kalina. She's another Italian brand they were saying they've taken billing out of a little bit coat. So it's just that just sort of unstructured and and much lies. Oh, well, I would be moving happy to wear a coat and scarf regardless of the season all year round. But of course, that is just me, and sadly, I don't really have much of an effect on the fashion calendar. Jimmy WADA's we will have to leave it there. But thank you very much for joining us from wamu influence on the briefing. And at twenty two minutes past the hour. It's time now for a look through today's newspapers with monocle Bill Ludi Bill, I up the Washington Post story here about beak pharmaceuticals, undermining the food and Drug administration. Tell me more about that. Would you believe it Ben big pharma doing bad things? Patients. Stuck in corporate fight against generic drugs. Is the headline basically, it's a story about biologic drugs, which doing excellent things for you know, the the the big the big issues like hunter arthritis serious diseases like that. And these are made naturally using Factoria. They found cheaper chemical versions of these drugs which have widely used in Europe and around the world and these pharma companies in the US kind of using scare tactics to push people away from them. Yeah. The the drugs companies doctors in leaving the already insane costs of healthcare in the US up. It's just a matter really getting the word out that these kind of these not the natural versions of these drugs. Just as good. Yeah. Sometimes fifty percent of the of the price. You know, these absolutely science is very very different to what the marketing departments of some of these big is you do companies. We'll be telling you, it's very worrying it can be very confusing for people, of course, to really understand who's saying what Bill sadly at time is against us. Take us to the New York Times where this story here about obesity in China, and there's a connection to Coca Cola. Yeah. I mean, how how possibly could be connected another huge company acting in their own interests. Would you believe? Yeah. There's a there's a happy Inten happy ten minutes campaign currently going around schools in China, encouraging children to do ten minutes of exercise a day to some. That seems ridiculous. Apparently, it's a bit of a pro exercises. A bit of a problem. But nothing is being said about the vast amounts of sugary junk, food, and drinks that people are consuming the children, especially the boys that Ben. Oh, it's because there's a huge lobby group paid for by companies like Nestle, McDonald's, Pepsi, yum, and Coca Cola pushing the government towards exercise rather than you know, promoting exercise rather than adding things like we've got here shook attacks and creating awareness for these fizzy drinks. So basically, they're just saying, yeah, you know, we need we need to push exercise. We need to push exercise will encourage you to exercise. But will also encourage you to buy coke. You can cause long as you do ten minutes of exercise a day is apparently now they've been found out coke said that they're going to look the way that they fund signs in science kind of projects around the world. But that's just the case of them being found out now, they're backtracking. So, you know, not coke what a gracious movement from from coke there. Unfortunately, we're out of time. But we wanted to get to a story in the LA times about shut down causing chaos at Joshua tree. But we will have to leave it that you can read the Los Angeles Times for more on that story. You're listening to the briefing. Twenty five minutes past twelve four many of us the unique format an orderly construction of a printed newspaper delivers information in a way that nothing else can and for Thomas Bernhardt, it's vanishing all too quickly. He's the protagonist of beloved newspaper Rita a book by Mikhail and Gila which chronicled the vanishing world of printed papers monocle recently, adapted the book into an audio cereal and all this week. We're getting a sneak peek his pot full of the series. The newspaper is still a part of all of that. But all of that is slowly disappearing because the papers disappearing it may be the case that this process will go on for years centuries. Even maybe the case, the newspaper will even experience a small renaissance, but still it is disappearing. No one's in doubt of that. But not everyone recognizes the loss that this disappearance entails a whole culture is in fact as appearing and I'm not intern able to discern that this culture is giving way to a new one. That's just as rich. Even though I have for a long time been a resident of both worlds, the analog and the digital. And by now, spend more time on Spiegel online than reading the effort said the daily paper is disappearing because it is outdated because a day no longer rules over the flow of information. That's true. But the speed which newspaper falls out of date was already an issue when only newspapers existed there's nothing older than yesterday's newspaper is the signature of the newspaper era. But that doesn't always hold true. This sentence. Didn't hold true for d for example, when he was in hospital reading the F said that he'd bought at the kiosk the previous day. Neither does it. Hold true for anyone who's on holiday on the country yesterday's newspaper is the best proof that you'll really somewhere else on vacation. You can only get yesterday's paper. If you've got your hands on a German newspaper from the same day, you may as well, go straight back home you not on holiday. That's how it was in the golden age of newspaper reading that's how it still is today. We spent Allah some holiday in Brittany. We rented a small house with a family. We're close to the hamlet a few kilometers from the coast. You couldn't boy newspapers in town. There wasn't any shops at all. But of course, we had our laptops with us, and we'd get a guilty conscience whenever we booted them up not only to keep abreast of the Gaza war and Spiegel online. But also to fritter away time on Facebook. The father of the family didn't go on Facebook, very often he read German newspapers on the end set set on his ipad. And when later in the day, we visited the small town on the sea. He bought Lamont LeBron's and the canal on. I kept quiet about the fact I was wondering about newspaper reading that. I might even ROY little book about it. I didn't want him to feel like he was being observed and change his behavior a problem. That's well known in the field of ethnology. If I told him he might not have routinely shoved the newspaper in his trouser pocket and started through the small port town from who streets. Newspapers had as good as disappeared whereby you have to admit that the place may be pretty, but it's geared up for regional tourism Benelux crime stories, which Lear so many people to Brittany I'll set elsewhere foreign papers were available in the stationery shop, but you have to ask for them the shop assistant through an unsorted bundle on the table from which I pulled out the previous day's Georgia and sat down in the cafe opposite from which the melody of a hit by alphaville emanated. I flick through these deutscher, and I looked over at the fishing boats, which were dozing in the midday sun in the end. I'd only read the spotlight section, which I hardly ever read in Berlin anymore, although I often intend to so I hadn't read a lot. But I had read de Gloser who is tirico commentary, which is one of the best things about the newspaper, which I read all too seldom it felt good. L also only read a fraction of the French newspapers. He'd bought he immersed himself in the canal on Chennai least of all the articles in the NADA, certainly very challenging. But the fact that he read so little of it low. His French is enviable studied in Paris had another reason reading highbrow newspapers on holidays like reading the local program to see what you could do that evening only to fall asleep in front of the television as soon as you get home from work on average. You might read two articles the main one on the front page and medium size one inside the paper. Most attempts to save the newspaper assume that people want to read newspaper. They don't consider that people might procure a newspaper simply to be able to read it after all that wouldn't make much sense. But that's how it is in many cases, and it applies to periodical magazines, even more. So so not only did my friend hardly read the cannot Oceana. He also didn't work through the bundle of New Yorkers. We brought along for him before getting on the plane with his family. He given us a suitcase that we had to squeeze into our cars we've box we assumed it contained clothes and toys can never crossed our minds that someone would have old issues of the New Yorker delivered to him. Neither is the obvious purpose of a collection of New Yorkers to read back issues on holiday, nor is the obvious purpose of a holiday to read old New Yorkers, but it did have its purpose. He read a couple of articles and seemed satisfied this too is well known from the history of ethnology the researcher take. On the behavior of their research subject. We went on a trip to pain poll with the firm intention of buying a novel. I went into a bookshop and found a novel about Paris under your Pompidou later. I read about twenty pages on the beach. Never touched it again. It wasn't bad. But you should have bought Pierre's, Latinos, and Iceland fisherman. I told myself that one is set in po-. Then again, I wouldn't have read any more of an Iceland fisherman, then of Paris under George Pompidou. That was the fourth installment of Monaco's audio cereal the last newspaper reader by Mikhail and Gillam, you can listen to the full story by tuning into our print industry review program, the stack you can find all the details at our website, and we'll have part five of that series owned Morris edition of the briefing. Well, that's all for today's show. It was produced by Marcus hippy and researched by your lingo, go fund. And Nick money's L studio manager with David Stevens. Join us for the briefing at the same time tomorrow and Juliette foster. Is in this chair for today's edition of Midori house? That's going live at eighteen hundred here in London thirteen hundred if you're in New York, I'm Ben Ryan. That's the briefing goodbye.

US President Trump president London Chuck Schumer Jacob kayla Google Florence White House Serbia Bill Ludi Bill Democrats China European Union Europe congress Paris Lubiana
10. Art History's biggest beefs, conspiracy theories and controversies with Nico Paws.

Jo's Art History Podcast

57:06 min | 4 months ago

10. Art History's biggest beefs, conspiracy theories and controversies with Nico Paws.

"Hello and welcome to the jaws are history podcast podcast which celeb route. All things are to star cold every single day on today's podcast. I have invaded back. Scottish illustrates nicole brooklyn new proposed to do something different one today show. We sat down. We discuss one. Historical beef be disagreement one auto controversy on one zero conspiracy theory which we each and to the other one for the first time. This was a really interesting episode. And i think it just can't assures you the brit of what our are can stretch a particular highlight of maine and conspiracy theories off before we get started. I would just like to see a get once again. The old you in this isn't particularly load. Unfortunately nicole night that record us in the same room have ever think something was wrong with her on dot. She seems to be she seems very far. Do apologize again does not take from all the interesting things discussed so sit back. Relax and let nicole. And i entertain with some our history. Beefs controversies conspiracy theories with the okay. So today nicole. You're coming up with with about a little bit of a different set up today so we're going to be discussing History beef aka disagree news on our history controversy so something within the art world. That's happened that sparked a little bit of debate and attention on finally Most exciting an art historical conspiracy theory. Because you have to love a conspiracy theory and some of them are just hilarious. Okay so nicole. You're gonna kick his off on your coming out me. West quite contain pre are historical beef. I think this is wall. Started this conversation. When i told you here. So between shirt sample at any skipper So sample are excellent ways. Like painting sculpture. Collage always is used for activism. Any discusses mental health journey has years challenges through social class issues. Such as consumerism is advocate for mental health and is even basseterre for mind all right. The charity Has beef is with As mentioned for is a british engine sculptor known for making massive pieces. Such as the beam. One that you've posted before the bike. The farm is yet safari. Dismemberment or something. Like that yeah. scored Being for anyone listening the chicago beaten so or is also called climate gate Amazing so far very reflective whole Taking and sculpture so he's very famous for making king of structures. That will stay where they are. Just beg masterpieces. He's also known for buying the rates for using into block. Okay so what was meant to. Black vans blocked by diversity as a synthetic material resorts named point named six percent of light invasion surface. Okay so the face describe as general the roadrunner any pick up like Becomes a whole to fall into. Yeah it looks like that so literally. Cartoonish really flat and it's the closest thing will ever be able to see to a black hole actually looks like road so an each previews this material for a bunch of work. Because he's obsessed with the voight you have to have an ancient eat applied to the work. He can actually use it so he has also the money behind them Can i can. I ask you why he needs an engineer. Just the way the matija works manipulated the chemicals and stuff okay. That's only use it. So to be honest he dead by the race but it's just he could afford to I runs the engineers behind the material. Where just like it was the cane of opportunity to use it because it was a good way to get there but people were not happy that he owned the rights to this color. Or to the law right. Okay because i believe is like ten thousand pounds. I've seen numbers thrown a by. But when i was looking again can find the numbers okay. So that's like exclusive. He's bought the exclusive rights so case that's color So this is where stir sample comes in so sample refers tanisha Supervillain the art world though he and foretaste decided to make the And he already has a website where he sold pigments is called. Culture hustled. okay. But when he'd haired i guess it was a pain of star with everyone in each compare A certain color. it was really unhelpful. I think there's only one other artist who's done it. And it was with a sheet of blue that the use the law oh and eve claims the international blue and he was an artist again Just exactly what you said. He's known for this very deep royal blue and he uses it within all his works but not just an of paint forum also in its pure pigment as well because his whole idea of using it was to link. Break it free from its traditional constructs of confinement rather off-line some can't believe people think our history as a one carry can't believe that people think our history stuck up so and the gave lanes over the pink. Okay is that unleashed repair can no use it. So few cool on to culture hustles up if you buy any of the ranger just called the colored Color which i think's amazing. It says anti colt notes by adding this product to your cart. You can confirm that your knowledge to per you're in no way affiliated tunisia You're purchasing this eight behalf in each cabrera associated To the base of your knowledge information unbelievers paint will not make its way into the of kaniche compare hashtag. She thoughts Hands on the pincus. Pink a conceit where wayne book sampled that say that he was going to have a lawsuit by because they be as he should of the pincus To challenge the into black he has been made the blackest block block two point. Oh and into the nineteen made flat three point. Zero which reflects nineteen nine percent of reflection in radiation so essentially on par event. Right okay so you can buy bowl one hundred and fifty miles in his fourteen today. Okay so it means. He's opened up to everyone to be And he's always wanted everyone to be able to use the colors that you make Okay but there's this thing where compared to get his hands on some. I go let court battle or something with it as quite an interesting the beef times on the the pink the pink bought. There's other things where each composed of done something in people onto sample ask for hail peninsula. Apple's done stuff to challenge it so there was another one which i just know. I don't have all kind of So won't give references and stuff but is he went to felton extension on where he stays on but then the the late two people that left need them. Yeah so then. They'd contacted sample sample. Had made created this reflective paint right so that they have apparently source. Oh that's amazing. Yeah so i said. I mean the most amazing thing is he has made this amazing range of colors so as a mixture between light pigments natural paints and stuff like that yet. If it just the sites Token ability tea point all he had to stop because of the technique is needed to make the pain overly sweet a hold like independent people able does. It's amazing though blake s a really fun. Interesting thing actually think i'm going to buy the black is black. His weight Beaten by even just face. Supply never say israeli cartoonish and he's done Done like that vein to block on a circle and it does just look like voltron are just throw a Bare black hole died people Thank he's done. Ones that art dance. Nettie pizza blacks a looks like his contiguous will people phone into which is Obviously he's not appear continues void that standard my vote the beef so as an ongoing one. It's one that's never been resolved though and people who make fun of what things look kissed. The being paint beating the pincus pay can. Yeah because i think the respect where he doesn't want people taking pictures with being gay. There was something as something some known since about that but yet it caused Of large of discussion and controversy in the when he when he bought the rights to this color at yet. It's just very interesting. Anyone thinks can own the right to a color exclusively for themselves. I think kevin that's really missing in my opinion while the plane as any. What do we know. I'm sure there are reasons behind and not being an international superstar artists. I'm sure we are mere observers the drama to the drama. Okay right so might be as very art historical. Actually one of our history's most famous italian. Painters code kind of odd you know. Carbajal was active and mozart from recife but is best known for painting in room on. He is famed for his intense unsettling paintings particularly of biblical depictions. So you may know him as there's a really famous of medi-share software Rowing portrait on a green background on. It's just decapitated head of medusa. Anyone that's listening to the podcast. Any images in paintings are reference. We well Instagram's you can find on my instagram. Or you can find them on my website and everything will be linked below enemy. So the beef that i've got is that casual kelt. Amman which. I had absolutely no idea until we started so of research in some of our historical beefs. Which actually if you go just brings up a whole stuff. A boat singers and songwriters. Keep it into here. We go the biggest beef going. Although i think not settled anyway. Caravaggio well-documented that he was very hot blooded on very very passionate and very aggressive. At patterson there's actually records from the police looks in rome. Show that he was in trouble all the time. So there's logs all an one of the accounts. In sixteen four he threw a plate of artichokes are weaker. Face was arrested. Another police log haas hem end. Sixteen five that he also attacked a guard of women guard with students and was imprisoned for a little while buckle free however the beef that we're talking about happened and sixty six and has temper a bit too far. He stopped cold a well known. Roman pen names. Vinicio toma sony and through. That was it was a price on his head and then he had to flee rome and for the remaining years of his life was continuously on of going from place to place ryan to wait a people. Pardon which is basically he'd. He'd appealed to the pope part smarter on the reason he was coach was not Event will maybe some money or it was a prostitute. It was over a game of tennis. I am basically some money had been had been assayed. Anyway it didn't didn't go in. Caravaggio fever and has been has have dealing with roy gillum. Yep mama just killed on all that set. So he spent the rest of his life on the run so of running around all over italy and ended up in malta. Sicily naples however this beef or this mark dr so really really a beef. It's the because the beef caused a martyr so he spent the final years of his life. Moving between naples multi insulate waiting for a people pardons that win the pope of rome forgives you on behalf of because at this time the pope he still is today seen as the living embodiment of gorge on air. However this beef was long continuing because people were out for revenge on the family of the gentleman code a price on. Caravaggio hit which is why he continuously keep moving a right so people find him. So there's a whole controversy over his death nice. Some people say he was code in revenge. Some people say that he annoyed nights when he was in malta and it was the nights that coach him on Historians have said that he actually died of syphilis for. Maybe something like malaria however to Contain his boons where and after extensive dna and carbon dating and other analysis. It was identified. The carbide you might have died from lead poisoning which was an parked lead poisoning because paints used his time contained high amounts of late salts which may also have linked caravaggio to has Boats of madness of madness. And i'm spikes and has behavior so this is why thank perhaps he was about hot tempered because of desolate poisoning however later results show that there may have been some of blunt trauma to spend malcolm For yet but so they seem to think that there was maybe it was bad gangster or to kill him It's not really botched if it worked Let's be honest successful. Assassination will that setsu. So there's still a complete conspiracy theory of how he died. He died very young. He was only in his thirties when he died. He was incredibly famous in rome. He produces these incredible scenes that really affected people because of how realistic but also violent they wear year. But yeah that is a beef. The continued to haunt him I think it's quite interesting that the idea of lead poisoning could have affected his behavior and contributed to not interest them. So that you that as as the beefs abusively. That's the beefs. Okay as well as a beef. You have a controversy for medical baby. So my controversy as guerrilla get us so this is a group of anonymous female access which began in new york in nineteen eighty five. The war and i believe of selective so the develop masks and the create thought-provoking to challenge sexism racism within the. Why don't still the used expert books. Stickers flyers boards just kind of traditional means crow tastes in spread the message of the injustices to the peace. That is our discussing as do women have to be naked to get into the museum and it was made in nineteen eight tonight. So this is a part of the inaugural talk back series. This was challenging the of female and people of color within galleries oceans. I'm dealers Was inspired by the metropolitan museum's clayton and new york the to section action and gathered the information sale so they went rained Participated in the within the six that they had on the poster in that. I'm so the original one because they've updated it twice the still. There is a yellow poster. Bennett has a number Renaissance painting of But the female has a mask on it says. Do women have to be naked to get into the mid museum and then underneath it says less than five percent of ours in the modern Women but eighty five percent. Newts are female. And then it's guerrilla goes conscious of so that's piece was inspired torture too because the public art fund in new york i stained to design a bellport The project projected his denver clean enough message right. Unnecess- the what you're talking about. This is what they produce for this oil yet so they would ask us board okay. The knee went to the may cancel. The pieces gathered. The statistics himself. Made the poster shoot it to the fund and then they said noah mason clean enough which is yellow and black own it pops so they then decided to just thirteen Right okay so the bus face in new york but then the bus company began Day because it is the noble ending the females hunt and it was considered blake offensive. Okay is there anything enter hand. It's a it. Looks like a fat on duster star doesn't look offensive. The top looks agape argument if you are really want to do something you could save fouling but it doesn't right okay. This only thing. I can think is probably a fun. Yeah it looks like a fan but the tofu thin handle with like a circle in the top of you. Really pill straws. you could save that's not what they are. Dying predicts offensive because of boat was on her hand. Roth up okay. i'm will happen. So what happened after that. So the pit. On the buses the buses are dying because it could potentially be seen as offensive so they also because it was a part of that cds the stuck the would they would stick on the museum doors. They made pamphlets which would go into a museum shops and so whenever they would make something it would be challenging a statistic or challenging the lack of female people covered presentation case of sade. So it'd be things like you'd only half the picture of the don't and in the poster so they used affects a law right which is planting jason. An it's just really like surge of newly designed so the one that you always seen half the art world a like a five way card and maybe see like twenty percent israel that messages right occasional the us space to emphasize the message is fading punchy. Heart hatton gets the message. Appoint clearly messages like that. And books and gift shops Museums and stuff like that. They just did everything that the kids to get The also imprinted with thriller faces in manhattan them to people to wear okay to join the protests which was pay on fox but as i said earlier the updated twice okay so the update so the original is nineteen nine nineteen eighteen. Okay thirty five version as listen three percent of Women the three percent or notes which means it's gone down two percent Females overtones five and the yet but they have license to eight thirty while you're doing a great job to the two thousand twelve one is less than four percent of ours in the morning. Arts section of women seventy six of the female soap to take all the away well done and the out the representation by one percent so ghettos was behalf least You aren't and yet. Does it have some credible have haired of the guerrilla goes. But i'll be really honest and say that it's impossible to know like everything about everyone and the art world. Somebody who i was a of this poster on. I was a week their message on their activism. Trying do because they've also been active in london. Well i think they're active in more places than just the states. He started in new york. I know i believe is a global movement. Yeah because they are obviously still crane stuff to this day like the just really typically definitely stepping three books and stuff like that so obviously that is still an issue will lack of diverse Of course is of course and even recently. So we're recording. This is recording us in september. Twenty twenty on there was a recent study done that over one hundred top artists currently working like our of worth purchasing and the markets only two of them are women to only two of the top. One hundred's are women on something at something like eighty five percent Is still the naked woman. Naked women are still this sabine. Meyer yeah i mean. They're like they're a group. I knew off Don't know a horrendous might actually so maybe that would be quick podcast episode to deuce can of look there. There were a bit more detail. Yeah no absolutely because it's an incredibly important message on something. The world still suffers from the complete lack of female representation but of course there's lots of our historians female art historians so event beating the drum for lack of representation within the is agree. Instagram account codes the greek women artists if anyone is interested. I mean fairly certain. If you're listening to this year you're fulla full-bore or keno not history so you may have come across the ethanol. I would highly recommend that you that you follow that Gives you everyday outposts. Allow something about a different female and yeah yes you are so yeah game. You're controversies all right So mine as also quite current one and it's to do with the notorious contemporary artist. Jeff koons now. If you're listening to what. Jeff koons jeff koons kind of the american answer to the british damien hirst so he as well for so he's we were established that i would see the damion is. He's been going a hell of a lot longer but he's known for has representation of poking fun at everyday life using so recognizable objects from the everyday's a law office. Work is based around balloon animals. So you may have seen by balloon dogs or Balloon rabbits but these like highly shiny surfaces these that this is jeff curtains yet. You either love him or hate him. I i quite like him. Business-minded sorts saints anyone. He says jfk just because your needs polygamous. There's he's got like a whole other like back article weird and wonderful things. And he's actually different controversy but he actually replaced The staff and has new york boundary in studio with machinery. So there was a whole thing like that But that's not will bring to the table here. So my controversy is that enthusiasm in sixteen jeff. Koons offered the city of paris. A new sculpture to commemorate the terrorist attacks. Old two thousand fifteen in those who lost their life's which was a hundred and thirty one peres citizens and as a saying of 'wang-koo american comradeship on the lions jiffy approached the city in the january of twenty sixteen and said i would like to gift. You a sculpture. The work code a bouquet of chips and to describe the sculpture Hyper realistic hand. Holding eleven balloon juleps. Cain of like Chai party and you meet a balloon flower on there's an there's only eleven instead of twelve because the messing twelve flavor and the bunch represents the fallen right and those who lost their lives in the attacks. But there's a lot of controversy which The idea of had giving the sculpture to the city of paris. So number one. He was just giving the idea he wasn't giving the four point. Five million dollars what it would cost the city to make and install all. Oh my god what what are known as spot and he couldn't really understand why people were raped by this so it was the american chancellor who who loving in front porch coons Would you do you think bigger idea to make something. He came up with this concept in gifted the idea to paris So that was that was number one and then he also wanted to put it into a square by a museum which is all the boats. French art both contemporary and modern french arts. On the whole of why. That was a controversy was because the whole idea that space is that it should be left. Open four temporary exhibitions as has always been on. It's always. It's normally a space for french artists. Not an american artist and this caused white Cry because we're he had suggested it was stoltze. It would essentially ranger the gallery underneath a completely useless because of how much they would need to reinforce because it's something like thirty or two totten's on would need to reinforce the galaxy so there was. There was a chance that it would convince the galaxy completely useless so a lot of people that worked in the art world. Cain of tagged as a publicity stunt like a product placement for coons in has artwork so basically from the second it was announced names. It was filled with controversy and there was a petition within a few hours that go eat in signature saying do not install this but the issue was. It wasn't the idea the like the idea of but it was all the things that kind of the conditions that came with it on. The professional committee of art galleries in paris released a statement which says the professional committee of art galleries wish to make it known as opposition to the permanent installation of jason sculpture. The key for phillips between the museum of modern art on the city of paris and the palestine tokyo this is not a matter of judging aesthetic qualities or the stability of the sculpture as a whole mitch the victims of the attacks in fronts but the location that was chosen while it is important to pay tribute to the artists for his generosity on attention to the victims of terrorism it is also important that the commemoration of dramatic Finds its police in appropriate in specific contexts. Outside of any location related to artistic manifestations that could weaken or distract from. The memory is juicy of the city of paris to make such a site in collaboration with all the people concerned as well as the artist. We believe that the immediate surroundings of the museum of modern art for the city of paris and the palace. Tokyo much like those was george. Pompidou centre must remain free for those institutions to program depending on current events and should not be subjective to definitive permanent obstruction by nature temporary artistic occupation of these spaces should be entrusted to the creators. Who are in charge of programming them. And it's signed by the president of the The professional committee of art galleries. And i think as the point because another thing that kuhn's didn't do was consult city of powers on where he would like to police. The work was going to ask is. Why would they not someone from friends. Why ask music will that set. And that's another thing is where the another of backhand to controversy surrounding the as why. Why did they know A reason why they said if they wanted to be an apparent possessing such as is the more not for the city of paris. It should have been opened up to a hold of artists on ideas methods. however may have been different if it was a gift are gifted idea but even soul like it needs to be pleased somewhere with with importance in not distract from the meaning of eating exactly exactly satisfy The issues surrounding it so the saga continued for a good couple of years and even without apparent space confirmed. Kittens went ahead and made the work. But it wasn't until two thousand eighteen that it was confirmed the sculpture would be funded using private money through fundraising and a scene. Said that kuhn's The bell when the work went over budget. Okay because it's no easy on no cheap thing to make up at work like this let alone. Install it so a find. It's police quite near to the octa triumph Patas note so yet. It was unveiled on the fourth of tober two thousand and nineteen last year last year. So it's been going on for our law alone. You and it was unveiled. Say the petit police and potus one of the artists large sculptures to date and measures twelve meters high and when it was on viewed qin's wars interviewed. And he said that for him as a new yorker who was living in new york tame of the nine eleven attacks. He remembers greatly the depression that hung over the city and he just felt having expedients. Something honda's as a terrorist attack. He needed and wanted to do something. This is why he gifted the sculpture to the setting So the palestinian paris is outside art archaeology and very close to the trump he has will. so yes. It was unveiled october last year. So very recent thing. And when it was unveiled he also announced that eighty percent of the proceeds from the sailing of the copyright of the work from commercial products. Such is like tote box or postcards. Catholics by the work eighty percent of those proceeds would go to the victims of the attacks on the remaining twenty percent would be used for sculpture maintenance upkeep of the work so i think although it caused quite a controversy it actually i feel. It was handled very early in the beginning. But i actually think having Time for it to come on to for the project to to come into realization Be stowed. I feel that it will continue to do good year. It seems like obviously it may just win something out sadly because obviously it was a really cds based on you. Just don't think he thanked by jovially. He lived through nine eleven new york. He was just maybe taking back to his defense that late. Yeah i was just tonight. Passion while that set and i think it was a grief fail. Globally i mean we all remember where we were during nine eleven and we all remember where we were when these attacks in paris happened. I mean protect We'd assessed sister that loves empire so it was a very of really horrible night for a lot of people on a field. It like you said the heart was there but it just wasn't managed whale bought That he's not taking any profit from. Yeah no absolutely putting the money back into the scope here. I think f completely agree from what was very early handles has actually. It's quite nice. And yes. oh it was unveiled last year and this was complete news to me actually when i was researching concert for Controversies For this for this podcast and there's quite low let's be honest Particularly with everything we wanted the moment with them of gifting or giving pieces in collections. Back to places that were orgin happened stolen. I think this is. This is quite interesting piece. Not too complicated. wants tight. Yeah not think now. By best as the controversy that ended nice. Yeah absolutely so. It's all kind of come up roses no pun intended for the or come up trillo rather space up okay. Fantastic ni- final part of the podcast. Where each bringing a conspiracy theory from the art world. I love lease so if he listened to the podcast previously on. You've listened to ever episode on the mona lisa end and a few conspiracy theories surrounding the painting on. I would highly recommend if you haven't just to go back and less History about painting as incredible. And you you knew. The risks to end celia. Here i interview as just incredible in bringing these facts on fantasies to life is where which is great so i thought end the spirit of conspiracy with the mona lisa. We would continue doing that night. Cynical you have an art world conspiracy theory for me. Yes and on part is you'll pay the bench or they are the most standard. Thanks for for kicking off. So i only discovered this because we were researching can species so you know to stay. Deniger go his studies in the art world and is a grown during petro the supper so i assumed it was going to go into the you know heavy macro lens actually in the painting just kind of taking things from the But i think it's actually being prison. That is true. Meeting might not be a conspiracy. Might just be a cold hard facts. These are true but it starts conspiracy but it has been researched so the last supper. I'm just gonna just gonna button here nicole. Sorry to interrupt you but for anyone that doesn't know at the last supper as a as a huge mutual painting by leonardo da vinci and it's one of his most famous works with the mona lisa and it was painted in the league fifteenth century. I can be found in milan. And it's one of the world's most recognizable paintings a- partly according to the gospel of google venture. Nate was late. The bulk of the rs okay. He did the mona lisa. Which is the most famous painting. The gentleman say paint never goes puna. Lisa yeah the last supper is also bendigo. One of the most famous paintings. I think defensive is the ball all fingers repainting the head. That was beheaded here here. Here's it here farce. People living's wesley on so you're conspiracy theories speaking of music. Well hey i try. I mean above really tie so giovanni money is a computer engineer musician. Okay so he. Obviously people have discussed multiple messages and symbolism within a piece. Okay in the most obvious. Yeah yes so. There's things like in the sky. There's equations zodiacs all that stuff. The less we'll be here forever is top about is one thing but easy for. We'll come back to par seventy five on the last supper. Here's rowdy red wine on the viks. Giovanni was looking at the less up and he knew that within the composition of where they're also were standing in table. It debated harmonica monetarily. Okay so the apostles are the bars so the whole section as five bars right when you look at. But he also saw something that no one else that data out for vigil at the example of heavy debated up. And you can't see at once. Is there okay. I just kind of wish went whom can see my face. Because i'm looking at a full show off the painting now and really i mean you go get him. I think it's amazing. What people can spoil these joints immagination. Continue so he then looked at their hands with the break was placed because symbolically. That's the body of christ okay so. Nfl within the piece. That was assembles christianity. Which i believe is just the bridge but painting become no okay so giovanni composition does peace To vote ami says it sounds like a record is like a same try to emphasize the passion of jesus is the apostle manipulate and then makes the composition. So gonna play it. Okay this is over was on. Echoes into the in discusses. Essentially summarizing lifezette While another part is the debentures Musical genius as well as i cannot pay pay nter. I mean it wouldn't surprise me. I mean he he could literally everything. So that is my conspiracy. heat is essentially defunct. But i'm gonna see my conspiracy as you re bolts. He wrote bulbs will they are. I think it's really interesting. The someone can look a painting on. See the it doesn't make sense if what you're seeing symbolism wise that the you know the hand and the braid which christianity symbols support of christ naturally can become a body of music so just hire he saw is is quite incredible an the also the somebody has gone off and as often like this on composed it but anyway i would love to know what people whom i thank and like i say we will link an image on my instagram page and on my website is because i think this is one you really can have to see it to wrap your head around what you're kind of coming on onto but a really really interesting conspiracy theory that piece i mean there's there's thousands i let you say to the star don brown has been fantastic a weakening like What yeah absolutely in the whole vase. Templar and eliminated and as wrong as rob who you could spend the rest of your life going by thank again. It just kind of shows you the pirate of art really because these things were used as propaganda was a time where the the printing press wasn't really a thing. It wasn't wasn't newspapers there wasn't you know people didn't communicate in the way that we do know year. These were symbols and things that people understood because religion was really so sensual ending their life. An green on basically so very interesting. Welcome thank you get conspiracy theory okay. Mine is a bit more london-based cer- coming back or coming back to london here. You wouldn't tell me you can't tell me the theme even go into details. So i'm fixing to us okay. as a conspiracy theory which surrounds a british painter. Cold walter. Richard seker was done so he's actually quite a famous painter. Active between eighteen sixty and nineteen forty two is known for his verse of dramatic representations in his works on a someone who really loved of mixing with the underworld of society into depicting that within his paintings have however there is an american crime. Novelist code patricia. Cornwell who is convinced convinced. The seker was actually jack the ripper. So this is the conspiracy theory basically. She spent a large her fortune. So she writes. She's a very successful crime novelist. I personally have never heard of but then again though anticipate cranial apartment. She's amassed a fortune of over one hundred million dollars and she actually used to be a more assistant that's will that set. So this is obviously. She seems some stuff. Anyway so patricia cornwell claims to spend whale over three million pounds of her own money attempting to confirm fifty two books on the subject. So in two thousand and seventeen. She spoke to the newspaper. The telegraph saying over the past. Five years i spent thousands of hours as well as a small fortune investigating sicklers art memorabilia and more importantly other original documents evidence on technologies to prove that he Her i've continued walking with top. Scientists are experts siphoned through piles of archival materials utilizing non destructive forensic paper analysis on spatial light resources. The op show is that. I've never been shooter of sicklers goats. I believe he was responsible. For the jack the ripper crimes and other deportees wail which included dismemberment. Cannibalism and mortar children. And in two thousand thirteen. She came to light because she A work of the artist code the camden tight martyrs which the artist painted at nineteen eight which referred to a cds of martyrs. Which happened around camden. So she purchased this one painting which depicts a naked lady on the bait on her. Heinous of turned away from the viewer on the jane smith at the end of the bait. Who has his head is boj seen us on. It's very interesting if you It's very dark. there's nothing there's not a lot of details facially in these figures are just from hesse. Brush stroke technique but she came to light because she was so convinced that this painting contained a hidden message that she destroyed it in order to find it so she ripped apart this painting thinking. That's sackler headed a major confession within the work. Because she's just so convinced that he has jack the ripper essentially she hasn't actually the first person to accuse secular of this crime and he's been linked to mars before but it's usually he actually to mix with gentleman. Cold the gic of clarence. Who was the grandson of queen. Victoria and who had a passion for holding in the east end didn't lifetime with syphilis of the brain on the jacob kearns as at somebody who's also been associated with seker jack the ripper course. This is a conspiracy theory that runs deep in a couple years ago. Someone came out and said she was convinced that Women and you know a man of here but because the trust than i which is quite interesting anyway. So basically what sparked this as the artist name came into frame Claimed that he was the child of the artist and when the painter died or just before the painter died in nineteen four one he can face the crimes to him but this was never confirmed and it was always believed that was childless which is actually why komo believes that he became jack the ripper because his three failed marriages. He was bottling with a six reality. He was childless and a Jack the ripper on Committed these crimes and she seems to think that this series of paintings he did in nineteen eighty around the camden martyrs where really hammered messing to what he did. The martyr's And why she thinks this is because a lot of the works in nestle series are actually very similar to the osce photographs that were taken onto. Who the bodies were found so hard theory behind why he has his persons because they were so accurate These bodies were laid Particularly ones of jack. The ripper famously. Has last victim was found in her flats on he near enough completely recreated itself possession to position so this is why she thinks he is jack the ripper Are really cool here from andrew patrick of the fine art society who apparently Partly sold patricia. Cornwell a couple of paintings. He so he say to your quilting f as is claimed. A painting was cost up. That is very rolled. Everyone knows the stuff is known since he loved these dramatic titles and to play with the idea of menace in richardson who created a large sector exhibition at the royal academy in nineteen ninety two escorted by saying i can't believe she's done at such a rate tearing ozone's monstrously stupid to me as she so obsessed that she doesn't mean the destruction of a painting such by such a very fine artists and to add coincidence to this silly theory even if secular where jotted her. It would not justify doing this. It's like taking a kagyu you. Apart to investigate the stopping he was involved in at smart. He added sigler was interested in music. Hose theatrical and low-life he pleaded with the themes like data on his mentor. He always painted from photographs and he was one of the first artists to do so. And although kara has failed to find any on the lakers help by scotland yard Pretending or claiming to be par to compare two samples taken from secular lasers which she has bought at auction. She still claims that one laser had the same unusual watermark writing paper and believes this as justification enough to continue her close to be john. That secular was jack. The ripper unshaven says f. A jury had seen that been they would have hung him so there you are. And what do you think. For the jack. The ripper thing i honestly after Five hundred people that be connected to. Oh my goodness forever forever being an uninteresting theory that because he was aloof and didn't have any family and but then again it doesn't really explain why it stopped because all the marchers happened in eighteen. Eighty eight while. I remember them saying though was that the martyr's almost kind of search End like Precision that it had to be someone higher up nothing. He wasn't Adult that's by thought it was that. Yeah because i will be wealthy. Thought it might have been physician to the king are vicious squeeze between to royalty because of higher up in the knowledge and stuff like that this is also maybe why she's working with professionals because of high fat lashing Destroying a piece yet. Because i think regardless Contain the secrets of the universe behind There's ways like what did you think destroying people actually pay for that set. That's what i would have done like shouli. She should've Instead of an anybody By destroyed means that she's done so many taste on it but it says here that the theory is that she's completely The work but i think that's just a someone that has money and wants to fishing. Additive is as well if she picks beta that fishes harvick's. Yeah and i'm not obviously there. You see it everywhere when someone believes in a conspiracy the will to the will that set up so that they again another conspiracy that i would love to know what you think at home. nicole thank you so much for coming on the podcast today again and being so wonderful in sharing with me one of your strengths. One of your controversies on an art history conspiracy theory. I'm just something a little different so before you go. Where can people find you. So you can find me Underscore on instagram and safe. My website is www dot com. And i'm also recipient eric with files in k which is a female Recommend checking that he wanted to in place and that's came a free convenient basing me. No thank you for coming back again. i've already asked you previously. Why is art important. So i would like to ask you this time as of the sex. Fax that we've discussed today. What is your favorite out. But i think the last supper one. I think that just because obviously you've seen the films davinci and stuff and i was like. Oh my god. I can't believe this is a thanking. Didn't happen the music yeah. It's like fun although i did like the much Have caravaggio has. He's always leak. So is this is very iconic is. He's honor yet. He's one of these ones where you probably don't know the artist by knee but the second you see him you'll be like always guy. Yeah when you're going into the lead poisoning is not. Maybe why everything was so dark can because he's mental state wasn't in Chick yet was poisoned by lead. So he's you know. Mattis a higher. I i think maine is a toss up between the jeff koons hund- the jack the ripper eighty one. But there's nothing wrong with that. I think i did the best. Now i'll go with that. Wise is funds When you can actually see the composition a just qena to see high definitely everyone thinks and hey everyone can see it because one thing i forgot to mention was someone had saved up. But then the sky rada Today he decided to so sorry about that. But i'll know so qena interest in high someone was inspired The volta yeah. Thanks really kill a low of defense. She stopped his mathematical positionally. Nellie perfect ratio things like that so not every patient we will to think of do says the speidel His verve in months or Nfu place on lavar says broken acknowle squares and circles and carves. but it's ever since late repair gratiot. So what makes conflict compensation okay law individually spark and then a low of artwork lake That japanese painting with the wave. That's the perfect ratio. Ohio case when you will get shelled kasese the wave the blue. You're so even something because appears in nature is okay so is there came a phenomenon that it's just the thing that not respond to positive breaker. So it was a law and hanes and linked grass and grits and inspiration for graphics. Okay yeah interesting. I didn't know that i should use often. That next thing is really interesting. You can break done graphics. Hey credits and lanes and stuff and hey we respond to stop composition like saint our lesson rates interesting. Okay okay great thank you so so much nicole. Hi everyone is ju- here. I'm just currently editing. The podcast and i realized that during my conspiracy theory. I've actually referred to walter ticket as Colder set clara quite a few times. So i'm just jumping in to say. I do apologize Wolter second note set clear and it was a honest mistake. Only human by thought i would just quickly come on and say very sorry case. Anyone had picked up on that. Yes it was walter sick. It not set clear in. Thanks so much. Hope you enjoyed the episode enemy and thank you so much for listening there you have the end of another episode of the joys. Art has podcast. I would just once again like to thank nicole for coming on the podcast and for bringing such entertaining. Conspiracy theories on beefs controversies from within the to discuss thanking and had a lot of researching under korten this particular as we said in the podcast. Any images that we discussed throughout the episodes available to view on my instagram pitch. But you can find an electric blue or you can just. Joe was art history or you can find them on my website which is www dot. Joe is art history dot com addition to mayes of media outlet china. Where you can find us information you can also watch the podcast. My youtube channel. Which is joyce art history on here a very basic video together but whenever we discuss a walk i do the work through the duration of which we're talking fighter so perhaps if you prefer lessening watching things on youtube is just insolvent expand to reach people. Get in touch. I'm scott anything that you heard today. You can email me. Joe's art history at gmo dot com. I would love to hear your thoughts on the oil and a few have any conspiracy theories or our history. Beefs or controversies that you would like to share or perhaps less to cover a different ankle. Joy are slightly to four months. So what we do show finally my name. John mclaughlin is your you're pregnant. Art custodian on look forward to welcoming next time on the jurors art history podcast until then keep learning our new member art as for all.

nicole paris new york jeff koons rome professional committee of art nicole brooklyn Caravaggio tanisha Nettie pizza Carbajal mona lisa Vinicio toma roy gillum Sicily naples
Milton Glaser | Make Things That Move People [Best Of]

Good Life Project

58:48 min | 10 months ago

Milton Glaser | Make Things That Move People [Best Of]

"So over the history of this show spending eight years more than five hundred guests. Two years filming on location and crew, and now more than six years is a podcast. I have been asked one question over and over and over. So who's your favorite guest so when you do what I do, you learn quickly to dodge the answer to that question for one. You can't win for any name. He dare to offer your simultaneously snubbing hundreds, and if I'm blessed to keep doing this long enough thousands of other people, but more importantly. If you're really paying attention, truthfully, there is no such thing as a favorite guest. Guest I don't do this to be entertained or to fall in love or to make new friends or to have favorites I do because I love doing it, and because it's a bit like my living laboratory, it's it's not about who I liked best, but rather who I have learned from WHO has left changed and on that level would have come to believe as you learn something if you allow yourself to remain open from every single person. As it is on screen. Has It is in front of a Mike in Studio on the? So it is in life. But as I sit here today. Having just learned of the passing of a man who has become as our producer, Lindsay often reminds me. The single most referenced guest by me. In the history of the show Milton Glaser. I can admit to one truth over the same span of time much as I have been profoundly inspired and humbled and awakened, and learn more than any book or school or course of study has taught me. There have been very few guests. Who when they walked out. The door left me thinking to myself. I live their life. Milton glaser was at the top of this very short list born and raised in the Bronx. He discovered what would become his life's work, and never in his eighty five or so years of. Building on that veered from it to make things that move people those are the words he shared with me. As soon as These words were offered in that classic Glazer Rasp. I can feel every cell in my body. Come alive with resonance me, too. I felt me to. My whole body just saying with recognition and resonance. Me To Milton me to. Glazer's list of accomplishments in the world of design and media and education, the stuff of legends launching a design agency push pin studios in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four with a bunch of friends who he graduated, Cooper Union with he would change the face of commercial illustration of art and design that famed Iheart. Logo Did that a tribute to the city. He loved so fiercely at a time when it was on the verge of bankruptcy of crumbling underneath him, Glazer wanted to do his part to help people. Re Imagine it to see the way he knew it to be the way it was in his heart, which probably explains why he was also a founder of York magazine that iconic Bob Dylan Rainbow Hair poster with more than six million copies in print glazer again. Thousands of other works of art posters, brands product packaging restaurants. You name it. Glazer was behind so much of it and Milton's work he it's been seen everywhere from the halls of global industry to local pub to. The Museum of modern. Art in New York City the George Pompidou Centre. In Paris in two thousand four. He received the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum Lifetime Achievement Award. He received the National Medal of Arts Award from President Obama in two, thousand, nine, the first graphic designer ever to be given dishonor. The man had his own typeface Glaser Stencil. That, brilliant mind and the artful hand, and the impact that they would have didn't stop at making, though he also taught for more than five decades, he shared his wisdom his lens on everything from life to art to beauty to work to love with thousands of students, many of whom have now gone out into the world to make their own lasting marks, and it wasn't just this diversion to craft to making meaning to the creation of an noticing of beauty to his commitment to teaching and giving back to the work. It was the choices that he made about who and what matter to him. The deep sustained commitment to living life on his terms, and never allowing himself to be boxed into anyone else's expectations in any domain of life to working and playing and spending time with his wife Shirley who he wed in one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, seven, and to whom he remained married until the day he died at age ninety one. On Friday by the way which was also magically in classic Glazer style his birthday. One A friend of mine reach out to me back in two thousand thirteen and mentioned she was actually an old friend. Of Glazer's from back in their Osram days, and like an introduction I nearly fell over. Yes, yes, please a few months later. I found myself along with our film crew. We were filming back then in the front room of Glazer. Studio, setting up for a conversation that that I never wanted to end, nor did the crew we were transfixed. We'd have stayed longer but timeless tight. He was deep at work on a new show for museum. Did I. Mention he was eighty four at the time. During this wide ranging conversation, we talked about his astonishing journey to the teacher who validated his choice of happiness over safety about what drives him to continue to create how he? Who and what to work on? We talked about the difference between the urge to make and the desire to create beauty, the role of formal art education and the difference between a calling and a career. We also had a fascinating conversation about the role of computers, technology and art and design, and how it's affecting our ability to create. He has a very unusual take. He actually uses computers almost every day, but he he never. Actually touched them. You'll have to listen to understand this. Take the depth of his generosity of thought left me, not only re. My own choices, but yearning to reconnect with something that laid all to dormant for me for far too long, my own desire to make not just. But stuff. And meaning to work with my hands, and be able to step back and say Yeah I did that. My brief time with lung laser left me change. It. Not only planted the seeds, but also offered a model of what a re-imagined life might look like. You may not know Glazer's name. But if you've been alive and paying attention to the world, even remotely for more than a hot minute. You and your life you hurt your mind. have been touched either directly by his work and very likely by the work of the thousands of artists, designers, educators, makers, founders, many of whom would become his students, and then carry on. That legacy of making things that move people never bound by the ideas and insights of this giant, but rather inspired and invited to step into their own truths to make their own things that move people to create beauty however defined. Through the Lens of their own beating heart and their own shared mind. And so was kind of a heavy heart, but also. Really Alive and celebration of his life and legacy. I'm so excited to share with you this best of conversation. You will notice that the audio quality is a bit different, not quite our studio quality this as I mentioned earlier was actually filmed on location and fittingly. Joyfully towards latter parts, you'll also hear the sounds of little children laughing in the background glazer studio. It turns out where we filmed. It was a standalone townhouse that abutted the playground for a local. New York City Public Elementary School on any given day you could open the window and hear the energy of these little kids feel the studio, and as we would learn on this day. That was. Part of the magic part of the man. I hope you enjoy this conversation on Jonathan fields and this is a good life project. A. Good life project is supported by hub spot complex enterprise software. It shouldn't get in the way of launching your next campaign. That is why hubs spot built the new marketing hub enterprise, so say goodbye. Countless hours of software management their platform offers the power and flexibility that scaling companies need to succeed with the ease of use that you expect, so you match every. Every customer interaction to revenue use A to test and optimize and create more personalized experiences, plus you can integrate hub spot with hundreds of other tools and APPs so managing your outdated and overly complex software start creating remarkable customer experiences learn more about the new features in marketing hub enterprise ad hub spot, dot com slash wondering that's hub spot dot com slash wondering. Together with Apple Books Oprah is bringing you her next book club Pick Deakin, King, Kong, by James McBride to story of connections community at Love in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty nine New York City social novel with a heart of gold and characters that will crack you up and make you cry. Download Deacon! King Kong at Apple Dot. COM SLASH OTC and you can also explore millions of other books and audio books on the apple books APP already on your iphone and ipad there you'll find bestsellers, classics up and coming Authors and more so get started today and read with us. So, we're sitting here today in a room surrounded by. Incredible art incredible design probably years and years of work. and. It's interesting to because they almost don't know where to die then, but one of my curiosities is. Where did this all come from a curious in when I think about your body of work? Going way way back before it was a body of work. ME, like as a kid. Where does this? Where does the seat of this come from? Are you going to continue to ask me? Questions I can't be answered. I'll. Be My best. have no idea where it comes from. That after. A while you begin to realize a how little you know everything. and to have vast. The brain is and how they compasses. Everything you can imagine but more than that everything you can't imagine. What is? What is perhaps central to this is the impulse to make things. Which seems SEMAIT BE? A primary characteristic of human beings desire to make? Things whatever they turn out to be and then. Supplementary to that is desire to create beauty. which is a different? But analogous activities so. The urge to make things probably a survival device. There is create beauty something else but. Only, apparently something else because as you know, there are no unrelated events in human experience. I've said this before, but beauty at the creation of it. Is a survival mechanism. There was something about making things beautiful. And we sometimes called that art. That has something to do with the creating commonality between human beings so that they don't feel each other. and. Whatever that impulses wherever comes from. It certainly is contained within every human being I've met. Sometimes the opportunity to articulate occurs sometime. It remains dormant for a lifetime. Just get shot at it, but I've been very lucky. I imagined myself as a maker. Of Things! For the age of five. I realized that the to make something was miraculous. And I never stopped by just. Making things up my life whatever they were whatever category you chose. To put them in. Whether they attain the status officials status of art this another story. But that is a set about the But, the desire to make things is a profound human characteristic. That completely agree. was there something that happened at the age of five, or was it a gradual awakening around then that you seem to really key in on a moment, well I have a canned story about it, which is why I feel reluctant to tell it again build as somebody thought sometimes unfilled. But what really happened that this? This was an event. By parents were going out grew up in the Bronx and my parents were going up to some ceremonial occasion left me. At home to be taken care of by my cousin. Who must have been sixteen or seventeen years old, who came to the house? My parents left and he was. Carrying a brown paper Bag, and after we sat down in the living room, he said. We WanNA see a bird. Am I thought immediately that he had a bird in the bag. They said yes, and he reached back pulled out a pencil, and he drew bird on the side of the bag. Anna for one reason. I think it was the first time I ever seen anybody. Draw something that looked like the object depicted. Kids kindergarten drawing things didn't look. A bird but. I suddenly realized that you create life that you could create life with a pencil. And a bow put the bag and it was truly. A miracle in my recollection. Although people always telling me that memory is just the device to justify your president. I really. It was like receiving the Stigmata I suddenly realized that. You could spend your life in life. And I never stopped that at five. Mike Course was set I never deviated I never stopped. aspiring. or working in a way that the. That provided the opportunity to make things that if you did right move people. Which is interesting, too, because you. You grew up in. Essentially Post, depression and then world war two in the Bronx, and there was certainly ample need to create moments that touched people and work that touched people. But. Also I I wonder at that time in our country's history whether and in your mind. Whether doing this was something we said. This is something that I could get paid for and build a career around, or this is just. This is what I need to do. And this is my service. Characteristically I had a very good. Dynamic my mother. was relentlessly approving anything I did know at just thought everything I did was. Let's and by father was worried about making a living. It was very reluctant. To even think that I might choose a life of the arts, 'cause. He wanted made. Pursue alive that would. Basically have some financial security is. A kind of. Simple idea but during the depression the bay prevalent. There was a time when making a living was really tough. He had a dry cleaning store. And I used to deliver orders. They often that consisted of. Carrying full winter coats up six vice upstairs. And getting a nickel tip. So I couldn't imagine that life of Nagas would be much more difficult, but. Any right at the combination. My father's resistant so mother's support. Was the perfect violence because I learned. To overcome resistance. and. I was convinced by my mother that I could do anything. An ideal psychic environment for. Accomplishing something in the world. What leads you to In your mind, you're creating. The first glimpse of the the experiences of undoing this for me I love it. There's something that I just drawn to. versus people are responding to it. Interesting a COUPLA because I began. Using my drawings of a means of ingratiating myself with. other. Young people I mean I would I was the class August. So designated when I was six years old. All through. School I was always the class artists. What's funny idea? And I would do drawings as a kind of service activity for. My friends mostly drawings of naked girls at a time when. We didn't quite know what that was. But I always saw myself as being a IGA. Facilitator of other people's needs in that. Very primitive way I like the fact that I had status at a position at life. and I could also. Be of service. Although I never thought of it as being of service a sham. But I did something that gave me some privilege in that group, but that designation. was useful to me in terms of developing. Bildt sets of WHO I was A. To when when you reach a point where? You decide that this is something that I could potentially do beyond high school. This is something I could build my life around. It sounds like you had already. In your mind made that decision when you were five or six. Then, you have to work out the details. Absolutely. There was no. Doubt in my mind what was going to do? Ever. Had you come to the place of deciding? What that outlet is GonNa? Be A. How do I take this and and I'm I'm the class artist you know this is in my soul it somewhere. I have to make after create after have to make and a half to create beauty this I'm here to do. And a lot of different directions could gone with that. You could have gone fine art. You gone so many different directions. what led you to choose this path that you've been going through your recipe? Questions that are for the answerable, but I would. I would say that it didn't matter to me. As long as adept at categorical station between the arts is nonsensical. Stupid. But useful to society for one reason or another. I might have become a painter might have become address designer. I might have become an architect. All of those possibilities I knew I wanted to make things. And then circumstances began to intervene that interrupt. They decision and opportunities which I was willing to sees regardless of. Whatever the consequences so. I. Have to tell you the story which has very instrumental in that decision. Even, though it's part of by official. Range of stories. It was so profound the I. I have to tell it just order. To Express, how? How twenty seconds can change your life. When I was in junior high school had the opportunity to take the entrance examination to the Bronx Science. which is a great school or The high school basic not another great New York School, neither of which I sufficiently appreciated file. They shaped the city. And these both incredibly important institution. In terms of the York's population and Environment Zone. And the. I have a science teacher who? was very encouraging for me. Enter into science. I was very good sides. And he wasn't. Go to Bronx Science. And the. I was evasive about that because I wanNA tell them that. But the day of the entrance examinations they occur on the same day. I, took the entrance examination that is school of Music and art. and. The next day when I came back to school. He was in the hallway as I was walking out, and he said the. I WANNA. Talk to you I saw. The Jake is up. He's GonNa. Find Out. I took the wrong exam. He's A. Cup to my office. Sit down. As I was sitting at, he said I hit. You took the exam for music or not. And I said Oh. Yes. And then he reached over any reached into his desk, and he pulled out a box of French conduct crayons. Fancy expensive box. And he gave it to me and he said do good work. And the I can't tell that story why crime? Because it was such a profound example of somebody who? An adult? Authority figure. Sophisticated man who was willing to put aside his own. Desire. For something Afghan his own bet. Direction for my life at recognize. Me As a person who had made a decision and he was instead of just simply polishing. He was encouraging it. With this incredibly gracious and generous skip and I never forgot that started. You know I was. Fourteen fifteen years old, but that kind of the thing about it. That always astonishes you your life. Is that monitor couldn't take two minutes. Who's totally transformative about my view of life view of others view of education. I view. Acknowledging the other. the. Very Important Moment for me. It's some. It's interesting to me. Also as a parent because in a bit, everyone says what is apparent one for their child where they want them to be happy, but but above that I think before that we want them to be safe. Sure he though, and then we wanted to be happy and I think so. We have this kind of ongoing conversation in our heads. This may make them happy, but this may make it more likely to make them. You know so. There's this risk that were going and. So it's interesting when you share the story, because I think of that person, young, playing a similar role and saying you know what. I am choosing happiness and whenever we'll have will happen. You learn more and more that everything exists. At once would, it's opposite. The contradictions of Our never ending and the somehow the mediation between. These. Opposites. Of the game of blood. then. I'm asked. I'm sure you are also your teaching. What if I choose wrong? What if I choose wrong? Defy. What if that wasn't the right end? Edison interesting conversation because you know. I think the more I. Think about it in the more I explore life Lesson less had believe there is a wrong choice. You know it's more. It's more important to choose. And just see what happens. While it is at, you could also develop. Your own understanding by saying what choices you made them. You know some people. You know a constantly complaining about their life at little wrong choices. They may Alabama. What would you say to? Stop making those stupid choices I mean. I acknowledge that you make stupid choices and Ben see if you want to do something about, maybe don't. In evidently you don't need so. Be satisfied in your stupid chosen I'm. I mean without being arrogant about it, but you realize that the. The first step is always. In! The Buddhist says took knowledge what is? and. It's very hard to do. It's very hard to do. It is but deadly. Drawing, attentiveness? Is One of the ways you do that I made the great. Benefit. Of Drawing for instance. Is that when you look at something. You see it for the first time. And you could spend your life. Without ever seeing anything. What if you could actually do good for the world by making a purchase with your debit card? Every time you swipe your card? A tree was planted. What if you were rewarded with up to ten percent cashback every time you bought something that helped people or the environment? There's a bangle. Turn it. That's making that happen. It's called aspiration within aspirations. Spend and save cash management account. You can do better financially while creating a better future for the planet, see the planet and people impact scores of businesses like Amazon starbucks and Ebay so. So you know the impact of your purchases, and you can round up your change to plant a tree every time you shop with your Debit Card, save on ATM fees with zero fees. At over fifty five thousand ATM's Save Money Save the planet to open your aspirations spend and save cash management account text good to sixty four thousand. Do it now for your future. Open your aspiration, spend and save account by texting good to sixty four thousand. That's good to sixty four thousand for terms and conditions to aspiration dot com, slash terms. So in a past life, the lawyer I learned how important it was to be really precise with language and grammar. There was so much writing on every word. We had an entire team of copy editors that would review almost every document, and if I had had Graham early then it would have saved a huge amount of time and money even though I don't practice law anymore that experience it trained me to be hyper aware of how important my language was. How every word or punctuation mark? Lose a reader ornament, or lead to confusion so now that I'm still very much a writer, but largely my own. I am so glad I have grandma on my side so whether you're communicating with team online working on a project, Gramley is the digital writing tool that you can always rely on to get your message across clearly, and effectively it works across multiple platforms including g mail outlook Google. 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When you sign up at grammar dot com slash good life at twenty percent of Gramley premium at Gramley dot com slash good life, g. r. a. m. M. A. R. L. Y., dot, com slash, or just click the link and the show notes now. It's interesting that as as You're sharing this in the background. We're starting to hear the voices of children. Playing outside of this. Is the perfect complement like this topic because. What better representation of here and seeing what's in front of you when you're this big and if we could carry that feller but for. So many people I feel like it. Some way we lose a we do and you'll have to. Do I I can sound as though I. I know the answer I don't know the answer anything aircraft to constantly. Be tended to what you deflect than life, and what you don't pay attention to all the things you. Can't see an all preconceptions that you do have about everyday. Those preconceptions basically. Blur Vision. It's very hard to see. What's in front of you? That I I remember hearing once. told the that I couldn't draw. The response that it's not that you can't draw. It's that you can't see. Everyone can draw like it's about. Can you actually see what's in front of you rather than seeing? The image that has already been planted in your mind about what it's hosts still a flood. It's true. I mean A. It's a shame, but educationally been teaching for. An awfully long time and Because of. The technology, the computer and so on and the concern to Bassett programs and saw that this most fundamental. Act of anyone in and out of the arts is. The desire to understand what they're looking at. A which involves looking seeing? The brain transformation. The neurological path that moves from the brain to the had I mean. Someone said the hands. A thinking instrument. Have Book drawing his thinking and. That has been omitted from Art Education In most places, not both places. At a great loss to understanding even when you manage the technological. Needs that you have. To. Produce. Thanks for the society. The idea of drawing is a way of developing your ability. To think. Doesn't seem to be. Sufficiently conclusive. It so interesting for me also as a writer. For a long time, I would do on my writing on a computer. And then it would hit a point where I just tended to step out and started taking a little mole skin book with me. And I would just sit somewhere in a park that we go to a bar to sit and just right Monahan at. First Mahan to eight because. I really lost the muscles to be able to actually. And then. What start to realize was that? That that changes actually really chains my output. The what Kate? What channel through me onto the page when I was writing by hand? was very different creatively. Then what came to my interest looper? And that's that's. Really up slightly, but everything changes everything had. No Independent, the bent so mean. I use a computer every day. Now I love the computer. but I never touched. Since I have somebody at my side by make a big make sense. But I also use the computer. right down to a series of prints for show, but I have next year I use a computer like a lithographic press I spent years doing photography. And I just think of the computer as a press that operates at a different speed Because when you do lithographs, you have to do a drawing. Chit Prepare Stone transferred this stone. Print the proof the proof that so all of which will take you a day at an order to get five different color proofs that it'll take you to do print I can do. Oh that day on the computer by simply being able to. Determine what color Gozo color night on the computer itself rather than end the old technology, but if I did DULBECCO technology, the computer be useless to me. So it's a bit. The Interaction Ital- so the need for. Speed is a separate issue entire layer of because. In the case of work that you do on the computer, speed is a factor because it's an economic factor. But the world of art speed is. Nice though. You have two. Very different objectives slow. That I mean it's interesting. I I recently. There's a letter press shop out in Brooklyn and I recently went out there, and and took a class to learn how to use these. Let presses that they had to go and find from the fifties and bring in. They had like really good machines. and. There something so. When you sit there, and you choose the paper and you laid the blocks you know, ink the roller and the aegisliving. You would ruin you. Know that up and you feel it. It's it's such a different. Process and is so you You feel it so differently and so dearly it's it's visceral. Deep thing that's I could spend all day. Writing are trading on the computer. I won't get that the you know, so it's. It's an amazing thing to to move back to. To these ways to make. The virtual world has created a very different. Kind of. Nervous system for people who who spent their life. In that world? And it produces a different sense of appropriateness of time of morality. Ethics. Behavior. I was I cited this before, but I was at dinner with my wife We sat down next to a table. With four people each had cell phones, and they were all talking to somebody outside the restaurant accounts nursing. What what's going on there, I mean. Why would you be talking to somebody outside the restaurant at not even looking at the people at your table? And when did that become appropriate? If you were on the telephone for a meal. With for different people, talking at the forum is also even when I was growing up right. Would be. Incomprehensible may not only is comprehensible bow. It's unavoidable van. if the phone rang and the family was having dinner, you didn't pick up the phone, right? So. What shifted that perception of? What's the right thing to do and it's? It's something really weird about it adding. Who are least people in the streets? Talking to were in the middle of traffic asset trying to cross? What is it that makes every conversation so urgent that it can't wait delay stop. The gross. Give it and I, but I think what I I. Agree I think what the technology does on the one hand It flattens the world, which is wonderful I can talk to people in different continents of she vent. It opens up this cultural divide, but at the same time. It often disconnects us from the people at the dinner table. Right in front of us. and. You people constantly on. Is that enough to me might be the biggest creative. The biggest ideas don't come to me when I'm working hard getting them become. Step away from the work. You know when I'm in when I'm in the woods when I'm just when they create pauses day, and they get concerned because we're filling every possible pause with. Connecting and what is that GonNa, do to what we're capable of trading in the wall. What. We don't know the the thing. We don't understand you'd never know. Fishing water does notes water. We don't know what this is doing to the inside the human behavior. Any of it. We know it's changing and we know it'll be a profound change at will be what it was, but we don't know what the nature bed will finally be. It probably have some benefits and significant drawbacks, but it is just emerging A. you're creating a new. Kind of person. I agree and literally rewiring the brain. I'm curious when you When you look at the work that you're creating. And when you when you start to make decisions. About what am I going to do my not going to do? What what's important to you? About. What you choose to work on what is sort of the qualities that that drill you to work that light you up and say this is something. I WANNA I WANNA do be involved in. A. Little more. Specific. I mean so if somebody came with the project. You're you're? You're busy person. You've got limited time And you need to say yes or no. by curiosity is in your head. What is it about is about a project? Is it a product or work, or is it the team or the individuals or the opportunity for you to explore something just yourself that may not be related even to. Its dialectic I don't think it's one thing. I don't think everyone is like why. This person like this this and that but I don't like this this. Say the. Question of human defection is so complicated. Why do you like some? People don't like other people. Go into a room when you say yes. Yes, yes, no, no, no, if you've already made up your mind. Who you can get along with you can't. Sorted in my book of Principles so my ten principles of work. The first one is which worked with people you like and that simple. Really simple, minded, but fundamentally profound. You can't. And this is not entirely true. You can't work with people you don't like sometimes. There's a kind of dislike that urges you to overcome your. Own. Limitations comes from certain extent. I would say that now getting work. What was a combination of factors one as a? First thing is if the work is harmful. I don't do it. I mean do no harm is. I think the principle that does not only apply to the medical profession. which is say to urge people to do what is harmful to them, is something that I don't feel comfortable doing. the other thing is whether the there's really an opportunity to make something good out of it as opposed to fulfilling tasks, professional life is very often at the. To artistic life, because in professional life, you basically repeat what you already know. Your preacher previous successes. Marketing Marketing is the enemy of art because it is always based on the past. But the art is always based on the future, but it's very offer based on transgressions so. When you do something that basically is guaranteed to succeed. You are basically closing the possibility for discovery so. There's that and I do Josh. Fuel A. Purely for professional reasons because they know how to do certain things that will be effective. It will work in that. Serves me as a professional. And then I do jobs or I don't know what I'm doing. Projects where I don't know what I'm doing. I'm doing that now for. A show that I'm going to have. In Cincinnati next year. I decided to do a series of landscape prints. And I'm doing them on the computer. Impart and thinking drawings. And then subjecting them to the computer. To See if I could produce something that doesn't look as though was generated by the computer. 'cause you computers dangerous. Because it shapes your capacity to descend. What's possible? Computer is is like a apparently submissive. Servant. That turns, out to be a subversive. Ultimately gained control of your mind. The computer is such a powerful is from him that it it divides after what what is possible for you. And what is possible is? Within the computers capacity, and while it seems at the beginning like this incredibly gifted. And talented service, it actually has a very limited. Intelligence. The brain is so much faster. Than the computer but. The computer's insisted about what it's good at and before you know it, it's it's like big. Somebody has bad habits. You sort of fall into the bad habits, and it begins to dominate the wave. Of what is possible? So now because I never touched the abuser, I'm taking advantage of it. By doing things that are uncomfortable for to do. You have to give me more. Feeding it like it were a big breasts instead of. Advanced Electronic Instrument. Adults fascinating, so it's essentially. Reversed bit of role reversal they're. Owning it instead of being on by. When you think about how people are being trained. There's been a lot of really interesting. PUSHBACK is day is against or at school formal art education. As somebody, who's an artist designer and a teacher, I'm curious what your feelings are hurt were be Reeburg Push Burger buskers, meaning people saying it's it's not necessary. Adjectives yeah, that sort of formal art education that for what purpose for in order to become. Good at your craft become good enough so that you can build a living doing it. You have to separate baking a living. Which is what activity? And what that everybody has to face? With enlarging one's understanding of the world? And also providing. And instrumentality for people to have as I, said earlier, a common purpose in a sense Transformation. I went up to the bargain. Library the other day. Having a show. Old. It's called bastard drives. Master drawings any case. TASTIC ISOS as in the bad never seen A. Pencil watercolour landscape. and. I was transformed by look. My world was enlarged. At this ancient age. I'm still. Capable. Of astonishment of feeling my God. I'd never had this experience before. And that is what they are. Provide the sense of enlargement and the sense that. You have a cup at the end of your understanding. either yourself or the thanks. So That's why I was invented. The Nets Swipe practitioners who have. Occasionally expensive making such objects. Feel that they are part of a larger. Issue of the immediate context of their life I mean they're part of human history. thinking. For any reason friend had recently died. It's nice feel. That, you left something behind. When you? which is fascinating because? Some forty seven and Married have a daughter. And It's interesting that I find myself now. Thinking about legacy. Is still believe that had many decades left to create were sure, but it's creeping into my everyday actual clients. And it's a little bit surprising in a non why. Don't I, mean I? Don't necessarily up the big of his legacy that sort of gives. Right overtone to it and rabbit, but the is. Were again right of doing good work. There's something about that. The simplicity abet statement. The. I think I'm not sure what was said. Loving work. That's all the res-. That's pretty much true. Urinating on that. I need to spend more time on that. That's interesting. So, In the name of this project is the good life project. And it's an exploration of you know. Do we know what the pieces are, and and one of the questions that always ask when I when I have an opportunity to sit down so like in in your experience when I offer the term to live a good life. What comes up a certificate blip? Well first of all significant to whom. I mean If you thinking in terms of the history of the world, that's what being everything in terms of family. That managed to grow up and support itself Fed. Live a full life at do no harm. Every life is significant. Sub More than a their heraldic figures in history. Chosen need the real heroism or real importance or for some illusion of. Status. I was thinking about the pope. A unexpected. Modesty. who am I to? Condemn of Human Bay. About Gay, people. And I was thinking. Yeah, but that's. Who I you the condemn anybody else. We elevate. These people to heroic roles or significant roles. Just another guy. Living tried to make sense. Getting older die. That's I mean we're all disabled. So, but it was shocking to hear that coming from someone who has been. Anointed. With this. False. A logistic. that. This person somehow is more knowing that every other human being. I'm sorry. It's a self serving delusion, but obviously useful, because persists so much. Curious do. Do see good life and a significant life as one in the same. I A very suspicious of some words like that. BILL SO What they linked to I, guess feel about that the. You can't take anything at face value. have to go beyond the superficiality of existing belief. and. By favorite quote is certainty is closing of the mind. And so. I don't know what a good life is a good life. For me, certainly has has been The things that I think. A report friendships have people love. Sidney, a marriage that has endured And the continues to Adore Teaching Sharon during for up. Well over half a century and the. Feeling that. Whatever you? Know has the possibly big transmitted. Shared! Outside of that, I would know how to. Define, good life. As you know, some people seem to be. Village to some men heroes to another I meant. Amid? What's so interesting to me as I've asked this question now? over a year into this exploration. and. Initially I would have guessed that after about. Ten eleven twelve conversations. It'd be a lot of repetition There hasn't been host which is, it's been fascinating to me, said the lenses so unique to everybody. What is the most recurring idea though? Service. Is In various ways regard are not only for myself. Yeah, gratitude! In various under by various names so. There are two things that recur. In different ways different ways. Well, What my certainly in terms of gratitude I feel dominantly grateful for the life I had led the IPAD. extraordinarily. Easy Life I would say. I I benefit enormously from the generosity about this at I've been able to. Live well and do what I aspire to do. Make some things that I think are useful. That you're you have to be grateful. Whatnot especially when you realize the amount of. Pain and suffering that. The world is Philip. A completely. I think you so much for this commerce over will ungrateful to you for your time and your Royston. Your our hope. Serious goes well. Thank you. It? Thank you so much for listening and thanks also to our fantastic sponsors who help make this show possible. You can check them out in the links. We have included intraday show notes, and while you're at. If you've ever asked yourself, what should I do with my life? We have created a really cool online assessment that will help you discover the source code for the work that you're here to do. You can find it at sparky type DOT COM, that's S. P.. A. R. K. E., T. Y.. Y. P. dot com or just click the link in the shadows, and of course. If you haven't already done, so be sure to click on the subscribe button in your listening Apps, so you never miss an episode and then share share the love. If there's something that you've heard in this episode that you would love to turn into a conversation, share it with people and have that conversation, because when ideas become conversations that lead to action. That's when real change takes hold see you next time.

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Thursday 10 January

Monocle 24: The Globalist

57:02 min | 2 years ago

Thursday 10 January

"You're listening to the globalist. I broke on the tenth of January two thousand nineteen on monocle twenty four the globalist in association with UBS. Hello. This is the globalist coming to you live from Midori house in London. I'm Georgina Godwin on the show ahead. Involve you, there should not be a second referendum. What we see in? Parliament is some people who are advocating a second referendum because they want to stop Brexit parliament is taking back control in Britain. So they say and the house of Commons says approved a controversial amendment that will make Brexit even more difficult for Theresa May. We'll get the latest can't look at the options. Shinzo obey. The Japanese Prime minister is also worried about Brexit. He's in London to support. Mrs may we'll look at the trade implications of leaving the European Union and how tractive Britain is to Asia. Now, the Congo was all set to welcome the first democratic election in the country since independence in nineteen sixty accept it doesn't seem to have been very democratic. After all we'll ask why the country's so important to the region and examine the route to its issues with free and fair elections. When also take a look at the late. I in menswear from Florence with a report from pity Ormeau with papers business news to that's all ahead right here on the globalist live from London. Tensions ramping up in the British parliament, a head of the meaningful voice on the Brexit deal on Tuesday yesterday MP's began five days of debate on Mrs Maes withdrawal agreement with the EU and the framework for future relations the controversial amendment has been passed by the house. Meaning that should the prime minister lose the vote, which is believed to be likely she'll have just three days to present an alternative plan is also thought that the opposition labor party may call vote of no confidence in the government at that point with the support of some rebel members of maize conservatives. Well, join to explore the tangled web by Lance price. Who was Tony Blair director of communications when he was prime minister lawns. Thanks for coming on this morning. Tell us what transpired in parliament yesterday. Round in Paul when the speeches unusual step of the accepting been which basically times hands ties to easy maze hands as prime minister means of inspecting pond jets clans or the drill from the your view. Then that she have to come back within three days. They've about three weeks. He's what she would have had under the under the previous engines now impartiality speaker's impartiality was questioned, but he presses ahead on N P sports of the pastas. I'm not being taxed and you got to come to a head. I the index week all the very beginning of the week opted there because he's watching days that she has to come back with a little tentative bolstered upon this today. We saw some signs all the new proposals that she thinks will persuade him. He's back plan into the aggressor. All the northern autumn to descend merely which is actually sitting at the bone to that study meaningless. I also, I know impulsive, but it does look like bones concessions are going to be enough to get through. So she will probably lose the vote on cheese day she'll released Tuesday. I am nothing. The automobile moves on the walk next scenario all scenarios, which there are many. And and I think pretty quick admitted to tesla field tendencies, and while the government will furious. This was put to the tool talked yesterday full student choose event to come back within three days, actually, they're not abrasive it, and it maybe that it works to trees as well. Because if she can demonstrate or parliament dozen states that Knowles services has jersey has problems. Then then that means that her zeal is still hasn't been pulse is still what has to be an amended change or modify to try to get more supportive possible than in parliaments, and maybe to her about the things come to hand student role. So labor says that it will call for a vote of no confidence in the government. If in fact, the vote doesn't go through will happen. Well, there's sort of sorts of games and a couple of from benches as a leading figures in the in the labor party did say that been. Just been comforted. Government would follow it batteries. Derby pool spins and yesterday pointed the refused so in terms of Labour's tactics and still keeping constant the chance. Bitten should probably still lost. Which means that's the option of gentlemen. It actually would be taken off the table. And I think that's important about the next seven to ten days is one by one other options will be taking all the table. And if the ultra the Nexans, they think the table, then what made it does next is. Absolutely appreciate because if the labor party's hold or significant number favorite and peas could be swayed toback something a bit much museum as deal closer to what policy woman's then would would command. This has what does the labor party won't? Well, this is impossible to be even closer to European. You did choose me steal would allow he's right for the outset is ruled out customs union or membership Oppy single markets. Now if our. Lot of crickets, the conservative party on the on the stone Brexit season. Actually, it's pretty close to Judy anyway. So we didn't even closer with. It's just that you could get enough neighbor MP's or even intentionally the whole of coffee just folded lounge finally in the case of no deal and continued kale's. Do you think the UK's done enough to secure trading partners and instill confidence outside of Europe? We're gonna be talking about Shinzo Abbas visit to Britain in a moment is Japan, the only country to have concerns. The world concerns, and they're very very real concerns in the UK as well. So there's older muster about how? Well, the country could offer new deal Brexit of a little bit of destruction. But then everybody was assaulted self out most of these seventy majority peas recognize that sympathies through that we are totally overpainted for new Brexit of doing her own trade deals around the world. And then why not do but sitting creasing me as Todd's? And and that's one of the reasons that had been muscles in the way that they have Lance. Thank you very much. Indeed that was launched price there. Here's what else would keeping an eye on today. Australia's foreign minister is in Bangkok as congress considers an asylum application by an eighteen year old Saudi woman who says her family want to kill her row have Muhammed Al Quran is currently at a Bangkok hotel under the care of the United Nations refugee agency. She was initially refused entry to Thailand. But later barricaded herself inside a transit lounge and refused to board a flight back to Saudi Arabia. China has accused Canada of double standards and says the nation is disregarding. It's judicial sovereignty the Chinese ambassadors. Comments came as a diplomatic row continues over the arrest of executive may one Joe at the request of the United States and an open letter by the European Union's, parliamentary delegation for relations has sharply criticized what it pulls the White House is increasingly harmful approach to transatlantic relations. The fifty eight member delegation is calling on congress to help strengthen and not undermine ties. This is the globalist. Stay tuned. Shinzo lobby. The Japanese Prime minister will meet his British counterpart today in London it's thought that he'll endorse Theresa May's proposed deal with the EU at a press conference after the meeting other soft in the Netherlands on his way, which is where some Japanese firms concerned about the lack of clarity around Brexit. The set up offices to ensure that they have an operational base in Europe in the event of new deal. The UK absorbs forty percent of Japanese investment destined for the EU. We're his John Nelson. Right. Who's a senior lecturer in Japanese, politics, and international relations, Cambridge and a senior research fellow for northeast Asia with Chatham house. John good morning to you. British officials say that this is not a panicked effort to gain influential overseas support for maize deal, whether or not that's true might obey and Japanese business businesses be just as punished as Britain. Well, I think the prospect of the no deal and a crash out of the European Union is something that for obvious reasons. The Japanese particularly concerned about you remember that in the aftermath, of course of the referendum. It was the Japanese who set up a an investigative process with ram to three months and produce a sixteen page letter setting out Japan's concerns and since then the Japanese government has been assiduous in pushing the British government to provide greater clarity greater transparency and oversee promised to obey once a deal to be reached and once prime minister deal to be endorsed. But of course, the reality is all the predictions of suggesting next week prime minister may we'll lose that vote. And therefore, it's quite understandable. Why prime minister obey on this visit which has been planned for some time is keen to reiterate his message that a deal should be agreed beyond that. Of course, the prime minister will want to know, what are the contingency plans? If that deal is voted them next week as we. Effect. Well, it sort of numbers of Japanese firms of moving to the Netherlands all other places in Europe because of Brexit is it significant. Well, I think there is a real desire tickly on the part of comedy factors who've come out just in anticipation of this. Visit was a piece published today in the financial times setting out the use of Honda Nissan Toyota in expressing their concern and desire to have greater clarity. But at this stage, of course, having invested since the nineteen eighty s in establishing auto plants in the UK, the Japanese car companies aren't about suddenly move lock stock and barrel out of the United Kingdom. But they do have to make these very important contingency plans. And I think what we're seeing is a real effort by these very important companies who invested in good faith. And there is a real sense. I think that having been so committed to the United Kingdom is such a long time that they feel that the British government should if you like. Find as Lucien that on his those commitments, and so is Ave likely or able to bring any pressure to on MRs may about the future of Japanese companies in the UK. I don't think he can really shift the needle in Tim's of the political fundamentals. But of course, this meeting is not just about Brexit. There are other things at the prime minister's looking to discuss with the prime minister, we've had talked for example of Britain joining CPT P D eleven nation free trade agreement that Stobbe has been pushing quite deliberately in the aftermath of Donald Trump's decision to pull out of that deal. And of course, part of that is based on the fear that Britain. Of course, we'll end up without a workable deal, and therefore the imperative to to look at other bilateral multilateral trade agreements becomes that that much more important than are, of course, other areas where Britain and Japan can do a lot more together. And I think it's worth emphasizing that this will be part of the discussions between the two prime ministers development assistance in Africa security cooperation in which Britain and Japan have made some very important progress in recent years dealing with the threat of North Korea. Even for example, the role of Hitachi in building nuclear reactors in the United Kingdom these are areas where there is room for greater cooperation between the two countries. And in terms of separate trae dilemma isn't the free trade deal actually with the EU an means that Britain would not have too much be able to be a positive it. That's true. But there is a positive dimension to hear the agreement between the EU and Japan is opened up space in the cultural sector, and I understand that one of the agreements between Britain and Japan will be reached a decision on the part of the Japanese to lift the ban on British beef imports BSE, contaminated beef was an issue back in the nineteen ninety s and Mr. Ave is bringing if you like present with him to the British Prime minister, the possibility the quite likely possibility that ban on British beef will be relaxed as well as other agriculture. Cocoa products, lamb, three example, lamb exports Japan. So in the in the trade sector there is some good news for the two countries particularly Britain looking ahead this year with Britain with Japan hosting the G twenty summit in all sokaia. There will be discussions. I'm sure between the two countries about how best to prepare for that. Also Japan will be hosting the rugby World Cup. This. Another area where of course, the cultural ties between the two countries. So there's a look that can be discussed, but will be see the elephant in the room. If you like the big issue that worries Japanese is, of course, Brexit because of that heavy investment in the United Kingdom. Do you think that after Brexit Britain will still be an attractive trading partner, not only for the Japan, but for Asia, and in fact, the rest of the world. Well, that's the sixty thousand dollar question. Isn't it really? I mean, it's a question of how. How isolated Britain is depending on what happens with the Brexit deal. There's no doubt that there's a real appetizer on the part of British the British government. British ministers, of course, have been keen to stress the importance of ties with Japan, but it's ability to compensate for the huge economic reality that European represents is very questionable. I think on the part of British of Japanese companies there is an affinity with the United Kingdom a long history of close ties. But companies have to be pragmatic, and will as a as you rightly point out to be looking at developing alternative opportunities in the European Union. If the worst happens, and there is no deal at the end of March Joan finally Theresa May, maybe pleased to see a, but he might not receive a pleasant welcome from the British public. There are planned protests against Japan's decision to reestablish commercial whaling. Yes. That has been to some extent a bit of a surprise. I think the decision from Japan. Of course, the issue of wailing in a way goes against the grain of Japan's frequently emphasized commitment to the rule of law, and international institutions. This unilateral decision doesn't help Japan in terms of maintaining that consistent position in supporting those international institutions, and critics of Japan's down some wailing will be pointing at that problem within Japan. I think there is perhaps a sense that even if access to to wailing is not something that really matters to the average Japanese citizen. There are sitting communities which have a long tradition of whaling in Japan for whom the politics of this border mister bay being sensitive to that but small protests, probably, yes, which will cost a little bit of a cloud over the visit. But I think overall this should probably be. A successful visit in terms of the public atmospherics, and and promised they will be wanting to emphasize his common interests with his British counterpart as part of his broader agenda stressing Japan's proactive role in foreign policy Jonathan right? Thank you very much. Indeed. Maybe s has nine hundred investment analysts from over one hundred different countries over nine hundred of the shop is Moen's and freshest thinkers in the world of finance today. The one no small and find out how we can help you contact us at UBS dot com. Now for many of us the unique format and orderly construction of a printed newspaper delivers information in a way that nothing else can and for Thomas Bernhardt, it's vanishing all too quickly. He's the chief protagonist of the last newspaper reader a book by Mikhail and gala, which chronicles the vanishing world of printed papers monocle recently adopted the book into an audio cereal and all this week. We'll be getting a sneak peek is part four of the series. the newspaper is still a part of all of that. But all of that is slowly disappearing because the papers disappearing it may be the case that this process will go on for years centuries. Even maybe the case, the newspaper will even experience a small renaissance, but still it is disappearing. No one's in doubt of that. But not everyone recognizes the loss that this disappearance entails a whole culture is in fact as appearing, and I'm not intern able to discern that this culture is giving way to a new one just as rich even though I have for a long time been a resident of both worlds the analog and the digital. And by now, spend more time on Spiegel online than reading the effort said the daily paper is disappearing because it is outdated because day no longer rules over the flow of information. That's true. But the speed which newspaper falls out of date was already an issue when only newspapers existed. There's nothing older than yesterday's newspaper is the signature of the newspaper era. But that doesn't always hold true. This sentence. Didn't hold true for d for example, when he was in hospital reading the F said that he'd bought at the kiosk the previous day. Neither does it. Hold true for anyone who's on holiday on the country yesterday's newspaper is the best proof that you'll really somewhere else on vacation. You can only get yesterday's paper. If you've got your hands on a German newspaper from the same day, you may as well, go straight back home you not on holiday. That's how it was in the golden age of newspaper reading that's how it still is today. We spend our last some holiday in Brittany. We rented a small house with a family. We're close to the hamlet a few kilometers from the coast. You couldn't boy newspapers in town. There wasn't any shops at all. But of course, we had our laptops with us, and we'd get a guilty conscience whenever we booted them up not only to keep abreast of the Gaza war and Spiegel online. But also to fritter away time on Facebook. The father of the family didn't go on Facebook, very often he read German newspapers and the end set set on his ipad. And when later in the day, we visited the small town on the sea. He bought lemon LeBron's and the Kenosha ni. I kept quiet about the fact I was plundering about newspaper reading that. I might even ROY little book about it. I didn't want him to feel like he was being observed and change his behavior a problem. That's well known in the field of -nology. If I told him he might not have routinely shoved the newspaper in his trouser pocket and started through the small town from who streets. Newspapers had as good as disappeared whereby you have to admit that the place may be pretty, but it's geared up for regional tourism Benelux crime stories, which Lear so many people to Brittany are set. Elsewhere foreign papers were available in the stationery shop, but you had to ask for them the shop assistant through an unsorted bundle on the table from which I pulled out the previous day's deutscher and sat down in the cafe opposite from which the melody of a hit by alphaville emanated. I flick through these deutscher, and I looked over at the fishing boats, which were dozing in the midday sun in the end. I'd only read the spotlight section, which I hardly ever read in Berlin anymore, although often intend to so I hadn't read a lot. But I had read de Gloser who satirical commentary, which is one of the best things about the newspaper, which I read all too seldom it felt good. L also only read a fraction of the French newspapers. He'd bought he immersed himself in the canal, Chanel least of all the articles in the NADA, certainly very challenging. But the fact that he read so little of it low. His French is enviable studied in Paris had another reason reading highbrow newspapers on holidays like weeding the local program to see what you could do that evening only to fall asleep in front of the television as soon as you get home from work on average. You might read two articles the main one on the front page and a medium size one inside the paper. Most attempts to save the newspaper assume that people want to read newspaper. They don't consider that people might procure a newspaper simply to be able to read it after all that wouldn't make much sense. But that's how it is in many cases, and it applies to periodical are magazines even more. So so not only did my friend hardly read the cannot Shanna. He also didn't work through the bundle of New Yorkers. We brought along for him before getting on the plane with his family. He gives us a suitcase that we had to squeeze into our cars we've box we assumed it contained clothes and toys can never crossed our minds that someone would have older she's of the New Yorker delivered to him. Neither is the obvious purpose of a collection of New Yorkers to read back issues on holiday, nor is the obvious purpose. A holiday to read old New Yorkers, but it did have its purpose. He read a couple of articles and seemed satisfied this too is well known from the history of ethnology the researcher take. On the behavior of their research subject. We went on a trip to pay impo- with the firm intention of buying a novel. I went into a bookshop and found a novel about Paris under your Pompidou later. I read about twenty pages on the beach. Never touched it again. It wasn't bad. But you should have bought Pierre's, Latinos, and Iceland fisherman. I told myself that one is set in pine po-. Then again, I wouldn't have read any more of an Iceland fisherman than of Paris under George Pompidou. And that was the fourth installment of Monaco's audio cereal the last newspaper reader by Mikhail and gala, you can listen to the full story by tuning into print industry review program. The stuck. We'll details, of course on our website. Twenty four minutes past seven in London. You're listening to the globalist with me Georgina Godwin. And joining me in the studio is Charles Hecke's senior partner control risk. Good morning. Good morning. We are here to have a look through the newspapers unsurprisingly. Of course, Brexit dominates the headlines, that's already I think we have to make some sort of nod to the fact that even though this was covering great deal at the top of the broadcast that every single one of the British daily papers with their broadsheet or tabloid has the domestic Brexit developments essentially in six column headlines across every front page is that much variation in coverage. It's all incredibly predictable. So if you go to one end of the political spectrum, this is a massive parliamentary crisis and a coup being fostered by the speaker of the house, if you go to the other side of the political spectrum, this is a completely reasonable move that. Any responsible speaker of the house would have done given the opportunity. So I mean, this this is an issue that's not going to go. It's carried on the inside of most papers as well. And the photography actually is tentacle in every paper and quite interesting. And there's this amazing Tableau of speakers on berko, the at the head of the house of Commons surrounded by his clerks, and by MP's, and by people in various sort of parliamentary regalia, and it has this almost sort of religious symbolism to it of the sort of Tableau that you might see above an altar. It's very it. Looks like a renaissance painting. Yes, exactly right now, there's another picture that's dominating the rest of the front pages of. That's right. What little little spaces left on the front pages of the international newspapers is devoted to the fact that Jeff Bezos the founder of Amazon is getting divorced. This is in part a social society story, but it. Is of course, very very serious business story. But before we get to that I sort of have to say that I think this is a very 2019 divorce where currently Mr. MRs visas, Jeff Jesus and his wife MacKenzie have issued a joint statement where they say that after a long period of loving exploration and trial separation. We will remain cherished friends and continue our shared lives as friends, which is extremely modern approach to divorce and makes people think that perhaps there's not that much acrimony in this separation. What there is in this divorce is an enormous pile of money. Jeff Bezos is reportedly worth a hundred thirty seven billion dollars. That's billion with a B since the time that he started Amazon in his garage in nineteen Ninety-four and the beezus family is at least partially. Residing in the state of Washington state of Washington says that any property acquired in the course of marriage is automatically held jointly by the couple no matter who did the heavy lifting. And of course, they got married a year before he started zone. That's exactly right. So this puts the soon to be no longer MRs Bezos in the position of of acquiring sixty eight point five billion dollars, unless there is some sort of pre-nuptial agreement that dictates otherwise, we don't know about that. And the papers haven't discovered that yet. So that would make MRs Bezos the wealthiest woman in the world ahead of the heiress to the Laurie. Al fortune Francois's petanque were Myers head of the Queen of England and ahead of JK Rowling. Some of the other papers have asked whether or not this leads to a show. Holder crisis at the company what happens to management happens to the stewardship of Amazon. This will all play out as the divorce goes through the courts and goes through proceedings, but it is an enormous business transaction in addition to a family process, the lately in house out that it would have to be splashed all over the front pages at a very difficult personal time. Indeed, let's move onto the team. Now. This is very interesting when it comes to the Moore investigation. Tell us about the story, right? So on page four of the F T, we see that rod Rosenstein, who is of course, the second in command at the United States Department of Justice and the guarantor essentially of the continuity of the Robert Muller investigation into President Trump, Mr. Rosenstein has signaled that he's going to leave the Justice department as we know President Trump sacked Jeff. Jeff Sessions, the previous attorney general the head of the Justice department and confirmation hearings for his replacement William bar or beginning next week. Mr. bar has indicated that he's going to bring his own deputy into the Justice department. So it's time for Mr. Rosenstein to go. He is saying that this is all normal and managed and part of the process of change in leadership in that he's not being forced out. But this is done two things. It's triggered two reactions on the first is how much jeopardy does this place. The Muller investigation in if it's primary shepherd, Mr. Rosenstein is leaving the department an so Q a lot of gnashing of teeth and wringing of hands over how safe the Muller investigation is number one. And number two. It has triggered massive speculation that the Muller investigation might actually be very close to ending because Mr. rose. Stein under no circumstances would leave the Justice department and expose the Muller investigation to the potential threat of a shutdown or a cutoff or any political pressure. So this one move is actually triggered quite a strong reaction has he said when he's going to go which might give us an indication of when we could see me results, they'll be a brief transition period for a handover, but he's going to be gone. You know in the next few weeks, so Muller's gonna either have to wrap it up fairly quickly, or there may be some sort of guarantee that the new attorney general William bar will not shut him down. Interestingly in some of the coverage of this indicates that bar and Muller, actually, friends, and that their wives attend a bible. Study course together. Well, I they're praying for the right outcomes. Drones of back in the news again this right now that we're all back from our holiday travels. We learn that UK airports or attack are tackling the drone problem. You will recall, of course, the drama surrounding the shutdown of Gatwick on the eve of the holiday travel rush. And he threw itself was down very briefly earlier this week as the result of drone incursions near the airport. So the F T has a piece, but also on page eleven of the times, we learned that Heathrow is on the verge of spending ten million pounds to install drewn detectors anti-drunk devices drone signal jammers and is also considering widening the exclusion zone around the airport trying to keep drones at a safer distance from the runways. It's extraordinary that it has to take a crisis for this to happen. Well, exactly and the ironic thing about what happened at Heathrow, according to the times as actually that when the drones started appearing around the airport, the managers of Heathrow ordered up an instant shipment of expensive defense department anti-drunk technology that arrived later in the day. And by that time the drones for that day had already disappeared if they'd ever been that. Because of course, there was some doubt about that. But that's right. We were getting a little bit confused between drones and perhaps you Afo sightings when it came to Gatwick. Well, talking of UFO's mysterious radio-wave bust could be from aliens. That's right Virginia, you'll recall in this very room last year. We were discussing the appearance of a USO in the shape of a UFO in the shape of a cigar that came from outer space in past fairly close to earth. This time we've got radio signals coming in our direction. And this is not a group of crackpot saying this is again, another hard. Vard's? Scientists telling us that these these coordinated brief bursts of repetitive radio signals from outer space from deep space. They could be the result of a black hole. They could be the result of stars colliding. But this scientists is suggesting that possibly this is actually a high tech phenomenon and is coming from transmitters somewhere else in the universe and the popular reaction on social media to the suggestion has been, you know, please leave us alone. Busy with all of our own things right now, you know, not now govern favor. Thanks. We tells very much indeed that was child Hecker now still to come on the program. We hear the latest on elections in the Congo. This is the globalist. UBS global financial services firm with over one hundred fifty years of heritage built on the unique dedication of all people. We bring fresh thinking in perspective to our work, and we know that it takes a marriage of intelligence and haunt to create lasting value for. It's about having the rights ideas, of course. But it was time about having one of the most accomplished systems and unrivaled network of global experts. That's why at UBS we pride ourselves on thinking smarter to make a real difference. June in weekly to the bulletin with UBS for all the latest insights and opinions from UBS and experts from around the world. There's never been a peaceful democratic transfer of power in the Democratic Republic of Congo. But no, forty six million people voted in. What's hopes all the first democratic elections since nineteen sixty when Belgian colonial rule ended, but with huge delays in the voted self under nouncement of the results as well as his Asians of fraud and fears of violence democracy is by no means guaranteed in the Elliott of the smoothing with riot police on standby opposition leader, Felix cheeses Kennedy was named as the winner by the constitutional court. Well with me now is ugly to covers west and central Africa at the Economist Intelligence Unit. Thanks much for coming before we discussed the wind. Can you just tell us a little bit about the circumstances under which these elections were held share? So the less term of urges f- Kabila outgoing president's where supposed to end two years ago in two thousand sixteen but that didn't happen because basically. It's Whiteley believed that he was trying to to stay in power. But the brusher domestically and internationally really increase quickly, and he had to announce that he was going to have election, and he announced that petition he will would would run for the for the FCC. So that happened a couple of months ago, we had election in Semper. And we strongly believed cherry will be the the front runner, but at that plan for for caveat to have his potato winning this election in order to protect his interest face difficulties. And this is because we had results on social media media that began became widespread and that was ring clear lead for one of the obsession leader who was. So there were two main opposition leaders facing it was fixed security who has been provisionally the winner of elections. And so that was an expected for the Cadillac camp. They didn't expect such strong support for you. And these these results on social media was carry for them. So they decided to cut into nets, basically. So so that prompted widespread fear that they would manipulate results. One of the turning point was when the Catholic church responded to that. And they basically said that they had observers everywhere in the country forty thousand observers actually, which is massive. And they said that with the results they have they could say who could be the winner of these elections and the Catholic church in the important is really powerful force. So that increased the pressure again regime so over the. The best couple of days. I would say that that there was there were rumors of anew option, and you plan for the Kabila regime, which was to approach chickadee. So that's not official, of course. But that could be the least bad attorney for the Cadillac regime, basically because a presidency with Tshisekedi is more manageable than presidency for you presidency. With Vialli would have come with big risks for the regime, and delete and inner circle of the of Kabila because he's he has been constant in his position to the regime, basically one fixture security. It's a much more manageable alternative in the sense that if he becomes a threat to the Kabila regime or to the his inner circle in way, he's still has an option which is the. The fact that the diploma of security has been announced as maybe a contemplates diploma. So to get has diploma that he passed in Belgium, and I think it was yesterday or two days ago. There was an announcement that the in Brussels that they did not have a record of diploma. So you need a diploma this diploma to be able to run in the elections in the so basically, there's this kind of an ano how say leverage on chicken. So now, we have these provisional results. The problem is that there are big risks. The first one Lou has rejected the results this Kurds Cho's popular like poplar unrests of his supporters, which seems to be a massive. Amount of people. But most importantly is what the Catholic church is going to say now. So as I said, they are a really strong and popular actor in jersey. So yeah, so America has ordered its citizens to leave the country. There's already been so much violence in the lead up to this poll, and so many cases of fraud. Anyway, do you sit and riot police were on standby full? This announcement is violence likely. I mean, you talking about the supporters of fairly that's apparently around six point four million people potentially very explosive situation. Finance is likely. You're right. I mean. When when you have an election with such a week, and fraudulent a process, it just likes credibility. And when you have a process that lacks credibility opens the way to a rejection of the results, and therefore protests, and and this if it's the case will be met with harsh crackdown spot the by the regime now, we know that Congo matters hugely to the wider world. It's just country in Africa touches, so many other African countries. And of course, it's hugely mineral rich, whatever happens in the Congo now impacts everywhere, but can this lack of democracy, betrays bucks through histories structural? I mean, why does different fire elections have real issues here. So I think you're right to say that did you see is important to the region. We saw that during the second kogo war, the the violence instability there quickly sect in the neighboring countries. So it is important to to keep in mind that the the country is important is important to the region. What are the structural issues in in this country? I think I is important to say that having an election having cabbie link Cadillac to stand down having an election where you had a massive amount of people turning out and peacefully is showing that is there is an increase in particular spacious. So I think there is potential for democracy gains in the country, and is something we've seen across the region. But as you say, there are still major obstacles to the consolidation of democracies in the region in in the and despair because of for Jilin and flowed, Alexa, pussies, but also because of restriction and civil liberties. Week functioning government, which are characterized with with a pervasive network of corruption. So yes, I think overall democratic gains are potentially something that we could see in the region in the country, but the region still is way of other regions in terms of the advance of democracy loudly. And thank you very much. Indeed, that's Vanhoudt. It's time to business next. Join me on the line as the financial analyst Lewis Kupa. Louise, I want to say happy new year, but it wasn't particularly for retailers. No. So we we've had a report from the British retail consortium out this morning looking at sales trends over Christmas, and they describe it as the worst Christmas for retail since two thousand eight which is called at the beginning of the financial crisis in the crash of the economy food sales was the only thing that really held up retail in the UK. And if you looked sort of fashion sales, non-food items, really very ugly with declines in what consumers spent so we know consume as being failing a little more concerned, maybe overspent a little bit over the warm lovely summer, but even online which has never been growing for some time growing, really strong strongly. Even online has slowed the growth as well. And then this morning, we've got a whole rough of UK retailers reporting that that Christmas trading foam. It's gone three one two three four five six of them. I've gone through six of them. So I can give you some highlights of those as well. I guess I would describe it as separating the wheat from the chaff. If you are a good retailer than you, probably did, okay. Over christmas. If you're not great in a weak position than it was ugly, and it was difficult. So how does the UK retail sales like car parts and bikes? They've issued a profit warning this morning saying it was very tough on them. You look big department stores. You've got John Lewis, which is kind of this. What would you describe him? It's like a op it's owned by its workers and its members John Lewis's Jonah que they got positive like for like sales in that strolls over there white trays that very expensive food business is not looking quite so good. But other department stores denims marks and Spencer is really looking ugly debit share price again a big little mid range department store. Dem share prices collapsed to pretty much nothing valuing that group at very little. They've got pretty ugly talking about UK like for like sales down over six percent. That is no STI Mark suspense used to be the biggest fashion retailer in the UK no longer than not doing particularly. Well, that clothing and home side, they're like for like sales down two point four percent and their food which had been up to about you'll so holding up the best of the holding business that food again like white choice, incredibly expensive even. Food site is down two percent. So those two department stores denims monks, not very good tool. John Lewis, though Smith quite unique for a department store is doing okay with positive light for likes. But don't get carried away the UK's. Biggest retailer Tesco. It's a big supermarket. A big food retailer how to new boss at the helm turning around for the last few years. They've done considering how tough it Spain very well with UK like for likes actually excel writing getting stronger over Christmas. So the Tesco numbers show. If you've got the right man at the top it really can make a difference because the other re to other food retailers had had didn't have a great Christmas. So the the strong getting stronger the weak getting weaker this retail violent is separating the weight from the chaff. Louise, thank you very much. Indeed, this is the globalist a monocle twenty four. Tool stories is a Wiki feature from the team behind the finest Monaco's progun what about the cities in which we live. So this week we had to New Zealand's capital Wellington when nestled into the side of a hill and on a quiet suburban street, you can find premier house the official residence of the country's prime minister his uncle's David Stevens with more on this homes rather colorful history. Well, Trump sleep soundly in the White House and South Korea's Moore. And John hangs says the Blue House to send an raises the first baby of residence that was once nine as the mid. Construction of the category. One here to building dates back to the infancy of the New Zealand colony Belton Wellington in eighteen forty three. It was originally intended for the city's first mayor George hunter. But when the capital city was packed up and shipped down south from Oakland and eighteen sixty five to it's now, comfortable harm amongst the hills of the Wellington harbour, the building became New Zealand's official residence step aside ten Downing Street the Kiwis have to sixty ten according road. So the street address might not be snappy. But the newly minted residents was sitting Leah buzz with peanuts. And the Knicks seventy years a total of nine premium four prime ministers called at home and aside from simply moving in the favorite pillows plants and pooches many of the occupants sit about renovating the property to make it their own. Gordon Coates the country's twenty PM rebuilt, the properties conservatory and even ended and enclosed verandah in nineteen twenty six, but by this point, the place at fallen into disrepair, and it required more than a bit of window-dressing to survive. By nineteen fifty five prime minister, Michael Savage, who was the properties Knicks potential Tina more than had his hands full rebuilding the country's economy during the great depression and decided to rebuild at two sixty inequality road wasn't with adding job Shaked, he declined the offer to take out residents there, hence also not voters even he was giving up some luxury during the economic downturn. And the country was without an official residence. The address was handed over to the healthcare sick and transformed into a children's into clinic where became known by every school could face the mouth full of filling wools by the slightly exaggerated. Monica. The mid a house. Vass to the nine thousand nine hundred and debate over the future of the property had come to a head. Then minister of internal is Michael Bessette the cleared. The house was to be restored to its former glory tomato. One hundred fiftieth anniversary of Wellington becoming the nation's capital. In nineteen ninety the fish PM move back into the freshly refurbish residents since then almost every prime minister has set up shop in the valley quotas, barring the give a slighted Bill English due to a New Zealand law prohibiting Wellington-based impis claiming taxpayer combination in the capital while John k inhaling Clack used more as a hotel than a home. You Zealand's newest leader to send Adan has moved on proper even placing social media p- dates from the catch with pedals Zealand's. Fisk cat who sadly died early month in office? And what lex some of the grandeur of the Kremlin will the security of the White House. You see on premium house seems to sum up the country quite well. A quiet little house and a quiet corner of the capital with dog walkers returning from stroll around the Wellington botanic gardens might catch. The prime minister putting rubbish bins perhaps collecting the mail, please just hard to another Bill. That was one ical. David Stevenson for more of gin to the oven. Est. That's tonight on twenty four nine thousand nine hundred London time, this is the globalist. It is fifty two minutes past the top of the hour. And we finish today's program with chest with Monaco's fashion editor, Jamie waters. He's currently in Florence reporting from pitchy, Houma, the unofficial for one of the most stylish weeks in the global calendar. He KOTA with Monica lls, Emma, Nelson to share some of his impressions from under the Tuscan sun. It's pretty good of I can't really comply. We've just been out having spaghetti and sort of Nagorno knees. And it's it's a beautiful city today, although very chilly of these freezing. But between taking welcome break from over eating and drinking. There's a small matter of Petit womb. Oh, how is that Bain today yet been really good? It's very busy season autumn. Winter is busier than the the summer season is just kind of big industry, but we're one of the big grand way shows tonight. And so what does really well, I mean. The main event is the Fortezza nuts where they told hundred brands have stance on everything. But then they also host a special sort of one off runway events is normally one to fake designers who stays kind of spectacular shows one of those two not on the designer y project which was a prison liable the credits to the Belgian got gun mountains on. It's very respected brand that's very cool at the moment. And what's good about PC? Today's runway intensities design is that for these my shirts time, the paper to Gabba the paper to kind of absorb the shows talk about them off with it's really experience. What happens in power special? Michael milan. Is this such a sheds will that people just running between shows? So if you're brand you put a lot of money into a show on then it's on social media on Instagram. Whatever people talking about it for ten minutes abroad to the next show. And it's all wiped out. I'm not the problem that brands have to contend with a PC all before because he's not people have time. So there's a really nice feeling about it. So the why project show to not it was held in the cloister courtyard of the Santa marina, Bella, which is this incredible church from the fourteen hundreds in the center of the city was in this courtyard that was Nord lighting it was very dark on people had torches sitting on these long benches around the courtyard sets a very spectacular setting that really makes the most of being in Florence. It was a men's and women's shore on it sort of started with is quite eerie Quant music on the motives were kind of clipping down. The, you know, the stones of this courtyard in the guys into the black boots. And the the goes had gold hails on various being a spot where it was a very interesting shore. And it kind of felt like can occur. Asian and I think that's one of the things PC really does. Well, isn't interesting idea to actually give you time to see what's on show. How does that actually change the way that you see the fashion? Do you actually spend more time thinking about appreciating it more? Or is it still that whole thing about having to give an immediate reaction before we move onto the next thing. I think you do appreciate it more. You're in a kind of different mindset. I think even walking into this show. It said it was Pam shore. But only she started at seven so for our people we've walked through the centre in Avella and paper with just just wondering around the church and shining torches around and looking at, you know, the incredible data on the sailing, and you're in a different head space because you do have a bit more time that wouldn't happen at a normal fashion. Paper don't have now you would miss the next show. So I think that is the sense of. Curiosity that you have unequivocally after the show people are going to drink things like that. But that is not a runway show straight afterwards way to baiting the show talking about with different people. A was kind of gathered outside there's a different failing around the which makes it an incredible platform for the design as well. Because they do have the getting all this attention on them on just on that note. There's another one tomorrow, not the second my show. It's a brand new label and the designers could outta Maria Camilla men. Hayes had an amazing suppressed aegis career previously is been designer Zana Valentino Trucy Baluchi or these amazing European houses some brick cited sable Hayes gonna bring with his short. But yet, it's I think it's just an amazing plot designs on it's really nice frost as well. That we kind of have time to absorb what they're doing saying stuff up close D see how the fashion system, really. Really works. Given the fact that you do have that time, and you can see the per factions and the other things that make pushing on enormous show, really real those trainings. I think with the runway shows it's more about you saying the closing movement against the music. It's kind of the whole it's more of an emotional thing. And I think it's about the ho- spectacle. I think in terms of like feeling the clothes and saying the data. That's where the actual trade show is so good. And that's why I think PC works so well ferments by because menswear really is about the details. Generally, I knew see how it all works. And kind of it's a very stressful industry if a Boston sort of in the wrong place, which seems trivial, but if design is just not quite rot. You know? This is chance to show it tool the buys, these Shaw met a lot of money spent a lot of money on the so there's a lot of pressure for them. And you kind of use your say the workings up close and that Jamie will and that's all we have time for today. Thanks to produces Augustine much. Larry and Ben Ryland our researches page rentals Nicholson stadium manager today was David Stevens who'll give excellent tool stories package after the headlines. There's more music on the way on the continental shift Marcus hippie will be in the presentative that the briefing is live at day with Ben Ryland today. The program will be looking at the latest developments in the United States on the twentieth day of the government shutdown. President Trump walked out of a meeting late yesterday after senior Democrats refused to negotiate on their refusal of funding for border wall. I think he said five by as he went more details on the briefing at midday, and I'll be back with you on Saturday for the weekend edition that. Of course is our I wouldn't call it a variety program shot programming. Lots of great music, and of course, lots of great interviews, including meet the Rice's, my guest this week is John lunch. Stor who's written a book called the wool? Now. It's billed as disturbed in fiction. Sadly, it seems to be becoming all too true. So do chain into that fifteen hundred. Did on Saturday. I'm Georgina Godwin, Frankie Phyllis.

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#58: The Big 5 Gut Rehab (France and United Kingdom) Week of July 29, 2019

The EuroWhat? A Eurovision Podcast

47:10 min | 1 year ago

#58: The Big 5 Gut Rehab (France and United Kingdom) Week of July 29, 2019

"Angel Spun Get the Job Done Ah <music> hello and welcome to the euro episode number fifty eight for the week of July twenty ninth. I'm Ben Smith and I'm joined today by Mike mccomb. Hey Mike and our special guests Helen Drift ice. I Helen I he's the having used so we are a bunch of Americans trying to make sense of the Eurovision Song Song contest and this week we are wrapping up our series <hes> Gut renovating all the big five and talking about France and I guess really just Kinda stage intervention for the United Kingdom. That's why we're all here is what we had the folding chairs yeah. This is a very thin thinly-veiled excuse to talk about the U._K.. But we will talk about France. We love you and we're concerned. Yes even France. I'm sure listeners will love that. We've Combined Branson U._K.. <hes> to because yeah because their best eastern of this history conflict two tastes that goes so great together yes so Helen Welcome to the program. Thanks for having me so in Blunter splur- you hear that you can't produce eurovision well this kind of I guess all roads lead back to one direction in my case case. I was following a lot of U._K.. People around two thousand fourteen up your way because we brought friends because of that and a lot of them were tweeting pictures of a Cheetah <unk> on my timeline and I was like what is this and someone sent me a link. I ended up watching. I think the last half of the grand final that year and I have I've been hooked ever since the relatively recent but devoted euro fan now excellent excellent and again two thousand fourteen feels like a really good year to start with yeah. Common Linnet was also there my brother in I'm a big fan of of Iceland's entry from that. You're polar punk. Oh Yeah I think John Oliver covered that won that year as well so that it got some a lot of American press because a Cheetah One <hes> <hes> I think that year she was one of the top two google searches like in the United States yes so it's like wow that's it's really cool. It's also memorable for the French entry which will get to in a minute. I'm sure that I think that might have been the first entry that I actually ended up watching tune again. Halfway through out is so what an intro yeah yeah. I mean really if you if you're going to get the true your vision experience that is a very eurovision e and tree yes yeah and then it just kept getting more serious. As the years went on kind kind of Australia came in and made everybody step up their game saying exactly exactly we will get to talking about France in the U._k.. In a second second but it made sense to checking in on a few news desk things yeah so as always how many cities are in Netherlands we have to and as we predicted in last breath episode the think within hours of dropping the episode out no it was it was like while I was editing the episode that the news came up and it's like Oh cool. Thanks <hes> I'm. I'm not taking any of this stuff that we said otherwise we would have been like fifteen minutes shorter which may people would have appreciated but <hes> yeah it is now down to Maastricht and Rotterdam. I am as of this recording and full disclosure were recording a little bit early compared to when this episode is going to drop so there may be a selection made made by the time this episode goes live but <hes> yes Maastricht has already been looked at by the broadcaster. I'm not sure when Rotterdam's going to be getting looked at that probably would have already happened by the time the episode goes up <hes> weird. I think Rotterdam makes a little bit more sense as a choice seems like it has like better like venue capabilities in like a lot of people are going to WANNA probably go to Amsterdam as a tourist if they're there for a little bit in Rotterdam is think close fish of a train ride. I kind of liken it to Duesseldorf twenty eleven. I think yeah anyways I've never been to the other ones and <unk> as Dutch descendant. I feel like that is crime in now that I live in the U._K.. Farther jaunt so I'm full fully planning to go to Eurovision. I should next year. If if I can be helped excellent I think travel wise both of them seem okay. I mean I think Rotterdam's probably a little bit easier to get to but as we're planning our trip like we want to try to Belgium and maybe northern Germany and like you could do like a nice straight line from Belgium to Maastricht to Cologne alone but Yup Rotterdam would be just as awesome as well if you if you stay too long on your train from from Amsterdam to Rotterdam you will be in Belgium yes so the most people will be flying in like through Amsterdam as well so easier easier giant the process moving along so smoothly. I'm excited to see how it turns turns out compared to last year. Oh good organise such a relief like no news is good news at this point true true and then the other big news that was kind of a surprise like I certainly was not expecting it. <hes> Netflix has picked up the Eurovision rights for the U._S.. Yes yeah and that that's a that's a big one yeah yeah it was announced on Friday July nineteenth that the two thousand nineteen contests will be available for streaming hang on Monday July twenty second so it should already be on that list now by the time you're listening to this and it's the semi-finals and the final not just the final so that's kind of new for the U._S.. Normally semifinals weren't available. I'm interested to see how some of the editing to the grand final will be in this iteration considering one of Madonna's vocals which apologies on behalf of Michigan for that she is from Saginaw <hes> and then also like I'm curious to see whether the two major like statements on Palestine will be kept in agreed to just using the D._v._d.. Version according into various Internet sources apparently the D._V._d.. Does Not Have Hattori showing Palestinian flags so I'm I'm guessing that the version that POPs up on Netflix also will not have that especially because they're getting this after the fact which means they're probably getting the D._v._d.. Version Madonna already put her her version of the grand final on Youtube so I imagine veteran. She has a say in that yeah that was that was a that was a weird experience going back to that before. It's we need to review for the show just doing this is very different. From my memory. I went back and watch the Super Bowl <unk> performance phone a few years back. That's not much better for the vocals tweaked after the fact for that one or I might have been but I think that was before the the N._F._l.. was like posting official recordings. I was watching a boon yeah. One thing I noticed in the press. Release is that'd be twenty. Twenty contest is also going to be available but all all signs from that press release point to it being after the fact and not live. That's disappointing though because it's like when I think when yeah when the Olympics started started being aired live like you can't just you know you're going to see the results ahead of time and it was just like Oh spoiler spoiler as light. It's twenty well. It will be twenty twenty twenty. You can't really avoid it kind of excitement out yeah. I think it's also going to depend on what they mean by after the fact like if the contest is going to be available until July I twenty twenty that yes that's ridiculous but if it's going to be like what <hes> B._B._C. America had to do with Dr who wants to twenty thirteen hundred fourteen per it the era at eight P._M.. In the U._K.. And then it aired the same day in the U._S.. But at eight PM time but there was like that five hour gap Oh yeah <hes> <hes> fans would not stand for it which is like okay calm down but I I feel like with your revision like the die. Hard fans are going to seek it out live regardless and the people who are much more casual about it. The five hour delays not gonna be that big of a deal because I remember being a doctor who fan in twenty thirteen in two thousand fourteen be like guys we can wait eight hours. It's fine yeah same. I've watched doctor who recently but I hear Jodie's good so <music> female doctor is let's check on the season. She's doing great. They asked her back so good. All signs point you them not airing. It live even though Oh of the broadcasters in the U._S.. Netflix definitely it feels like they have the infrastructure to be able to stream that he has to be them dipping a toe into how do we do live events. It's on Netflix. Live is thinking about 'cause logo did not air a the twenty nineteen contest but they also didn't give up the rights which means like my family who is watching it back in the U._S.. <hes> over the phone with me had to seek out the Swedish feed. I also thought P._B._S.. Might be a good fit but I don't think they have the infrastructure sure with Netflix also doing the Will Ferrell's Eurovision movie like feel. It feels like this was a there may have been negotiations happening paying for a very long time about this and we're only just now finding out about it like I I'm so intrigued by this development and if the American song contest or whatever that ends up turning out to be like comes to fruition they may be shopping at to net flix rather than conventional broadcast network which might make more percents. I I don't know they're definitely more open to like new things so and they're not bound by any set schedule Agile either through obviously over in Europe doesn't really make much of a difference but hopefully that'll get more of a U._S.. Audience It because <hes> President George Pompidou died and they were we're going to air his memorial instead which and like their preferred was like sitting in the audience of your vision which is this kind of weird by get it. They also did not participate in nineteen eighty two and that was not due to a leaders passing that was due to the network that aired it at the time t.f one one criticizing everyone basically like they said that like there was an absence of talent and mediocrity of songs and declined to participate yeah everybody sucks. We're not doing this and the next year. A different channel took over in France. I'm more diplomatic channel. I would host yeah <hes> participate. That's ironic because France is like one of the founders of the contest that was real funding into those <hes> so as a nation they have had five wins three of which were in the first ten years of the contest and they've had one last place which we will definitely be talking about because that was in twenty fourteen all of their entries have had some or were entirely in French which did not surprise me at all because help. France France is is going to remain in the Big Five era they have had four top tens and eight instances where they were in twentieth or worse. Let's talk about France everybody what works for France and a national final seems to be doing okay yeah and it seems like they're learning as they're going like I thought last year's <hes> well <hes> the two thousand seventeen no sorry twenty eighteen edition of destination revision. It was a good I try like I think there were a number of kinks thinks that they had to work out and I think they worked out a lot of those kinks. In this year's edition. Yeah didn't pick up no bad song. I just can't remember it. Much of all of the nations at your vision is the one that has like the strongest national identity tends to be I think of France's motives strong nations and I think when they find a way to kind of balanced out there Frenchness it does it does good things for them and that by bouncing it I mean they either go all in or they figure out like that. Nice fifty fifty blind like nothing in in the middle because if you look at two thousand nine <hes> Patricia Kaas like that is like standard French torch song and they came in eighth place and they won the artist artist or then you look at something like Amir from two thousand sixteen or the sixth that was also like them serve still doing internal selection but suddenly suddenly being open to having a chorus in English or a verse in English <hes> and moving more towards like pop sensibility and tapping into like the voice talent Lynch <hes>. I believe he was a voice lob so I mean he's very charismatic as well on stage. I remember having him having so much energy. I was watching with a room full of students that year uh-huh do we want to talk about two thousand fourteen. That's definitely one that where it didn't work for them and I think one thing that that doesn't entirely they work for them and it's something that I like about France is that they're not afraid to go weird but occasionally they go to weird. I think not only about <hes> twin twin in two thousand fourteen and mustache but Sebastian tell ya in two thousand eight with divine were I love the visuals of that performance because you have an array array of five backing singers wearing fake beards to match Sebastian but also the vocals on that Song live are not great. Oh and it's just kind of like a three minute mood piece. The one that I was Kinda surprised like you know your your vision. Channel puts out there like you know top ten most viewed like each month in then like for I think a good like year a year. At least twenty seventeen like the most played entering on the channel was like they're twenty ten entry Jessy matador. I didn't realize how popular that was apparently elitist outside of the contest and that came wealth I believe on the night came twelfth and that would also I think I picked up by like Feta for a soccer thing. Oh that would make sense. That's probably why it has like a crazy amount of views but and like that would make so much sense as a soccer song and like I think before toy that was the in most watched eurovision might have been yeah yeah I.. I didn't realize the soccer connection. That totally makes sense. Yeah that makes sense. I think yeah yeah now that I listened to it. I'm thinking I'm comparing to secure added workshops on didn't she. Yeah it's kind of like that yeah or the one that Ricky. Martin did yeah yeah yeah so just doing some quick clicking around yeah so I lay allow ole was to be used by the French broadcaster as the summer hit of two thousand ten and also promoting be twenty twenty two feet for World Cup so I was like well. We have it for these two things. Let's just send it to Eurovision. Smart ways <hes> yeah I mean they came in twelve. It was not a bad strategy. Yeah what else is working or not working for France. They seem to just be like the exception of a mere. They're kind of middle of the table right right about now. I really liked actually directly from twenty seventeen. Yeah I like that. Song I think even though it performed last in the running order which I think think is normally considered to be a strong position 2017 was it was a real marathon to have to get through and I think by the time it got to that song is just like Oh. Can we just get to the voting he's. I don't think that's what we all knew who was GonNa win so yeah yeah. Wasn't there the whole controversy about whether or not that was even eligible. Oh yeah it wasn't a plagiarism thing I don't paying but yet sent a pre September one right and I think that also contributed too like why there was so much more English <hes> in the revamped version yeah it was <hes> really getting into the weeds of <hes> all the technicalities but I think also kind of highlighted a problem that I think Francis getting over where and this was really the case with Amir's entry where it's trying to take a four minute song and fit it into three minutes but the very wordy language and like in the two thousand sixteen performance. I I thought that Amir was it was going to be between like Sergey Lazarev Amir <hes> for winning up but then you got to the edited performance for France and it's like oh he doesn't have time to breathe like there's no break anywhere in the song and I think that's probably what caused it to SORTA underperforming. It's still performed well in two thousand sixteen but I think I was expecting Ashe Higher. I think the exact same thing happened with Italy in two thousand seventeen <hes> Yup. He also came who also lcm six yeah. I think this is a step in the right direction. I think the running order might have hurt below a little bit because he came right before Italy. I think <hes> you know kind of cancel each other out but I think it was a song that fit him. I wonder if they might consider having their national selection of bit later. Maybe it doesn't completely lose that buzz but yeah I thought he did a very good job this year of having a song and a singer that felt like it wasn't just randomly assigned that where they went together and like the combination made it stronger. I mean he's such a great personality as well. I mean he's a joy to watch Eddie interview. He he does definitely knows how to work. The camera sure such a big eurovision fan too yeah I mean I love when you get a contestant that like so clearly loves is like being there instead of just being like I'm here for a paycheck. Although I think one of my recommendations if they stick with the Destination Eurovision informat which I think they should maybe not have madame masseur participating next year like I like. I know we were very <hes> critical of them. In twenty eighteen I think they did a good job working with all this year but I think they're just too middle of the road as showed by the fact act they've finished thirteen and two thousand eighteen and a little lower than that this year and I think was the final one post Posta Shuffling. I I think they are going to have a very successful career and a very long career but I don't think they're going to break through the way that they need to get France into the top. Tad's so it'd be it'd be good to find another artist or song writer or team uh of artists and songwriters who are going to be able to just get that extra bit of oath yeah. I would love to hear other voices in French music. <hes> one thing that I do like about France as I was like <hes> looking through the entries that they've had over the years they have submitted a fair number of artists of color. Yes which is great eight two thousand ten and in Blah was well mom and then there were a few in the nineties as well. Keep that up yet. They're doing better than a lot of the other countries guard. Yes like really I think of the big five they are probably doing the bet well. I mean at least doing the absolute best but of up or leaning big <hes> big five if we had to give a second place in terms of that. I feel like France kind of France. Yeah and might be France I and another thing they might want to consider this like if do like destination Eurovision like one more year but do it the way that Cyprus did it like in Twenty fifteen where they had their national final and then for like two or three years following that they had other contestants from that national final so it's like. Oh yeah the runner up from the twenty fifteen contests test went out to represent them in two thousand sixteen <hes>. Ho- vague was also a contestant in the twenty fifteen national final did well in twenty seventeen and yeah just kind of build up a pool and then just have a national final every few years and just build up that pool again yeah. I think that's something that Mel fest in particular takeaway very good at is getting these returning artists back and building them up to keep doing what you're doing. France keep up the good work right there so that was the appetizer and how what what we're really here for buckle up twitter. It's time for the United Kingdom Albritton. Oh goodness all right so I have a feeling people are going to have opinions about this one. Oh yes anticipated very big comment section. Yes yes so let me get our pages of notes open in terms of their history. They participated at your vision <hes> every year except nineteen fifty six an eighteen fifty eight in that time they've had fifteen second-place finishes which is crazy to me. <hes> I mean granted yeah like I mean in the early years. There were only like there were fewer than ten countries so like second place isn't as much of a fee but still fifteen overall. That's pretty impressive. <hes> they've had five wins their last being in the late nineties. They've finished in last place four times. They've only had one nil wa which was back in two thousand and three Gemini Yeah <hes> since since the Big Five distinction they've had a two top five finishes his <hes> but ten of their entries finished in twentieth or worse so not great. I don't think are the weakest of the Big Five I yeah. I think maybe carrying that torch but <hes> so U.. K. has that to be proud about. I don't know but at least you have that yeah <hes> yeah <hes> although it's it's it's a racer the bottom. I guess this past decade in particular is just staying really awful. That was my next question like what's working. Good for them a lot. Yeah I list what's worked but there's no way for me to connect the dots in terms of figuring out larger patterns because what's worked for them. Having Andrew Lloyd Webber write the Song Surviving Band stage at the contest which I didn't realize until I watch the videos like Oh. He's just there yeah that was yeah. He was just hanging out with Jane. You know he's he's seems to be having a year this year. Cats is a thing so we should graf the faces of their next <hes> contestants onto some sort of weird life-size excited snapchat filter effect other things that have worked reviving a boy band revived blue and blue ended up in eleventh. If somehow somehow maybe they were good and that's why they got eleven and I've watched it's it's like when like when like backstreet goes onto or or like all these boy fans are Gonna get together and say no after going down and just sort of continuing to revive artists to to lower and lower returns they did then what internal and did ed picked serving emerging artists with molly and children of the universe and that place seventeenth which I remember how excited U._K.. Was for that where where it was just like okay we found ah I think they also had like a new head of delegation or a head of selection at BBC and they were like trying this new like almost kind of like the N._p._R.. Tiny desk concert search method of choosing a red button thing whereas like you can find out who are artists is with with the red button yeah and <hes> like I. I can understand the enthusiasm for that but that song was just so just not for me I but I don't know who it was four. I remember being very excited about it and I think I just got caught up in the in the General U._K.. Hype Yeah it was like we might actually not we might reach the left hand side this year. That's like seems to be the standard at the moment we haven't even reached that so they tried another internal selection that didn't work then we're like okay cool national finals again and so in two thousand Seventeen Lucie Jones and never give can you that song was written by at least written by Emily deforest so that's like a pass Eurovision winner kind of giving them a boost and they came in fifteenth that year and that's like the best they've done. I thought that entry worked for the most part I do think that the tele vote didn't deserve that low of televised score but they did get a bulk of their points from the Gary that was one it took a very long time to grow on me but I agree. I think it works and I think that the way that they staged that performance formats is in the direction that they should be going like it seems like an not not jump ahead to the recommendation section but <hes> any future and tree where the golden shower effect could possibly be a consideration for the staging should be rejected like nope no more golden showers for the U._K.. We've reached the peak with that. Yes I just remember. That's the only U._k.. Entry right can think of where there's like kind of a wild moment when <hes> I think it's the second chorus comes around the one thing I will say about that particular entry is that <hes> she has some interesting facial expressions while she sings <hes> <hes> on the west end now by the way Lucie Jones she for her in waitress at the moment <hes> so good for her to be hurt her stomping grounds. That's her background so connect with Andrew Lloyd Webber Go. Maybe bring her back with Andrew Lloyd Webber. I feel like choosing someone. WHO's a little bit? More theatrical isn't a bad idea because I think Surrey. We also had some like Les Mis and like she seemed fun. I liked her. Even if the song didn't do great I thought she would get more sympathy tele votes but no I thought I thought because they had someone like jump on stage like they should have taken the opportunity to perform again at the end. I know I was wondering that too early in the running order yeah they were like after a commercial break yeah. They should've taken that to like how their song out again but I also understand why they didn't and and respect them for that but yeah like I thought that that song could have done better yeah. I just mandate should have had her back. I miss her. She seems to be doing okay though so okay so those are things that have worked it hasn't worked everything else literally everything else and like a lot of them kinda latching onto what had what had worked and just running into to the ground after blue came in eleven okay cool Engelbert Humperdinck Bonnie Tyler with do it and at the world said no Engelbert humperdinck century is fine in but it's not a eurovision song. I mean if I need like something soft on in the background at a party like maybe I just remember a two thousand fifteen. I think that's the first year of watch the contest and fall an electoral velvet coming on and me just being like what in the world is this. Let's have like no like strobe lights on clothes anymore. Either never do that again. I applaud them for just going completely out of the box with that line but that it's it it still makes me cringe anytime pops this up on my spotify yeah one thing I will point out. Is that the room at my my Your Vision Party in Twenty fifteen loved electro velvet unfairly. It's none of us had voting prevention like I did not love it but like the rest of the people I've ever like. This is amazing. I appreciate what was going for in trying to mash up but also now. I think this year is the year where have is just like. Maybe there's some hope for it because I mean okay bigger than us. This is not like the best song don't believe in a good song but like him or not. Michael writes has an amazing voice and I thought like okay we have something here and then just the whole press around. It seemed to be like the Swedish representative wrote this song and they really took that and day their stage performance in Tel Aviv was basically Sweden light. That is a good point that there was not really a strong narrative around around him where it's like yeah it was either framed in the context of Sweden which that's not going to help anybody or they were making a big deal about him going to Tel Aviv and having awful for the first time and it was just like I listen to the B._B._C. podcast about your vision that they put out this year which also didn't do any favors for my opinion the BBC in that regard. Oh my Gosh I just I felt bad for him. Yeah I think the biggest problem that that we were sort of talking around is that the U._k.. Needs like a massive attitude adjustment. When it comes to your vision is that right now you have the B._B._c. kind of be focusing on being snarky and not really marketing things and being kind of lazy about the selection process? Yeah I get it like one of the one of the draws that they kind of advertise on in the U._k.. For people watches like you listen to Graham Norton riffing on all the acts which I like Graham Norton but not necessarily in that context. I feel like it's like the B._B._C.'s attitude has led okay. It's this thing that we have to pay money for and I guess will be there and you know just doing like Lieberman literally the their minimum yeah yeah it's it's super frustrating because the U K pop industry has so many good like songwriters and songwriting camps and is doing great production stuff like you you have a Dell. Maybe don't send a Dell but don't send Adele. She's busy but convinced disclosure to like do something kinda Housi- for three minutes with a good vocalist on top of it yeah yeah yeah. Don't don't ask me to do anything else. Please yeah they definitely should not send Adele because I could just see people being like aw that's just the U._k.. Panda Reagan like then people won't vote for it because of that at it's just going to be completely absent of what the song was or like how Adele would sing it so yes definitely do not send Adele <music>. You're correct that like you would not win if you sent her but not for the reasons that your suggestion the narrative would be like oh we can send Adele when still lose exactly exactly yeah. There's just a lot of complaining about how they don't get votes because of Brexit which probably partially true fair yes correct. Let's be real supposedly by this time time. According to the plan from last year is that we'd be out of the E._U.. By now but that has not happened yet so it's scheduled for Halloween of all of all dates so if it happens at all so you know this this contest is is not political drink drink now but I have a radical idea because the B._B._C. does not seem to care handed off to another network. Maybe I mean I'm wishing well. I was doing a little bit of research. 'cause I was wondering what the audience for the BBC like is and it turns out the average viewing age. Each of BBC One at least is like in the fifties and sixties really yes. How not really the audience for a European anymore? Maybe like thirty forty years ago when it was still like you know quote unquote a family show but like it's <unk>. The contest is gearing a lot younger anger now. They're the C._B._S.. Of Your vision and the network that's actually I think the most successful in terms of viewership at the moment is actually hi T._v.. They are the network that has like all the British talent competitions so they've got the x factor got the voice they've got Britain's got talent notable among all things it's not really talent competition but they are the network that has a long island at the moment which is just all over my feed right now. The young are watching have the winner of love eyelid. Go Represent your we've tried everything except that and you know what maybe they can sing a special love island season during the spring where they can all sing but I- T._V. is as its parent company isn't Byu member so like There is an indie artist. Guano who used to be part of this pop group called the pets and like now she's off recording like music in Welsh and cornish admittedly it's it's like five minute Kinda like crowd rocky songs that do not fit in two or three minute bucket but I'm sure that if asked to write a three minute song they could do it yeah so I have two the ideas <hes> once a little bonkers one I think is a little more straightforward. <hes> I'll start with the bonkers one <hes> there have been reports that Ed Sheeran as expressed his interest in writing a eurovision song and I think the B._B._C. should consider taking him up on that. That's not the bonkers part that was that was on my list of suggestions that was like edge. Everybody loves Ed Sheeran Right now. Make him right for everybody but his his schedule is such that he's not going to be able to be the performer former for it so you have to get somebody else to like actually sing the song and I think the person that they should get is my nemesis Nicole Scherzinger really really okay yeah. I think number one I think that collaboration would be kind of insane just because they're just two completely different styles styles <hes> but he did put out a collab- album yeah. I think she's also a no like she's a known quantity in the U._k.. But she's not awfully certainly not a madonna level star like she's like her. GIG is judge on the mask singer so it's like the proper level of celebrity liberty but also had history of being an x factor judge in the U._k.. As well right so and she was also going back to cats. Let's see within cats in the death and so I mean she has an audience and I think she'd do it. I think she would too yeah. I mean alternately if she's busy. I have another one who I know is known in the U._K.. Also has some level of European fan base and has worked with Algerian before Jessie ware <hes> and she she can she can do UPTEMPO. She can do down tap oh but no one of one of her larger hits in the U._k.. That I think gets used a bunch on the various got talents and X.. Factors Etcetera say you love me is a Collab- with Algerian okay okay. I think she's on one of his songs on divide. It is well. I can't remember but actually credited but she is there a couple artists. I do think that they should the the national final thing hasn't really worked in the last few years so I think they should go for like an internal selection this time around although if they do want to go with like some form of national final vinyl and this is this is the idea that I had take the song land format yet like five or six different artists and have them work with like the aspiring songwriters have like five weeks series of working through those different songs and then the five songs that come out of that process are the song for the national final that way. There's like some sort of long term exposure to the songs instead of like we're going to drop these these like Karaoke tracks on Thursday. Everybody's GonNa vote on them on Monday. By the this would allow for a little bit of buy in but also a little bit of kind of getting into the sausage making process yes and just being like okay. This is where they started. This is where they're going. There could even be like potential to go even farther from that. After whatever national final process says happens okay yeah. We'll get away from the dogs that are currently in their national finals from C._N._N.. I like first drafts. Yeah I would also like to see some some of the artists from past national finals come back. If that's going to be the case like my might Tali quite a bit personality. I'd love to see her like with a better song. I had thought about suggesting them doing what Finland has done the past couple of years even though it hasn't really worked where we've selected the artist here are three to five songs yeah pick one because because that way we have had say you have had say theoretically we both have by on this artist. Yeah I mean on the other hand. I feel like win given a choice the U._k.. Currently just I want to like break things if the nation has decided that that vote for the worst is still a thing from from the American idol era or if we just want to yeah. We're just like the people of the U._k.. Just really want to send in a year after you. I'll make they could probably they do well with send giant giant probably is not busy just like they have like the Christmas number one like what about like having that saw G- be driving granted this year's Christmas number one wouldn't work since it was a cover of we built this city Hud sausage rolls. I like your thinking. They're often lately. They tried to vote up past song that it was released well before the September debt yeah the other thing is that when it has been that it's most often been annexed actor winner so maybe true which is almost often often a cover so if nothing like a strategy that might work for them focusing on the jury's yes like at least for the first half of the scores too just if you really want to just sit in that top part is like right something this juried catnip in stage it is well stated they really have like just dropped. Drop the ball on staging and almost every single year I I already trying to do the writing for the jury and that's by getting these like just syrupy syrupy dogs of like personal empowerment and it's just like their their eurovision entries instead of pop songs that are being submitted to cash Ashley Okay. Let's go back to get get edgier diskette. Everyone Loves Ed. We don't have to put him on stage. Just give them that. That's fine the the other thing is like if they're going to do a national final. They have to make it like must see T._v.. Like you know hype it up. Put out more ads for it because I think the national final was I think on BBC two this year that sounds right and Thursday saw Thursday or Friday they and they really didn't <music> advertise it. It was just kind of their my biggest recommendation just written in large letters in my notes just care yeah. This just came out when you have a songwriting writing industry about things I think it goes back to like you know. Italy came back to contest twenty eleven and Australia joined in Twenty fifteen in both both of those countries. I think have really like put in a lot of effort and made everyone else kind of step up their game and BBC. Just has hasn't gotten a gun along with that. I don't like this season of ironic. Detachment that they've been in is is is well past it sell by maybe in the two thousands but like and just this kind of not caring thing then they need different semifinal commentators. I watched the first semifinal <hes> on the B._B._C. and then I hated it so much a really I do not like violin at all. That's fine but I just keep them away. Keep them away. I actually watched the second semi final on the Swedish feed 'cause I was just like what they don't have to listen to that. Oh Wow same thing with the grand final I was going to watch it on youtube feed but a lot of people were also doing that so in theory quality they don't yeah I don't mind humor in in the in the commentating because for the first semi final this year I was listening to the Icelandic English commentator and he had like a very dry wit that was just delightful throughout some of the commentary. I think the B._B._C. gives out. Sometimes it can be mean yes <unk> but yeah but it wasn't like specifically about the acts. It wasn't specifically about what was being song. It wasn't mean I think if you can you can catch funny commentary but you know just don't be a bully yea like I i. I think it was on the Swedish feed. It might have been the twenty seven it might have been the <hes> Romanian yodelers add on the Swedish feed like after that performances done the commentator just went yep and then went onto the next act like pretty much all you could say so and I feel like we still haven't really scratched the surface on the what all they could do but we've done a lot. It's not working for them. Like that's the problem is that they haven't done other than get Ed Sheeran Yeah. I don't even know why it has to be him specifically. I guess it's just because he has actually said that. The music industry data of who actually purchases CDs does not lie. It's Ed Sheeran I guess number one three and Dan four in the singles chart this week so all right and he has a number one album so there is there is an audience I guess and I twenty eleven. They love Ed Sheeran but you still need to be able to stay. I mean like you can complain about the telephone and whatnot and yes sure televises full full of politics but like you're not going to get a good jury score if you don't give them a complete good package to latch on I'm trying to think of the last entry that they they had were people were like actually moving on the stage and not just like walking dramatically from one mic stands to another Mike stand but like actual dancing or like just some sort of visual interesting component because it is a television show. I mean blue comes to mind but that was very boy bandy so that was almost two years ago. That's that's the other arc so. Are they still together. Can we get them back. Let's not do that I mean I thought I thought the twenty eleven version it was their reunion so that would be backstreets reunited. What seven times now I guess I'll have like mortgages and stuff so <music>? We need something to pay the bills. I don't know maybe one direction can reunite and represent them. I am perceptions of other countries food. Oh man point is just just just care just trying to care. Just try okay. Hey we've we've done it. We have talked all of the Big Five and suggestions will be put into place probably not I mean I could just stand outside the B._B._C. and protest yeah. Please do not lock yourself to their doors on our behalf kicked out of the country so so okay we'll do it for this episode of the Euro. What thanks for listening the your what podcast is hosted by Ben Smith? That's me and Mike mccomb. That's me special. Thanks to our guest this week Helen Helen where can folks find you online well and most active on my twitter at Helen Marie Ninety five. I have a blog that I use periodically article <unk> blog dot wordpress DOT COM and I'm starting up my youtube channel again and that's film Geek five to zero now that I'm out of master's degree I can do more things funny how that works and we will have all of those in the links you can find us on our website at your what dot com and on twitter facebook and instagram the Graham at your what we'd love to hear your questions comments and ideas on how the big five can save themselves. Please please fill our twitter <hes> mentioned column with how will the

France Ed Sheeran BBC Netflix Rotterdam Maastricht Mike mccomb soccer Youtube Italy Australia Ben Smith Sergey Lazarev Amir Helen I Duesseldorf Graham Norton Rotterdam Amsterdam United Kingdom John Oliver
Edition 2056

Monocle 24: The Briefing

59:50 min | 1 year ago

Edition 2056

"You're listening to the briefing first broadcast on the twenty sixth of September Two Thousand Nineteen on monocle twenty four the briefing is brought to you in partnership with Rolex. Hello and welcome to the briefing coming to you live from studio one here at Missouri in London. I'm Emma Nelson and a very warm welcome. Today's program coming up France's President Jack Sherack dies at the age of eighty six Andrew Mueller will look demand described as a political chameleon with the line and Financial Pecadillos even his early adulthood displayed indications of what might be generously described as an adaptable approach to politics not for nothing would he likes to be known as Chameleon Bonaparte and luxury wet the weathervane then Benjamin Netanyahu tries to form a government will ask if he can claw flo victory from last week's humiliating. Israeli elections also ahead is Donald trump toast will examine how moves to impeach a US president could play out in his favor as trump's behavior after the Miller report particularly became more and more extreme more and more overtly and contempt of the most the basic norms but premises of constitutional government and is a Polish. MVP demands vegan food be served in parliament canteens. Well ask our media colleagues colleagues will take to a change in a menu all that right here on the briefing with me Emma Nelson last last week. The future didn't look bright Israel's Benjamin Netanyahu the election he call to resolve the country's political amps embedded him into an even deeper crisis this with his Likud party falling into the minority but now he's been thrown a political lifeline with the Israeli president tasking him with forming a coalition government joining me the studios you'll see Michael Burke professor of international relations at Regent's university and your sister in following the Israeli election very closely for us here at monocle twenty four welcome back to the studio. Yeah good to see you right. Let's just recap where we were last week. At the time when the elections were held it did not look good for Benjamin Netanyahu they did it. No and I don't think it looks good to me. No of course predicting in forecasting is early politics is always very dangerous because you'll be able to play Ayumi that in a week and I'm full of myself but at the same time the basic tenants of what happened in this election instill there and that we're talking about the blocks and the fact that the president asked him Netanyahu to form a government doesn't mean that he can inform and government it means that by low unique to us the presidency starring Vin River in trying to be creative and said go to unity government blue and white led by Bennie guns and Netanyahu and if Netanyahu is indicted because he has his hearing doing next week to take some time to decide then it was suspended himself by low is supposed to suspend himself for or always suspended suspended for Honda days but no would be indefinite suspension. It will still be prime minister by suspended. I know Israeli politics comes all sorts of great idea so there will be to prime minister wants to spend in one. I don't think it's the justice brilliant idea but they tried to get out of the impasse by saying there would be suspended spended. One DELOOF is legal issues and there will be real one benny guns that will deal with the country's issues. He's going to go for that. I think those those who wouldn't like to see sailed elections in a meadow of six seven months which there is a good argument even with the public that will get to sell public holiday in one year probably would be against it cost a lot of money and there are no guarantees that it would look any better now if I will oh benny guns I will say I'm not interested because they promised my my voters that I'm not sitting with someone that is indicted for such serious corruption allegations since this is not democracy and to prime minister that one is dealing with corruption allegation in court and one running the country. It not only sounds ridiculous. It makes a mockery of Israeli democracy and its imaging the world even further it also is not going to appeal to much to Benyamin Netanyahu who you set these elections going last week with the intention of of consolidating his position many now suggests that his position that that his time has now gone simply because he's tried twice to form a government he is now as you say having to do with corruption allegations but it is going to be extremely difficult to for him to accept that maybe the time is up from two by Netanyahu shows the stock doc market. I want going by one. I think this is a dwindling commodity and it's a matter of time. The indictment is very serious. It's very difficult to see attorney. General even after hearing common save or the police got it got it all all the battery of lawyers that look at the evidence on flee serious Chris Cases. We got it all so most likely. It's going to be indicted. They'll going to be a court case and it's Netanyahu himself in a similar case they a doormat was prime minister. You can't spend your time in court in such a such a such a complex county so it's the central supply to Netanyahu. I think the real trick here if there will be any courageous person for him on the Likud Party. I'm not a great fan of what's called a unity party because usually there is a statement there. It's stability no coffee hour if they want to get out of the stalemate with a unity government someone should at last be brave enough courageous enough in the party or group of them and said to Netanya timing up and if you want if you care about the country which at this stage it doesn't then you need to go and then if another leader of the Likud party there is a possibility for unity from Likud is going to say that AH I don't trust many of them to have because they they the opportunity to set it by Peter People like wild cats get on saw. Maybe allow then you know some people even though if you went into politics and especially at this level you want to become a prime minister. You don't go just to be second income on some of them want to be getting someone to be prime minister. Lisa Alcott's wants to be would like disposition but they believe it's you know the Mexican politics deface want to challenge. The leader is not the one that's going to be fine. You think about Michael Finding John Major time in so many other boys Johnson in Feldstein around so what what they'll thank to do not to be the first to do that but top the someone else will do it the death each of them. Tell us is this fails because I mean you've already laid out the pitfalls of having adding to prime minister's running concurrently while one is admittedly fighting a court case and this has been what our second election. There's no appetite for third but is there a likelihood that Israelis will be having another national holiday before the end of this year in order to go vote again. Maybe the beginning of next year. It's a a possibility as good as any at the same time. I think the indictments will make a difference the minute Tony General will come out and say there is indictment. Netanyahu's is going to spend because it's not a matter of months contend if he's convicted. It's a metal of appeals because their appeals can turn the country like league days. They might be Tonya my ridge the conclusion if you we can get to an arrangement with the general persecution that's. I I admit to Summerfield but I'm not going to jail and then I'll resign if fights for his for his for his liberty basically not being not being cold and being out out of jail this is the mental everything is for Netanyahu is calm noise for the rest of the country. There are a lot of issues that Netanyahu says talk there is the Palestinian issue and the line there is a economy and going gap between rich and poor and Tan spilt admits improvement movement infrastructure for Donyo in the Netanyahu family in Balfour Street in Jerusalem. It's all about themselves. Yes he macaroni. Thank you very much indeed for joining us here on Monocle monocle twenty four. You're listening to the briefing fronts owns his former president. Jacque Chirac has died age eighty six a man who enjoyed one of Europe's longest political careers he arguably left his country no better state than when he found and he was a political chameleon with more than a few financial peccadilloes but as a charming Debonair Frenchman and committed European he became one of the nation's best best loved political figures. Androulla looks back now on his life also need the lakes. He's a pig is a meme Llanelli. Rarely has there been a less uplifting campaign slogan vote for the Crook not the fascist the posters that appeared all over France in two thousand and two were not the work of the candidates they were endorsing though plenty of people had argued over the years that Jacques Chirac was shameless. Even by the standards of French politicians this would've necessitated some hotspur even for him rather the placards reflected the unappetising choice presented to French voters in two thousand two's presidential essential run-off between Sherack then seeking a second term in the palace and Jo Marie Lapenne the ghastly old crank then leading the far far far far right National Front the result neatly summarized the contradictions of a man who dominated French politics for decades without really ever quite effecting any of it. Chirac won eighty two percent of the vote yet was one of the least popular presidents in French history. Jacques Chirac was born in Paris on November Twenty Ninth Nineteen Nineteen thirty two even his early adulthood displayed indications of what might be generously described as an adaptable approach to politics not for nothing would late to be known as Chameleon Bonaparte and lingerie wet the weathervane he walls for a period a member of the French Communist Party he also while completing reaching his compulsory military service volunteered to fight in France's brutal water thwart the independence aspirations Algeria Chirac's career in politics politics began when as a junior civil servants he caught the eye of then Prime Minister George Pompidou who admired the young share determination and disregard for obstacles. Kohl's Chirac's more boasts worth nickname lead bulldozer dates from this period yes yes of course he would come in and kick table over meet. People on both sides forced the hand of destiny. My mother told me that President Pompidou said that he was a bulldozer so that description description probably reflects his personality Pompidou. I made sure Akis Chief of staff then in nineteen sixty seven encouraged him to stand for a national assembly seat incorrect Coetzee having won his place in parliament Chirac spent the next three decades assembling a formidable political CV Minister of Agriculture Minister Minister of the interior a brief stint as prime minister eighteen years as mayor of Paris interrupted by another brief stint as prime minister he was such a well known own and well regarded national figure that he owned semi affectionate cameo in the nineteen seventy-six Asterix volume obelisks and Co thinly veiled as a manipulative ability Roman misery cold-case preposterous sherack made his first bid for the big desk in one thousand nine hundred one but fell short of the final run off he made eighty one step further in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight but was defeated by Francois Mitterrand in nineteen ninety-five Mitterrand felled by failing health sherack defeated Lionel Jospin Fund and was president at last Johnson in common with many politicians who have schemed maneuvered for decades to get the top job. Shrek seemed once. He'd gotten it on short what to do with it. He was unable to embody either an era or an idea in the manner of his predecessors ss Mitterrand Pompidou never mind to goal he seemed both for and against most things lower taxes high taxes privatization nationalization except the ones such as nuclear weapons testing about which he couldn't make up his mind he sabotaged his first term as president with a hubristic calling of an early election shen which put his socialist rivals in government straight after September the Eleventh I spoke obviously the American president but also to our key allies though oh I think it would be right in saying the Jackie right was always more hesitant about military action. Even in respect to Afghanistan was basically a a coalition of support their second term included what was probably the highlight of his presidency. He's emergence as the most senior figure head of opposition to the United States invasion Asian of Iraq in two thousand and three but this was also clouded by gathering scandal of allegations that as mayor of Paris he'd feathered the nests of his party he and his family by plucking the right pair in two thousand nine out of office and unprotected by Presidential Immunity Sherack was ordered to stand trial on charges charges of diverting public funds among other malfeasance as in two thousand eleven he was convicted and given a suspended prison sentence. Jack Sherack Kamei have fancied himself as Francis Ronald Reagan. He was near Francis Richard Nixon a disappointment than a disgrace. He's own summary of his his career. Best imagined accompanied by a gallic shrug demonstrates the lack of the moral core around which more substantial leaders of formed when I was elected he once said I was thirty two and I joined the government right away then I just stayed forever. Governments changed. I stayed along with the furniture. They they want me to go back to go back to grand then. Let Them Go. Do No dad no the problem. Is this for monocle twenty four. I'm Andrew Mullah. Thank you Andrew in a moment we will discuss Jack. Shit connects legacy with our panelists but I the time at Toll Fifteen fifty minutes past mid day here in London a quick summary of the day's other news headlines with Danube Age Wjr thank you Emma members of the US Congress have been examining a complaint from a whistle blower that has led to calls for Donald Trump's impeachment the complaint refers to a controversial phone call between president trump and the Ukrainian President Wlodimierz Alinsky. One Democrat said the complaint was disturbing. Saudi Arabia says all options are on the table including a military response following attacks on its oil facilities. Riyadh says Iran was behind the attacks a claim which has been backed up by the US the UK France and Germany Germany in recent days leaders in Tehran have denied any involvement in today's monocle minute takes a closer look at this weekend's Austrian election it follows the collapse of the country's coalition government formed by the center right and far right parties earlier. This year for more on this story has monocle dot com slash minute and tune into tomorrow's edition of the globalist for a longer discussion on Austria live from London at seven am. Those are the day's headlines now back to you. Emma thanks Daniel. You're listening to the briefing on monocle twenty four on news panel follows next coming soon Monaco Rolex. Bring you the pioneers. The pioneers is a brand new series that tells the stories of people improving the planet. You'll hit how Rolex supports these innovators with whom they share a passion to safeguard in the F for Future Generations Nations gain precious insight into the fresh thinking that is disrupting received wisdom for the BETCHA and learn how Phyllis action continues to be the crucial driver of change the the news coming soon to be twenty four. It's time to look at some of the day's news in a little greater depth. I'm delighted to say that joining me in the studio Alex Tinsel man he's a historian or and screenwriter and then some mckinney the UK correspondent with Year News. Welcome both here Let's pick up on the news that France's former president. Jack Shiite has died. He was eighty six president. Chirac enjoyed a very long continuous political career in Europe twice president twice Prime Minister Eighteen years is Ma- of Paris an arguably Alex say don't make them like they used to they he was he was a man who never wants to leave and managed to stick around. He certainly did until the end until the sort of corruption allegations ends and trial and indie conviction which of course people are talking about today but I mean he's also a man who went through numerous political changes on with the century he started out as a member of the Communist Party ended up on the political right started as a goal list and then ended up sort of supporting federal Europe where I was he said not so much the United States of Europe as a united Europe states that important difference that he quoted and say and of course he's also being remembered today for so two significant achievements in particularly opposing the Iraq war leading really the opposition to that and also for being the first French politician to really recognize his country's role in Holocaust so we have a figure of a man here who enacted enormous chain made France his image internationally stronger and stronger with his image of the OPPO oppositions the Iraq doc war in helping Frisco go into the single currency Vincent he was a total committed political chameleon at home as Alex's alluded to just yeah I mean I came to my mind when I heard this news was that his opposition to the Iraq war how incense George Bush seems like a very simple take time you know the word French fries being banned from the White House Freedom fries because of how strong Chirac was great photos of shock Chirac pulling people at Tony Blair and and I and the other kind of countries that went into the rock were into corridors at big international meetings and trying to talk them out of this but yeah if you look at his record at home needed a lot you know the things like reducing the presidential term down to five years. He made huge reforms when it came to things like road safety when you really dig into his record. It really is something that kind of spans all over the place I mean I didn't do it feels like a very twentieth century political career. I don't know if you could have this kind of career swinging between the restarting outing nuclear testing in one thousand nine hundred five to the shock of the world to go into an environmentalist in two thousand and two you know his comments on race very. I didn't think you'd be able to survive these kind of comments now now where he said in the early nineties. Africa was ready for democracy. I think is what about the riots northbound on the kind of to the end of his term and how badly handled handled those that it is a remarkable political life to to read about is the kind of career. I don't think you have in this world now. Just picking up on this idea of belonging to an earlier era era the thing that domestically his remembered for apart from not really changing fronts that much. Didn't you know living standards didn't improve unemployment employment didn't improve but he was subject to quite a lot of corruption. He had a conviction for it. This was part of a arguably part of a French French political culture. I mean he took over for Mito so this is a time when corruption and generally oiling the wheels was just the done thing in front and I'm sure some French who would take some issue with that but he there is a certain way which does seem like a sort of you know an ultimate Frenchman Looking back I mean Nas Knauss only the source of all of that you need a little bit on the side the flirting with the ladies and of course his his look even I mean he's sort of we're discussing earlier. How will if you could central bursting and ask for a French President they'd probably have sent you. She'll especially when he was younger. He was really you know sort of very glamorous. I mean so he's sort of you know how to certain and Golic stew him. I suppose the perhaps did allow him to get away with more than less charming man might have done and he had a lot of charm didn't Hammond looking at the photographs of the last into the emerging today Vincent. There's this astonishing one of him sort of kissing the hand of Angela Merkel now that's something the glamour or have not worried down by the world yet googly hide at him and look at Obama. Just that love the mountaintop picture. I mean there's some good detail in the bokhary. you know he was such a man of the people something that is pointing this out you know Sarkozy and Francis Salaam the people that followed him. You know they only did one term. They didn't have the army had he loved going out into the public. He is to shake so many hands says they used to have to put his hands in a is buckets at the end of each day where plasters to avoid blisters. This is someone that really liked to press the flesh. The kind of stunts and twitter's been filled with the old political advertisements had their you know they are so eighties and nineties. It is quite remarkable. You know him just lying on a couch saying. May We say Sherack it's all th- all of this kind of stuff very friends whether this is going to prompt some sort of nostalgia for a slightly for slightly different time in a moment we'll move onto the autobahn pit that we've got at the moment in British politics but the idea that you can be a great you can be Tshauma but but with a very very strong international image as well I mean he was a great European. I mean you mentioned the idea of not United States of Europe Tonight'd Europe of states this. This was someone who perhaps belong to no one really questioned the further integration of Europe. Lewis questioned it but I do think yes he'd and of course he was coming from a goal is background. I mean it was a it was a move that he made perhaps along with the Times certainly along with one current of the times and then he really sort of ended up up spearheading. That's which is sort of fascinating again. I think has been since earlier. I mean the the idea that perhaps you could do that now. I think he's much more remote surely that to change horses in that way it would be much more dubious these days. I think give it ten minutes in May and it shows you know maybe a foresight looking in the time that he was president collapse of the Soviet Union the Cold War looking at how the world was going to rearrange itself. He seems to have had an early view that really really you know not having a to integrated Europe but a strong Europe in world was anyone superpower left but those on the rise seems like a pretty good bit of foresight for him. You're taking Francais into the single currency and things like that they they did benefit from but yeah the kind of character. I don't think we'd see again. I wonder whether we're getting a little bit died. In the way that Angela Merkel did I ever distant era of politics. Sharak has died at the age of eighty six. Let's turn now to an altogether different here and now of modern British politics Abed pit a place of fear and loathing about nasty it. Has It ever been the scene in the British parliament yesterday. Were brutal this evening. The Prime Minister's continually use pejorative language to describe an act of parliament passed by this House Speaker that was should not resort to using offensive dangerous or inflammatory for legislation that we do not like are we hear Mr Speaker onto the shale about brought to pass it in these place fries and abuse never heard such on bugging get all my lights the Labor MP Polo shirt taking on Boris Johnson in the House and having her accusations shot down by one word Humbug Humbug as MP's took where they left off the expectation of perhaps an apology from the government for acting unlawfully in suspending parliament last month instead those defiance and and rage Vincent you following this. It was something else yesterday. Wasn't it yeah I mean I've covered parliament for nine years and I haven't really had what an evening like that in the comments of listened two hundred dollars base and they went home last night feeling pretty chilled and signed about the state of things and the speakers come out John Birch they saying his twenty two years in Palm. He hasn't seen a session like that. The language was deplorable. The emotions were running incredibly high and to explain to listeners in that clip the the crest that was being talked about was that of Joe Cox Labor. MP FOR BATTLING SPAN. She was murdered the week before the Referendum in twenty-six sixteen by far right terrorist. I yelled whilst he was shooting her. Britain I independence for Britain. It was an absolute travesty travesty that that happened many people at the time thought that that would possibly mean that you know the referendum vote would go to stay but I was on the ground around the country that whole time and it really didn't shift things in the way that we expected and the way that her name is being in an invokes now is because she had a simple message in her opening speech in parliament element is that we have more in common and she worked hard work across the aisle. She made friends with many conservative. MP's and the response of the prime ministerial. I don't think I it wasn't even you know forget whether it was a prime minister response wasn't even basic human response and the woman who was a friend of Jaycox Tracy brave replacers. MP Oft that beg the Prime Minister after that exchange that we just heard there to please think about it because other MP's had left the chamber very upset some of them close to tears and he said you can honor Joe Cox delivering Brexit's. It was incredible stuff. I Mean Alex. You've studied politics parliament and and this kind of world for a long long time where is it. Do you think that the wheels actually came off in terms of basic decency to to fellow human beings I mean this is a combative arena. That's not big look. It's not been in any down but a different turns into been taken. Yes then I think would be making a mistake. If we thought this was an accident I think this this is quite deliberate. Actually by Boris Johnson because what serves him is to stoke the anger in the country and stop people open to get this idea into people's heads that it's about about parliament versus the people I don't think there's any chance in the world him polarizing backing down. I think it will escalate and as a result Vincent having been invalid in a looking at the comments for the last nine years where in what way do you think this is going to escalate. I'll give you some ice stand on the Green in two thousand ten twenty eleven eleven. I would bring a MP's. We walk over. We do interviews they wouldn't be stopped. They wouldn't be harassed people might recognize an MP and asked him some Nice questions and replace Nice them. They're MP's that can't walk over the green now without police escorting them their MBA that have had to have safety measures built into their homes panic alarms. They are getting regular death threats. They are not playing lightly with the fact that many of them are receiving threats you just go and social media to see what's going to head in public to them but some of them have been really threatened and one of them there was a plot earlier in the year that she was going to be killed by far right terrorists and it was stopped at the last minute and so the changes that MP's really do feel under threat and most most Boris Johnson is playing with. They're saying trying to build because he attacked the judiciary yesterday for the decision but said this was politicized. He is trying to build this. PEOPLE VERSUS SAYS ESTABLISHMENT election up but I think it is very dangerous and if something does happen which would be tragic again. I think this will be firmly. Emily played back at him and pointing. He's escapes a lot but I think this last night was a real watershed moment. In its writes his girlfriend his former wife his four five or six children however many there are all have police protection he can feel safe with as little impedes very safe at the moment. Let's talk a little bit more Johnson and and the way that the rhetoric of politics is developed in the last few weeks Boris Johnson has been described as a man who has an interesting relationship with the truth and he's arguably living in a perfect perfect time for him given the rise of fake news a phrase sold heavily by Donald Trump. How does it made life for today's reporters. Let's get a taste of their other hostile perch taken by President Donald Trump during a press conference with Boris Johnson earlier this week in New York when a journalist asked British prime minister if he's going to resign nasty question for the American report would take one off along pretty well that was John Boris Johnson defending the art of journalism at no great surprise Alex because is was a journalist yes and certainly want he wasn't wasn't too scared to use incendiary language than ever or to make things up famously a Lotta them about the EU and Bendy Bananas also things I mean about about the the consequences consequences of what happens when you put an inflammatory journalists in the position of being a prime minister knowing quite few journalists myself. I'm not sure it's a career path that many of them should really undertake but this is a very different job and I actually agree with what Wentz that earlier that we're in a very dangerous time. and I do think that playing with this stuff maybe electoral positioning maybe policy. I expect the consequences of some of this can be severe and in that clip we heard him sort of step back from trump a bit but then if you can't step back from trump where all you I mean you know this is. It's Gone Ah the shift that we've seen just in the last few years really with trump and now with Johnson. Is You know to a very different manner of politics. You know it's it's very much on the surface. Explain a little bit more what you mean by the consequences of this well the fact is that if you you know what you're seeing is them you actually. I mean although I think you you can be too simplistic about comparisons between trump and Johnson. They're actually quite different. In lots of ways and you know we do need to complex about that but what both of them are doing. Is You know really smashing. There were three big institutions and three things where you know in in the US across the constitution is written annals is not but there is a great deal of understanding really a lot of it operates on trust and on the expectation that people behave decently and you break that down you keep breaking that down. Things changed quite radically. We've had Tori. MP's yesterday for instance calling for things like the abolition volition of the Supreme Court now politically appointed judges. I mean these changes have big consequences and I think often. It's you know sort of very quick reaction into something that has upset them. That in fact could really spark a very different outcome than they think just adds up. I mean the idea that you you attack a call for being plus call to scrap it and then call for for a new Supreme Court like in America whether appointed by politicians last night just blew me away the F- The false logic in that but I think just on this point about language and journalism. Ah Let's say two things the first is about a former journalist. Boris Johnson was agenda for many years. He lost his first journalism as a writer on the Times because he lied lied he made up a quote from his own godfather about a story in the Tower of London ran into Times newspaper now one golden rule with journalism and it's don't make stuff up and he was fired from that and he went to the Telegraph and he wrote you know he's continued to work between times as journalists wrote very inflammatory column which has refused to apologize for in which she compared Muslim woman to Bank Robinson letterboxes and that was just this year and I want to say doesn't working journalists right now and it shows how dangerous this is because her name is Adam and Chelsea Z. She's BBC presents on BBC breakfast earlier. In the air. Donald Trump said the words go back home that is we all know a rare west government as is a racist trope in that employment rules if a member of working someone from the US government said that to a colleague they would be fired on that. It is clearly racist. Stripe not given Jesse was presenting BBC breakfast. Her colleague asked her what she thought about that language. She's a British Asian woman and she said Yes. It's racist. I've heard that turn my whole life. It is racist the BBC has reprimanded her for breaking guidelines on bias that is not bias that is standing outside in the rain and saying it's raining. So how as journalists do you try and navigate this this boldness that seems to have some sort of like like being been embraced by politicians when it comes to lying when it comes to using language that has been widely accepted as unacceptable you you. It's it's so hard because especially in this country is brexit. You know I think with political interviews is to you know I often think about when I covered the coalition here between ten and twenty fifty and what we think Kale's then if myself as journalist with conducting this interview now and I didn't what happened in the space between I constantly just think what would 2014 me think of what is being said now because language is being used so carelessly like saboteurs says and betrayal and trying to vote this patriotism. I think you just have to keep calling it out and one of the only ways I mean there was an incident this morning where James Cleverly who is the leader of the the Katori policy said Oh the prime minister didn't say a trail and then he was quoted back by shows journalist saying no he said this is when you're portraying people and he said he didn't say trail. I mean that is just ahead that stopped. Puerto is doing think goodness me me Where are we going with this Alex. We've we will we are losing the the the the common speaker John Berko next month. Many people Roger Heartbroken at the fact that one of the leading players is leaving the the screens but the those who wished to replace him all say that they want to bring parliament together author to have a more conciliatory approach to have more respectful and polite place where is the possibility of such a violent and brutal space actually finding itself being calm down. WH where are the solution to. I think it's super hard to do that. Actually if you look historically at other examples restoring civility is not that easy. We asked anybody who know that WHO has had a drunken party and then tried to calm it down. I'm afraid once these things are out of the box. It's very hard to put back again and I think it will potentially she come. When the voters decide they want to vote for more civilized type of politician which at the moment they show very little sign of doing so I it's a question of you know this. This will respond and it will s and that's exactly what I think. This will escalate and escalate. I don't think there's an easy way down from this. I do think inviting Burke I really is in many ways given a gift to the current parliament by letting them appoint a speaker now before new parliament comes in May of course be much more extreme in in any way that requires unpredictable nickel so my hope would be that you could get someone in who was recently a decent influence at this point and then see how that goes from uh on that point. I think you know one of the leading contenders is Harriet Harman. She's a future source. She was passed effectively Deputy Prime Minister Gordon Brown. She is the mother of the house which means the longest serving female. MP and she is going for it and she is someone who in recent years. I've even thought could actually run for Labor. Leadership began. I mean she's still that respected and well liked to figure she's still on top of the game but the fact that I think she's one step up as speaker of the house shows. Maybe she is quite worried about parliamentary democracy and you know you look look back at how unfortunately parliament is still very pale male and stale and a lot of those people in the back benches and can be brought to heel by a woman women quite well and if you look back at Betty boothroyd in the nineteen eighties clips of her on youtube she knew how Spring to heal and I think Harriet Harman wouldn't put up with anything and she's got the experience indepth knowledge in parliament even longer than Berko to be able to run that place the way will need if we end up with having an extreme parliament on both on both sides you know we've got extreme stream momentum. MP'S IN AND EXTREME BREXIT party MP's in you know getting it. There is something something will break eventually. We'll need to be some kind of reset. It's just hard to see how that will be done finally could the contents of an MP's lunchbox exact widespread change in Europe's eating eating habit. Sylvia spirit is a new Polish member of the European Parliament. He's also Vegan and when she tried to get the mail in the canton her only option was a plate of chips or French fries or need freedom fries if you're George Bush and some salad greatest hero rabbit or seven year old but not perhaps if you're in charge of representing your citizens it made me think about get your favorites government subsidized canteens we've all been in French work canteens British work canteens parliamentary work canteens. What's it like that what's it. What's life like in their Alex. Well you know it's a it's a real mix. I haven't been any ones my favorite is the canteen Senate National Archives to just outside Washington. DC which is where the State Department and CIA caves which has fabulous selection of cuisines and really very good food and until the burke find herself a Vegan options she would be fine yeah that would be no problem but the EU clearly needs to get with the program on that because really you know if we're talking about environmental change and I mean anyone who is being vegetarian or Vegan and traveled to France knows that this is all Germany actually knows that this can be a real uphill struggle but and chips and salad. I'm afraid is quite often offered on a hiding to nothing if taking Alex you on the other hand Vinson you you've been a member of parliament canteen and you could have sympathy with Sylvia sporadic yeah. Do you know what I'm going to fly the flag Britain on this one because in this you know and we're looking at rocky said you can't trust people to cook that bad. Do you know what I think. Brisson does convenience food food better and healthy convenience food better than anywhere else in Europe. I traveled around Europe working. The EU canteens are awful. What what can you get for lunch taken. Thank you well. It's it's you know it's it's chips and so that is the vegetarian option in the you know the. I've had bad fish there. I've had awful rubbery check in the House of Commons in the UK. Has There is lot of vegan food a lot of vegetarian food. It's fresh salad bars and also the food is good because there there is a a wonderful one of the Jamaican west Indian heritage chefs in the Commons introduced the comments to jerk chicken. You can get jerk in every day that we can house comments. It is amazing. They now sell L. The recipe and hits for it because it's so good you can have stir fry things. You can have all kinds of food. I mean and I worked for company which is headquartered in France the canteen there is no oh great and reprimanded by French colleague because I thought the food was so bad being served up that I went sandwiches crisps and fruits which I was told that that is not a lunch and I was like what is better than what's being served here's they. I think Britain actually does public canteen food quite well actually let for French company by you have cheese. He's bar and walling. Oh very during lunch is absolutely fine absolutely oils. The wheels perfectly but is that whole idea of everything thing that we've spoken about is heavily subsidized. Whether it's a private broadcasting company that you work for or indeed th th the the local parliament should we really be subbing our MP's. He's to have jerk to. This is the biggest mistake that people make about this. You're not subsidizing the MP's in place parliament. You only have six hundred and fifty. MP's you have four thousand staff including police officers minimum wage cleaners researchers who paid for the work they do in parliament when you're in parliament they are secure bubble zones hard getting announce of your often working long hours and in Westminster. There isn't really many options around because it's all kind of formal buildings there aren't that many canteens it's canteens and in European pounds the same. It's not for the cause any Pisa. MP's don't often eaten them that much. It's for the staff that work there because because your when I worked for an MP this decade ago I three meals a day because I was in at seven and I didn't leave until nine o'clock at night because of the sitting out of the chamber when you're doing that it's it's who you subsidizing at four. We'll have to leave it there leaving us with an appetite for jerk chicken vince convenient Alex fanton sleman. Thank you very much indeed for joining us on on medical twenty four the briefing live on monocle twenty four with Emma Nelson as we were hearing in the headlines. Members of Congress have been examining a complaint from a whistle blower. That's led to calls Donald Trump's impeachment. The complaint refers to a controversial phone call cool between president trump and the Ukrainian president Philadelphia's Alinsky. So what do we need to know what Abbot Adam Gopnik is a staff writer for the New Yorker magazine and as long advocated located an impeachment inquiry into president trump. He's been speaking to Monaco's Thomas Lewis so I've been writing about impeachment of trump for quite a while and I am rarely prescient but it was a month ago that I wrote a piece taking into account all the reasons why understood that Nancy Pelosi would be reluctant to lead the charge for impeachment but saying that it was nonetheless essential morally strategically to go forward with impeachment. I'm glad she's caught up with me now but I do think that the reasons were exactly the reasons I outlined wind in my unduly or my unusually pressing piece which are essentially that if you don't you make it clear that Donald Trump's behavior is unacceptable for the leader of democracy if you don't make it clear that the conception of the presidency not just as a tyrant without constraints but as a mob boss who without government then then you allow that to become an acceptable president and it says the Democratic Party which will someday come back into power views that is being just part of the normal play. Ahah politics you don't impeach trump and that means trump is is just part of the normal back and forth and Oscillation of American politics. That's wrong. There is a normal back and forth oscillation in between left and right in American politics that everyone has to accept on both sides they will be highly conservative right wing governments that I profoundly disagree with in power hour and I have to live with that. Trump is something different. TRUMPISM is a form of criminality in entrenched in power and we have to be able to say we we totally accept the concept of the Oscillation illegitimate power but we can also single out conduct. That's unacceptable and all those reasons for that reason specifically. I think that it's overdue an wanted. Nancy Pelosi shows reticence in your view and now in a very quick space of time has nicer to take relate well. Her reticence was grounded in a very real sources she understands is not enough progressives do that a large part of the Democratic Liberal Caucus were elected in trump sympathetic writings as we were saying Canada and districts my son I will add personal worked for one of those candidates a wonderful manning Max rose who won the most right wing Congressional district strict in New York City and one of the most rightwing in all of your state in Staten Island which is kind of the Archie Bunker Tony Soprano part of the world and Max rose did not win his you see by talking about impeachment he wanted by talking about porta-pottys for soccer fields and about healthcare and about local issues above all so asking Max rose all the other Max Roses the Democratic Party to put their political lives on the line on behalf of the quixotic active impeachment seemed to her crazy and that was perfectly rational sane and appropriate reasoning her part. I think that what happened is that as trump's behavior after the Miller report particularly became more and more extreme more and more overtly aggressively and contempt the most basic not just an enormous but premises of constitutional constitutional government it became impossible for her to sustain that position in part because those people who will have to put their political lives on the line have come out and said. I don't don't know how this will affect my political career but I know what's unacceptable. Donald Trump has tried already to say that the witch hunt. You know phrases come back again. Do you think that him trying to paint this. As another you know trying to get him will will wash this tie but does this feel like a different the moment you think you can do with. I'm cereal pessimists in this because each time trump has genius for each time. You say this is the worst. He's attacked a you know a Goldstar mom in during the campaign. He's mocked handicapped person. He's admitted to being a sexual. Predator each time he's comically obviously falsified a weather map just out of vanity narcissism each time they love this. Everyone's gotTa look at this and say this guy's on fit and each time his supporters kind of look around and say well. Maybe that's not so bad you and things that would have been totally intolerable before become tolerable and I fear fear that this may be of the of the same kind I think if you look at the specifics of this couldn't be clearer instance of what's meant by a high crime and misdemeanor then using the position of presidency in order to try and get a foreign power to fabricate evidence against a domestic political opponents it would never have been tolerable at any point in American history when someone would do that and but I as I say part of the the evil genius trumpism is to be able to constantly changed the terrain in a way that makes the intolerable suddenly tolerable and the abnormal the new normal and the outrageous the cause of a collective shrug so I would not be optimistic mystic about it in that way. If optimistic is the word you WANNA use about a political catastrophe but I have to believe and this may be a delusional belief that the other people in his party though they may be have all kinds of used that I don't share are not crazy. They know exactly who he is. Hone stable he is and they know how arbitrary and they know how enter democratic impulses are and at some point. I still believe they have to face that and and if we in in a minimum they're going to have to own their own bad faith. They're gonNA have to own their own own. Bed Consciences. I I think that's a better position to put them in than simply allowing them to skate away. Might this be the moment that actually gives them that boost as opposed to that way to to make that jump I think is so self evidently outrageous that it ought to have that effect but we've seen self evidently outrageous behavior h-have yer get swallowed up in in the recent past so I wouldn't WanNa be unduly optimistic. I do think it's a positive thing for the the people who oppose trump to say. We don't oppose trump because we oppose his policies. We oppose trump because he's an enemy overt enemy of constitutional government. I think it's very important that we make that distinction and we make it aggressively Adam Gopnik there in conversation with motorcycles Thomas Lewis. You're the briefing coming soon monochrome Rolex bring you the pioneers for the founder of Rolex Hands Bills Dove. The world was like a living laboratory he began to use it as a testing ground for his watches from the nineteen thirties sending them to the most extreme locations supporting explorers ventured into the unknown but the world has changed in the twentieth century unfolds exploration for pure discovery has given way to it ration- as a means to preserve the natural world to make the planet perpetual lend more with the pine is coming soon to wonderful twenty four in the moment we cross over to Zurich for the latest news headlines But first monocle latest addition to the new stuns is is a brand new annual. The entrepreneurs described as a business handbook for people with big ideas. It's a spin off from our radio. Show also called the entrepreneurs Monaco's executive Edison. Josh joins me in the studio. Now Josh welcome thanks Emma's lovely to be back in studio one and to be talking about the entrepreneurs annual because sits on the Danish will desk in front of us. It looks like rather a bright and optimistic thing to be looking through does not it's a neat little fit. How did it come about well. I think there were lots of reasons I think entrepreneurship Benicia and business of in central monocle since the very beginning and even think the circumstances under which Monica was setup two thousand seven a time when a lot of big companies are going bust people were rethinking how they're going to make their way in the world and people realize that honest and interesting businesses can happen to and I think there's a weird parallel between two two thousand seven and now we saw the ousting of the sea of we work and a little bit of that nostalgia about that first generation of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs that naievety he falling away and people thinking you know. What kind of business do you want to run. Does it improve the world. This is hopefully a handbook for providing some best practices might is around that starting by the Nissan. WHO's this for. Is it for if you're an existing business owner looking to freshen up your ideas or is it for people who thought actually. I have a germ of an idea here but I have no idea how this dots shots. Will we love a good printed product and it's fairly heavy search for someone with. I think good you know good strong back. Good upper body strength lifting big printed products around on the welded. Did them as you say it. It's a handbook for the voyeurs who may never quit that that that big money job that they're in but kind of like the idea of running a cafe but maybe it's also for the people straight out of university want to see the best practice and some interesting globally gleaned insights so it's someone who's Fitch works out and likes is to dream glorious ideas and one thing that I noticed about is there as the return of the Comic Strip to Monaco's painters us about that well actually wrote this comic book but for some reason someone took my name off it so from the beginning to the end we decided that that big expo section of the magazine which we normally reserved for peace of repechage should be something a little bit instructive. Hopefully not didactic should make you laugh should make you smile and should maybe your across a couple of these lessons that that come out elsewhere in the in the magazine running. A business can be fun. You don't have to look for a massive valuation or changed the world you can just change the street. You live on the village. You could just start a company to spend have more time with the people you love and I think that sense of of fun and that you know issuing the earnestness that surrounds the idea of border ports and bills and business. It was very important to do and there are a couple of really filthy jokes in there. I'm not sure if you saw them probably keep them away from any one of a sense disposition discreetly turned away. Just rinse it out. I believe it's out today of all times great timing Tishman at thank you very much indeed for joining us on monocle twenty four you at the briefing and finally let's Cross Djuric Monaco's contributing editor in the city. Jessica Bridge joins us for a roundup of stories from from middle upper. Welcome back to the briefing Jessica. Tell us now about the one hundred frank note so that's pretty exciting one here in Zurich and in Switzerland as a whole whole it's been about two weeks since the Swiss National Bank released the new hundred franc note which is a beautiful blue note and it is actually the most commonly circulated curated note in the Pantheon of Swiss bills an why this the the bill came about in the first place so the Swiss Swiss release a different rounds of currency and this particular one comes twenty years. It's the ninth series after the eighth series and the reason for its releases. This is primarily security measures. The old notes weren't up to par Let's move on to the film festival. It's opening day so it is opening day. The city is really a buzz with all of the kind of goings on in this is the fifteenth time that the Film Festival has convened and there are a number of luminaries here including Cate Blanchet Julie Delpy Javier Bardem Donald Sutherland Ronald enrich and more than how the press covering it to a where you are at the moment what's at the end zone so there's a lot of coverage for example the end the dead foia tone which is their arts section has a long interview with Julie Delpy. there's an article by Co Founding Director Carl Spirit about Oliver Stone who this year is the jury president so it's a little bit more about how the atmosphere in Zurich changes ages when the superstars roll into town so Zurich always has kind of this low key glamorous side to it but when superstars there's roll into town the city really rolls out the red carpet and a lot of the branding for the film festival is up all over and there's definitely a palpable sense of excitement. Let's let's move over to Berlin. lots of coverage of the thirtieth anniversary since the Berlin Wall fell What's the balance item saying about it so the Berliner Zeitung has had a run of opinion pieces and articles about the thirtieth year anniversary and today is a piece by Burchett? 'EM WHO runs a hair salon on lamenting that Berlin is now to hip too expensive too aggressive in this is not her Berlin anymore tennis little bit. We'll watch the reasons for such to sort of a pronouncement of so basically the city has changed a lot and she's lamenting a lot of the changes that are linked to rent increases. This is the cities become more competitive in it's been more about demonstrating wealth but also she's noticing a lack of social responsibility and saying that given the freedom the Berlin promises you have to also give to the city and not only take from it. Can you give us some examples of what she said that too much taken a not enough give that people expect to be able to do as they please into take of the cultural offerings that the city has an of the infrastructure and a lot of the elements that make Berlin linnea great city it some of the finest public transportation it has. This vibrant arts scene a vibrant music scene but that she seeing that there's been a change in that people people are kind of coming in for a couple years crash landing. They're not contributing to it jetting back out again and that's something that I've seen so I've lived there since two thousand ten into and it changes are really startling in what way tell us how your daily life is changed the. It's much harder to get apartments. There used to be pop up. Bars vacant lots is that had jungle like greenery kind of this paradise of experimentation and a lot of that activity has really been squeezed out for example on one of the main shopping streets near me. I used to be bookshops and little cafes that were completely unpretentious unbranded and now there's a chanel store that sells makeup and various chains and this is something we see in a lot of cities but in Berlin. It's really impacted what made the city of really great world city. It's just kind of taken the city down a notch auction. It's become much more like other cities in Europe which maybe isn't bad but it also removes what made Berlin special and one thing that has been doing is though it positively trying to get rid of course yes yes and that Berlin has a lot of positive things it's trying to do. They've been looking at ways to address housing issues so the city's not without kind of a response to a lot of issues in one of the big ones getting rid of cars and this coming weekend or the first weekend in October. There's an experiment report of Friedrichstrasse which is one of the main shopping streets in the east part of the city will be free of Cars Jessica Percha. Thank you very much indeed for joining us on monocle twenty four. That's all we have time for today's program. The briefing was was produced by Reese James Marcus hippy and Daniel H and researched by will higginbotham studio manager was steph Singer. Thanks to all an thanks to my guests in the studio to to finance from me Emma Nelson Goodbye. Thank you very much for listening into a loaned statiscal. Condo Monocle Vinci Guada- twenty four this Espen L. Monaco vintage crop broadcasting from London Zurich Pong Kong Tokyo Toronto and Los Angeles. You're listening. Income Monaco twenty four with over one hundred editors and correspondents uncle delivers the latest in global affairs business business media fresh music fashion design and much more stay with us the headlines are up next monocle keeping an eye on the world so it's twenty one hundred and Tokyo fourteen hundred in Zurich Thirteen hundred here in London and ATM in New York City. You're listening to monocle article twenty four.

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